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View Full Version : RIP Nodar Kumaritashvili - Luger died at Olympic games


Sander.
Feb 13th, 2010, 10:55 AM
The Olympic luger Nodar Kumaritashvili was killed in a horrific accident in an training for the Olympics yesterday. The 21 years old had been making his final practice slide in Whistler before today's competition. He lost control on on a bend as he came to the finish and flew over the rim of the track at more than 90mph/140km/h, crashing into a pillar. There had been concerns about the speed of the Whistler course, it's the fastest in the world.
Shortly before the Georgian's accident, reigning Olympic champion Armin Zoggeeler also crashed but escaped unhurt.

It's clear the course is very dangerous, in my opinion the lugers has to boycot the course.

It was shocking to see this happen.

RIP Nodar.

Milito22
Feb 13th, 2010, 12:04 PM
:sad: R.I.P.

Juanes
Feb 13th, 2010, 12:08 PM
pooor guy... :sad: :sad::sad::sad::sad::sad::sad::sad:

rest in peace!

young_gunner913
Feb 13th, 2010, 12:14 PM
Very tragic. :sad: RIP.

Effy
Feb 13th, 2010, 01:03 PM
RIP :sad:
so young :sad:

Elwin.
Feb 13th, 2010, 01:04 PM
rip :sad:
so tragic.

hellas719
Feb 13th, 2010, 01:21 PM
RIP :sad:

GeorgianFan
Feb 13th, 2010, 01:22 PM
RIP :sad:

ViennaCalling
Feb 13th, 2010, 01:23 PM
He was so young :sad:

RIP :sad:

CrossCourt~Rally
Feb 13th, 2010, 01:33 PM
RIP, such a sad and tragic happening :awww::hug:

McPie
Feb 13th, 2010, 01:35 PM
:sad:

Mynarco
Feb 13th, 2010, 01:39 PM
awwwwww he's just 21 :sobbing:

Sander.
Feb 13th, 2010, 02:41 PM
The Olympic course is adjusted. The wall in the curve is increased and the profile of the ice is slightly modified.

Saturday's race will start.

hellas719
Feb 13th, 2010, 03:43 PM
Now they fixed it? :rolleyes:

Sander.
Feb 13th, 2010, 03:46 PM
They say it's fixed when the races start today, hopefully we can trust on the IOC and hopefully everything will good today.

Juanes
Feb 13th, 2010, 04:26 PM
Now they fixed it? :rolleyes:

i have heard men will race in women´s one.... it is not allowed to compete in this one anymore.... ater such a tragedy i totally understand....

Endru.
Feb 13th, 2010, 04:28 PM
rip :sad:

HRHoliviasmith
Feb 13th, 2010, 04:41 PM
RIP. prayers and condolences to his family. very upsetting. he was so young.

SVK
Feb 13th, 2010, 04:43 PM
R.I.P.:awww:

hankqq
Feb 13th, 2010, 04:44 PM
such a tragedy :sad:
RIP

gentenaire
Feb 13th, 2010, 04:57 PM
i have heard men will race in women´s one.... it is not allowed to compete in this one anymore.... ater such a tragedy i totally understand....

It's the same course, the start line is just a little further down the track. The woman's course has two curves less. And yes, I did hear the men will also use the women's start line.

TheBoiledEgg
Feb 13th, 2010, 05:10 PM
i dont get all those steel pillars
should have been covered in soft foam.
are they normally there at every Luge track ?

didnt watch the OC either as there's nothing to celebrate.

RIP Nodar :sad:

Sander.
Feb 13th, 2010, 05:15 PM
It's the same course, the start line is just a little further down the track. The woman's course has two curves less. And yes, I did hear the men will also use the women's start line.

I think this is a right decision, but all racers still think: 'Yesterday someone died here'. That can be a reason for more accidents :shrug:
We mustn't forget it happened less then 24 hours ago.

Sander.
Feb 13th, 2010, 05:18 PM
i dont get all those steel pillars
should have been covered in soft foam.
are they normally there at every Luge track ?

didnt watch the OC either as there's nothing to celebrate.

RIP Nodar :sad:

I don't know, but for today's race they placed plexiglass to protect the racers from the pillars.

Justin SW
Feb 13th, 2010, 05:20 PM
RIP :sad:

:angel:

pepaw
Feb 13th, 2010, 05:24 PM
the video is so disturbing, i dont know why it being shown everywhere.

Kworb
Feb 13th, 2010, 05:36 PM
the video is so disturbing, i dont know why it being shown everywhere.

I know. :o It's like watching someone jump in front of a train or something.

RFSTB
Feb 13th, 2010, 05:52 PM
Most elite luge competitors are very skilled and experienced, almost all are in their mid to late 30's. This guy was a rookie, only 21, barely a couple of years of experience. You have to question the Georgian Olympic Committee's decision to send him to an elite competition in the first place, especially to a course that is known for being the fastest in the world.

adam_ads_n
Feb 13th, 2010, 06:55 PM
It's so sad...even though he was completely unknown in world's luge such things rarely happen.

Anyway - this shown that the Olympic Idea is outdated...in Olympics places where the sports are performed should be formed for both amateurs, and professionals. I mean for example - luge and bobsleigh courses should be slower with less "hard" curves, also for example downhill should be quite easy, not like in Wengen or Kitzbuehel in World Cup. If someone goes to Olympics just to perform won't get a good result in such course anyway.

What is also very strange for me is what I heard in news - the person who made a project for the luge course told he known "as much as any tv viewer" about luge and bobsleigh...

tennislover
Feb 13th, 2010, 07:00 PM
:sad:

R.I.P.

I'm shocked

RFSTB
Feb 13th, 2010, 07:20 PM
The Olympics is very much a made-for-TV event these days. Would the average TV viewer know the difference between a 90mph and a 80mph run? I don't think Olympic record or world record makes any sense in these sliding/skiing sports because every course is different. They should just slow it down to 80mph. From what I read the start of the course is too steep.

Canada is also not helping by restricting practice by foreign athletes on all their venues to give Canadian athletes home field advantage.

Break My Rapture
Feb 13th, 2010, 07:48 PM
So shocked, such a young athlete. :tears:

RIP, thoughts go out to his family and friends.

Sander.
Feb 13th, 2010, 08:00 PM
Most elite luge competitors are very skilled and experienced, almost all are in their mid to late 30's. This guy was a rookie, only 21, barely a couple of years of experience. You have to question the Georgian Olympic Committee's decision to send him to an elite competition in the first place, especially to a course that is known for being the fastest in the world.

I understand why you think like this way, but it's unfair to give the reason for his dead because he's too young. That's not an excuse for the bad course, Nodar was very talented and maybe a potential medal winner at the Olympics.

RFSTB
Feb 13th, 2010, 08:27 PM
I understand why you think like this way, but it's unfair to give the reason for his dead because he's too young. That's not an excuse for the bad course, Nodar was very talented and maybe a potential medal winner at the Olympics.

Unfortunately talent doesn't always trump experience, especially in a dangerous sport.

ArturoAce.
Feb 13th, 2010, 11:08 PM
RIP :sad:

PatrickRyan
Feb 13th, 2010, 11:11 PM
Such a sad and tragic loss :sad: R.I.P.

nevetssllim
Feb 13th, 2010, 11:33 PM
What devastating news. RIP :sad:

GeorgianFan
Feb 13th, 2010, 11:42 PM
http://img.skysports.com/10/02/800x600/96631325_2419227.jpg

vadin124
Feb 14th, 2010, 12:23 AM
This is just awful.

Just happened to switch on to the Winter Olympics tonight, and found out about this.

So sad to hear of this happening to such a young prospect. :sad:


R.i.P. Nodar, and deepest condolences to your friends and family, and the Georgian Olympic team.

The greatest respect has to be paid to ALL people who take part in this sport. Football, Rugby and Cricket get so much exposure in this country, and you constantly hear of athletes moaning and whining about broken thumbs and sprained muscles. It's time these sports are recognised for the skill it takes to succeed in them. It's also a testament to their training and hard work that these kind of accidents don't happen more frequently.

miss_molik
Feb 14th, 2010, 03:43 AM
This is awful :sad: R.I.P

flyingmachine
Feb 14th, 2010, 09:55 AM
RIP :sad:

griffin
Feb 14th, 2010, 03:19 PM
RIP

How devastating to his family and his teammates :(


Most elite luge competitors are very skilled and experienced, almost all are in their mid to late 30's. This guy was a rookie, only 21, barely a couple of years of experience. You have to question the Georgian Olympic Committee's decision to send him to an elite competition in the first place, especially to a course that is known for being the fastest in the world.

Two points - first, Kumaritashvili was relatively young, however he was no rank amateur. He had experience at the international level, and was a serious competitor. Second, even some of the medal contenders have crashed on this course. It hardly seems fair to write off this tragedy as simply the result of Kumaritashvili being sent down the run before he was ready.

Mary Cherry.
Feb 14th, 2010, 10:37 PM
the video is so disturbing, i dont know why it being shown everywhere.

Curiousity got the better of me, ended up watching it yesterday.

Ouch.

Vanity Bonfire
Feb 15th, 2010, 08:47 AM
R.I.P. to this poor man. What a tragic incident to die so young.

I think the Olympic organisers should apologise though - even though his death was mostly human error. This is a controversial and dangerous course which they have set, and forbidding athletes from other countries to practise on it just to boost their medal hopes is disgraceful.

Williamsser
Feb 15th, 2010, 07:01 PM
R I P

Super Dave
Feb 15th, 2010, 07:36 PM
Curiousity got the better of me, ended up watching it yesterday.

Same here. Deeply disturbed by this accident. RIP.

Dodoboy.
Feb 15th, 2010, 07:50 PM
Tragic death!

tenn_ace
Feb 15th, 2010, 08:55 PM
MARTIN SAMUEL: Canada's lust for glory is to blame for this senseless tragedy



Last updated at 7:44 AM on 15th February 2010
Canada wanted to Own The Podium at the Vancouver Winter Olympic Games. This morning they can put their maple leaf stamp on something more instantly tangible: the nondescript little box carrying the lifeless body of Nodar Kumaritashvili back to his home in Bakuriani, Georgia.
Made in Canada, it should say. Made by the perversion of the Olympic movement for national gain; made by a culture of worthless aggrandisement and pride.

Kumaritashvili, a 21-year-old luge slider of limited experience, died because he was making only his 26th practice run on a dauntingly fast track that, it transpired, was technically defective.
Almost half of these runs had been from the women’s, novice or junior starting positions because Kumaritashvili wasn’t that good. His Canadian rivals, by contrast, have practised upwards of 300 times on the course on Blackcomb Mountain. That is what Owning The Podium is about. Cheating.

Canada have yet to win a gold medal as the host nation at an Olympic Games and have spent £74million ensuring that changes. As a result, Canadian athletes have been given access to the luge, skeleton and ski runs at Whistler and the speed skating track at Richmond that has been denied to their rivals. For the best, it merely puts them at a competitive disadvantage; for the less talented it is potentially fatal.



Kumaritashvili was no threat to anybody. He was ranked 44 in the world and had competed in just five World Cup events. On Friday, making his sixth practice run, he came late into curve 16, shot up to the roof, where he would have experienced immense G forces causing him to lose control of the sled. He hit the wall, catapulted to the top and struck an unguarded metal support pole at 89mph. He was pronounced dead in hospital.
The organisers say the design and safety of the course was not to blame, but this is not true, either. There is now a makeshift fence at the top of curve 16 and the poles are padded. Any curve that allows a slider to exit the course is by definition flawed. The men’s luge will now begin from the women’s starting position to reduce speeds in the lower bends. If this is not an admission that the course had been poorly conceived,
what is?
Yet danger is part of the thrill and it is hard to get the balance right. The sport of three-day eventing was cursed with a series of fatalities 10 years ago and at the Sydney Olympics in 2000 the organisers made safety a priority with the result that many complained the course was too tame. Sliding sports are extreme and until Kumaritashvili died, all were very excited that Vancouver was promising the fastest track in the history of the Games.
http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2010/02/14/article-0-0849296A000005DC-400_235x349.jpg Death on the ice: Nodar's mother Dodo mourns

In this context, though, to limit the time athletes had to prepare on it was courting tragedy. Owning the podium should not mean placing competitors in jeopardy, particularly in a sport in which fatalities have occurred, albeit infrequently.
Hosting major sports events used to be about just that: reaching out to the world. There was a generosity of spirit, a desire to welcome all. Now the process is so costly, so corrupted by commerce, that it has mutated into month-long exercises in flag-waving self promotion. Look at us, look how strong we are, look how fast we are, look how powerful. We will crush you with our sporting prowess.

We knew what to expect from totalitarian China, but when Canada is so blinded by ambition that lives are risked in pursuit of glory, it is time to stop and take stock.
If Canada own the podium on Blackcomb Mountain, what will it mean against the grim final journey of Nodar Kumaritashvili? To have collateral damage in war is unacceptable; in sport, it is an abomination.