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JustineTime
Jan 31st, 2012, 10:00 PM
Monday, 30 January 2012

To My Old Master (http://www.lettersofnote.com/2012/01/to-my-old-master.html)



http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7150/6791211435_1259d0af67_o.jpg


In August of 1865, a Colonel P.H. Anderson of Big Spring, Tennessee, wrote to his former slave, Jourdan Anderson, and requested that he come back to work on his farm. Jourdan — who, since being emancipated (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emancipation_Proclamation), had moved to Ohio, found paid work, and was now supporting his family — responded spectacularly by way of the letter seen below (a letter which, according to newspapers at the time (http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7035/6790780585_466117fe88_o.jpg), he dictated).


Rather than quote the numerous highlights in this letter, I'll simply leave you to enjoy it. Do make sure you read to the end.


(Source: The Freedmen's Book (http://www.gutenberg.org/files/38479/38479-h/38479-h.htm#Page_265); Image: A group of escaped slaves in Virginia in 1862, courtesy of the Library of Congress (http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/cwp2003000055/PP/).)



Dayton, Ohio,


August 7, 1865


To My Old Master, Colonel P.H. Anderson, Big Spring, Tennessee


Sir: I got your letter, and was glad to find that you had not forgotten Jourdon, and that you wanted me to come back and live with you again, promising to do better for me than anybody else can. I have often felt uneasy about you. I thought the Yankees would have hung you long before this, for harboring Rebs they found at your house. I suppose they never heard about your going to Colonel Martin's to kill the Union soldier that was left by his company in their stable. Although you shot at me twice before I left you, I did not want to hear of your being hurt, and am glad you are still living. It would do me good to go back to the dear old home again, and see Miss Mary and Miss Martha and Allen, Esther, Green, and Lee. Give my love to them all, and tell them I hope we will meet in the better world, if not in this. I would have gone back to see you all when I was working in the Nashville Hospital, but one of the neighbors told me that Henry intended to shoot me if he ever got a chance.


I want to know particularly what the good chance is you propose to give me. I am doing tolerably well here. I get twenty-five dollars a month, with victuals and clothing; have a comfortable home for Mandy,—the folks call her Mrs. Anderson,—and the children—Milly, Jane, and Grundy—go to school and are learning well. The teacher says Grundy has a head for a preacher. They go to Sunday school, and Mandy and me attend church regularly. We are kindly treated. Sometimes we overhear others saying, "Them colored people were slaves" down in Tennessee. The children feel hurt when they hear such remarks; but I tell them it was no disgrace in Tennessee to belong to Colonel Anderson. Many darkeys would have been proud, as I used to be, to call you master. Now if you will write and say what wages you will give me, I will be better able to decide whether it would be to my advantage to move back again.


As to my freedom, which you say I can have, there is nothing to be gained on that score, as I got my free papers in 1864 from the Provost-Marshal-General of the Department of Nashville. Mandy says she would be afraid to go back without some proof that you were disposed to treat us justly and kindly; and we have concluded to test your sincerity by asking you to send us our wages for the time we served you. This will make us forget and forgive old scores, and rely on your justice and friendship in the future. I served you faithfully for thirty-two years, and Mandy twenty years. At twenty-five dollars a month for me, and two dollars a week for Mandy, our earnings would amount to eleven thousand six hundred and eighty dollars. Add to this the interest for the time our wages have been kept back, and deduct what you paid for our clothing, and three doctor's visits to me, and pulling a tooth for Mandy, and the balance will show what we are in justice entitled to. Please send the money by Adams's Express, in care of V. Winters, Esq., Dayton, Ohio. If you fail to pay us for faithful labors in the past, we can have little faith in your promises in the future. We trust the good Maker has opened your eyes to the wrongs which you and your fathers have done to me and my fathers, in making us toil for you for generations without recompense. Here I draw my wages every Saturday night; but in Tennessee there was never any pay-day for the negroes any more than for the horses and cows. Surely there will be a day of reckoning for those who defraud the laborer of his hire. [AMEN! You tell 'im, Jourdon!:yeah:]


In answering this letter, please state if there would be any safety for my Milly and Jane, who are now grown up, and both good-looking girls. You know how it was with poor Matilda and Catherine. I would rather stay here and starve—and die, if it come to that—than have my girls brought to shame by the violence and wickedness of their young masters. You will also please state if there has been any schools opened for the colored children in your neighborhood. The great desire of my life now is to give my children an education, and have them form virtuous habits.


Say howdy to George Carter, and thank him for taking the pistol from you when you were shooting at me.


From your old servant,


Jourdon Anderson.


Seems his former master didn't have much to "sell". :tape:

What strikes me is that it's rather hard to discern whether Jourdon is being sarcastic or truly bears his former master no ill will. My guess is that it's the latter, which is almost certainly a testament to the man's character. But it also occurs to me that there must be something tremendously mentally debilitating about having spent most, if not all, of your life as someone else's property, a kind of Stockholm Syndrome from which I would think it would be extremely difficult to recover.

What a blight and a blot that accursed institution brought upon this country! It seems we may never fully recover from its scars. :sad:

Sammo
Jan 31st, 2012, 10:17 PM
What are you talking about? I thought that liberalism was bullshit, that guy should have been returned to his owner! USA! USA! USA!


:lol: Sorry I just find patriotic-to-death Americans so laughable

JustineTime
Jan 31st, 2012, 10:19 PM
Liberalism in its current incarnation IS :bs:. In its classical definition, I heartily subscribe! :)

tennisbum79
Jan 31st, 2012, 10:23 PM
Monday, 30 January 2012

To My Old Master (http://www.lettersofnote.com/2012/01/to-my-old-master.html)



http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7150/6791211435_1259d0af67_o.jpg


In answering this letter, please state if there would be any safety for my Milly and Jane, who are now grown up, and both good-looking girls. You know how it was with poor Matilda and Catherine. I would rather stay here and starve—and die, if it come to that—than have my girls brought to shame by the violence and wickedness of their young masters. You will also please state if there has been any schools opened for the colored children in your neighborhood. The great desire of my life now is to give my children an education, and have them form virtuous habits.


What terrible situation it must have been.No freedom, no dignity and can't even protect your own kids from sexual predators who read the bible every night, go to church every Sunday, and send their kids to sunday school to be taught and right and wrong, but see nothing wrong with perpetuating sexual viloence on subjugated little girls.



Seems his former master didn't have much to "sell". :tape:[quote=JustineTime;20876026]What strikes me is that it's rather hard to discern whether Jourdon is being sarcastic or truly bears his former master no ill will. My guess is that it's the latter, which is almost certainly a testament to the man's character. But it also occurs to me that there must be something tremendously mentally debilitating about having spent most, if not all, of your life as someone else's property, a kind of Stockholm Syndrome from which I would think it would be extremely difficult to recover.I think he is being sarcastic and saw this as a chance to show his former master that he is not as clueless as they all think he is.I would like to see the master's reaction when he finds out that his former slaves knows that he is due unpaid labor.

What a blight and a blot that accursed institution brought upon this country! It seems we may never fully recover from its scars. :sad:Yet, there are people, many of them God fearing people who have convinced themselves this was not as bad as it is made out to be.
And merely raisng the issue reparation, which is, let's be honest about it, what Jourdan is raising; is seen as not loving the United States.

Jourdan knew he certainly can't get his dignity back, but he could tell the former master how he stripped it from him and his famility.

tennisbum79
Jan 31st, 2012, 10:38 PM
Liberalism in its current incarnation IS :bs:. In its classical definition, I heartily subscribe! :)
First' I'd like to commend you for posting this article.
This gave a window to the thought of many slaves and their ordeal in their master house.
In today's world, these people would be incarceraed not for not paying their slave for time worked, but for sexual organized crime upon their slave families.


Now about liberalism.
Conservatives now claim it is liberalism in its current form they don't like.
The truth is, conservatives have always been afraid of liberalism and it propensity to bring or husher in ( to use Sarah Palin favorite expression) new ideas, open people's eyes on what should be and not what is now.

Conservatives never like liberalim in the past, do not like it now, will not like it in the future.

When liberal ideas push for women to vote, conservatives said no.
When liberal ideas push for black be given the right to vote and not be discrimiated against, conservatives said no.
When liberal ideas push for for child labor to stop, conservatives said no.
When liberal ideas push for for women to join the workforce, conservatives said no.
When liberal ideas push for for women to get equal pay for equal work, conservatives said no.
When liberal ideas push for desegregation of workplace, public accomodation, schools, conservatives said no.


Lastly, as you might have noticted, when the USA (or any other western country) seeks for a partnter to talk to in an hostile country, they look for people with liberal ideas.
They never look for conservatives.

Sammo
Jan 31st, 2012, 11:35 PM
First' I'd like to commend you for posting this article.
This gave a window to the thought of many slaves and their ordeal in their master house.
In today's world, these people would incarceraed not for not paying who have for them, but for sexual organized crime upon their slave families.


Now about liberalism.
Conservative now claim it is liberalism in its current form they don't like.
The truth is, conservative have always been afraid of liberalism and it propensity to bring to husher new ideas, open people's eyes on what should be and not what is now.

Conservative never like liberalims now in the past, does not like it now, will not like in the future.
When liberal ideas push for women to vote, conservatives said no.
When liberal ideas push for balck be given the right to vote and not be discrimiated, conservatives said no.
When liberal ideas push for for child labor to stop, conservatives said no.
When liberal ideas push for for women to join the workforce, conservatives said no.
When liberal ideas push for for women to get equal pay for equal work, conservatives said no.
When liberal ideas push for desegregate workplace, public accomodation, school, conservatives said no.


Lastly, as you might have noticted, when the USA (or any other western country) seek for a partnter to in an hostile country, they look for people with liberal ideas. They never look for conservatives.

:bowdown:

mykarma
Feb 1st, 2012, 01:17 AM
Monday, 30 January 2012

To My Old Master (http://www.lettersofnote.com/2012/01/to-my-old-master.html)



http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7150/6791211435_1259d0af67_o.jpg


In August of 1865, a Colonel P.H. Anderson of Big Spring, Tennessee, wrote to his former slave, Jourdan Anderson, and requested that he come back to work on his farm. Jourdan — who, since being emancipated (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emancipation_Proclamation), had moved to Ohio, found paid work, and was now supporting his family — responded spectacularly by way of the letter seen below (a letter which, according to newspapers at the time (http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7035/6790780585_466117fe88_o.jpg), he dictated).


Rather than quote the numerous highlights in this letter, I'll simply leave you to enjoy it. Do make sure you read to the end.


(Source: The Freedmen's Book (http://www.gutenberg.org/files/38479/38479-h/38479-h.htm#Page_265); Image: A group of escaped slaves in Virginia in 1862, courtesy of the Library of Congress (http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/cwp2003000055/PP/).)



Dayton, Ohio,


August 7, 1865


To My Old Master, Colonel P.H. Anderson, Big Spring, Tennessee


Sir: I got your letter, and was glad to find that you had not forgotten Jourdon, and that you wanted me to come back and live with you again, promising to do better for me than anybody else can. I have often felt uneasy about you. I thought the Yankees would have hung you long before this, for harboring Rebs they found at your house. I suppose they never heard about your going to Colonel Martin's to kill the Union soldier that was left by his company in their stable. Although you shot at me twice before I left you, I did not want to hear of your being hurt, and am glad you are still living. It would do me good to go back to the dear old home again, and see Miss Mary and Miss Martha and Allen, Esther, Green, and Lee. Give my love to them all, and tell them I hope we will meet in the better world, if not in this. I would have gone back to see you all when I was working in the Nashville Hospital, but one of the neighbors told me that Henry intended to shoot me if he ever got a chance.


I want to know particularly what the good chance is you propose to give me. I am doing tolerably well here. I get twenty-five dollars a month, with victuals and clothing; have a comfortable home for Mandy,—the folks call her Mrs. Anderson,—and the children—Milly, Jane, and Grundy—go to school and are learning well. The teacher says Grundy has a head for a preacher. They go to Sunday school, and Mandy and me attend church regularly. We are kindly treated. Sometimes we overhear others saying, "Them colored people were slaves" down in Tennessee. The children feel hurt when they hear such remarks; but I tell them it was no disgrace in Tennessee to belong to Colonel Anderson. Many darkeys would have been proud, as I used to be, to call you master. Now if you will write and say what wages you will give me, I will be better able to decide whether it would be to my advantage to move back again.


As to my freedom, which you say I can have, there is nothing to be gained on that score, as I got my free papers in 1864 from the Provost-Marshal-General of the Department of Nashville. Mandy says she would be afraid to go back without some proof that you were disposed to treat us justly and kindly; and we have concluded to test your sincerity by asking you to send us our wages for the time we served you. This will make us forget and forgive old scores, and rely on your justice and friendship in the future. I served you faithfully for thirty-two years, and Mandy twenty years. At twenty-five dollars a month for me, and two dollars a week for Mandy, our earnings would amount to eleven thousand six hundred and eighty dollars. Add to this the interest for the time our wages have been kept back, and deduct what you paid for our clothing, and three doctor's visits to me, and pulling a tooth for Mandy, and the balance will show what we are in justice entitled to. Please send the money by Adams's Express, in care of V. Winters, Esq., Dayton, Ohio. If you fail to pay us for faithful labors in the past, we can have little faith in your promises in the future. We trust the good Maker has opened your eyes to the wrongs which you and your fathers have done to me and my fathers, in making us toil for you for generations without recompense. Here I draw my wages every Saturday night; but in Tennessee there was never any pay-day for the negroes any more than for the horses and cows. Surely there will be a day of reckoning for those who defraud the laborer of his hire. [AMEN! You tell 'im, Jourdon!:yeah:]


In answering this letter, please state if there would be any safety for my Milly and Jane, who are now grown up, and both good-looking girls. You know how it was with poor Matilda and Catherine. I would rather stay here and starve—and die, if it come to that—than have my girls brought to shame by the violence and wickedness of their young masters. You will also please state if there has been any schools opened for the colored children in your neighborhood. The great desire of my life now is to give my children an education, and have them form virtuous habits.


Say howdy to George Carter, and thank him for taking the pistol from you when you were shooting at me.


From your old servant,


Jourdon Anderson.


Seems his former master didn't have much to "sell". :tape:

What strikes me is that it's rather hard to discern whether Jourdon is being sarcastic or truly bears his former master no ill will. My guess is that it's the latter, which is almost certainly a testament to the man's character. But it also occurs to me that there must be something tremendously mentally debilitating about having spent most, if not all, of your life as someone else's property, a kind of Stockholm Syndrome from which I would think it would be extremely difficult to recover.

What a blight and a blot that accursed institution brought upon this country! It seems we may never fully recover from its scars. :sad:

I'll have to read this when I have more time but the picture breaks my heart.

tennisbum79
Feb 1st, 2012, 01:22 AM
I'll have to read this when I have more time but the picture breaks my heart.
It is a very heartbreaking letter.
Reading takes you back in the dynamic between slave family and and his master.
The master is totally oblivious to the pain he has inflicted to his slaves family and even contemplating the famility will comeback to his house if he asks.

Helen Lawson
Feb 1st, 2012, 03:05 AM
It was a very powerful letter.

I don't know if he was being sarcastic or not. It is possible either way. One of the plantations in Charleston has photos through present day, the descendants of the plantation owner still get together with the descendants of the head slave, picture of their children playing today, etc. It was a very strange world I'm not sure we can fully understand today. I assume from the photos, the family of the plantation owner are not sharing profits from the now-open to the public plantation with the head slave's family, so I don't think the reunions are financially motivated.

mykarma
Feb 1st, 2012, 03:10 AM
It is a very heartbreaking letter.
Reading takes you back in the dynamic between slave family and and his master.
The master is totally oblivious to the pain he has inflicted to his slaves family and even contemplating the famility will comeback to his house if he asks.
It was a great letter and so glad Justinetime posted this so we won't have to read the "what about FAMU" post. I can only imagine how happy massa was to hear from Jourdan until he read how much he owed Jourdan in back wages. :hysteric: Po' Colonel, I can only imagine the cussing and goings on in that house when he read that letter. :lol:

Sam L
Feb 1st, 2012, 11:04 AM
It's fascinating. I love reading letters from a long time ago.

allhailwilliams
Feb 1st, 2012, 01:29 PM
every black person living in the usa should read that letter. it touch me so much. to think what black's have gone through in this country by so-called god-fearing white people. im sorry, im not racist...but i will never trust any white man. like my mama alway's told me they are the blue-eyed devil, willing to sell their mama's down the river for a quick dollar bill. every time i see much younger blacks running and hanging around their so-called white friends i want to tell them to please be careful and make sure you dont have anything they want cause they will steal, beat, or kill you to get it. when i say whites, i mean american whites.

stromatolite
Feb 1st, 2012, 03:41 PM
I think the sarcasm is pretty obvious, but it is a very gentle sarcasm given the circumstances. And very witty. Especially this line cracks me up:

"Say howdy to George Carter, and thank him for taking the pistol from you when you were shooting at me."

Classic!

JN
Feb 1st, 2012, 03:51 PM
- snip -

Yet, there are people, many of them God fearing people who have convinced themselves this was not as bad as it is made out to be.
And merely raisng the issue reparation, which is, let's be honest about it, what Jourdan is raising; is seen as not loving the United States.

Jourdan knew he certainly can't get his dignity back, but he could tell the former master how he stripped it from him and his famility.
Michele Bachmann: Kids Better Off Under Slavery?

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-A_g4fMSQQwo/Thc2tQ7Le6I/AAAAAAAAGCU/vQ5d4badGjg/s320/bachmann-crazy.jpg (http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-A_g4fMSQQwo/Thc2tQ7Le6I/AAAAAAAAGCU/vQ5d4badGjg/s1600/bachmann-crazy.jpg)

Republican, presidential candidate, Representative Michele Bachmann, is one of the most dangerously, ignorant, candidates for the American presidency in recent memory. She has already stated that the founding fathers worked tirelessly to end slavery when in reality they all had dozens to hundreds of slaves. But, now, she's come out and saying (http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2011/07/08/bachmann-pledges-to-ban-all-forms-of-pornography/) that African-American children essentially had it better under slavery than today!!!Slavery had a disastrous impact on African-American families, yet sadly a child born into slavery in 1860 was more likely to be raised by his mother and father in a two-parent household than was an African-American baby born after the election of the USA’s first African-American President, the document said.

Given that families were broken up regularly for sales during slavery and that rape by masters was pretty common, this could not be more offensive, Jack & Jill Politics' Cheryl Contee noted (http://www.jackandjillpolitics.com/2011/07/michelle-bachmann-signs-pledge-that-says-black-children-better-off-during-slavery/#comment-245783913).(Source (http://geniusofinsanityworld.blogspot.com/2011/07/michelle-bachmann-kids-better-off-under.html))


It was a great letter and so glad Justinetime posted this so we won't have to read the "what about FAMU" post. I can only imagine how happy massa was to hear from Jourdan until he read how much he owed Jourdan in back wages. :hysteric: Po' Colonel, I can only imagine the cussing and goings on in that house when he read that letter. :lol:

I'm sure the dagnabit!s and n-word!s were flying like daggers. :lol:

The Witch-king
Feb 1st, 2012, 04:14 PM
Wow! This letter gave me such a warm and fuzzy feeling inside. Makes me proud.


What strikes me is that it's rather hard to discern whether Jourdon is being sarcastic or truly bears his former master no ill will. My guess is that it's the latter, which is almost certainly a testament to the man's character. But it also occurs to me that there must be something tremendously mentally debilitating about having spent most, if not all, of your life as someone else's property, a kind of Stockholm Syndrome from which I would think it would be extremely difficult to recover.

What a blight and a blot that accursed institution brought upon this country! It seems we may never fully recover from its scars. :sad:
[/INDENT]

I thought he was obviously being sarcastic. Asking to be paid for his previous service to his owner + interest, I assume was unheard of esp. considering that he was emancipated, which I guess was assumed to be a generous act on the owners part. Were freed slaves generally compensated for their time as slaves back then? I don't know. Anyway, there's other portions of the letter that intimate that he was somewhat resentful and suspicious of the guy (e.g. "If you fail to pay us for faithful labors in the past, we can have little faith in your promises in the future." and "Surely there will be a day of reckoning for those who defraud the laborer of his hire."). Or maybe that's just how I wanted to read it.

I would have liked to have seen the original letter to the emancipated slave too.

I only have one question, why was the letter published in a newspaper?

Sammo
Feb 1st, 2012, 04:23 PM
Michele Bachmann: Kids Better Off Under Slavery?

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-A_g4fMSQQwo/Thc2tQ7Le6I/AAAAAAAAGCU/vQ5d4badGjg/s320/bachmann-crazy.jpg (http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-A_g4fMSQQwo/Thc2tQ7Le6I/AAAAAAAAGCU/vQ5d4badGjg/s1600/bachmann-crazy.jpg)

Republican, presidential candidate, Representative Michele Bachmann, is one of the most dangerously, ignorant, candidates for the American presidency in recent memory. She has already stated that the founding fathers worked tirelessly to end slavery when in reality they all had dozens to hundreds of slaves. But, now, she's come out and saying (http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2011/07/08/bachmann-pledges-to-ban-all-forms-of-pornography/) that African-American children essentially had it better under slavery than today!!!Slavery had a disastrous impact on African-American families, yet sadly a child born into slavery in 1860 was more likely to be raised by his mother and father in a two-parent household than was an African-American baby born after the election of the USA’s first African-American President, the document said.

Given that families were broken up regularly for sales during slavery and that rape by masters was pretty common, this could not be more offensive, Jack & Jill Politics' Cheryl Contee noted (http://www.jackandjillpolitics.com/2011/07/michelle-bachmann-signs-pledge-that-says-black-children-better-off-during-slavery/#comment-245783913).(Source (http://geniusofinsanityworld.blogspot.com/2011/07/michelle-bachmann-kids-better-off-under.html))




I'm sure the dagnabit!s and n-word!s were flying like daggers. :lol:

What a f***ing moron :facepalm:

hablo
Feb 2nd, 2012, 06:21 AM
Love that letter!

tennisbum79
Feb 3rd, 2012, 10:46 PM
First' I'd like to commend you for posting this article.
This gave a window to the thought of many slaves and their ordeal in their master house.
In today's world, these people would be incarceraed not for not paying their slave for time worked, but for sexual organized crime upon their slave families.


Now about liberalism.
Conservatives now claim it is liberalism in its current form they don't like.
The truth is, conservatives have always been afraid of liberalism and it propensity to bring or husher in ( to use Sarah Palin favorite expression) new ideas, open people's eyes on what should be and not what is now.

Conservatives never like liberalim in the past, do not like it now, will not like it in the future.

When liberal ideas push for women to vote, conservatives said no.
When liberal ideas push for black be given the right to vote and not be discrimiated against, conservatives said no.
When liberal ideas push for for child labor to stop, conservatives said no.
When liberal ideas push for for women to join the workforce, conservatives said no.
When liberal ideas push for for women to get equal pay for equal work, conservatives said no.
When liberal ideas push for desegregation of workplace, public accomodation, schools, conservatives said no.


Lastly, as you might have noticted, when the USA (or any other western country) seeks for a partnter to talk to in an hostile country, they look for people with liberal ideas.
They never look for conservatives.

Not to blow my own horns, but suffice to mention that Lawrence O'Donnel, l on hist Last Word show prety much listed, via wrting on the now defunct The West Wing TV show, these reasons why he is proud liberal. The scene feature Alan Alda as the conservative GOP candidate, Jimmy Smitts as the vibrant,energetic idealist lieberal not affraid to embrace the label.

I think the only they ommited "child labor" ban, which of course, Newt want ot bring back.

tennisbum79
Feb 4th, 2012, 04:55 AM
Republicans supported Civil Rights, while Democrats opposed it.

http://www.black-and-right.com/the-democrat-race-lie/

November 6, 1956
African-American civil rights leaders Martin Luther King and Ralph Abernathy vote for Republican Dwight Eisenhower for President

September 9, 1957
President Dwight Eisenhower signs Republican Party’s 1957 Civil Rights Act

September 24, 1957
Sparking criticism from Democrats such as Senators John Kennedy and Lyndon Johnson, President Dwight Eisenhower deploys the 82nd Airborne Division to Little Rock, AR to force Democrat Governor Orval Faubus to integrate public schools

May 6, 1960
President Dwight Eisenhower signs Republicans’ Civil Rights Act of 1960, overcoming 125-hour, around-the-clock filibuster by 18 Senate Democrats

May 2, 1963
Republicans condemn Democrat sheriff of Birmingham, AL for arresting over 2,000 African-American schoolchildren marching for their civil rights

September 29, 1963
Gov. George Wallace (D-AL) defies order by U.S. District Judge Frank Johnson, appointed by President Dwight Eisenhower, to integrate Tuskegee High School

June 9, 1964
Republicans condemn 14-hour filibuster against 1964 Civil Rights Act by U.S. Senator and former Ku Klux Klansman Robert Byrd (D-WV), who still serves in the Senate

June 10, 1964
Senate Minority Leader Everett Dirksen (R-IL) criticizes Democrat filibuster against 1964 Civil Rights Act, calls on Democrats to stop opposing racial equality. The Civil Rights Act of 1964 was introduced and approved by a staggering majority of Republicans in the Senate. The Act was opposed by most southern Democrat senators, several of whom were proud segregationists—one of them being Al Gore Sr. Democrat President Lyndon B. Johnson relied on Illinois Senator Everett Dirksen, the Republican leader from Illinois, to get the Act passed.

August 4, 1965
Senate Republican Leader Everett Dirksen (R-IL) overcomes Democrat attempts to block 1965 Voting Rights Act; 94% of Senate Republicans vote for landmark civil right legislation, while 27% of Democrats oppose. Voting Rights Act of 1965, abolishing literacy tests and other measures devised by Democrats to prevent African-Americans from voting, signed into law; higher percentage of Republicans than Democrats vote in favor
The theme was liberal vs conservatives.
Those southern democrats were conservatives and they are now home in the republicans party.

All those item your cited were opposed by conservatives, including the intellectuals like Williams Buckley Sr and Jr

Nice try though. but it just does not cut.

dragonflies
Feb 4th, 2012, 05:43 AM
every black person living in the usa should read that letter. it touch me so much. to think what black's have gone through in this country by so-called god-fearing white people. im sorry, im not racist...but i will never trust any white man. like my mama alway's told me they are the blue-eyed devil, willing to sell their mama's down the river for a quick dollar bill. every time i see much younger blacks running and hanging around their so-called white friends i want to tell them to please be careful and make sure you dont have anything they want cause they will steal, beat, or kill you to get it. when i say whites, i mean american whites.





There was racism, racist people and slavery in the USA. It was bad and I dont think anyone can deny it. Still, your post is appeared to have narrow minded and racist just like those people in the past. You said you are not racist, but your thoughts are the thoughts of a racist. Just like some of your previous posts.



Black people can also be racists and close minded too. There are always different kinds of people ( good, bad, some in between) in every race and they should be judged individualy based on each one's behavior, rather than as a whole solely based on stereotypes.

tennisbum79
Feb 4th, 2012, 06:39 AM
Black people can also be racists and close minded too..
That may be true, but it is largely reaction to whites.
Besides, black people, as group, never codified thier attitues into law to enforece against whites or ther non-blacks. That is a big difference.
White people did it here. They did in South Africa. They did in Australia, and of course in Germany.

There are always different kinds of people ( good, bad, some in between) in every race and they should be judged individualy based on each one's behavior, rather than as a whole solely based on stereotypes.
I agree,.
But in black people experience in the USA, whites tend to excercise their prejudice/racism in as a group, whites vs blacks prism... passing law to enforce them.
Before there LA riots and Detroit riots, there had been several white riots against black neightborhood after emancipation, where entire balck town and business were destroyed.
These were newly freed generation of balck people who were trying pull themseleves by their own boothstraps, but were intimiated and destroyed by Whites mobs.
I am not a natural born US citizen, but I have been home of AfricanAmerican where these historical facts are told and passed from generations.
I doubt that in your average white home, these stories are told.

One last though I want to express is that the civil right movement not only saved black america, but also freed whites collectively and individually(unlike the german people); it has given the entire an country a collective conscience vis-a-vis other human beings who come to these shores.

In fact, other minoritiees, have their own civil right groups modeled after the NAACP.
Because of the black amerinca civil fight , any other minority that enters this country today is formally protected from prejudice/racism they would have suffered without it.
Unfortunately, this is seldom acknowledged

égalité
Feb 4th, 2012, 07:42 PM
We're talking about liberal vs. conservative, not Democrat vs. Republican.

tennisbum79
Feb 4th, 2012, 07:54 PM
Look at previous posts by liberals above. They mention several Republican politicians and their supposed stance against Civil Rights, when in fact Democrats have a history of opposing Civil Rights.
No, this not FAUXNews, where you can confuse people easily.
Here is the original post

First' I'd like to commend you for posting this article.
This gave a window to the thought of many slaves and their ordeal in their master house.
In today's world, these people would be incarceraed not for not paying their slave for time worked, but for sexual organized crime upon their slave families.


Now about liberalism.
Conservatives now claim it is liberalism in its current form they don't like.
The truth is, conservatives have always been afraid of liberalism and it propensity to bring or husher in ( to use Sarah Palin favorite expression) new ideas, open people's eyes on what should be and not what is now.

Conservatives never like liberalim in the past, do not like it now, will not like it in the future.

When liberal ideas push for women to vote, conservatives said no.
When liberal ideas push for black be given the right to vote and not be discrimiated against, conservatives said no.
When liberal ideas push for for child labor to stop, conservatives said no.
When liberal ideas push for for women to join the workforce, conservatives said no.
When liberal ideas push for for women to get equal pay for equal work, conservatives said no.
When liberal ideas push for desegregation of workplace, public accomodation, schools, conservatives said no.


Lastly, as you might have noticted, when the USA (or any other western country) seeks for a partnter to talk to in an hostile country, they look for people with liberal ideas.
They never look for conservatives.