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InsideOut.
Jan 6th, 2010, 04:35 PM
I went to the HK exhibition on Day 1 and will be there for Day 2 as well. Unfortunately I didn’t take photos so I apologize for that. If you have any questions feel free to ask.

Before the Matches

I watched a few training sessions on the outside courts before entering the stadium. Wozniacki was hitting with Dulko, and they played a practice set. I didn’t see all of it, but what I saw was that Wozniacki was actually taking initiative, moving Dulko around the court, and finishing the point off at the net. From the little I saw I must say she doesn’t play like a pusher – at least in practice. Dulko’s forehand was fairly solid but she couldn’t do much once forced on the defence.

Azarenka was hitting with Edberg, and I was impressed – by Edberg. Azarenka had trouble just keeping the ball inside the lines and Edberg pretty much just absorbed all her pace and directed it back at her. Azarenka had a huge lot of trouble handling his backhand slice. But one thing she’ll never have trouble with is finding the energy in her vocal cords to belch out that horrible mooing grunt of hers – it was audible even inside the stadium, so you can imagine how annoying it was to stand next to her court, trying to watch players practice while a human banshee screamed her lungs out.

Sharapova was warming up with her hitting partner (forgot his name, sorry) and was hitting conventional volleys as I watched. As she was practicing on the court right next to Azarenka’s, for the sake of my poor ears, I could not stand there and watch for too long. But while her volleys looked solid they were far from convincing, which became evident later in the match.

Match 1: Vera Zvonareva def. Ayumi Morita 6-2 6-2

This match stood in stark contrast to the Sharapova-Zheng match later on both in terms of its competitiveness and the atmosphere within stadium court. With no Sharapova in the matchup, with no Venus in the contest, the crowd tried to rally behind Morita but soon realized that it just wasn’t worth it. The crowd didn’t care who won, and even occasional good shots didn’t elicit much applause from the quiet audience.

The match began with a beautiful inside-out backhand return winner from Zvonareva, and after one game it was clear that a demolition was about to unfold. Zvonareva didn’t have to do anything too special, and points usually ended with a Morita error. Zvonareva basically just had to stay in the rally, move her opponent around, and the error would come flying off Morita’s racquet. Whatever Morita did, Zvonareva was just that much better at doing it. She moved better, hit harder, had better tactics, was more consistent, served better, returned better.

One thing I must comment on is Morita’s return. Disregarding her near inability to return a first serve, her second serve return is truly cause for concern. There were only two possible scenarios for her second serve return: either she would hit it back short in the middle of the court waiting to be thwacked away, or she would hit it deep but straight at where Zvonareva was waiting and right into her hitting zone. Either way the results were the same, and the only way Morita got points on Zvonareva’s serve were when Zvonareva made a sloppy error.

Morita’s best moment in the match definitely came in the second to lost game, when she went up 40-0 on her own serve before being pushed back to deuce. She played some excellent points to hold her own serve, saving three match points along the way. One such point was a delightful half-volley winner at the first deuce, and a series of two-fisted groundstroke winners to save match points. No matter how she fought, however, there was never going to be any comeback. That much was obvious in the entire 2nd set, and sure enough Zvonareva closed it out comfortably.

Match 2: Maria Sharapova def. Zheng Jie

Unlike the first match, this match actually got the crowd going. On one side you had the world-famous glamour girl and longtime darling of the Hong Kong crowd in Sharapova, and on the other side you had Zheng, former Wimbledon semifinalist and importantly, an extremely successful Chinese player. The crowd was pretty much torn between the two, and I conclude that the general sentiment towards the players was much love and adoration for Zheng and sheer admiration for Sharapova. As the match went on, the crowd started rooting more and more for Zheng even as the match slipped from her grasp.

The first set was a fairly dramatic roller-coaster. In the very first game Sharapova went up 40-0 on Zheng’s serve but immediately lost five points in a row. However, some excellent returning coupled with Zheng’s weak, ineffectual serving, allowed Sharapova to break to lead 2-1 in Zheng’s next service game. But Sharapova’s serve was clicking and her early service games in the first set were all reasonably comfortable. Once the rally started, though, Zheng was aggressively dictating play, taking the ball on early and moving Sharapova around the court. Because of her resilience and aggression, Zheng deservedly fought back from 2-4 down to level at 4-4, before Sharapova broke again to serve for the set at 5-4. Perhaps affected by nerves, Sharapova allowed Zheng to once again take the initiative and Zheng broke right back and then held for 6-5. Tense moments ensued in the 12th game when Sharapova let a 30-0 lead close to 30-30, but strong serving bailed her out and she forced a tiebreak. Zheng played the first few points extremely aggressively and got the first mini-break to lead 4-1. Sharapova then exploited her opponent’s sudden tentativeness and pathetic serving to reel off four points of her own to forge ahead at 5-4 with a mini-break in hand. But Zheng, unwilling to give up, forced Sharapova into errors to take the first set tiebreak 7-5 after over an hour.

In comparison to the first set, the quality of tennis in the second set was considerably lower. Sharapova’s groundstrokes were losing their range and flew long, wide and into the net. Zheng took advantage, breaking at 2-2 and then consolidating for a 4-2 lead. From that point onwards Sharapova fought hard, and untimely mistakes for Zheng at *4-3 30-15 as well as at 4-4* 30-15 (Sharapova serving) cost her dearly. As Zheng started retreating into her shell and playing passively, Sharapova upped her level and claimed the second set 6-4 on a netted Zheng backhand.

The third set was all Sharapova – Zheng won points when Sharapova made errors, and lost them when Sharapova hit winners. From what I saw Zheng only hit one winner in the third set, in the very last game. Sharapova was dictating the play, moving Zheng around the court from left to right and back again. After 2 and a half hours of play Sharapova claimed victory off yet another error from Zheng.

In terms of her overall game, I can safely assure all Maria fans that she was serving suitably well – she had 10 aces and only a few double faults, and was generally serving around 100-110 mph for her first serves. Zheng, despite being extremely proficient at returning big serves, only managed to make Sharapova’s first serve look bad once or twice, and the rest of the time Sharapova’s serve won her quick points. However, her net game was pretty poor – while her drive volleys remain reliable as always, her conventional volleys left much to be desired. The few times she ventured to the net off a slice approach or a rolled forehand, she got passed easily or hit the volley into the net (either that, or it bounced off her racquet and landed right in front of her). The only instance I remember her winning a point off a conventional volley was when she reached out, arms flailing, at the passing ball and somehow got it back into play with her superior reach, and Zheng missed the easy passing shot. For Zheng, however, it would be prudent for her to return to the practice courts and work on her serve, which was simply so useless that she would be relieved that she just managed to spin it in. In the end, Maria’s power and fight won her the match.

InsideOut.
Jan 6th, 2010, 04:36 PM
I think I'll leave the mixed doubles match for tomorrow; I'm really tired right now. :)

ElusiveChanteuse
Jan 6th, 2010, 04:37 PM
No pics. Booooo.:ras:

:lol: Just kidding. Thanks.:yeah:

Mrs. Dimitrova
Jan 6th, 2010, 04:37 PM
Thanks for the reports. :yeah:

10 aces for Maria? That's nice to hear. :eek:

I could've done the same for Hua Hin, Thailand. :ras:

VishaalMaria
Jan 6th, 2010, 04:38 PM
Is Maria intending to play Sydney?

Ksenia.
Jan 6th, 2010, 04:49 PM
Thank you :) I don't think Jie reached Wimby final? :scratch:

Kim's_fan_4ever
Jan 6th, 2010, 04:51 PM
Thank you :) I don't think Jie reached Wimby final? :scratch:

Yeah, she lost to Serena in the semis, I believe :)

InsideOut.
Jan 6th, 2010, 04:53 PM
Oops. Edited ;)

Mrs. Dimitrova
Jan 6th, 2010, 05:12 PM
Is Maria intending to play Sydney?

No, I don't think so.

Noctis
Jan 6th, 2010, 05:19 PM
Nice try Jie! But try beating big names in 2sets and focus your concerntration :lol:

Congrats Masha

dulkogii
Jan 6th, 2010, 05:26 PM
Fanstastic work honey!

Ellery
Jan 6th, 2010, 05:38 PM
The sad thing about Jie's crappy serve is, she hired a coach during the off-season just to train her serving, and she is supposed to have worked quite hard on it :scared:

DontGetItTwisted
Jan 6th, 2010, 05:54 PM
Excellent writing, kudos dude!

mauresmofan
Jan 6th, 2010, 06:00 PM
Interesting read and thanks for the honest report!

Morisicki
Jan 6th, 2010, 06:16 PM
Geez Ayumi :rolleyes: you are making me lose all hope on you and fast. I still :hearts: you but gosh darnit if your not in the top 50 by the French, i swear ima swtich players bcuz i just can't go on being :mad: about your results :help:

Maria Croft
Jan 6th, 2010, 06:24 PM
Thanks for the report :)

pattty
Jan 6th, 2010, 06:37 PM
Thanks, have fun 2morrow too!

Shvedbarilescu
Jan 6th, 2010, 08:40 PM
Wonderful post, especially the part about Azarenka hitting with Edberg. Brilliantly written, InsideOut. :yeah:

Corswandt
Jan 6th, 2010, 09:51 PM
Match 2: Maria Sharapova def. Zheng Jie

[...]

However, her [Sharapova's] net game was pretty poor – while her drive volleys remain reliable as always, her conventional volleys left much to be desired. The few times she ventured to the net off a slice approach or a rolled forehand, she got passed easily or hit the volley into the net (either that, or it bounced off her racquet and landed right in front of her). The only instance I remember her winning a point off a conventional volley was when she reached out, arms flailing, at the passing ball and somehow got it back into play with her superior reach, and Zheng missed the easy passing shot.

[...]



Sharapova tends to "experiment" in Hong Kong. She won't be going forward to "volley" as much in competitive matches.

Thanks a million for these reports.

Morisicki
Jan 6th, 2010, 09:56 PM
Match 1: Vera Zvonareva def. Ayumi Morita 6-2 6-2

This match stood in stark contrast to the Sharapova-Zheng match later on both in terms of its competitiveness and the atmosphere within stadium court. With no Sharapova in the matchup, with no Venus in the contest, the crowd tried to rally behind Morita but soon realized that it just wasn’t worth it. The crowd didn’t care who won, and even occasional good shots didn’t elicit much applause from the quiet audience.

The match began with a beautiful inside-out backhand return winner from Zvonareva, and after one game it was clear that a demolition was about to unfold. Zvonareva didn’t have to do anything too special, and points usually ended with a Morita error. Zvonareva basically just had to stay in the rally, move her opponent around, and the error would come flying off Morita’s racquet. Whatever Morita did, Zvonareva was just that much better at doing it. She moved better, hit harder, had better tactics, was more consistent, served better, returned better.

One thing I must comment on is Morita’s return. Disregarding her near inability to return a first serve, her second serve return is truly cause for concern. There were only two possible scenarios for her second serve return: either she would hit it back short in the middle of the court waiting to be thwacked away, or she would hit it deep but straight at where Zvonareva was waiting and right into her hitting zone. Either way the results were the same, and the only way Morita got points on Zvonareva’s serve were when Zvonareva made a sloppy error.

Morita’s best moment in the match definitely came in the second to lost game, when she went up 40-0 on her own serve before being pushed back to deuce. She played some excellent points to hold her own serve, saving three match points along the way. One such point was a delightful half-volley winner at the first deuce, and a series of two-fisted groundstroke winners to save match points. No matter how she fought, however, there was never going to be any comeback. That much was obvious in the entire 2nd set, and sure enough Zvonareva closed it out comfortably.

Did you see any signs of greatness from Ayumi? and thanks for the post...even though i hated reading what i read

Mynarco
Jan 6th, 2010, 10:02 PM
OMG, it seems picking Ayumi is NOT a good idea...

Morisicki
Jan 6th, 2010, 11:06 PM
OMG, it seems picking Ayumi is NOT a good idea...

but she is a sweetheard :kiss: and i think she will improve...remember she is just a teenager and i can always switch

GracefulVenus
Jan 6th, 2010, 11:22 PM
Nice read!

InsideOut.
Jan 6th, 2010, 11:36 PM
Did you see any signs of greatness from Ayumi? and thanks for the post...even though i hated reading what i read

Actually, yes. It's just that Zvonareva does so much better than her in just about every department that made her look pretty back. I personally think Morita needs to start looking for a few more creative angles and setting the points up instead of just going for the lines on each shot, and in fact her net game was really pretty solid, as I saw later in the doubles match. The trouble for her is that she simply can't expect to play a perfect down-the-line winner on every point against someone who defends as well as Zvonareva does. She needs to work the points more instead of going for broke.

Mynarco
Jan 6th, 2010, 11:39 PM
Insideout. , did you queue up for autographs?

InsideOut.
Jan 6th, 2010, 11:42 PM
No :lol: It was cold and I forgot to bring anything to be autographed. :tape:

Morisicki
Jan 6th, 2010, 11:42 PM
Actually, yes. It's just that Zvonareva does so much better than her in just about every department that made her look pretty back. I personally think Morita needs to start looking for a few more creative angles and setting the points up instead of just going for the lines on each shot, and in fact her net game was really pretty solid, as I saw later in the doubles match. The trouble for her is that she simply can't expect to play a perfect down-the-line winner on every point against someone who defends as well as Zvonareva does. She needs to work the points more instead of going for broke.

okay thanks...it sounds like she just needs some experience

Mynarco
Jan 6th, 2010, 11:42 PM
No :lol: It was cold and I forgot to bring anything to be autographed. :tape:

how cold is it in HK right now?
last year I paid 120 for that giant tennis ball :p

Bahia
Jan 7th, 2010, 12:03 AM
Edberg even so far removed can handle the genericness of Azarenka. Loving that.

Craig.
Jan 7th, 2010, 01:17 AM
Thanks so much for the report! :yeah:

How were Maria's groundstrokes and movement? I'm guessing something other than her poor net play must've been wrong if she served well and yet had to go to 3 sets with Zheng.

InsideOut.
Jan 7th, 2010, 01:31 AM
Thanks so much for the report! :yeah:

How were Maria's groundstrokes and movement? I'm guessing something other than her poor net play must've been wrong if she served well and yet had to go to 3 sets with Zheng.

Movement was pretty OK. She transitioned to the net for drive volleys very well; I mean she'd never be a fantastic defender but she did get quite a lot of balls back. :) Quite solid in the movement department.

Groundstrokes began really on song, moving Zheng from side to side, but then she lost some bite on them in the latter half of the first set and really let Zheng dictate. Missed quite a fair few of those early in the second set, but she was in complete control in the third, hitting winners or forcing errors left and right. :) So I would say she was fairly inconsistent, but I give Zheng a lot of credit for rushing her in the first two sets.

Craig.
Jan 7th, 2010, 01:35 AM
Movement was pretty OK. She transitioned to the net for drive volleys very well; I mean she'd never be a fantastic defender but she did get quite a lot of balls back. :) Quite solid in the movement department.

Groundstrokes began really on song, moving Zheng from side to side, but then she lost some bite on them in the latter half of the first set and really let Zheng dictate. Missed quite a fair few of those early in the second set, but she was in complete control in the third, hitting winners or forcing errors left and right. :) So I would say she was fairly inconsistent, but I give Zheng a lot of credit for rushing her in the first two sets.

Thanks so much once again!

Pasta-Na
Jan 7th, 2010, 01:37 AM
Nice try Jie! But try beating big names in 2sets and focus your concerntration :lol:

Congrats Masha

she did the same against safina too... led 5-2 in the final set, then went back into her shell. :p

jie said its just expo, lose or wins not important. she just wanted to find the feel to be on the court and tried her new serve. :p

PerfectForm
Jan 7th, 2010, 02:08 AM
Thanks for the great report! I wished I was there :)

InsideOut.
Jan 7th, 2010, 02:35 AM
Match 4: Sharapova/Kafelnikov def. Morita/Srichaphan 6-4 7-5
Despite starting at 11 pm and finishing past midnight, the mixed doubles match was surprisingly well-attended. With Sharapova’s star power and the way Kafelnikov endeared himself to the crowd in the men’s singles (yes he did!), the impulse for much of the crowd to root for the so-called ‘Asia-Pacific’ team was nullified. The match turned out to be a lot of fun for both the players and the spectators, with a lot of entertaining shots and rallies.

The first few games were all pretty tight, with the first two games both going to the deciding point and Asia-Pacific forging a 2-0 lead early on. Sharapova showed some really quick reactions at the net in the first game but the standout player for the first few games was – hold your breath – Ayumi Morita. She was sharp at the net and didn’t hesitate to cross, and time and again she hit a decisive volley winner off a solid return.

Unfortunately for Asia-Pacific, Morita decided that she wanted to continue to be the standout player in a very different way. Error after error coupled with puffball serving and she handed the break right back to Russia. Thereafter both teams held serve, with a few net exchanges here or there ending with Sharapova getting passed after a weak pushed volley, Morita sending a smash into the back fence, or Srichaphan and Kafelnikov missing low volleys. Granted, most of these errors were after nice long rallies, the players laughed about them, and so did the crowd.

Before I go on I would like to comment on how Sharapova returned Srichaphan’s serve better than she returned Morita’s serve – Morita actually aced her and got many easy points when she served to Sharapova. Srichaphan’s serve, however, got massacred by huge, dipping Sharapova returns that were really quite outstanding. Meanwhile, Sharapova was perhaps surprisingly winning her service games more comfortably than Kafelnikov with his, due mainly to Kafelnikov’s willingness to just hit the first volley after the serve.

There was a situation at 3-4 in the first with Sharapova serving that I didn’t really understand – it was a deciding point, so if Asia-Pacific had broken they would have served for the first set. Srichaphan had indicated that he wanted to receive, from the ad court side, but for some strange reason, Sharapova signaled that she wanted to serve from the deuce court side with Morita serving and the umpire didn’t intervene. I had to assume that Asia-Pacific had a change of mind, but why that would be is beyond me. Inevitably, Russia won the point with ease and it was fistpump action all the way form Team Russia. A few sloppy errors from Morita and Srichaphan in the next game and Russia broke. Kafelnikov served out the set without too much trouble, ending with a stunning half-volley.

The second set began with a break for Russia as Srichaphan started to unravel on serve, dumping volleys into the net every other point. Kafelnikov’s groundstrokes – especially that breathtaking backhand – were starting to fire again, but just when everyone thought Russia had it in the bag, the Russians handed back the favour with errors of their own. From then on they remained firmly on serve and to the delight of the crowd, the net exchanges became more and more frequent. All four players showed good reflexes but more often than not the point ended with Kafelnikov missing his volley, the crowd laughing, and Kafelnikov poking fun at himself.

But if there was one thing that both Russians were evidently superior in over their opponents, it was the ability to do well when it really mattered. They pounced all over the Srichaphan serve at 4-4 and broke easily, but at match point down on the Kafelnikov serve, Morita suddenly came up with the goods with a stunning passing shot and helped their team level at 5-5. Unluckily for Asia-Pacific, with Morita now serving, they could get next to no advantage on the delivery, and missed volleys and smashes from both Asian players didn’t help things. With a ‘come on’ from Sharapova they once again lost their serve, and Sharapova held her nerve on the deciding point on her serve to close it out. Kafelnikov punched the putaway volley into the open court, ending what had been a very light-hearted and closely fought affair.

Eduardo Oliveira
Jan 7th, 2010, 02:45 AM
Thank you :worship:

Lefty.
Jan 7th, 2010, 03:01 AM
Thanks so much for the incredible report. :D :yeah:

About the serving/receiving conflict thing in the mixed you were talking about, I thought normally what happens in mixed is that the girl serves to the girl and the guy serves to the guy which is why that happened in the match? But I might be totally wrong on this. :lol:

Morisicki
Jan 7th, 2010, 04:27 AM
o gosh ayumi not a very good day :help:

Maria Croft
Jan 7th, 2010, 07:26 AM
Thanks once again, for the report :yeah:

Mahon_Lorcan
Jan 7th, 2010, 08:21 AM
Gisela and Victoria are playing now, unfortunately live score is .... all the time is 1:0 (40:40) for Victoria.. Maybe someone has other, better live score?

pav
Jan 7th, 2010, 08:31 AM
Thanks for the reports, reading about the terrible noise pollution from Vika and not a word about Masha's decibel donations has she gone mute?

Nina.
Jan 7th, 2010, 08:44 AM
thank you very much for your reports :yeah:

domon17th
Jan 7th, 2010, 09:01 AM
Very good report, detailed and coherent, very good read! Excellent job, it's as though we're at the matches ourselves!

Hugh.
Jan 7th, 2010, 09:22 AM
About the serving/receiving conflict thing in the mixed you were talking about, I thought normally what happens in mixed is that the girl serves to the girl and the guy serves to the guy which is why that happened in the match? But I might be totally wrong on this. :lol:

Just think...in a game in a doubles match, the server has to serve to both players on the opposing team and obviously alternate serving between the ad court and deuce court. So of course the guys wil be serving to the girls :lol:

Koon
Jan 7th, 2010, 09:37 AM
Hi. Thanks for the reports so much :kiss: :hug:
I just wanna ask some ques: Did Vera move well ? :shrug: Is she ok with her ankle ? Did she move a lot ? :shrug: Thanks :hug:

Cloon76
Jan 7th, 2010, 10:01 AM
Cheers for the report :)

denny5576
Jan 7th, 2010, 10:03 AM
Thank you very much!

The Witch-king
Jan 7th, 2010, 11:13 AM
I love these type of threads

InsideOut.
Jan 8th, 2010, 01:20 PM
The Rain Delay
Bad timing and procrastination on my part made me late for Day 2. Furious with myself, I found the practice courts empty and hurried straight into stadium court, where Azarenka vs. Dulko had just started. Unfortunately, the moment I walked in, the heavens opened and rain poured down in torrents. The players stopped play immediately and I tried to make myself comfortable, with little success, in a stone-cold seat while being soaked in the rain. Ultimately I decided to go and get a coffee and something to eat. When I came back, the rain had diminished somewhat and the ball boys were drying up the court. The optimism was short-lived, however, when the rain started coming down even more heavily than before. I ended up walking around the tented village for over an hour before play finally resumed at 8 pm. The rain delay disrupted the entire day and greatly dampened – literally and figuratively – an otherwise delightful experience.

Match 1: Victoria Azarenka def. Gisela Dulko 6-1
When I arrived at *1-0 40-30 with Azarenka serving, both players were playing reasonably well. Dulko was striking the ball cleanly and staying in every rally with Azarenka, hitting two beautiful backhand down-the-line winners in three points. Azarenka’s shots, though lacking in beauty, were certainly consistent and effective and she moved Dulko around until she found the opening for a winner. I thought we would have a great match on our hands before the rain came in and ruined everything.

Azarenka was quickly out of the blocks when the rain stopped and play resumed. Unflappable, she continued to hit consistently from side to side, while Dulko now looked completely out of sorts. Errors flowed from her racquet and her serve had seemingly disappeared. Though Azarenka, too, made a few errors, they were few and far between. Though both players tried to do quite the same things on court, Azarenka was simply able to do them more frequently than the error-prone Dulko, and the scoreline reflected them very accurately.

Match 2: Venus Williams def. Caroline Wozniacki 6-4
This being a match between two top 5 players, I certainly expected a higher standard of tennis. Indeed it was a very strange match with both players making errors at inopportune times. I would analyze it by dividing into two halves – the half when Wozniacki was winning and the other when Venus came back – and the gameplan executed respectively by the two players truly decided what went on during these spells.

Wozniacki began by playing at her vintage pushing best, getting balls back with little pace on them and many of them landing quite short. One cannot help but be impressed by how she manages to make this gameplan so successful time and again. Sure enough, Venus made a load of errors off both wings and Wozniacki promptly broke for 3-1. But from that point onward, things changed.

Wozniacki decided to be slightly more aggressive – big surprise – and for a few points it really looked like good, solid, baseline tennis. She was moving the ball comfortably from side to side, occasionally going for a short angle, and finishing off with a wrong-footing winner Perhaps being accustomed to being defensive, however, her consistency deserted her and she started making unnecessary and certainly uncharacteristic errors. Venus, meanwhile, had managed to lift her game and when she was on the attack, she showed exactly why she had taken home five Wimbledon trophies. Her shots were finally landing inside the lines instead of outside them, and she transitioned to the net with relative ease. With the two reversing roles, Venus reeled off four games in a row to lead 5-3.

A game away from defeat, Wozniacki suddenly stopped missing and, after salvaging her own service game, found herself with a 0-30 opening as Venus served for the match, after Venus double-faulted to start and Wozniacki’s measured aggression earned her the next point. At 0-30 down, however, Venus complained that the court was slippery, that it was beginning to rain again and asked for play to be suspended. The crowd, having already been forced to wait pointlessly for 4 hours, shouted in disapproval and dismay. As it was very clearly not raining, play resumed in about 5 minutes, and Venus served her way out of trouble, saving a break point before clinching the match on her 2nd match point.

Neither player played particularly well but all credit to Venus for reining in her game and for some spectacular serving and shot-making. I was also greatly impressed by how well Wozniacki’s game worked for the most part – you really have to see it to believe it. As far as rallies and variety were concerned it was nothing compared to the simply gorgeous Edberg-Chang match later on – I could report on that too, if you I am requested – but it was passable for the first match of the season for both players.

peanuts
Jan 8th, 2010, 03:37 PM
Thanks for the reports. Fun read. :D

GracefulVenus
Jan 8th, 2010, 09:47 PM
Thanks

Uranium
Jan 8th, 2010, 11:32 PM
Thanks. And Venus is #6 right now:ignore:

Uranium
Jan 11th, 2010, 03:47 AM
No more reports:(:p

InsideOut.
Jan 11th, 2010, 04:33 AM
I only went for 2 days :sad:

Bahia
Jan 11th, 2010, 04:47 AM
Thanks for what you could offer.