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tennisbum79
Feb 28th, 2010, 07:09 AM
I have noticed that in this winter olympic, many the Italian athlete name are not typical of what is generally known as Italian name. At least in the US.

Many of the names sound rather germanic or scandinavian, ofen ending with "er", not "one", "lli", "cci", or "ni" as I am more famliar with.

But then again, I am no italian antropologist


For those who are familiar with Ittaly demography and geography, is there a part of Italy where those names prevalent?
Or is this is simply a randomness of isolated immigration from other parts of Europe?

I am jusr curious. This is the first olympic I noticed this.

gentenaire
Feb 28th, 2010, 07:21 AM
Italy has a small German speaking part: South Tirol. And that part happens to be in the Alps. So it's not a coincidence at all.

tennisbum79
Feb 28th, 2010, 07:24 AM
Italy has a small German speaking part: South Tirol. And that part happens to be in the Alps. So it's not a coincidence at all.
Ok, that explains it.

Thank you very much.

Diam's
Feb 28th, 2010, 07:25 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trentino-Alto_Adige/S%C3%BCdtirol

:wavey:

tennisbum79
Feb 28th, 2010, 07:31 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trentino-Alto_Adige/S%C3%BCdtirol

:wavey:
Merci beaucoup. Tres informatif.

I really appreciate this piece of information.
I have had this question on my mind the entire duration of the olympic.

Diam's
Feb 28th, 2010, 07:34 AM
De rien ;)

tennisbum79
Feb 28th, 2010, 07:36 AM
De rien ;)
Aurevoir et bonne nuit

miffedmax
Feb 28th, 2010, 02:39 PM
It's a bit like a lot of my French ancestors having names like Wagner and Mosler. Some of those border regions get swapped around a lot.

gentenaire
Feb 28th, 2010, 03:10 PM
It's a bit like a lot of my French ancestors having names like Wagner and Mosler. Some of those border regions get swapped around a lot.

It's like the opening song of the Musical Chess: Merano

"Fight now we're Italian - we used to be German, the border keeps shifting around"

Wiggly
Feb 28th, 2010, 03:26 PM
I know Nicolas Bean doesn't speak the language.:tape:

tennisbum79
Feb 28th, 2010, 04:13 PM
From what I read on link provided by Diam's, the region populated by the Italian german has limited autonomy and t is divided into 2 provinces:

Autonomous Province of Bolzano-Bozen, majority German (69% speak German), with a minorit speaking Ladin
Autonomous Province of Trento, majority ItalianFor each province, the Italian goverment recognizes a brand of autonomy.
It is like South-west of the US( Californina, New Mexico, Arizona) formerly part of the Mexico having an autonomy granted by Washington.

Which would never happen in the US, as it would be seen by many as a concession to Mexico , worse, an "attempt to destroy America" in some quarters.

From all indications from outside, this seems to work fine since I have never heard reports of any major friction between the Italo-Italians and Italo-Germans.
Can any one confirm this? And why?

By the way, who are the people who speak Ladin? Their origin and lineage

hellas719
Feb 28th, 2010, 04:15 PM
Ladin or Latin? :p

nevetssllim
Feb 28th, 2010, 04:20 PM
I have noticed that in this winter olympic, many the Italian athlete name are not typical of what is generally known as Italian name. At least in the US.

Many of the names sound rather germanic or scandinavian, ofen ending with "er", not "one", "lli", "cci", or "ni" as I am more famliar with.

But then again, I am no italian antropologist


For those who are familiar with Ittaly demography and geography, is there a part of Italy where those names prevalent?
Or is this is simply a randomness of isolated immigration from other parts of Europe?

I am jusr curious. This is the first olympic I noticed this.

It's not just Winter Olympians. Alex Schwazer, who won the 50km race-walk in Beijing, is from that region on the borders.

tennisbum79
Feb 28th, 2010, 04:21 PM
Ladin or Latin? :p
The link says Ladin.
It is not a typo
It is a language

Correction:

tennisbum79
Feb 28th, 2010, 04:25 PM
It's not just Winter Olympians. Alex Schwazer, who won the 50km race-walk in Beijing, is from that region on the borders.
Ok. Thanks
I only noticed during the Winter olympic, because the Bolzano-Bozen names are more prominent here.
At least to me anyway

tennisbum79
Feb 28th, 2010, 04:32 PM
I like this thread (not because I created it:)) but because I am learning somehting thanks to other posters.

It also highlights about about the Olympic: bring together people of different background, for one goal, represent their country.

I was also impressed how French and English Canadians came together amd made their country proud.

G&R
Feb 28th, 2010, 04:55 PM
I think Ladin is a language spoken only in some area of Switzerland and to be honest I've never heard of fights between "Italo-Italians and Italo-Germans" :)

tennisbum79
Feb 28th, 2010, 05:10 PM
I think Ladin is a language spoken only in some area of Switzerland and to be honest I've never heard of fights between "Italo-Italians and Italo-Germans" :)
The wikepedia link I read indicated that Ladin is spoken in both provinces by a minority of the population.

I assumed if you are from Italy and have never heard of it as being spoken there, the ladin population must really be infinitesimal.

Any other Italian posters can shed some light on this.

G&R
Feb 28th, 2010, 05:18 PM
OMG sorry I was confusing Ladin with Romansh language haha I apologize..they're related though
Ladin is a language spoken in Italy in some areas of Trentino Alto Adige and Veneto(two regions of Italy)
I apoligize once again :)

Apoleb
Feb 28th, 2010, 05:22 PM
The wikipedia article I once read mentioned that there have been border issues between Italy and Austria, which have been resolved in the 90s. There's also some tension between the Italian-speaking and German-speaking parts of Sud Tirol, with a significant part wanting a referendum on whether to gain more autonomy or to join Austria.

The Südtiroler Heimatbund asked the Soffi-Institute in Innsbruck to conduct an opinion poll (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opinion_poll) on the future of South Tyrol. The poll was conducted at the end of 2005 in which only German-speaking South Tyroleans were asked. 45.33% of those asked were in favour of remaining with Italy, 54.67% were against remaining. The latter group comprised 33.40% in favour of an independent state and 21.27% in favour of Tyrolean reunification with Austria.[17] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Province_of_Bolzano-Bozen#cite_note-16)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Province_of_Bolzano-Bozen

tennisbum79
Feb 28th, 2010, 06:47 PM
OMG sorry I was confusing Ladin with Romansh language haha I apologize..they're related though
Ladin is a language spoken in Italy in some areas of Trentino Alto Adige and Veneto(two regions of Italy)
I apoligize once again :)
No problem

Beat
Feb 28th, 2010, 08:01 PM
OMG sorry I was confusing Ladin with Romansh language haha I apologize..they're related though
Ladin is a language spoken in Italy in some areas of Trentino Alto Adige and Veneto(two regions of Italy)
I apoligize once again :)

no need to apologize, ladin is very similar to romansh. in fact, one of the 3 different idioms of romansh - the one that is being spoken in engadin (e.g. in st. moritz) - is called ladin as well.

*JR*
Mar 3rd, 2010, 08:09 PM
One in the WTA too. (Karin Knapp) ;)