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ugarte
Jun 3rd, 2011, 12:00 PM
Pauline Betz Addie A Great Champion Is Died May 31 2011
I Think She Was A Beautiful Player From 1940-1947.
She Won Wimbledon In 1946 In The First Attempt And She Was Finalist In Roland Garros The Same Year.
She Won The Us Championships 1942 -1943-1944 And 1946

Rollo
Jun 3rd, 2011, 03:14 PM
Really sad news. When Jeff and I interviewed her in 2004 she was such a delight.

Rest in peace Pauline. May you enjoy playing bridge with your mom in heaven.

Rollo
Jun 3rd, 2011, 03:22 PM
http://www.livetennisguide.com/wp-content/uploads/Tennis-Hall-of-Fame-winner-Pauline-Betz-Addie-died-at-91.jpg

The American tennis hall of fame winner, Pauline Betz Addie was died on Tuesday, 2nd June, 2011 at an age of 91-years. Pauline was top women’s tennis player for United States in 1940’s.

Pauline was a top women’s player winning four consecutive U.S. National Championship, which is know as U.S open these days’ from 1941-1946 and she was well know of winning the Wimbledon championship trophy in 1946 without losing even a single set in the entire tournament.

The former American world No.1 was died on Tuesday, due to a Parkinson’s disease. She was initially from Dayton, Ohio. However, she has been grown as a girl in Los Angeles and was brought to tennis by her mother. She was also a longtime teaching professional in the Washington, D.C.

According to various sources, Addie had Parkinson’s disease, died at an assisted-living facility in Potomac, Md., the International Tennis Hall of Fame.
Her career was cut short at the height of her success in 1947 when she was confirmed a specialized for exploring the opportunities of making a pro tour. She was disqualified from future major competitions, which allowed only part-time to enter until 1968.

austinrunner
Jun 4th, 2011, 10:38 PM
Pauline Betz Addie, a Dominant Tennis Champion, Dies at 91

By Robin Finn, The New York Times, June 2, 2011, http://www.nytimes.com/2011/06/03/sports/tennis/pauline-betz-addie-a-dominant-tennis-champion-dies-at-91.html?pagewanted=1&_r=1

Pauline Betz Addie, a dominant American tennis champion who at the height of her amateur career was abruptly barred from the sport in 1947 because she had openly considered turning professional, died on Tuesday [May 31, 2011] in Potomac, Md. She was 91.

Her son Gary confirmed her death, at an assisted living facility, saying she had had Parkinson’s disease.

Betz Addie, who was groomed on the tennis courts of Los Angeles, was a five-time Grand Slam singles champion and the world’s top-ranked woman when, in April 1947, the United States Lawn Tennis Association notified her by cable — she was in Monte Carlo at the time while competing in Europe — that she was barred indefinitely from taking part in any further amateur matches.

Another American player, Sarah Palfrey Cooke, a multiple Grand Slam champion, was also suspended. The two were ruled ineligible for the 1947 French Open.

Betz, who was 27 at the time (and had not yet married and added her husband’s name), had spoken openly about possibly leaving the amateur ranks and touring for pay with the likes of Jack Kramer and Gussie Moran. She and Cooke had discussed doing so together, and Cooke’s husband, Elwood Cooke, had sent a letter to the tennis association’s member clubs soliciting bookings. The letter, specifying fees the women would expect to receive, prompted the lawn tennis association to suspend them.

Betz had written to Cooke, who lived in Manhattan, asking how their plans for touring were coming, but she had not signed any professional contracts when the association issued its ruling. Her defenders called the decision unjust and premature.

"She was ruled out as an amateur on the basis of intent," Kramer wrote in his 1979 memoir "The Game: My 40 Years in Tennis," written with Frank Deford. He likened the Betz suspension "to what the Olympic committee did to Jim Thorpe" when it took away Thorpe's Olympic titles because he had earlier played semiprofessional baseball.

"It was a crime," Kramer wrote.

After the ruling, Betz said, "I’m not going to sit in a corner and cry about this."

She then began an entertaining but historically insignificant stint on the fledgling professional tour circuit, abandoning her Grand Slam career to play for pay from 1947 to 1960. As a professional, earning $10,000 her first year, she went undefeated in a field far less challenging than the amateur ranks.

At the time of her suspension, she had been undefeated in her last 39 matches, earning the No. 1 ranking. She owned a half-dozen Grand Slam titles, five in singles, a lonely discipline in which she excelled by virtue of her athleticism and a competitive streak so fierce that she routinely thrashed her outclassed opponents without surrendering more than a couple of points. Her only Grand Slam doubles crown came in the French Open’s mixed doubles competition in 1946.

Her news media coverage was often gushing. In 1946 she made the cover of Time magazine. "Pauline is a trim 5 ft. 5; her hair is strawberry blonde, sun bleached and wiry," the accompanying article said. "Principally because of her green eyes she seems to have a ready-to-pounce, feline quality. A straightening of her shoulders is a characteristic mannerism — a squaring away that seems to symbolize in an otherwise relaxed girl, a won't-be-beat spirit."

Though World War II curtailed Betz’s ability to test herself on foreign surfaces, she won on the grass courts of Wimbledon in 1946 — the only year she competed there.

At home, however, she was a demon on all surfaces. After capturing the national indoor and clay titles in 1943, she prevailed on the grass at Forest Hills in Queens, N.Y., where she fought her way to a record six consecutive finals from 1941 to 1946, winning four.

Betz's only defeats during that streak came in 1941 and 1945 against Cooke, who was superb hitting volleys, and was Betz’s stylistic opposite. Betz referred to her as "a good friend and a thorn in my side." Cooke joined the professional circuit just ahead of Betz in 1947.

In 1949 Betz married Bob Addie, a sportswriter for The Washington Post, taking his surname. The next year, the player-turned-promoter Bobby Riggs persuaded her to join a co-ed barnstorming circuit featuring Pancho Segura as well as Kramer and Moran. Betz Addie and Moran (Gorgeous Gussie in the news media) became circuit rivals, Betz Addie wearing leopard print short-shorts to compete with Moran’s famous lacy panties, which had caused an international stir at Wimbledon in 1949.

In one match, Betz Addie outplayed Moran so thoroughly that Riggs asked her to be more merciful to make his floundering tour appear genuinely competitive. She refused to lower her standards.

The tour was short-lived, but Betz continued to play professionally until 1960 while also teaching tennis. In 1955, she became the first woman to be named club professional at Bethesda's historic Edgemoor Tennis Club. The actor Spencer Tracy, a former boyfriend, was among her students.

Pauline May Betz was born on Aug. 16, 1919, in Dayton, Ohio, and raised in Los Angeles, where her tennis-playing mother taught physical education in the Watts section. Pauline bought her first tennis racket when she was 9, trading some of her father’s pipe collection for it at a thrift shop; her father made her take on a paper route to pay him back.

Her quickness on her feet and her piercing backhand passing shot soon distinguished her as a potential star on the local public courts. In 1939, she attained her first national ranking in the top 10; she was 19. That same year she received a scholarship from Rollins College in Florida, where she played on the men's tennis team, filling the No. 4 spot behind No. 1 Kramer.

In college she was known as a gifted all-around athlete, whether playing table tennis, golf or pickup basketball games with men. After graduating in 1943, she climbed to the top of both the United States and international rankings.

Betz Addie and her husband, who died in 1982, had five children, two of whom, Rusty and Gary, became tennis teachers. They survive her, as do two other sons, Jon and Richard; a daughter, Kim Addonazio; five grandchildren; and a great-grandson.

Motherhood did not diminish her on-court tenacity. In a 1959 exhibition, when she was five months pregnant with her fifth child, Ricky, she defeated the indomitable Althea Gibson, the first black woman to win a Grand Slam title. Betz Addie was inducted into the International Tennis Hall of Fame in 1965. In 1997, she marched in the United States Open parade of champions to help christen Arthur Ashe Stadium in Flushing Meadows, N.Y..

Until 2003 she continued to compete at the club level, in part, she said, to "keep up" with her grandchildren. She also taught tennis at Sidwell Friends School and at clubs in the Washington area. She wrote two books, "Wings on My Tennis Shoes" and "Tennis for Teenagers."

Betz Addie said her first wish was to be remembered as a good wife and parent. Her backup wish? To be remembered as one of the best of her era. Kramer paid her that honor in his memoir, calling her the second-best female player he had ever seen, behind Helen Wills Moody. Betz Addie, he said, was "terribly underrated."

austinrunner
Jun 4th, 2011, 10:53 PM
Pauline Betz Addie was a great player on all surfaces. But she was not invincible on clay. Dorothy Bundy Cheney defeated her 4 times from 1941 through 1946 on that surface, including the 1944 U.S. Clay Court Championships.

alfajeffster
Jun 4th, 2011, 11:29 PM
I'm sad to hear of her passing. She was such a neat old gal- Rollo and i had the great fortune to interview her a few years back at the nursing home, and she even played a little piano for us, if memory serves. I think there's a thread somewhere about the visit and subsequent USTAMS article.

austinrunner
Jun 5th, 2011, 03:00 AM
Pauline Betz Addie, 1940s tennis champion, dies at 91

By Matt Schudel, The Washington Post, June 1, 2011, http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/obituaries/pauline-betz-addie-1940s-tennis-champion-dies-at-91/2011/06/01/AGRMmmGH_story.html

Pauline Betz Addie, one of the preeminent tennis players of the 1940s, whose career came to an abrupt halt after she won four U.S. Open titles and the 1946 women’s singles championship at Wimbledon, died May 31 at the Summerville assisted-living facility in Potomac. She was 91 and had Parkinson’s disease.

Mrs. Addie, who was known by her maiden name during most of her tennis career, was the country’s dominant female player throughout World War II, when women’s tennis rose to new heights of popularity.

For six years running, 1941 through 1946, she reached the final round of the U.S. Open — then called the U.S. National Championship — and won four times. She was the top-rated player in the country.

In 1946, the only year she played at Wimbledon, she won the women’s title without losing a set in the entire tournament, defeating fellow American Louise Brough in the final. In September that year, the week she won her fourth U.S. Open, Mrs. Addie appeared on the cover of Time magazine (http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,803945,00.html), which pronounced her “the first lady of tennis.”

Tennis great Jack Kramer wrote in his autobiography that Mrs. Addie was the second-best female player he ever saw, after only Helen Wills Moody, who won 19 Grand Slam titles in the 1920s and 1930s. Mrs. Addie possessed a powerful backhand and remarkable speed on the court. “I can’t believe any woman who ever lived could keep up with Pauline Betz,” Kramer wrote. “On the court she was the best athlete I ever saw in women’s tennis.”

She was the reigning Wimbledon and U.S. Open champion in 1947 and at the peak of her athletic powers, but she would never appear in a major tournament again. When it was learned that she had explored the possibility of turning professional, she was banned from amateur competition because of “intent” and was not allowed to defend her championships.

Professional players were not allowed to participate in the four major Grand Slam events — Wimbledon and the U.S., French and Australian opens — until 1968. This year, the men’s and women’s champions at Wimbledon will receive $1.8 million apiece.

But when Mrs. Addie competed during the wooden-racket era, the code of amateurism was so strictly enforced that the world’s most prestigious tennis tournaments awarded no prize money.

“I remember that even after I’d already won the nationals I was still working as a waitress,” Mrs. Addie told the Washington City Paper in 2005. “That’s just the way things were.”

Cast adrift from the leading showcases of her sport, Mrs. Addie embarked on a peripatetic professional career, touring the country from 1947 to 1951 with men’s stars Kramer, Bobby Riggs and Pancho Segura. She was most often matched with “Gorgeous” Gussie Moran, who had scandalized the tennis world in the late 1940s when her tennis skirt rose up to reveal lace-trimmed underwear.

Mrs. Addie defeated Moran so often in their exhibition matches that she was told to take it easy. “I wasn’t about to let them cancel the tour,” she said in 2005. “So let’s just say Gussie Moran got better all of a sudden, and the tour continued. I studied economics in college.”

Pauline May Betz was born Aug. 6, 1919, in Dayton, Ohio, and grew up in Los Angeles. Her mother, a physical education teacher, introduced her to tennis at age 9. She won tournaments throughout California in her teens and won a scholarship to Rollins College in Winter Park, Fla., from which she graduated in 1943.

Mrs. Addie won the U.S. Open title from 1942 through 1944 and again in 1946. In addition to her Wimbledon championship, she won the mixed doubles competition at the 1946 French Open.

She was followed by gossip columnists, who chronicled her friendships with actors Katharine Hepburn and Spencer Tracy, boxer Jack Dempsey and heiress Barbara Hutton.

In 1949, she married Bob Addie, a sportswriter for the old Washington Times-Herald and later The Washington Post. She became the teaching pro at the Edgemoor tennis club in Bethesda and continued to compete as a professional.

She won seven women’s professional championships before losing in a grueling 2 ½ -hour match to Althea Gibson in 1960. Mrs. Addie was a 40- year-old mother of five at the time, and Gibson — the first African American tennis star – was just two years removed from winning Wimbledon and the U.S. Open. [Note: This was the U.S. Professional Championships at Cleveland Arena in Cleveland. Gibson won 7-5, 2-6, 7-5 after trailing 4-2 in the third set.]

“I beat her after that in a tournament in Hampton, Va.,” Mrs. Addie told The Post in 1965. “So I figure we came out even.” [This was an exhibition. Betz Addie won 6-2, 6-3.]

Mrs. Addie, who played tennis into her 80s, ran a tennis camp at the Sidwell Friends School in the District and taught for 20 years in Bethesda at what is now the Pauline Betz Addie Tennis Center. She was inducted into the International Tennis Hall of Fame in 1965.

Mrs. Addie’s husband died in 1982. Survivors include their children, Rusty Addie of Bethesda, John Addie of Avon Park, Fla., Kim Addonizio of Oakland, Calif., Gary Addie of Washington and Rick Addie of Aldie, Va.; a brother; five grandchildren; and a great-grandson.

Mrs. Addie’s sense of competitiveness extended to other sports, including golf, basketball and table tennis. Later in life, she became a tournament bridge player at the life master level.

She played the piano and flute and once took a course in car mechanics to learn how to take apart an engine.

Soon after she met her future husband, her son Gary recalled, she lost $50 to him in a poker game. She wrote a check for the full amount but signed her name “Pauline Betz Addie.”

“If you want to collect,” she said as she handed over the check, “you’ll have to marry me.”

austinrunner
Jun 5th, 2011, 03:40 AM
Per a published report in January 1961, Althea Gibson declined a professional tour with Pauline Betz Addie that would have taken place during the winter of 1960-61.

austinrunner
Jun 5th, 2011, 04:13 AM
Burial information:
http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=70733756

http://web.wm.edu/tenniscenter/Betztimemag1946.jpg

http://web.wm.edu/tenniscenter/betz5.jpg

Above: Pauline after winning the 1943 U.S. Championships.

http://www.montgomeryparks.org/enterprise/tennis/cabin_john/images/PaulinesFamily.JPG

Above: Pauline with her children and grandchildren, plus Billie Jean King.

http://www.montgomeryparks.org/enterprise/tennis/cabin_john/images/Paulinewithroses.JPG

http://www.montgomeryparks.org/enterprise/tennis/cabin_john/images/PBACeremonyCake1.jpg

Cake featuring Pauline's Time Magazine cover from September 2, 1946.

http://www.corbisimages.com/images/BE028740.jpg?size=67&uid=aead805f-ff8d-46f2-83a2-09233d8a2c73&uniqID=a2fbeedd-3e59-4c92-a527-f3cc288ee347

Above: Pauline during the final of the 20th annual Pacific Southwest Tennis Tournament at the Los Angeles Tennis Club, September 29, 1946. She defeated Dorothy Bundy Cheney, 6-2, 6-2, before a capacity crowd.

http://www.corbisimages.com/images/DM3382.jpg?size=67&uid=e18a40fe-f4d7-467b-ac84-90fbabc90cdd&uniqID=0da105a1-58b6-4b65-bbf1-7e9d907404cb

Above: Pauline and Gussy Moran (left) in 1950.

http://www.corbisimages.com/images/HU006091.jpg?size=67&uid=6dc5d853-2969-4c78-ab9d-26a42a385281&uniqID=90e13bba-e356-4758-8f04-5c468117d121

Above: Pauline at Wimbledon in 1946.

Double Fault
Jun 7th, 2011, 08:39 PM
I have only just learned about the passing of Pauline.

RIP Pauline, you were a great champion and lady.

alfajeffster
Jun 7th, 2011, 11:24 PM
I especially like the 1943 U.S. Championship photo, as Bobby personally autographed a copy of it "To Jeff, Best Wishes, Bobby". You know when you sometimes meet a person for the first time, and just know they're not only good and kind, but probably was a ton of fun when she was young- that was Bobby. She obviously had a few memories of when she dated Spencer Tracy, but had the dignity to not expound. Rollo and I were both intrigued to say the least!

trivfun
Jun 8th, 2011, 03:47 AM
She also coached too. Darlene Hard.

elegos7
Jun 10th, 2011, 07:56 AM
This is really a sad news.

I have read in her obituaries that in 1959 she beat legendary tennis player Althea Gibson in an exhibition match while she was five months pregnant with her last child.

Does any of you have any details about this match (score, exact date)? I know Gibson played an exhibition in February, perhaps it was the same one.
It would also be interesting to compare them to Bueno in 1959, who despite winning Wimbledon and the US title, had several defeats. I wonder how she would have fared against Betz Addie and Gibson in 1959 or 1960.

austinrunner
Jun 10th, 2011, 01:14 PM
Refer to post #7 in this thread.

elegos7
Jun 10th, 2011, 01:26 PM
Refer to post #7 in this thread.

The quote comes from post #4, post #7 has no additional details about their encounter in 1959.

Rollo
Jun 10th, 2011, 05:23 PM
Hi Elegos

From what I can recall Pauline never beat Althea but did come very close. The match I is (I believe) in 1960 from the Pro event in Cleveland. The quote I recall was "my old pins let me down"-a reference to her age.

I'm going to listen to the interview Alfa and I conducted this weekend-if any more details come up I'l post them here:)

austinrunner
Jun 10th, 2011, 09:42 PM
The quote comes from post #4, post #7 has no additional details about their encounter in 1959.
Really? Read it again. The score is there. The place and name of the tournament are specified. The correct date is given.

The New York Times got the match facts wrong concerning the year and her pregnancy. (She wasn't 5 months pregnant.) I verified these errors myself by doing a search on Google news archive.

alfajeffster
Jun 10th, 2011, 10:59 PM
Hi Elegos

From what I can recall Pauline never beat Althea but did come very close. The match I is (I believe) in 1960 from the Pro event in Chicago. The quote I recall was "my old pins let me down"-a reference to her age.

I'm going to listen to the interview Alfa and I conducted this weekend-if any more details come up I'l post them here:)

There's a portion where she says all the top players had winning records (or at least suggested this) against Althea, and that "she had no backhand at all" :lol:

Rollo
Jun 11th, 2011, 11:00 AM
There's a portion where she says all the top players had winning records (or at least suggested this) against Althea, and that "she had no backhand at all" :lol:

Louise said the same thing "no backhand."


And I see from AR's work that I stand corrected. So Pauline beat Althea 6-2 6-3 in an exhibition-wow. If we have an exact date (right now I see after Cleveland-1960) I might be able to get more, as my mom lives in the Hampton area.

alfajeffster
Jun 11th, 2011, 06:08 PM
Louise said the same thing "no backhand."


And I see from AR's work that I stand corrected. So Pauline beat Althea 6-2 6-3 in an exhibition-wow. If we have an exact date (right now I see after Chicaho-1960) I might be able to get more, as my mom lives in the Hampton area.

I hate to rely upon my progressively unreliable memory, but I seem to recall her mentioning they played a couple of exhibitions, and Bobby got the best of her younger opponent more than once- amazing when you think about it. It would be akin to Althea beating Chris Evert in Florida after filling in for an injured Rosie Casals(?) in the 70s. I remember Chris telling that story when another commentator asked her if she'd ever played Althea. After telling the story, the commentator then followed with asking Chris if she lost to Althea that day. Her immediate response was "No, of course not." :lol: Remember Bobby saying Chris Evert was probably her favorite player, and had hit with her several times? You also asked Bobby about the Steffi Graf being the fastest player of all time, and Pauline remarking "I was faster"!

austinrunner
Jun 12th, 2011, 03:03 AM
It appears that Pauline Betz Addie and Doris Hart played each other in 2 professional matches, with Betz Addie winning both. One was in Milwaukee and the other in Cleveland. The matches were indoor and the surfaces were canvas and wood. http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=KLYyAAAAIBAJ&sjid=_OsFAAAAIBAJ&pg=3475,3379666&dq=pauline+betz+us+pro+indoor&hl=en

In Cleveland in April 1956, Betz Addie defeated Hart 21-16, 19-21, 21-12 using VASS scoring. http://www.tennisforum.com/showthread.php?t=310696

The Milwaukee, 4-woman tournament was held at the River Tennis Club in May 1956. It was the first national professional women's tennis championship involving more than two players and was sanctioned by the United States Professional Lawn Tennis Association. http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=oQQqAAAAIBAJ&sjid=rSYEAAAAIBAJ&pg=6975,6344979&dq=pauline+betz+us+pro+indoor&hl=en In the first round, 30 year old Hart defeated Valerie Scott 6-2, 6-2 and 36 year old Betz Addie beat Magda Rurac 6-1, 6-2. "Mrs. Betz, mother of four children, displayed a fine change of pace against Mrs. Rurac, one time Hungarian champion and more recently a two time winner of the United States clay court title. She chased the Chicago woman all over the court with her combination of fast and slow stroking. With all of the running she did, Mrs. Rurac could have qualified for the Olympic track squad." http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=YDMaAAAAIBAJ&sjid=_yUEAAAAIBAJ&pg=5258,459769&dq=pauline+betz+us+pro+indoor&hl=en In the final, Betz Addie defeated Hart 6-4, 6-4. "The match was decided strictly on the merits of a veteran pro meeting a new one. Miss Hart, United States women's amateur title holder the last two years, had the power and speed; Mrs. Addie, who has been on the professional circuit for nearly 10 years, had the control. One of the few things Mrs. Addie could not control in this match, however, was her own service, and that made her victory a bit more difficult to achieve. Time and again, the veteran was unable to get her first serve home and that cost her numerous points. Miss Hart was more explosive and excelled in attacking at the net, when she could, but over the long haul she was forced to play Mrs. Addie's driving game. That was where steadiness was important - and Mrs. Addie had it." http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=jvrRlaHg2sAC&dat=19560513&printsec=frontpage&hl=en

austinrunner
Jun 12th, 2011, 05:20 AM
While still single, Betz was photographed with Jack Dempsey in New York in May 1947. When questioned about a rumored romance with Dempsey, Betz said, "My first love is tennis - about my second, it's your guess." Ouch! http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=X2RDAAAAIBAJ&sjid=BK4MAAAAIBAJ&pg=1074,2550695&dq=pauline+betz+professional+sarah+cooke&hl=en

laschutz
Jun 12th, 2011, 08:46 PM
dang, impressive that in 1956 betz could be doris hart, who finally after little mo had to retire was on top of the world in amateur tennis?

too bad for maureen! imagine her playing betz! maureen firing those groundies left and right and betz chasing down everything in sight! wow, what a match to see! gotta think though that maureen would break down betz game,before she could 'run down everything" and get maureen to hit unforced errors? don't know if betz really had anything to "hurt" maureen besides speed and athleticism?

alfajeffster
Jun 12th, 2011, 09:54 PM
...gotta think though that maureen would break down betz game,before she could 'run down everything" and get maureen to hit unforced errors? don't know if betz really had anything to "hurt" maureen besides speed and athleticism?

Pauline had one of the best backhands in the history of women's tennis. The stroke was so good it was compared regularly with the famous Don Budge backhand drive. Jack Kramer (whom I consider a pretty reliable source for quality tennis analysis) said as much about Pauline's backhand regularly over the years. The one-handed backhand being my favorite shot makes me want to see Bobby's backhand in action video all the more.

austinrunner
Jun 13th, 2011, 07:18 AM
There were published reports in the mid-1950s that Maureen Connolly was going to be asked to tour professionally with Betz Addie, Doris Hart, and others. One obstacle was the years-pending lawsuit that Connolly was pursuing against the cement truck operator that damaged her leg and ended her career.

Rollo
Jun 13th, 2011, 12:21 PM
Great information all-around folks. The info about the 1956 event is particularly interesting!

Some more bit son Betz.

After the 1960 World Pro event in Cleveland Pauline and Doris Hart toured Japan for about 6 to 7 weeks giving clinics and playing exhibitions.


While still single, Betz was photographed with Jack Dempsey in New York in May 1947. When questioned about a rumored romance with Dempsey, Betz said, "My first love (http://www.tennisforum.com/showthread.php?p=19716221&posted=1#) is tennis - about my second, it's your guess." Ouch! http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...ah+cooke&hl=en (http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=X2RDAAAAIBAJ&sjid=BK4MAAAAIBAJ&pg=1074,2550695&dq=pauline+betz+professional+sarah+cooke&hl=en)


They dated alright. I was listening to a tape sent by a board member in which Betz says she dated Dempsey "Among others".

elegos7
Jun 13th, 2011, 07:55 PM
The New York Times got the match facts wrong concerning the year and her pregnancy. (She wasn't 5 months pregnant.) I verified these errors myself by doing a search on Google news archive.

I know Google news archive mentions only the two encounters in 1960 between Betz and Gibson (Rollo asked for the date of the Hampton meeting, it was Aug 20).

However, I still find it possible that they already met at the start of 1959. Her son was born in May 1959, so Pauline could have been 5 months pregnant around January or February, when Gibson played an exhibition with someone.
Perhaps World Tennis reported on this meeting, so anyone with early 1959 issues could help us finding any info about this possible meeting.

Rollo
Jun 13th, 2011, 08:18 PM
I know Google news archive mentions only the two encounters in 1960 between Betz and Gibson (Rollo asked for the date of the Hampton meeting, it was Aug 20).

However, I still find it possible that they already met at the start of 1959. Her son was born in May 1959, so Pauline could have been 5 months pregnant around January or February, when Gibson played an exhibition with someone.
Perhaps World Tennis reported on this meeting, so anyone with early 1959 issues could help us finding any info about this possible meeting

Thanks for the Hampton date Elegos. I'm assuming that's Hampton, Virginia-when I go down to my mom's I will try and check.

I got the info about the Betz-Hart exhibitions from WT, so I'll try and check 1959 if I have that year.

Rollo
Jun 16th, 2011, 11:55 PM
However, I still find it possible that they already met at the start of 1959. Her son was born in May 1959, so Pauline could have been 5 months pregnant around January or February, when Gibson played an exhibition with someone.
Perhaps World Tennis reported on this meeting, so anyone with early 1959 issues could help us finding any info about this possible meeting.

I found nothing in WT for 1959. One thing blocking a match between them was Althea was still an amateur late into 1959.

Rollo
Jun 17th, 2011, 12:00 AM
Soon after she met her future husband, her son Gary recalled, she lost $50 to him in a poker game. She wrote a check for the full amount but signed her name “Pauline Betz Addie.”

“If you want to collect,” she said as she handed over the check, “you’ll have to marry me.”

That story is so sweet. Pauline loved cards-she made a lot of remarks about playing bridge with her mom. She also paled around with gamblers Bobby Riggs and Wayne Sabin.

austinrunner
Jun 17th, 2011, 04:36 AM
One thing blocking a match between them was Althea was still an amateur late into 1959.
The date she signed a professional contract was 19 October 1959. http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=7hZWAAAAIBAJ&sjid=8eIDAAAAIBAJ&pg=5094,3967514&dq=althea+gibson+professional&hl=en

elegos7
Jun 17th, 2011, 08:06 AM
I found nothing in WT for 1959. One thing blocking a match between them was Althea was still an amateur late into 1959.

Thanks for checking WT. Have you looked at all the early 1959 issues?

I myself find a possible encounter between Betz and Gibson in early 1959 very intriguing.

Gibson was indeed not a pro at that time, but she was semi-retired, playing only one amateur tournament that year, and pro-amateur meetings took place occasionally (at least between men). I wonder where the obituaries got that info, with the emphasis on her 5-month pregnancy. They did not simply confuse this with one of their 1960 encounters, as they took place at the end of May and August.

trivfun
Jul 6th, 2011, 12:07 PM
Thanks for checking WT. Have you looked at all the early 1959 issues?

I myself find a possible encounter between Betz and Gibson in early 1959 very intriguing.

Gibson was indeed not a pro at that time, but she was semi-retired, playing only one amateur tournament that year, and pro-amateur meetings took place occasionally (at least between men). I wonder where the obituaries got that info, with the emphasis on her 5-month pregnancy. They did not simply confuse this with one of their 1960 encounters, as they took place at the end of May and August.

Here is an excellent article: http://www.bethesdamagazine.com/core/pagetools.php?pageid=11745&url=%2FBethesda-Magazine%2FMay-June-2010%2FWorld-on-Her-Strings%2F&mode=print

Rollo
Jul 6th, 2011, 12:55 PM
Thank you Trivfun! :worship:

I still haven't found this elusive possible match in 1959-my sources for this year are not so great I'm afraid.

One key appears to be nailing down the birth date for her son Ricky. That would at least tell us when the match should have been played.

elegos7
Jul 6th, 2011, 08:23 PM
I still haven't found this elusive possible match in 1959-my sources for this year are not so great I'm afraid.

One key appears to be nailing down the birth date for her son Ricky. That would at least tell us when the match should have been played.

Years ago I contacted her daughter Kim who told me Ricky was born in May, so this would put the match to January of February.
A couple of weeks ago I managed to have a look at the early 1959 issues of World Tennis, but found no mention of this match. However, in the news column they mentioned the Addies are expecting a child in March.

So I do not know who is right at the moment. I contacted Kim about this question once again, I will tell you if and when I get an answer.

austinrunner
Nov 1st, 2011, 05:17 AM
"The Way of a Champ ... The Perils of Pauline," Time Magazine, 2 September 1946, page 57:
Last week they were all in Boston, at suburban Brookline's venerable Longwood Cricket Club, the next-to-last stop on the tournament line. There the National Doubles Championships were at stake. The goal they were all shooting for-- the U.S. Singles-- begins this week at Forest Hills. The big names: 1) skyscraping Yvon Petra of France, Wimbledon winner; 2) solemn Frank Parker, the U.S. champion; 3) brilliant but unpredictable ex-Coast Guardsman Jack Kramer; 4) jugeared Bill Talbert, best of the wartime tournament regulars. Among the women, there was one whose name led all the rest-- California's Pauline Betz.

At 27, Pauline, a friendly, attractive and aggressive American girl, is three-time winner of the U.S. Women's Singles. This week she will be out to win a fourth time-- a feat that has been accomplished six times before. Pauline is a trim 5 ft. 5; her hair is strawberry blonde, sun bleached and wiry. Principally because of her green eyes she seems to have a ready-to-pounce, feline quality. A straightening of her shoulders is a characteristic mannerism-- a squaring away that seems to symbolize, in an otherwise relaxed girl, a won't-be-beat spirit.

As a tennis player, Pauline (who prefers to be called Bobbie) is an obvious cut or two below the alltime greats, Suzanne Lenglen and Helen Wills Moody. But she has certain natural gifts of champions: she is cool; she is confident of winning; she has a quick eye and a good court sense; her footwork is superb. No matter how impossible a shot looks, she makes a dive at it. Says she: "I am a retriever."

On a cement court, which she likes best, her acrobatics are rough on the hands and knees; on a grass court, she grass-stains her starchy white outfit and doesn't mind. After a bad spill at Wimbledon this summer, she bounced back up to wisecrack: "And they say it takes three weeks to get laundry done in England." As a court strategist, she rates alongside another Californian, ex-Champ Helen Jacobs. Say tennis writers sadly: if Pauline only had the strokes.

No Foot Stamping. Experts debate whether her brilliant backhand (rated more powerful than Lenglen's but not as consistent) makes her other strokes look weak. Whatever the fact, sheer virtuosity is only relatively important to Pauline Betz. The thing that makes her go is a terrifying determination not to lose at anything-- tennis or checkers, or gin rummy at a cent a point. Competition is the spice of her life. Says Pauline: "If I were a second-rater, I'd quit."

The Betz competitive urge is the kind that once kept powerful Molla Bjurstedt Mallory, a sturdy Scandinavian with square-cut bangs, at the head of the class during and after World War I. Neither of them went in for irate foot-stamping like Lenglen, nor walked off the court as Helen Wills Moody did in 1933 when it looked as if she would take a licking. When Pauline's hit-or-miss game misfires, she usually controls herself.

The Betz Club. Women's tennis, in the days of the fighting Helens-- Moody and Jacobs-- was a catty rivalry that was high on headline value and low in court manners. Betz is on wisecracking terms with her two principal rivals (also from California): San Francisco's chubby, red-haired Margaret ("Ozzie") Osborne and blonde Louise Brough (rhymes with rough) of Beverly Hills. All of Ozzie's strokes except the backhand (which is only good) are better than Betz's.

Because she is the current First Lady of Tennis, Pauline usually chooses what tournaments she will play, demands and gets top expense money. Since the rest of the girls have little choice but to tag along, women's tennis today is known as the Betz Club. Its eastern home is with Delaware's wealthy tennis fan William du Pont, who subsidizes Ozzie, Bruffie and a dozen or so lesser lady tennists as much as the watchdog of amateur tennis, the U.S.L.T.A., allows. Betz owns to having been helped financially at one time (it is permissible to accept "gifts"), but now she gets along on her own and the legitimate take.

Tennis for the King. The Betz Club got its first foreign seasoning in June. For the first time since 1938, the top five U.S. women players-- Betz, Osborne, Brough, Pat Todd and Florida's Doris Hart -- headed for England to play Britain's top women in Wightman Cup competition. The U.S. team blasted Britain's out-of-practice best off the courts in seven straight matches without dropping a set. Betz won the Wimbledon Singles crown, a glory at least equal to the U.S. championship. In Paris three weeks later, Osborne handed Betz one of her few beatings. The Betz Club romped up to Sweden, and played barelegged before 88-year-old tennis bug King Gustav. Then the other club members returned to the U.S., but Pauline headed for a Swiss resort (Gunten) to celebrate her 27th birthday with millionheiress Barbara Hutton. They swam, jitterbugged and went mountain-climbing for ten days-- Pauline's longest vacation in ten years.

Something Ladylike. Pauline Betz has had a tennis racket in her hands almost every day since she was nine. Her mother, a gym teacher at Los Angeles' Jefferson High School, put it there.

From the time she was 16, and got her first real tennis instruction (from Bruce Ainley, pro at swank Town House), Pauline set the alarm clock for 5 a.m., took a basketful of balls to the practice court and worked on her strokes until it was time for school. At 21, she won a scholarship to Florida's tennis-conscious Rollins College, played No. 4 on the men's team and got enough As in the classroom to earn a scholarship in economics at Columbia. She didn't like Manhattan's weather, and quit Columbia after six months. At 23 she was national champion.

Hobnobbing with Headliners. She liked the life-- checking in & out of hotels, hopping planes, eating in restaurants, hobnobbing with headline names. Winters, when the tournament season is over, she rarely spends an evening in the Betzes' small Los Angeles apartment, where the family serves vegetables in her sterling silver trophies. Usually she is to be found with movie folk, especially the Bill Powells. At the elegant Beverly Hills Tennis Club, she has little trouble beating Cinemactors Paul Lukas and Robert Taylor.

Men Are Better. But against top-flight tennists, Pauline, like all women players, is far behind. The 700-year-old French game of tennis, traditionally as much a lady's as a man's game, was introduced to the U.S. in 1874 by a woman, Mary E. Outerbridge. For 62 years women have played championship tennis at Wimbledon, at first in ankle-length gowns and long sleeves, yet no woman has ever done better than to beat the best men in juniors. On the subject of male v. female in tennis, Pauline says: "It's ridiculous to compare them." Her reasons: a man anticipates the play better, runs faster, hits harder, lasts longer.

Pauline has had a succession of boy friends, but says with a grin: "I can't find anyone who wants to be married one month out of the year." But she admits a fear of turning 30 without getting married.

Egg on Her Face. Last fall, after three years as national champion, Pauline Betz had her first major setback, from 33-year-old Sarah Palfrey Cooke, who came out of retirement to tournament play. Sarah took the crown away from Pauline at Forest Hills.

Pauline marched home to California, beaten and burned up-- at herself. She sought out Eleanor Tennant, an old tennis teacher, who coached Champions Bobby Riggs and Alice Marble, once charged the movie's Marion Davies $1,000 a month for lessons.

Teacher Tennant decided to buck Pauline up first. Says Eleanor: "When a gal has egg on her face, the first thing to do is let her know she is the world's greatest player."

Then came the details. Tennant, a believer in "easy does it" tennis, decided that Pauline's strength was in her killer instinct ("She has the quality of a stevedore"). So she strengthened Pauline's weak forehand by cutting two-thirds off the backswing and adding it to the follow-through. Her service was none too robust, so Eleanor Tennant concentrated on placement. When Pauline took her revamped tennis game on tour this summer, the egg was off her face. Teacher Tennant, who has taught them both, glowingly rated Betz above Alice Marble. Most tennis experts are content to call Pauline the best in a year which has no greats, and wait for the rest of the returns to come in before saying more.

1980's Verdict. Halfway through last week's doubles championships at Brookline, Pauline ran into trouble. Her big toe became infected, swelled up to twice its normal size. In the semi-finals, teamed with Doris Hart, Pauline discarded sneakers, played in heavy woolen socks. They lost. (Osborne and Brough won their fifth doubles championship beating Mary Arnold Prentiss and Pat Todd.)

Just how the injury would affect Pauline's playing at Forest Hills this week, no one knew for sure. At Brookline, it interfered with her latest hobby: taking action pictures of her tennis-playing pals, with a new movie camera she bought in Switzerland. At Forest Hills, besides the newsreel cameramen focusing on her, she will have a friend filming her matches with a new camera. Says Pauline: "In 1980 I want to be able to say, 'See what grandma did!'"