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View Full Version : Sania Mirza?? What really happened....


MakarovaFan
Jul 15th, 2010, 03:50 AM
Ok i have never been a big fan or follower of hers and i know she has had some of the WORST luck with injuries ever but what has happened to her career? Seriously,i dont want the smart comments about her being over hyped or sania who...sure she was NEVER gonna win a slam and the top 10 was unlikely but this girl had loads of talent,could hit as hard as anyone,was ferocious and had a great serve but to see her results now(losing in challengers,not being able to even have a close match with any top 50 players,losing in qualies). I think she was finally finding her form/potential in the summer of 07 before injury struck and she has barely done much since. Is it lack of interest,poor training,loss of talent,outside distractions or playing injured?

Mana
Jul 15th, 2010, 04:08 AM
I am not bashing.. but in my opinion I always though her serve was average. Almost everyone can land one big serve per service game.. but it's consistantly hitting first serves at a good speed that counts.

But she defo should be top 100. And she will be again, injuries have slowed her progress down. But theres still plenty of time.

Infiniti2001
Jul 15th, 2010, 04:22 AM
Sania was all about her forehand, and never tried to fix the rest of her game. Anyway, I guess she's now happy being Mrs Shoaib Malik:shrug:

VeeReeDavJCap81
Jul 15th, 2010, 04:27 AM
I enjoyed her, that forehand was :eek: But I think people overestimated her potential. She was like a swap meet clerance version of Ivanovic :shrug:

Albireo
Jul 15th, 2010, 04:46 AM
While injuries were a big part of the problem, she also abandoned good coaching. When she first caught everyone's attention, she was working with Bob Brett; at the time of her first real breakthrough (summer 2005) she was working with John Farrington. Her management then kept her on the coaching carousel before settling on her father, under whose guidance she had failed to correct the flaws that she started with. (I have no idea of her current coaching situation, admittedly.) Given her technical limitations, poor fitness, and rudimentary court sense, she needed a strong coaching hand, and she stopped getting it after 2005.

I also think she became somewhat complacent--with as much fame and fortune as she got (much of it negative, as in all her clashes with religious leaders, being burned in effigy, etc.), she never seemed to really want to be great. Easy to be happy with middling success when it can still reap huge rewards. Then again, given her outspokenness on certain political issues, maybe she feels like tennis is a stepping stone to something more worthwhile.

It's incredibly ironic, at least to me, that she's essentially been a (successful) doubles specialist the last few years.

tommyk75
Jul 15th, 2010, 05:19 AM
I agree about Sania's serve not being much, but she really did have talent. That forehand looked so effortless yet generated such incredible power. With proper fitness and coaching, there's no reason she couldn't have been a perennial Top 10-er (seriously, Sania had much more pure ball-strking skills than Wozniacki or Radwanska; she just didn't have their resilience and conditioning).

Wiggly
Jul 15th, 2010, 05:22 AM
Yeah, something is wrong when you more more broken engagements in the last year than WTA Tour wins.

DOUBLEFIST
Jul 15th, 2010, 05:23 AM
I think any fan of the game who fails to compensate for the establishment's ritual of immediately over-hyping a player is going to be SORELY disappointed and shocked by Mirza's results. Any fan who has the good sense to take a more measured approach to the new kids on the block are still somewhat disappointed, but not necessarily surprised.

If you stir into the mix those elements of the game - establishment or otherwise - salivating at the hope/chance of the GINORMOUS market and financial powerhouse of India having a top-flight player, you have a recipe, more likely than not, for prematurely hyped players who ultimately will crash and burn.

As for the injury, yes. They definitely didn't help, but every player must deal with significant injury at some point in their career. I can't think of a single elite player who hasn't, so...

Cakeisgood
Jul 15th, 2010, 05:30 AM
The ULTIMATE forehand ball basher.

Shvedbarilescu
Jul 15th, 2010, 06:20 AM
While injuries were a big part of the problem, she also abandoned good coaching. When she first caught everyone's attention, she was working with Bob Brett; at the time of her first real breakthrough (summer 2005) she was working with John Farrington. Her management then kept her on the coaching carousel before settling on her father, under whose guidance she had failed to correct the flaws that she started with. (I have no idea of her current coaching situation, admittedly.) Given her technical limitations, poor fitness, and rudimentary court sense, she needed a strong coaching hand, and she stopped getting it after 2005.

I also think she became somewhat complacent--with as much fame and fortune as she got (much of it negative, as in all her clashes with religious leaders, being burned in effigy, etc.), she never seemed to really want to be great. Easy to be happy with middling success when it can still reap huge rewards. Then again, given her outspokenness on certain political issues, maybe she feels like tennis is a stepping stone to something more worthwhile.

It's incredibly ironic, at least to me, that she's essentially been a (successful) doubles specialist the last few years.

Really good post. I agree with all of the above.

Mightymirza
Jul 15th, 2010, 06:30 AM
I agree about Sania's serve not being much, but she really did have talent. That forehand looked so effortless yet generated such incredible power. With proper fitness and coaching, there's no reason she couldn't have been a perennial Top 10-er (seriously, Sania had much more pure ball-strking skills than Wozniacki or Radwanska; she just didn't have their resilience and conditioning).

That.. Tons of injuries and poor fitness..

Larrybidd
Jul 15th, 2010, 07:51 AM
I think any fan of the game who fails to compensate for the establishment's ritual of immediately over-hyping a player is going to be SORELY disappointed and shocked by Mirza's results. Any fan who has the good sense to take a more measured approach to the new kids on the block are still somewhat disappointed, but not necessarily surprised.


Agreed generally with the tendency of many fans to go crazy (meaning over estimate the potential) of new talent. I wonder sometimes if fans realize how hard it is to consistently succeed at the pro level. Well, I don't wonder really: i know most fans don't really appreciate how hard it is, even for players who flash talent.

Sports fans mainly fall into 2 categories, i'm afraid. The ones who cling to the memories of retired hero's...thinking they can wipe the floor with the current crop of talent (ie. the Hingis worshipers) or the fans who go GaGa over the "next new thing" and complain that the problem with the WTA is they keep out 16 year olds. Its a hellava thing, fan mentality.

siddharthrajpal
Jul 15th, 2010, 09:47 AM
she got married and people realized that her forehand backhand serve and volley are her weakness..

Yonexforever
Jul 15th, 2010, 02:04 PM
she got married and people realized that her forehand backhand serve and volley are her weakness..

OUCH!

Super Dave
Jul 15th, 2010, 02:31 PM
I saw her in Cincinnati in '05 and she had a lot of followers there. There was a good vibe for her at that tournament and I thought she was an up and coming star at that point. Injuries and off-the-court doings have really done her in.

Miss Atomic Bomb
Jul 15th, 2010, 02:35 PM
I never thought she had much potential, she has a good forehand but nothing else really :shrug:
She has always been an extremely overhyped player (mainly because she played a competitive match against Venus in australia and beat Kuznetsova).

spiceboy
Jul 15th, 2010, 02:43 PM
While injuries were a big part of the problem, she also abandoned good coaching. When she first caught everyone's attention, she was working with Bob Brett; at the time of her first real breakthrough (summer 2005) she was working with John Farrington. Her management then kept her on the coaching carousel before settling on her father, under whose guidance she had failed to correct the flaws that she started with. (I have no idea of her current coaching situation, admittedly.) Given her technical limitations, poor fitness, and rudimentary court sense, she needed a strong coaching hand, and she stopped getting it after 2005.

I also think she became somewhat complacent--with as much fame and fortune as she got (much of it negative, as in all her clashes with religious leaders, being burned in effigy, etc.), she never seemed to really want to be great. Easy to be happy with middling success when it can still reap huge rewards. Then again, given her outspokenness on certain political issues, maybe she feels like tennis is a stepping stone to something more worthwhile.

It's incredibly ironic, at least to me, that she's essentially been a (successful) doubles specialist the last few years.

Spot on. Couldn't have explained it better :worship:

rockstar
Jul 15th, 2010, 03:19 PM
overhyped as asia's big star. NEXT.

Helen Lawson
Jul 15th, 2010, 07:20 PM
I saw her a few times, once she lost to Lisa Raymond. On clay. In singles! You get the picture. This Wozniaki gal is Margaret Court next to Sania.

jrm
Jul 15th, 2010, 08:13 PM
I am not bashing.. but in my opinion I always though her serve was average. Almost everyone can land one big serve per service game.. but it's consistantly hitting first serves at a good speed that counts.

But she defo should be top 100. And she will be again, injuries have slowed her progress down. But theres still plenty of time.

You called that a serve??? Didn't she have a top coach on her side and he still couldn't do a thing' Lost cause and overhyped here (as usual)!

wildemu
Jul 15th, 2010, 08:28 PM
Not only did Mirza seriously underachieve in her career, but now she's negatively impacting her husband's form in his own sport.

In all seriousness, she couldn't handle the pressure of being the top asian player.

Borishynikov
Jul 15th, 2010, 09:14 PM
Not only did Mirza seriously underachieve in her career, but now she's negatively impacting her husband's form in his own sport.

In all seriousness, she couldn't handle the pressure of being the top asian player.

Shoaib Malik ain't that good a cricket player either, just part of the rotation of the rabble. Pakistani cricket has political problems plus the fact they can't play any matches at home these days. Players only want to play T20 (smash and bash) thus develop no proper technique and their flaws which should have been corrected by the time they left high school are still there when playing for their country...

Thus Sania and Shoaib are a perfect match!

Is she more interested in becoming a Bollywood star than a tennis player?

KournikovaFan91
Jul 15th, 2010, 09:51 PM
I think the hyping came because China was getting better at tennis and I guess people assumed India would improve also, like both their economies.

I remember a segment on Wimbledon a few years back about how tennis was going to be all about Asians in future years and the Eastern European dominance might end :tape:

But to be fair she had a ton of political crap to deal with also. :shrug:

mirzalover
Jul 15th, 2010, 10:05 PM
She didnt develop, didnt keep her good coaches and went with her father, she didnt improve her fitness enough, and injuries. She was a Top 15-40ish player to me, someone who would go deep one tournament then lose early the next tournament, then match her "seeding" the next tournament, then lose a round before she should have. Hot and Cold player would mostly became cold colder ice aged.

Deuce24
Jul 15th, 2010, 11:12 PM
She never was Asia's top player, thats always been Maria Sharapova. She was born in Siberia which is in Asia.