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View Full Version : Ideas for a LGBTQ related exhibition art


Miss Atomic Bomb
Jan 22nd, 2012, 06:25 PM
Right, so I have been asking everybody I know about this, and since this forum has a lot of vocal LGBTQ people, I thought I might post it here.

I am on the committee of out universities LGBTQ society and we are hosting an exhibition in one of our college galleries to mark the LGBT History Month in February (http://lgbthistorymonth.org.uk/). We have already got several high profile designers involved (thank you uni alumni!) but as students we have to submit art works too (could be anything from movies, photographs, posters to proper campaigns).

If anyone has any ideas, suggestions or even issues they would like to be shown, they are welcome to post here.

Sammo
Jan 22nd, 2012, 06:30 PM
I have a question, what does LGBTQ stand for?

Miss Atomic Bomb
Jan 22nd, 2012, 06:31 PM
I have a question, what does LGBTQ stand for?

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transexual and Queer.

Sammo
Jan 22nd, 2012, 06:38 PM
Queer? I thought that was an insult or something like that

MrProdigy555
Jan 22nd, 2012, 06:41 PM
Queer can be used as an insult. But the concrete definition of Queer is pretty much a deviation from conventionality; different.

Miss Atomic Bomb
Jan 22nd, 2012, 06:50 PM
Queer? I thought that was an insult or something like that

Some gay communities have been trying to reclaim that word. We use it as a blanket term for people who are sure or questioning their sexuality as well as gender identity.

Stamp Paid
Jan 22nd, 2012, 07:03 PM
Please make sure that gays/lesbians of color are represented, and in non-denigrating/non-stereotypical ways.

Miss Atomic Bomb
Jan 22nd, 2012, 07:09 PM
Please make sure that gays/lesbians of color are represented, and in non-denigrating/non-stereotypical ways.

That is one of out main themes, especially given that our society committee is so diverse ( our president is a black woman, I am mixed race etc.). The area where one of the colleges of our university is, has one of the densest population of coloured people in the UK, and we are encouraging them to join in.

One of my friends (gay, coloured and closeted ), is planning on coming out to his parent after taking them to the exhibition, he has made a really cute collage about the problems gay black guys face when coming out.

ToopsTame
Jan 22nd, 2012, 07:16 PM
One of my friends (gay, coloured and closeted ), is planning on coming out to his parent after taking him to the exhibition, he has made a really cute collage about the problems gay black guys face when coming out.

OMG. I hope you guys have a backup plan in case his parents don't take it well. :eek: Coming out in a public place can be dangerous.

Miss Atomic Bomb
Jan 22nd, 2012, 07:17 PM
OMG. I hope you guys have a backup plan in case his parents don't take it well. :eek: Coming out in a public place can be dangerous.

He is not exactly telling them publicly, he is taking them to the exhibition first then hoping they get the clue. If not, he will tell them in private afterwards.

MrProdigy555
Jan 22nd, 2012, 07:23 PM
Ways of going about, dealing with, and accepting coming out.

*I'm really struggling with this myself.

Stamp Paid
Jan 22nd, 2012, 07:27 PM
That is one of out main themes, especially given that our society committee is so diverse ( our president is a black woman, I am mixed race etc.). The area where one of the colleges of our university is, has one of the densest population of coloured people in the UK, and we are encouraging them to join in.

One of my friends (gay, coloured and closeted ), is planning on coming out to his parent after taking them to the exhibition, he has made a really cute collage about the problems gay black guys face when coming out.
Okay, awesome. We just tend to get thrown into the margins when these things happen, that was my concern.
I hope your friend isn't Jamaican. lol

ToopsTame
Jan 22nd, 2012, 07:31 PM
He is not exactly telling them publicly, he is taking them to the exhibition first then hoping they get the clue. If not, he will tell them in private afterwards.

Oh ok.

I don't know if it's as big an issue in the UK, but over here we have lots of homelessness and poverty in the queer community, which gets swept under the rug when lgbt issues usually come up. It would be good to highlight alongside the more topical issues of marriage equality, adoption rights, immigration etc. Another big issue is the struggle to find realistic role models as gay males. On one extreme we have the handsome, rich, monogamous, heteronormative stereotype, and on the other is the vapid, vicious, promiscuous queen. Most guys are neither of these.

Miss Atomic Bomb
Jan 22nd, 2012, 07:35 PM
Ways of going about, dealing with, and accepting coming out.

*I'm really struggling with this myself.

Thats the hard part, we know what we have to do but its challenging to show case it in an art exhibition.

Okay, awesome. We just tend to get thrown into the margins when these things happen, that was my concern.
I hope your friend isn't Jamaican. lol

My friend's family is originally from Nigeria, but he was born in London.

So far we haven't really had a lot of response from the coloured community as far as gay males are concerned; we have a fair few coloured lesbians and transexuals though.

jameshazza
Jan 22nd, 2012, 10:00 PM
Good Luck :yeah:

Kirt12255
Jan 23rd, 2012, 02:10 PM
Best of luck with it and hope it is a great success ;). Last year I wrote an essay on the plight of the LGBTI community in African countries. I was astounded and apauled by the victimisation and othering that occurs at a systemic level. Perhaps these following quotes from Mugabe could be written on uncoiled rolls of toilet paper....(these are cut/pasted from wiki but know they are legit as I used them in the essay)....

Mugabe received worldwide criticism for comments he made on 1 August 1995 after coming across a stall set up by the Association of Gays and Lesbians of Zimbabwe (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Association_of_Gays_and_Lesbians_o f_Zimbabwe&action=edit&redlink=1) (GALZ) at the country's annual International Book Fair in Harare (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harare). GALZ, founded in 1989 to facilitate communication within the gay community (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gay_community), had not received much attention from the government beforehand. Mugabe's comments after seeing the stall at the book fair were:
“
"I find it extremely outrageous and repugnant to my human conscience that such immoral and repulsive organizations, like those of homosexuals, who offend both against the law of nature and the morals of religious beliefs espoused by our society, should have any advocates in our midst and elsewhere in the world."
”


Two weeks later during Zimbabwe's annual independence celebrations Mugabe proclaimed:
“
"It degrades human dignity. It's unnatural, and there is no question ever of allowing these people to behave worse than dogs and pigs. If dogs and pigs do not do it, why must human beings? We have our own culture, and we must re-dedicate ourselves to our traditional values that make us human beings. … What we are being persuaded to accept is sub-animal behavior and we will never allow it here. If you see people parading themselves as Lesbians and Gays, arrest them and hand them over to the police!"

Miss Atomic Bomb
Jan 23rd, 2012, 03:10 PM
Best of luck with it and hope it is a great success ;). Last year I wrote an essay on the plight of the LGBTI community in African countries. I was astounded and apauled by the victimisation and othering that occurs at a systemic level. Perhaps these following quotes from Mugabe could be written on uncoiled rolls of toilet paper....(these are cut/pasted from wiki but know they are legit as I used them in the essay)....

Mugabe received worldwide criticism for comments he made on 1 August 1995 after coming across a stall set up by the Association of Gays and Lesbians of Zimbabwe (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Association_of_Gays_and_Lesbians_o f_Zimbabwe&action=edit&redlink=1) (GALZ) at the country's annual International Book Fair in Harare (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harare). GALZ, founded in 1989 to facilitate communication within the gay community (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gay_community), had not received much attention from the government beforehand. Mugabe's comments after seeing the stall at the book fair were:
“
"I find it extremely outrageous and repugnant to my human conscience that such immoral and repulsive organizations, like those of homosexuals, who offend both against the law of nature and the morals of religious beliefs espoused by our society, should have any advocates in our midst and elsewhere in the world."
”


Two weeks later during Zimbabwe's annual independence celebrations Mugabe proclaimed:
“
"It degrades human dignity. It's unnatural, and there is no question ever of allowing these people to behave worse than dogs and pigs. If dogs and pigs do not do it, why must human beings? We have our own culture, and we must re-dedicate ourselves to our traditional values that make us human beings. … What we are being persuaded to accept is sub-animal behavior and we will never allow it here. If you see people parading themselves as Lesbians and Gays, arrest them and hand them over to the police!"

I will definitely put that up on our agenda with this week! Our societies is one of the bigger societies amongst UK universities (Over 500 members) but we have absolutely no one from Zimbabwe to provide more insight (but thats what the internets for!) and sadly most of our socials seem to turn into going out in soho and partying :tape: :lol: instead of looking up these issues for the next NUS conference.

nevetssllim
Jan 23rd, 2012, 03:45 PM
^There's a really good article about homosexuality in Zimbabwe on Jstor (I'm assuming you have access as you're a student) which I used for a presentation about gender in one of my modules last term. Might be of some use. :)

http://www.jstor.org/pss/2637467

Miss Atomic Bomb
Jan 24th, 2012, 04:55 PM
Thanks! ^