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View Full Version : Vanessa Williams "Bashes" 'The Blind Side' on 'The View'


Mrs. Berasetegui
Mar 10th, 2010, 12:13 AM
http://insidetv.aol.com/2010/03/08/vanessa-williams-bashes-the-blind-side-on-the-view-video/

I posted this on the topic about Monique. If you didn't see it on that thread, see what you think. :)

Andrew Laeddis
Mar 10th, 2010, 12:16 AM
I love Vanessa but I dont share her opinion on this. It's not as if The Blind Side was fiction. Its based on a true story. Should someone not get to have their story told because they happen to have been helped/taken in by a white family.

I enjoyed watching the film and wasnted all offended by it.

Bayo
Mar 10th, 2010, 05:10 AM
That's really interesting.

When I first heard the premise of the film, I thought the very same thing as Vanessa. Someone asked me to go and see it with him, and I replied that I would just wait until Dangerous Minds/Finding Forrester/Freedom Writers (etc. etc. etc) re-aired for free on cable.

But, I have haven't seen the film, while many of my friends have (some of whom are very sensitive to issues of race), and I have to say I've only heard good things about it. So I backed off with my negative impressions, at least until I can judge for myself. And I think in this case maybe Vanessa should have at least seen the film before criticising it.

darrinbaker00
Mar 10th, 2010, 06:01 AM
As long as Michael Oher doesn't feel that way about his upbringing, it doesn't matter what Vanessa Williams or anyone else thinks.

Sam L
Mar 10th, 2010, 11:16 AM
She has a point in that the film should be more about the failures of "the system" towards homeless kids rather than about the great work of one Christian Republican family. But somehow, if that were the case, I think it would've made A LOT LESS money than it did at the box office.

I can't remember where I read it and I don't know the details but Michael Oher apparently said that the film took a lot of liberties in retelling his "true story".

Mynarco
Mar 10th, 2010, 12:08 PM
at first glance I thought the topic was Venus Williams bashes the Blind side on the View.

oh no, my sight is getting worse

Sam L
Mar 10th, 2010, 12:09 PM
at first glance I thought the topic was Venus Williams bashes the Blind side on the View.

oh no, my sight is getting worse
That's what I thought at first too. That happens to me ALL THE TIME! We might be dyslexic. :lol:

Mynarco
Mar 10th, 2010, 12:21 PM
That's what I thought at first too. That happens to me ALL THE TIME! We might be dyslexic. :lol:

surfing TF too much sign 1:
you know there are only 3 people that can have the surname Williams: Venus, Serena and Richard

I digress too much :lol:
well this movie hasn't been officially released in UK yet..I would wait to see the movie and make my own judgment

young_gunner913
Mar 10th, 2010, 01:32 PM
As long as Michael Oher doesn't feel that way about his upbringing, it doesn't matter what Vanessa Williams or anyone else thinks.

This.

After watching the clip, Vanessa just seemed really bitter and it was a classless statement. If you havent seen the movie, you really should not be making ignorant comments about it. I saw the film and I really liked it.

ampers&
Mar 10th, 2010, 01:42 PM
She's right. The film is a horrible, stereotypical mess and really not that good at all, IMO. Nothing less than what I would expect from Hollywood though. They salivate over these type of stories.

GracefulVenus
Mar 10th, 2010, 02:22 PM
I love Vanessa Williams, but strongly disagree with her stance on the story. Race is not a issue unless we make it one, and Vanessa is clearly making race an issue with these statements. Take the color away from the story and it is a story of a family helping a homeless kid. When American starts thinking like this, we will be much better off as a country.

darrinbaker00
Mar 10th, 2010, 03:14 PM
She has a point in that the film should be more about the failures of "the system" towards homeless kids rather than about the great work of one Christian Republican family. But somehow, if that were the case, I think it would've made A LOT LESS money than it did at the box office.

I can't remember where I read it and I don't know the details but Michael Oher apparently said that the film took a lot of liberties in retelling his "true story".
Michael was mainly talking about the scenes that showed the Tuohy family teaching him how to play football. He said he had been playing since he was eight.

harloo
Mar 10th, 2010, 03:45 PM
That's really interesting.

When I first heard the premise of the film, I thought the very same thing as Vanessa. Someone asked me to go and see it with him, and I replied that I would just wait until Dangerous Minds/Finding Forrester/Freedom Writers (etc. etc. etc) re-aired for free on cable.

But, I have haven't seen the film, while many of my friends have (some of whom are very sensitive to issues of race), and I have to say I've only heard good things about it. So I backed off with my negative impressions, at least until I can judge for myself. And I think in this case maybe Vanessa should have at least seen the film before criticising it.

:worship: Get out of my head!! My girlfriend wanted to see The Blind Side and I told her all she had to do was watch Dangerous Minds and Freedom Writers. :lol: After I got a chance to actually watch the movie via download I couldn't stop rolling my eyes at all the cliches. :rolleyes:

I've always been a big fan of Sandra Bullock and have no issue with people who enjoyed the movie. However, it would be a lie to say The Blind Side wasn't more of the stereotypical theme that a great white hope has to save a down-trodden poor black person. :o

Congrats to Sandra on her Oscar win though but the movie was a wreck. :tape:

Golovinjured.
Mar 10th, 2010, 04:19 PM
I love Vanessa Williams, but strongly disagree with her stance on the story. Race is not a issue unless we make it one, and Vanessa is clearly making race an issue with these statements. Take the color away from the story and it is a story of a family helping a homeless kid. When American starts thinking like this, we will be much better off as a country.

This.

"Here's another white family that has saved the day" :confused: What the fuck is she thinking?

Golovinjured.
Mar 10th, 2010, 04:21 PM
Did she say: 'I'm sure, I haven't..... (seen it?)'

kwilliams
Mar 10th, 2010, 04:49 PM
I agree that she should've watched the movie and seen the approach that the writer/director took. Her words could very well be true but at the same time she could be talking crap - which would be fine if the movie was fictional but it's not so she should definitely watch the movie before taking a jab at it.

I also agree with what darrinbaker00 said.

At the end of the day, one family did an extremely good thing and set a great example to others. They all deserved to have their story told...even if it was done in a trite kind of way, the core message deserved to be heard because it might influence people towards even little acts of kindness.

harloo
Mar 10th, 2010, 05:10 PM
I agree that she should've watched the movie and seen the approach that the writer/director took. Her words could very well be true but at the same time she could be talking crap - which would be fine if the movie was fictional but it's not so she should definitely watch the movie before taking a jab at it.


Well, if you've seen one of these type of movies you've basically seen them all. The genre is quite profitable for studio's which is why money will continue to pumped into these kind of films. Of course Vanessa could have watched the movie before criticizing but to be honest all one had to do is watch the trailer to know exactly where the direction of the movie was going. She was spot on in her analysis.

slamchamp
Mar 10th, 2010, 06:35 PM
Well it's based on a true story I think, so... and isn't Vanessa Williams half white? why does she sound so bitter?:tape:

Infiniti2001
Mar 10th, 2010, 07:50 PM
Well it's based on a true story I think, so... and isn't Vanessa Williams half white? why does she sound so bitter?:tape:

Posters here express their opinions all the time and it's okay, yet Vanessa expresses hers and she sounds bitter? and what does her race have to do with it? Both her parents are biracial but consider themselves black/African American . Vanessa considers herself as an African American woman and I think we should respect that. Funny how I don't see the same people knocking her in the Howard Stern insulting Gabby thread :rolleyes:

van£ss
Mar 10th, 2010, 10:15 PM
Here's Sandra Bullock response about the subject , which i think is great ! i'm not sure the actress she's talking about in the video is Vanessa Williams or not but anyway :

WubeJfQX6-Y

geoepee
Mar 10th, 2010, 10:59 PM
Here's Sandra Bullock response about the subject , which i think is great ! i'm not sure the actress she's talking about in the video is Vanessa Williams or not but anyway :

WubeJfQX6-Y
I'm not a huge fan of Tavis Smiley, or his show. Just wanted to add this little side-note. His set was designed by Venus Williams and V Starr Interiors.

http://www.pbs.org/kcet/tavissmiley/about/staff.html

geoepee
Mar 10th, 2010, 11:18 PM
Well, if you've seen one of these type of movies you've basically seen them all. The genre is quite profitable for studio's which is why money will continue to pumped into these kind of films. Of course Vanessa could have watched the movie before criticizing but to be honest all one had to do is watch the trailer to know exactly where the direction of the movie was going. She was spot on in her analysis.

I agree with this post. And, in my personal opinion, it was very brave for Vanessa to speak her mind and say anything at all about this issue. Especially after Sandra won the Oscar. It's a fact that people are very touchy about race issues. Just seeing how people are quick to jump down her throat for saying what she thinks, even in this thread and on other blogs/forums, she could have just kept her mouth shut and said nothing and been better off for it. :shrug: People are even questioning her blackness, which is funny to me, but anyway...

I don't understand why people are so upset with Vanessa for pointing this out :confused:. I think she made it clear that she was not talking about the act of kindness towards the young uneducated black football player who was failed by the system (pause), or even Sandra Bullock's performance, which I have seen and personally thought was fantastic.

I agree with Vanessa that the story has been done before, and it has been done to death. It's a old Hollywood formula that they know works. And the sad thing is that the hoopla is less about Oher but about how the woman in all of her kindness and generosity and how she saved him.

It's such a tried and true formula that we are going to see the same story over and over and over again. What's wrong about saying that?

Calvin M.
Mar 11th, 2010, 12:05 AM
As long as Michael Oher doesn't feel that way about his upbringing, it doesn't matter what Vanessa Williams or anyone else thinks.

Based on the video, Vanessa Williams wasn't judging Michael Oher or his plight.

I agree with Vanessa. True story or not, the scenario in "The Blind Side" is one that Hollywood loves to tell (disadvantaged black person prevails when a white person comes to "save the day"). It's one of the reasons why I had no interest in seeing it (the film's apparent sentimentality is another issue).

On a related note, I thought this Wikipedia entry on the "magical negro" was hilarious (and accurate):

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magical_negro

That's precisely what I thought about Jennifer Hudson in "Sex and the City" and Djimon Hounsou in "In America", among others.

Midnight_Robber
Mar 11th, 2010, 12:21 AM
"See the movie before you bash it."
I think that's complete nonsense. Ever heard of a thing called 'genre' or selectively choosing what you watch? If you're not into crime fiction in general (let's say that crime narratives/formulas don't appeal to you), or you have a certain antipathy when comes to graphic violence - and have heard that a particular film is a standard crime story or that it contains incredibly violent scenes, then why should the viewer be then obliged to go and watch it before they have a 'right' to be sceptical/wary/critical? Why should they go and see it if they've seen the trailer and already know that it's not their type of film or their idea of a good time? (Films are supposed to entertain, amongst other things.)

Same applies to this. Personally the deluge of "white savior complex" of movies (or the "white charity" genre) from the US bore the heck out of me. They're formulaic, patronising, dime-a-dozen and the sentimentality irritates rather than 'moves' me. When there is so much to see and read in this world, why would I deliberately go out of my way to watch something that's going to get on my nerves? Because it won an Oscar? (So did "Titanic", "Braveheart", "Gladiator" and "A Beautiful Mind". :rolleyes:)

Now if I'd read a review that suggested that "The Blind Side" seriously questions or innovates the genre in someway, does *something* unexpected, or even takes a risk and strays from the standard formula then I might at least feel mildly curious about it. But even the people who love it death aren't arguing that it's fresh, thought-provoking or original. True, I don't think that every movie *has* to be original in order to deserve an audience, but again if a film is using a formula that you're adverse to in the first place then usually, said film would have to do *something* different in order to tempt you to watch it when you ordinarily wouldn't.

And who cares if a film is based on real-life or not? In the end, you're always dealing with a storied representation that's organised and contains artifice - not reality on the screen - so it's irrelevant. (And that includes documentaries) 'The real life' tag is just advertising. It has nothing to do with good writing, skillful narrative or decent acting. It would be like suggesting that every domestic abuse story on Lifetime channel should be watched with absolute reverence because *gasp* it's based on a true life story/incident. Again, either the story interests you, or it doesn't.

Anyway, I agree with Vanessa Williams criticism. She's not critiquing "the film" as a whole :rolleyes:, or "bashing" Bullock's performance - she even speaks positively of Bullock. What she's challenging is the rather questionable, frankly racialised premise/topos that underlies the film - white saviour/black dependent which is a stale old drama that has been playing out in narratives since the notion of "white man's burden".

'One human being helps another' is a story that plays out every single day on the planet - and all the actants involved of are every creed and race. But the only specific version of that story that ever makes it into best-selling novels or on to Hollywood screens is the "white-savior saves black person" binary. Hollywood is addicted to that model of storytelling, so much so that we are saturated by that particular version of the one person saves another" story as if it is the only one that exists, to the exclusion of all others. And let's not kid ourselves. "The Blindside" is certainly not marketed as 'one human being helps another' or in any such 'neutral', humanist terms. The entire basis for the story is that she's white and Republican and he's a black footballer and in need. Race and class are everything to the story. Strip away these racial markers and chances are the story wouldn't have ever made it into book form, let alone to the screen. If he was middle class white kid who'd fallen on hard times, or if she had been like the numerous black women across the U.S. who help black kids every damn day - which is also "real life" :rolleyes: Hollywood wouldn't have blinked an eye. They'd have ignored it as they always do.

As I said, people help/save/rescue other human beings everyday but for some reason the story is *only* worth telling, 'interesting', and garners undue attention is if it's a white saviour rescuing some non-white - and in the case of the U.S. usually black - person. It almost NEVER works the other way around because I suppose in "real life" no black person has ever helped or saved a white person before. :rolleyes:

woosey
Mar 11th, 2010, 02:09 AM
vanessa's right. speak on it girl. i'm glad she spoke up and out. i was telling someone this last week.

the same issue is present in avatar which i saw and didn't like.

PlayByPlay
Mar 11th, 2010, 02:37 AM
Vanessa Williams should shut up. The whole point is the family decided to help the young man and did not use race as an excuse to help him.

tommyk75
Mar 11th, 2010, 03:26 AM
I don't think it's the fault of "The Blind Side" people who simply chose to make the movie they wanted to make. I think the people who should be blamed are the powers-that-be in Hollywood that refuse to accept scripts and stories where the main black characters are empowered into helping themselves, saying, "Oh, that's not commercial/mainstream enough."

meyerpl
Mar 11th, 2010, 03:32 AM
I don't see what all the fuss is about. Sure, movies often portray white people helping black people, but black people have also been portrayed helping white people for as long as Hollywood has made films.......like, Mammy and Prissy helping Scarlett O'Hara get dressed and stuff in Gone With the Wind.

doni1212
Mar 11th, 2010, 03:46 AM
I understand where Vanessa is coming from but at the same time I loved Sandra's response.
This is a great discussion.

doni1212
Mar 11th, 2010, 03:54 AM
I don't see what all the fuss is about. Sure, movies often portray white people helping black people, but black people have also been portrayed helping white people for as long as Hollywood has made films.......like, Mammy and Prissy helping Scarlett O'Hara get dressed and stuff in Gone With the Wind.

WOW, those are 2 wayyyyyy different issues!!!
The black people like Mammy,Prissy, Big Sam, Pork, etc in GWTW weren't appreciated and barely seen as people! They were forced to be servants for the white people and laughed at (especially Prissy). Hollywood made a mockery of them in this movie and other movies where they used black face! They weren't portrayed as "helping" white people like the Mom genuinely helped the black guy in The Blind Side.
There is NO comparison here. Find a different example, :rolleyes:

The Witch-king
Mar 11th, 2010, 04:37 AM
That's what I thought at first too. That happens to me ALL THE TIME! We might be dyslexic. :lol:

no u are just obsessed with Venus!

The Witch-king
Mar 11th, 2010, 04:47 AM
WOW, those are 2 wayyyyyy different issues!!!
The black people like Mammy,Prissy, Big Sam, Pork, etc in GWTW weren't appreciated and barely seen as people! They were forced to be servants for the white people and laughed at (especially Prissy). Hollywood made a mockery of them in this movie and other movies where they used black face! They weren't portrayed as "helping" white people like the Mom genuinely helped the black guy in The Blind Side.
There is NO comparison here. Find a different example, :rolleyes:

i'm pretty sure he was being sarcastic

woosey
Mar 11th, 2010, 06:10 AM
I don't see what all the fuss is about. Sure, movies often portray white people helping black people, but black people have also been portrayed helping white people for as long as Hollywood has made films.......like, Mammy and Prissy helping Scarlett O'Hara get dressed and stuff in Gone With the Wind.

i suspect sarcasm....

Golovinjured.
Mar 11th, 2010, 02:45 PM
I don't see what all the fuss is about. Sure, movies often portray white people helping black people, but black people have also been portrayed helping white people for as long as Hollywood has made films.......like, Mammy and Prissy helping Scarlett O'Hara get dressed and stuff in Gone With the Wind.

*dead* :haha:

Cosantoir
Mar 11th, 2010, 03:15 PM
I've viewed the movie and I can understand both sides of the coin. Fact is, this formula has been done before and has been proven to make $$$.

meyerpl
Mar 11th, 2010, 05:29 PM
I've viewed the movie and I can understand both sides of the coin. Fact is, this formula has been done before and has been proven to make $$$.Indeed. I think generally speaking, when Hollywood movie producers look at a potential project, they're out to make money, not dispell or reinforce stereotypes and/or help or hurt race relations.

I think Ms. Williams makes a good point; gernerally speaking, Hollywood films portray people in ways that reinforce stereotypes. But, as alway, when speaking in generalities there are always exceptions. One of my favorite exceptions is Crash, the 2004 movie with Don Cheadle, Sandra Bullock, Jennifer Esposito, Matt Dillon, etc. that really challenges racially-based attitudes and assumptions in a serious way. I like the tag line: You think you know who you are. You have no idea.

I think you can believe that The Blind Side is a nice movie that tells a good story and acknowledge that Ms. Williams has a point......a good one. I think it's also worth recognizing that, generally speaking, mainstream films are more responsible in the way they portray people who aren't white Christians than in the past, although that doesn't negate Ms. Williams' point. Stereotypes may be reinforced in more subtle ways than in the past, nonetheless; it's still going on.

Sam L
Mar 12th, 2010, 11:16 AM
See the problem is that there's a part in the film where one of Sandra Bullock's friends says to her, "Honey, you're changing this boy's life", and she says, "No he's changing mine". Really? How? Because she's the exact same character at the beginning of the film as she was at the end.

And that is the problem because the character has virtually no flaws. She's this perfect white Republican Christian housewife who rescues this black boy who becomes someone famous.

Now when your husband is as rich as he was/is and own Taco Bell franchises(?) and you live in a house that looks in a palace, driving a posh car and send your kids to a private school, I'm sure that you can be all that and some more.

There are people who do volunteer work to help many poor people not just in rich countries but in poor countries and their life stories don't get made into movies. Fact is, nothing remotely interesting actually happened to Leanne Tuohy other than that the child she adopted happened to become a football star.

Are we supposed to shower her with praise for doing this and especially because she "saved" a black kid?

There is something seriously wrong with the fact that: A. This was even seen as a film/story worth being made into a movie. B. The fact that it made that much at the box office.

Sam L
Mar 12th, 2010, 11:18 AM
See the problem is that there's a part in the film where one of Sandra Bullock's friends says to her, "Honey, you're changing this boy's life", and she says, "No he's changing mine". Really? How? Because she's the exact same character at the beginning of the film as she was at the end.

And that is the problem because the character has virtually no flaws. She's this perfect white Republican Christian housewife who rescues this black boy who becomes someone famous.

Now when your husband is as rich as he was/is and own Taco Bell franchises(?) and you live in a house that looks in a palace, driving a posh car and send your kids to a private school, I'm sure that you can be all that and some more.

There are people who do volunteer work to help many poor people not just in rich countries but in poor countries and their life stories don't get made into movies. Fact is, nothing remotely interesting actually happened to Leanne Tuohy other than that the child she adopted happened to become a football star.

Are we supposed to shower her with praise for doing this and especially because she "saved" a black kid?

There is something seriously wrong with the fact that: A. This was even seen as a film/story worth being made into a movie. B. The fact that it made that much at the box office.

Sam L
Mar 12th, 2010, 11:18 AM
See the problem is that there's a part in the film where one of Sandra Bullock's friends says to her, "Honey, you're changing this boy's life", and she says, "No he's changing mine". Really? How? Because she's the exact same character at the beginning of the film as she was at the end.

And that is the problem because the character has virtually no flaws. She's this perfect white Republican Christian housewife who rescues this black boy who becomes someone famous.

Now when your husband is as rich as he was/is and own Taco Bell franchises(?) and you live in a house that looks in a palace, driving a posh car and send your kids to a private school, I'm sure that you can be all that and some more.

There are people who do volunteer work to help many poor people not just in rich countries but in poor countries and their life stories don't get made into movies. Fact is, nothing remotely interesting actually happened to Leanne Tuohy other than that the child she adopted happened to become a football star.

Are we supposed to shower her with praise for doing this and especially because she "saved" a black kid?

There is something seriously wrong with the fact that: A. This was even seen as a film/story worth being made into a movie. B. The fact that it made that much at the box office.

Sam L
Mar 12th, 2010, 11:19 AM
See the problem is that there's a part in the film where one of Sandra Bullock's friends says to her, "Honey, you're changing this boy's life", and she says, "No he's changing mine". Really? How? Because she's the exact same character at the beginning of the film as she was at the end.

And that is the problem because the character has virtually no flaws. She's this perfect white Republican Christian housewife who rescues this black boy who becomes someone famous.

Now when your husband is as rich as he was/is and own Taco Bell franchises(?) and you live in a house that looks in a palace, driving a posh car and send your kids to a private school, I'm sure that you can be all that and some more.

There are people who do volunteer work to help many poor people not just in rich countries but in poor countries and their life stories don't get made into movies. Fact is, nothing remotely interesting actually happened to Leanne Tuohy other than that the child she adopted happened to become a football star.

Are we supposed to shower her with praise for doing this and especially because she "saved" a black kid?

There is something seriously wrong with the fact that: A. This was even seen as a film/story worth being made into a movie. B. The fact that it made that much at the box office.

Sam L
Mar 12th, 2010, 11:19 AM
See the problem is that there's a part in the film where one of Sandra Bullock's friends says to her, "Honey, you're changing this boy's life", and she says, "No he's changing mine". Really? How? Because she's the exact same character at the beginning of the film as she was at the end.

And that is the problem because the character has virtually no flaws. She's this perfect white Republican Christian housewife who rescues this black boy who becomes someone famous.

Now when your husband is as rich as he was/is and own Taco Bell franchises(?) and you live in a house that looks in a palace, driving a posh car and send your kids to a private school, I'm sure that you can be all that and some more.

There are people who do volunteer work to help many poor people not just in rich countries but in poor countries and their life stories don't get made into movies. Fact is, nothing remotely interesting actually happened to Leanne Tuohy other than that the child she adopted happened to become a football star.

Are we supposed to shower her with praise for doing this and especially because she "saved" a black kid?

There is something seriously wrong with the fact that: A. This was even seen as a film/story worth being made into a movie. B. The fact that it made that much at the box office.

Sam L
Mar 12th, 2010, 11:21 AM
See the problem is that there's a part in the film where one of Sandra Bullock's friends says to her, "Honey, you're changing this boy's life", and she says, "No he's changing mine". Really? How? Because she's the exact same character at the beginning of the film as she was at the end.

And that is the problem because the character has virtually no flaws. She's this perfect white Republican Christian housewife who rescues this black boy who becomes someone famous.

Now when your husband is as rich as he was/is and own Taco Bell franchises(?) and you live in a house that looks in a palace, driving a posh car and send your kids to a private school, I'm sure that you can be all that and some more.

There are people who do volunteer work to help many poor people not just in rich countries but in poor countries and their life stories don't get made into movies. Fact is, nothing remotely interesting actually happened to Leanne Tuohy other than that the child she adopted happened to become a football star.

Are we supposed to shower her with praise for doing this and especially because she "saved" a black kid?

There is something seriously wrong with the fact that: A. This was even seen as a film/story worth being made into a movie. B. The fact that it made that much at the box office.

The Witch-king
Mar 12th, 2010, 12:11 PM
Omg we get your point Sam L!!

darkchild
Mar 13th, 2010, 12:05 AM
:spit:

woosey
Mar 13th, 2010, 12:49 AM
See the problem is that there's a part in the film where one of Sandra Bullock's friends says to her, "Honey, you're changing this boy's life", and she says, "No he's changing mine". Really? How? Because she's the exact same character at the beginning of the film as she was at the end.

And that is the problem because the character has virtually no flaws. She's this perfect white Republican Christian housewife who rescues this black boy who becomes someone famous.

Now when your husband is as rich as he was/is and own Taco Bell franchises(?) and you live in a house that looks in a palace, driving a posh car and send your kids to a private school, I'm sure that you can be all that and some more.

There are people who do volunteer work to help many poor people not just in rich countries but in poor countries and their life stories don't get made into movies. Fact is, nothing remotely interesting actually happened to Leanne Tuohy other than that the child she adopted happened to become a football star.

Are we supposed to shower her with praise for doing this and especially because she "saved" a black kid?

There is something seriously wrong with the fact that: A. This was even seen as a film/story worth being made into a movie. B. The fact that it made that much at the box office.

See the problem is that there's a part in the film where one of Sandra Bullock's friends says to her, "Honey, you're changing this boy's life", and she says, "No he's changing mine". Really? How? Because she's the exact same character at the beginning of the film as she was at the end.

And that is the problem because the character has virtually no flaws. She's this perfect white Republican Christian housewife who rescues this black boy who becomes someone famous.

Now when your husband is as rich as he was/is and own Taco Bell franchises(?) and you live in a house that looks in a palace, driving a posh car and send your kids to a private school, I'm sure that you can be all that and some more.

There are people who do volunteer work to help many poor people not just in rich countries but in poor countries and their life stories don't get made into movies. Fact is, nothing remotely interesting actually happened to Leanne Tuohy other than that the child she adopted happened to become a football star.

Are we supposed to shower her with praise for doing this and especially because she "saved" a black kid?

There is something seriously wrong with the fact that: A. This was even seen as a film/story worth being made into a movie. B. The fact that it made that much at the box office.

See the problem is that there's a part in the film where one of Sandra Bullock's friends says to her, "Honey, you're changing this boy's life", and she says, "No he's changing mine". Really? How? Because she's the exact same character at the beginning of the film as she was at the end.

And that is the problem because the character has virtually no flaws. She's this perfect white Republican Christian housewife who rescues this black boy who becomes someone famous.

Now when your husband is as rich as he was/is and own Taco Bell franchises(?) and you live in a house that looks in a palace, driving a posh car and send your kids to a private school, I'm sure that you can be all that and some more.

There are people who do volunteer work to help many poor people not just in rich countries but in poor countries and their life stories don't get made into movies. Fact is, nothing remotely interesting actually happened to Leanne Tuohy other than that the child she adopted happened to become a football star.

Are we supposed to shower her with praise for doing this and especially because she "saved" a black kid?

There is something seriously wrong with the fact that: A. This was even seen as a film/story worth being made into a movie. B. The fact that it made that much at the box office.

See the problem is that there's a part in the film where one of Sandra Bullock's friends says to her, "Honey, you're changing this boy's life", and she says, "No he's changing mine". Really? How? Because she's the exact same character at the beginning of the film as she was at the end.

And that is the problem because the character has virtually no flaws. She's this perfect white Republican Christian housewife who rescues this black boy who becomes someone famous.

Now when your husband is as rich as he was/is and own Taco Bell franchises(?) and you live in a house that looks in a palace, driving a posh car and send your kids to a private school, I'm sure that you can be all that and some more.

There are people who do volunteer work to help many poor people not just in rich countries but in poor countries and their life stories don't get made into movies. Fact is, nothing remotely interesting actually happened to Leanne Tuohy other than that the child she adopted happened to become a football star.

Are we supposed to shower her with praise for doing this and especially because she "saved" a black kid?

There is something seriously wrong with the fact that: A. This was even seen as a film/story worth being made into a movie. B. The fact that it made that much at the box office.

See the problem is that there's a part in the film where one of Sandra Bullock's friends says to her, "Honey, you're changing this boy's life", and she says, "No he's changing mine". Really? How? Because she's the exact same character at the beginning of the film as she was at the end.

And that is the problem because the character has virtually no flaws. She's this perfect white Republican Christian housewife who rescues this black boy who becomes someone famous.

Now when your husband is as rich as he was/is and own Taco Bell franchises(?) and you live in a house that looks in a palace, driving a posh car and send your kids to a private school, I'm sure that you can be all that and some more.

There are people who do volunteer work to help many poor people not just in rich countries but in poor countries and their life stories don't get made into movies. Fact is, nothing remotely interesting actually happened to Leanne Tuohy other than that the child she adopted happened to become a football star.

Are we supposed to shower her with praise for doing this and especially because she "saved" a black kid?

There is something seriously wrong with the fact that: A. This was even seen as a film/story worth being made into a movie. B. The fact that it made that much at the box office.

See the problem is that there's a part in the film where one of Sandra Bullock's friends says to her, "Honey, you're changing this boy's life", and she says, "No he's changing mine". Really? How? Because she's the exact same character at the beginning of the film as she was at the end.

And that is the problem because the character has virtually no flaws. She's this perfect white Republican Christian housewife who rescues this black boy who becomes someone famous.

Now when your husband is as rich as he was/is and own Taco Bell franchises(?) and you live in a house that looks in a palace, driving a posh car and send your kids to a private school, I'm sure that you can be all that and some more.

There are people who do volunteer work to help many poor people not just in rich countries but in poor countries and their life stories don't get made into movies. Fact is, nothing remotely interesting actually happened to Leanne Tuohy other than that the child she adopted happened to become a football star.

Are we supposed to shower her with praise for doing this and especially because she "saved" a black kid?

There is something seriously wrong with the fact that: A. This was even seen as a film/story worth being made into a movie. B. The fact that it made that much at the box office.



it's the little things that amuse me.:haha:

i guess the system was moving too slow that day...:hug:

youizahoe
Mar 13th, 2010, 12:53 AM
I like the movie, it's sweet. Perhaps not oscar worthy, but which movies have been worth an oscar lately? I doubt any.

mykarma
Mar 13th, 2010, 01:30 AM
Well it's based on a true story I think, so... and isn't Vanessa Williams half white? why does she sound so bitter?:tape:
I don't think Vanessa sounds bitter at all and even though this is a true story I think she was talking about the stereotyping of blacks. BTW, both Vanessa's parents are black.

mykarma
Mar 13th, 2010, 01:40 AM
I don't see what all the fuss is about. Sure, movies often portray white people helping black people, but black people have also been portrayed helping white people for as long as Hollywood has made films.......like, Mammy and Prissy helping Scarlett O'Hara get dressed and stuff in Gone With the Wind.
:smash::smash::smash:









You are one sick puppy.

:haha: :haha: :haha:

mykarma
Mar 13th, 2010, 01:43 AM
WOW, those are 2 wayyyyyy different issues!!!
The black people like Mammy,Prissy, Big Sam, Pork, etc in GWTW weren't appreciated and barely seen as people! They were forced to be servants for the white people and laughed at (especially Prissy). Hollywood made a mockery of them in this movie and other movies where they used black face! They weren't portrayed as "helping" white people like the Mom genuinely helped the black guy in The Blind Side.
There is NO comparison here. Find a different example, :rolleyes:
Doni, you've been around Meyerl long enough to know that he was being sarcastic.

Crazy Canuck
Mar 13th, 2010, 02:11 AM
I don't think it's the fault of "The Blind Side" people who simply chose to make the movie they wanted to make. I think the people who should be blamed are the powers-that-be in Hollywood that refuse to accept scripts and stories where the main black characters are empowered into helping themselves, saying, "Oh, that's not commercial/mainstream enough."
A sensible post in a thread that is seriously lacking in them. Well put.

harloo
Mar 13th, 2010, 05:01 AM
I don't see what all the fuss is about. Sure, movies often portray white people helping black people, but black people have also been portrayed helping white people for as long as Hollywood has made films.......like, Mammy and Prissy helping Scarlett O'Hara get dressed and stuff in Gone With the Wind.

:haha:Have you been drinking again?:tape:

Nicolįs89
Mar 13th, 2010, 10:30 PM
Holywood is all about $$$, these types of tragic stories always bring some good money, if the tragedy is stereotyped they end swimming on it.

Calvin M.
Mar 16th, 2010, 01:02 AM
I don't think it's the fault of "The Blind Side" people who simply chose to make the movie they wanted to make. I think the people who should be blamed are the powers-that-be in Hollywood that refuse to accept scripts and stories where the main black characters are empowered into helping themselves, saying, "Oh, that's not commercial/mainstream enough."

I didn't get the impression that Vanessa Williams was criticizing the makers of "The Blind Side". Her issue is here is "this story again?" and Hollywood's insistence to tell it.

Renalicious
Mar 16th, 2010, 01:15 AM
Sandra responded perfectly. Well done Sandra.