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goldenlox
Mar 25th, 2010, 02:05 AM
By JONATHAN CLEGG (http://www.tennisforum.com/search/term.html?KEYWORDS=JONATHAN+CLEGG&bylinesearch=true)

The world's No.1 player is nursing a sore knee and the highest-profile star in the women's game is out with an elbow injury, but if tennis fans think the absence of Serena Williams and Maria Sharapova from this week's Sony (http://www.tennisforum.com/public/quotes/main.html?type=djn&symbol=SNE) Ericsson Open is evidence of an understrength line-up, the numbers suggest they're sorely mistaken.
In fact, the players on show in Miami are arguably the strongest in the history of the women's game.
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NO NEED Jelena Jankovic of Serbia returns a shot to Denmark's Caroline Wozniacki in the final of the BNP Paribas Open at Indian Wells, California, on Sunday.

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Trainers from the WTA Tour delivered a report at the beginning of this year which found that the sport's top players have never been in such excellent physical shape, the result of a radical strategy hatched five years ago by tennis officials to improve the sport's commercial prospects.
To grow the game, they needed to play fewer matches.
"We needed to give fans and sponsors healthy athletes on a consistent basis," says Stacey Allaster, the WTA's chief executive. "When you look at a movie billboard, you're going to see the lead actors being showcased and driving that film, and in tennis it's the same thing."
So far, the plan appears to be working: Last year, the WTA Tour scrapped a quarter of its premier events and cut the number of mandatory appearances for the world's top-10 players. In the same period, attendances are up by 11% and prize money on the Tour has increased by a third.
Last week, a record crowd at the BNP Paribas (http://www.tennisforum.com/public/quotes/main.html?type=djn&symbol=BNP.FR) Open in Indian Wells, Calif. saw Jelena Jankovic clinch the trophy after recapturing the form that briefly led her to the top of the world rankings in 2008.
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Agence France-Presse/GetWTA Chief Executive Stacey Allaster

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"Now there's a good schedule, I feel like I'm in the best possible shape," says Ms. Jankovic. "I don't feel burned out or like I don't want to play."
It wasn't always like this. Until recently, the women's tennis circuit was a year-long grind for the world's best players, an endless series of forgettable stops and far-flung tournaments in which increasing your stamina was more important than your improving your service game. On top of the four Grand Slams and the annual Fed Cup tournament, the WTA had 26 premier events, of which half were mandatory for top-ranked players.
Even players way down the world rankings came under pressure to keep playing all year round, passing up any kind of off-season in order to increase their earnings during the exhibition season in November and December.
Making matters worse, the current generation of players are starting younger and playing harder, while the majority of tournaments and tennis academies now favour hard courts, as opposed to clay, grass or carpet. In short, even before they join the Tour, modern players had put their bodies through an unprecedented pounding.
The pro circuit's punishing schedule took such a toll that injuries were commonplace and careers were cut short: In 2008, while occupying the No.1 spot in women's tennis, Justine Henin decided that the effort of getting there had exhausted her physically and mentally, and at the age of 25 retired from the sport.
"Tennis was a sport where you played this insane schedule from 14 years old and by 26, it was over," Venus Williams told reporters in Miami this week.
In 2006, officials at the WTA Tour decided this situation was absurd. In an effort to protect its biggest asset—the world's best players—official ripped up the tennis calendar and devised a new schedule that aimed to protect players from burnout, while also delivering a consistent supply of fit, focused stars to event organizers and sponsors.
To reshape the season, the organisation turned to its in-house group of sports scientists and statisticians. The sports science and medicine department of the WTA Tour, which was established in 1994 and monitors the preparation and performances of the world's top players, pored over 15 years worth of data to analyse the effect of the workload on women who can begin playing professionally as young as 15.
The results confirmed that the Tour was simply too tough.
"We looked at five years of data for the top-10 players and asked when did they play? Where did they play? How many events did they play? when did thjey get injured?" says Ms. Allaster.
"It showed us the top players can't play 13 Tour events, plus the Slams, plus Fed Cup. They just can't do that. So by default we had a schedule which we already knew we couldn't deliver."
After months of planning, in 2008 the WTA unveiled its solution: the Road Map—a new calendar that aims to deliver more good tennis more of the time across the year. It has restricted the number of premier events to 20 and called for top-10 players to appear in just 10 tournaments each year.
It also includes a three-week break between Wimbledon in July and the start of the U.S. Open Series in August and an earlier climax to the season in the first week of November as opposed to an extra month for the men's ATP Tour.
Players are also prevented from practising too hard. Now, they must run their proposed schedules through a Web-based program designed to minimise the risk of burnout. Play too often or leave yourself with insufficient recovery time between matches and a warning sign on your comptuer screen demands you change your routine.
"It's hard when they're so young because they want to play, play, play and they want to build up confidence, but all of the data shows that when you overplay, you don't have the longevity," says Ms. Allaster.
In 2009, the first year of the WTA's new Road Map, instances of players pulling out of WTA Tour events declined by 25%, while court-calls—requests for treament by the courtside trainers—were cut by 28%. For the first time in history, in nine of the 10 premier tournaments.
With three months and 13 tournaments gone this season, there has been an 11% decrease in the number of mid-match retirements as women's tennis learns to embrace the theory that less is more.
"I'm one of the players that likes to compete, I like to play matches so I stay as fit as possible, but there have been some changes and I think my game had improved," says Ms. Jankovic. "I think I'm a much better player now."

SIN DIOS NI LEY
Mar 25th, 2010, 02:10 AM
Tanking increased 50%

BuTtErFrEnA
Mar 25th, 2010, 02:21 AM
Tanking increased 50%

exactly...

spencercarlos
Mar 25th, 2010, 02:29 AM
Tanking increased 50%
Excelente comentario, por fin una buena :p

Volcana
Mar 25th, 2010, 02:34 AM
The world's No.1 player is nursing a sore knee and the highest-profile star in the women's game is out with an elbow injury What's this about Serena also having an elbow injury?

fufuqifuqishahah
Mar 25th, 2010, 03:17 AM
at least tanking is preferrable to w/d in the middle of tournaments.

remember a few years ago when injury time outs and pulling out of matches were all the rage with the players

fufuqifuqishahah
Mar 25th, 2010, 03:17 AM
What's this about Serena also having an elbow injury?

she needs to put some lotion on them

miffedmax
Mar 25th, 2010, 03:48 AM
Tanking increased 50%

And playing suckfully increased 75%.

What's the source of this article? The WTA? Is Clegg Allastar's son-in-law or something?

DragonFlame
Mar 25th, 2010, 05:02 AM
Players were totally burned out after the usopen. I'd say the fall season was the worst ever in the history of the sport. Tokio and Beijing were definetly the lowlights of the season, players tanking/not caring left and right.

Why? because they had to show up, it's MANDITORY. Of course the pulling out decreases when you put harsh penalties like zero pointers in play.

Now lets count the 1st match losses by top10-15 players and compare them to other years, i'm sure this will give us some very interesting information.

Bijoux0021
Mar 25th, 2010, 06:28 AM
By JONATHAN CLEGG (http://www.tennisforum.com/search/term.html?KEYWORDS=JONATHAN+CLEGG&bylinesearch=true)

The world's No.1 player is nursing a sore knee and the highest-profile star in the women's game is out with an elbow injury, ."
:lol: How desperate! :o The most-hyped/over-hyped player in the women's game, yes. But, not "the highest-profile star."

Midnight_Robber
Mar 25th, 2010, 06:42 AM
http://michaeljacksonanimatedgifs.com/images/others/mjgifs18.gif

Hmmm.
Find it hard to believe that Serena is somehow *less* internationally famous than Maria, (let alone at Miami) but whatever.

I wonder if they think that anyone who follows the WTA is actually going to believe that the Roadmap suddenly works? :rolleyes:

Lachy
Mar 25th, 2010, 06:51 AM
:lol: How desperate! :o The most-hyped/over-hyped player in the women's game, yes. But, not "the highest-profile star."

:rolleyes:

Mrs. Dimitrova
Mar 25th, 2010, 07:41 AM
:lol: How desperate! :o The most-hyped/over-hyped player in the women's game, yes. But, not "the highest-profile star."

By highest-profile they probably meant richest. ;)

Slutiana
Mar 25th, 2010, 09:07 AM
Quite hilarious actually. Last year post USO was a mess, and how can anyone forget the YEC? There were about two players who weren't injured. :help:

Jajaloo
Mar 25th, 2010, 09:19 AM
What's this about Serena also having an elbow injury?

:lol: i thought this too! I couldnt for the life of think who that "highest-profile star" was, because Serena doesn't have an elbow injury!

Should read:

The world's No.1 player is nursing a sore knee and the least interesting, and most infamous player in the women's game is out with an elbow injury, but if tennis fans think the absence of Serena Williams and Maria Sharapova from this week's Sony Ericsson Open is evidence of an understrength line-up, they'd be right on the money.

A Magicman
Mar 25th, 2010, 09:43 AM
In fact, the players on show in Miami are arguably the strongest in the history of the women's game.


You just have to constantly repeat it and believe in it to make it come true. :rolleyes:

Marilyn Monheaux
Mar 25th, 2010, 09:49 AM
You just have to constantly repeat it and believe in it to make it come true. :rolleyes:

http://www.haibao.cn/js/editor/emot/emot-36.gif

The Witch-king
Mar 25th, 2010, 10:06 AM
By highest-profile they probably meant richest. ;)

whitest... :(

AnnaK_4ever
Mar 25th, 2010, 10:38 AM
The biggest pile of crap I've ever read.

Bijoux0021
Mar 25th, 2010, 10:56 AM
whitest... :(
EXACTLY!

sfan
Mar 25th, 2010, 11:18 AM
Maria might be not as influential as Serena, but she is still a powerful celebrity and an ambassador for the sport and still ahead of Venus despite her shoulder problems.

http://www.forbes.com/lists/2009/53/celebrity-09_The-Celebrity-100_Rank.html (someone posted this the other day)

According to the forbes list of the most powerful celebrities, Serena is ranked at 67, Maria at 76 and Venus at 77.

Jaco·He
Mar 25th, 2010, 11:19 AM
so good

Marilyn Monheaux
Mar 25th, 2010, 11:57 AM
Maria might be not as influential as Serena, but she is still a powerful celebrity and an ambassador for the sport and still ahead of Venus despite her shoulder problems.

http://www.forbes.com/lists/2009/53/celebrity-09_The-Celebrity-100_Rank.html (someone posted this the other day)

According to the forbes list of the most powerful celebrities, Serena is ranked at 67, Maria at 76 and Venus at 77.

According to this list Angelina Jolie, Jennifer Aniston, Coldplay, Miley effing Cyrus and Ryan Seacrest are more powerful (celebrities) than Barack Obama. :bs:

goldenlox
Mar 25th, 2010, 12:05 PM
On the SonyEricsson list, Sharapova is #1.
They have an endorsement deal with her, as well as with the WTA tour

miffedmax
Mar 25th, 2010, 12:14 PM
If squabbling with the opening line of this steaming pile of :bs: is your biggest problem, then you really need to read the rest of the article.

Golovinjured.
Mar 25th, 2010, 04:49 PM
The world's No.1 player is nursing a sore knee and the highest-profile star in the women's game is out with an elbow injury

:bowdown:

Congrats Masha, still #1 baby straight outta compton!!1111111

In The Zone
Mar 25th, 2010, 05:27 PM
Tanking increased 50%

Exactly. Serena's 2009 clay season is clear evidence of this.

bhathiya9999
Mar 25th, 2010, 05:41 PM
Nice one great post...

Matt01
Mar 25th, 2010, 05:43 PM
The quality of play also declined 25% :o

Monzanator
Mar 25th, 2010, 05:46 PM
What's this about Serena also having an elbow injury?

:happy: :tape: