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Jeff
Jan 3rd, 2010, 03:21 AM
Post 2010 articles and news for Serena here :)

Craigy
Jan 8th, 2010, 04:59 PM
'Meeka' shall inherit the earth; or else!
January 9, 2010
http://www.smh.com.au/sport/tennis/meeka-shall-inherit-the-earth-or-else-20100108-lyuf.html


''The general consensus was that I was a big, fat cow. That's what I kept hearing. My best days on the tour were behind me. They said I was a lost soul who'd been away from the game for too long to get back to the top. My first thought was, 'Moo'.''

Serena Williams arrives in Sydney today. Baby got backbone. She will strut off a United Airlines flight, strut through the airport at Mascot, strut through the Sydney International and then strut through her defence of the Australian Open. A giant of world sport is among us.

Sydney is where it all began for Williams, 12 long years ago when a sassy 16-year-old offered the first sign of becoming more than some soulless diva and/or glamazon of the WTA Tour. Sydney was where a remarkable character first became the ultimate warrior of women's tennis; it was where she pulled out the first jaw-dropping upset of her career, toppling Lindsay Davenport while unveiling the one weapon she has since relied on more than any other while amassing 11 major championships, two Olympic doubles gold medals, the most prizemoney of any female athlete in sports history at $US28.5 million and an ongoing hold on the world No.1 ranking. Sydney was where she first revealed the backbone.

It was January 1998. It was the good old NSW Open at White City. Davenport was the world No.3. Williams was barely inside the top 100. She lost the first set 6-1. She trailed 5-2 in the second. The commentators, sitting in a booth now occupied by hobos, started packing up when she lagged 40-15 on Davenport's serve. ''She came back and won,'' sister Venus recalled more than a decade later. ''It was so intense. We saved the newspaper article. It was called 'White City's Great Escape'. We'd read it over and over again, about how she overcame all the odds and won that match. That's classic Serena Williams.''

Classic Serena Williams has since involved constant repeats of White City's Great Escape. She storms through deficits like some kind of human force of nature, clawing her way back from the impossibilities of set and match points down, screaming like a banshee, staring at the Kim Clijsters, Maria Sharapovas and Nadia Petrovas on the end of her revivals with a look that says more than a thousand insulting words ever could.

She was the self-described runt of the Williams litter, the smallest and feistiest of five sisters, and therein lies the origins of the backbone. Somehow, she had to match the more statuesque, the more talented, the more beautiful, the more perfect elder sister, Venus. ''There was no living up to her,'' Serena wrote in her biography, Queen of the Court. ''She was taller, prettier, quicker, more athletic. And she was certainly NICER.'' Her father, Richard, let the cat out of the bag in the biggest hint of all that Serena would end up BETTER: ''Serena is the meaner of the two.''

She was thought to be a big, fat cow before the Australian Open of 2007. Her world ranking had ballooned to No.81, only one place worse than when she was 16 and forging her identity against Davenport. Two barren years had passed since her last meaningful tournament win. Empowered by what she called the ''silent fuel'' of criticism, Williams went on a near-violent rampage in Melbourne, tearing apart six seeded players and mauling the top seed Sharapova 6-1, 6-2 in the final. The ferocity of that performance, just the crazed desire to prove everyone wrong, was a demonstration of an almost feral determination. That wasn't a tennis match, it was a cage fight, and only one woman was prepared to go bare-knuckle.

In her most gruelling battles, when the thundering strokes are off kilter, she grunts like a wild boar in an attempt to intimidate. But against Sharapova, and in all her most dominant victories, an eerie calm falls upon her. Nothing is more scary than a whisper. She becomes untouchable in her quiet moods. Written notes are read at the change of ends: ''What would U do if U were not afraid?''

Williams grew backbone while dodging bullets growing up in the dirt at Compton in Los Angeles: ''If you can keep playing tennis when somebody is shooting a gun down the street, that's concentration.'' She used backbone while moving out of the shadow of an elder sister who was taller, prettier, quicker, more athletic and certainly nicer: ''One year, three months, nine days. That's the age difference. I wanted to do everything just like Venus. Whenever we went to a restaurant, my mom would make me order first, because if I didn't, I'd just order whatever Venus ordered.''

She needed backbone when her father let her and Venus play only against adults as a kid: ''Luck has nothing to do with it because I have spent many, many hours, countless hours, on the court working for my one moment in time, not knowing when it would come.''

And she still calls on the backbone required to prove her worth beside big sister: ''I can't become satisfied. The fact that I'm making history right now, it doesn't happen every day … but now people are really going to be fighting to beat me.''

Her win-loss record against Venus Ebony Starr Williams is 13-10. Her sister has a mere seven major titles while Serena's double-digit haul trails only Margaret Court, Steffi Graf, Chris Evert, Martina Navratilova and Billie Jean King. The consensus is Serena Jameka Williams is no longer a big, fat cow.

The family calls her Meeka but that's wrong, too. The meek don't come this far. She is unlikely to win in Sydney. Her record in non-majors is disproportionately poor, but she couldn't give a hoot. The 28-year-old is all about prime time, showtime, peaking at the right time for her tilt at a fifth Australian Open.

She huffed and puffed through a series of unconvincing wins at the Sydney International last year before Russia's Elena Dementieva bundled her out in a couple of underwhelming straight sets. Williams said she was still the best player in the world. Computer said no. Jelena Jankovic was ranked No.1. A fortnight later, a fourth Australian Open was stuffed in Williams's racquet bag and another Wimbledon victory was on its way. The bigger the occasion, and the more intense the criticisms and disparaging remarks, the more baby gets backbone and the more aggressively she begins to moo.

VishaalMaria
Jan 8th, 2010, 06:03 PM
She was the self-described runt of the Williams litter, the smallest and feistiest of five sisters, and therein lies the origins of the backbone. Somehow, she had to match the more statuesque, the more talented, the more beautiful, the more perfect elder sister, Venus. ''There was no living up to her,'' Serena wrote in her biography, Queen of the Court. ''She was taller, prettier, quicker, more athletic. And she was certainly NICER.'' Her father, Richard, let the cat out of the bag in the biggest hint of all that Serena would end up BETTER: ''Serena is the meaner of the two.''

You can tell from the paragraph above that she's had to fight from a young age. And I'm glad she's grown into her own.

Reminds me of why I love Serena ever so much.

MrSerenaWilliams
Jan 8th, 2010, 06:13 PM
I LOVE that article :hearts:

Vaidisova
Jan 8th, 2010, 10:49 PM
Serena Williams looking forward to challenge to facing Justine Henin again
By Andrew Webster
January 09, 2010

Serena Williams says arch-rival Justine Henin can again challenge her as the world's best female tennis player - and would relish a crack at her in the Medibank International.

Williams and Henin struck up one of the fiercest rivalries in the game before Henin's shock retirement in May 2008.

The Belgian's decision to return late last year has fans of the game salivating at the prospect of the pair resuming their hostilities.

Henin has been handed a wildcard for Sydney, and then the Australian Open in Melbourne, and there is a distinct possibility the pair will meet in both tournaments.

Asked if she would enjoy a showdown with her former nemesis in Sydney, Williams said: "That'd be awesome. You know me? I don't really care who I play - as long as I win. But she's a great player and I definitely think she can get back to where she was. She left at the top of her game and she's a great player still."

The pair's duels over the years - both on the court and then in the press conferences that followed - are the stuff of legend.

And bitter acrimony, not least after Henin defeated Williams in the quarter-finals at both the French and US opens in 2007.

"I really am not surprised by anything on this tour any longer," Williams said when asked if she was shocked by Henin's decision to play again. "I mean, I was really shocked when Michael Jackson died. That surprised me. Not much surprises me outside of that."

http://www.foxsports.com.au/story/0,8659,26565879-5018900,00.html

nadlinds
Jan 9th, 2010, 07:26 PM
Fans Return Federer to Top; Serena Gains First TR Player Award

Still Hot: Ivanovic & Safin Sexiest for 5th Straight Year; Wozniacki, Del Potro, Stosur, Soderling Among Other Winners

After a standout 2009 that included his first Roland Garros title and his record breaking 15th Grand Slam crown at Wimbledon, Switzerland’s Roger Federer was named the male Player of the Year in the annual ******************** 2009 readers poll. American Serena Williams, who grabbed her 10th and 11th major titles at the Australian Open and Wimbledon and also took the year end Sony Ericsson WTA Tour Championships, was named the women’s’ player of the year.

In the most popular part of the poll, Serbia’s Ana Ivanovic and Russia’s Marat Safin won the Sexiest Players of the Year for the fifth year running.

Ivanovic more than doubled the votes of her closest competitor, Russia’s Maria Kirilenko, while Safin did the same to Spain’s Fernando Verdasco. Coming in third place in the men’s Sexiest category was Spaniard Rafael Nadal, while Russian’s Maria Sharapova placed third in the women’s category.

"It's very flattering,” Ivanovic said. “All women like to receive compliments for their looks and I am no different. But I don't take this kind of thing too seriously. The best thing about it is that it means that people are watching my tennis."

US Open champion Juan Martin Del Potro easily won the Youngster of the Year category on the men’s side, while Denmark's Caroline Wozniacki, a finalist at the 2009 US Open, scooped up the Teenager of the Year award on the women's side.

“ I'm really happy to win this award,” Wozniacki said. “It means a lot to me and I feel like the last season was a great one for me, so it is really nice that people start knowing my game and like watching me play.”

The most improved players were French Open finalist Robin Soderling of Sweden and Australian Samantha Stosur, who won her first singles title in 2009 and had her first top 20 finish at No.13. Soderling finished ahead of Del Potro, while Stosur edged Germany’s Sabine Lisicki.

Russian Nikolay Davydenko, who won the year-end ATP World Finals, and his countrywomen Elena Dementieva, who reached the Wimbledon semis, were named Veterans of the Year, with Dementieva edging Italy’s Flavia Pennetta by less than two percentage points.

Federer’s epic five-set win over Andy Roddick in the Wimbledon final was named Men’s Match of the Year, while Serena’s three-set classic over Dementieva in the Wimbledon semis took the prize in the women’s category.

Young Latvian Ernests Gulbis, who went from the top 40 in 2008 to out of the top 100 for a period in 2009, was named the Bust of the Year in the men’s category, while Czech Nicole Vaidisova of the Republic, who has fallen from a ranking of No. 7 in 2007 to No. 175, earned that distinction on the women’s side.

“I wasn’t particularity shocked by the results this year, but I was a bit surprised that Nadal finished behind Del Potro in the player of the year awards, that Kim Clijsters came so close to Serena and that despite the serious competition, that Ivanovic and Safin continue to win the sexiest category year after year,” said Tennisreporters’ co-owner Matt Cronin. “Safin has retired, so some other guy will win it in 2010, but we may have to give Ivanovic a Lifetime Achievement Award in order to give other players a real chance.”

TR.net co-owner Ron Cioffi added,, "The biggest surprise for me was not that Serena won player of the year, but this is the first time she's received this honor from our readers. Del Potro's strong showing as he placed first or second in three categories -- Player of the Year, Youngster of the Year and Most Improved Player -- shows the great impact he had on the sport."

nadlinds
Jan 9th, 2010, 08:41 PM
Serena arrives in Sydney

Serena Williams was on her best behaviour when she arrived in Sydney on Saturday to put the finishing touches to her preparations for the Australian Open.

The American was all smiles as she turned on the charm offensive for the media scrum that greeted her in the arrivals hall at Sydney airport.

The world number one excitedly talked up her chances of successfully defending her title in Melbourne but politely declined to discuss her foul-mouthed attack on a lineswoman at last year's US Open.

"I feel it's over. It was what it was," she said. "I think I've spoken enough about it."

Williams escaped a suspension after the Grand Slam Committee opted to slap her with a fine and a two-year probation, allowing her to compete in the Australian Open, starting in Melbourne on January 18.

She has already won the title four times, in 2003, 2005, 2007 and 2009, and is looking forward to chasing a fifth title later this month.

"It's all about doing the best that I can," she said. "Obviously I love playing well in all the Grand Slams and I hate to lose, regardless of where it is.

"Whenever I play, I give 200 per cent and whether that's becoming number one as a result or becoming number 50, it doesn't matter as long as you enjoy what you do."

nadlinds
Jan 9th, 2010, 08:45 PM
Williams Sisters Serve up Fashionable Snacking With Nabisco 100 Calorie Packs

Via National Contest, Eight People to Win Chance to Appear With Venus and Serena in National Magazine Advertising Spread

EAST HANOVER, N.J., Jan. 8 - It may be the season for New Year's resolutions, but the Williams sisters still enjoy their favorite snack-cessories. Fashion-minded tennis champions Venus Williams and Serena Williams are working with Nabisco 100 Calorie Packs to show people everywhere what it means to snack with style.

Together with the brand, Venus and Serena are launching a new "Diet Like A Diva" contest - a national search to find people who add fun and flair to their snacking routine. Maintaining a "Diet Like a Diva" is a way to enjoy your snacks, while still watching your portions.

With 16 varieties, the Nabisco 100 Calorie Packs line of portion-controlled snacks, including the new Yogurt Flavored Pretzels (on shelves this month), makes snacking fun and convenient.

"Nabisco 100 Calorie Packs make it a cinch to stay on track, whether I'm at home or on the road heading to a tournament," said Venus Williams. "And, enjoying the classic snacks we all know and love, like Oreo Mini Cakesters and Chips Ahoy Fudge Drizzle Cookies, is what living like a diva is all about."

The Champion of Snacking Ideas

Beginning today, savvy snackers can log on to DietLikeADiva.com to submit a video about how they add fun and flair to their sensible snacking routine. Eight winners will experience a glamorous fashion photo shoot with the tennis superstars this March, featuring the latest in fashion and snacking. The photos will be featured in a spread in several Conde Nast publications.

"I know there are women out there like me who are living life to the fullest and aren't interested in depriving themselves of tastes they enjoy," added Serena Williams. "I think it's going to be great to see who enters and I know Venus and I will have a blast with the divas in March!"

Game, Set, Match, Snack

The key to living sensibly within your diet, while making it fun, is to have snacking options that fit an on-the-go lifestyle. The Nabisco 100 Calorie Packs line of stylish snacks features 16 different varieties. From savory to sweet to a combination of both, there's something for everyone.

"Nabisco 100 Calorie Packs continue to be the trendsetter for sensible snacking," said Steve Siegal, senior brand manager for Nabisco 100 Calorie Packs. "Venus and Serena embody women who know what it's like to snack with flair, and with the contest, we look forward to learning how Nabisco 100 Calorie Packs enable others to do the same."

Those interested in knowing more about what it means to "Diet Like a Diva" and to enter the contest through Feb. 10, 2010, can visit www.DietLikeADiva.com. The new site is packed with tips, videos with the Williams sisters, a monthly sweepstakes and more. Become a fan of www.facebook.com/Nabisco100Cal.

About Kraft Foods

Kraft Foods (www.kraftfoodscompany.com) makes today delicious in 150 countries around the globe. Our 100,000 employees work tirelessly to make delicious foods consumers can feel good about. From American brand icons like Kraft cheeses, dinners and dressings, Maxwell House coffees and Oscar Mayer meats, to global powerhouse brands like Oreo and LU biscuits, Philadelphia cream cheeses, Jacobs and Carte Noire coffees, Tang powdered beverages and Milka, Cote d'Or, Lacta and Toblerone chocolates, our brands deliver millions of smiles every day. Kraft Foods (NYSE: KFT) is the world's second largest food company with annual revenues of $42 billion. The company is a member of the Dow Jones Industrial Average, Standard & Poor's 500, the Dow Jones Sustainability Index and the Ethibel Sustainability Index.

http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/williams-sisters-serve-up-fashionable-snacking-with-nabisco-100-calorie-packs-80995862.html

nadlinds
Jan 10th, 2010, 08:27 PM
Serena Williams claims to have moved on from US Open foul-mouthed outburst

January 10, 2010

Sydney: American tennis star Serena Williams has said that she has moved on from her foul-mouthed outburst on a lineswoman at last September's US Open.

Serena was fined a record 82,500 dollars by the International Tennis Federation for abusing the Japanese official for foot-faulting her in the US Open semi-final against Kim Clijsters.

“I don't feel one way or the other about it now. It was what it was and I think I've spoken enough about it since. You guys know me, I feel like it's over,” The Sydney Morning Herald quoted Serena, as saying.

Serena further said that she was confident of defending her Australian Open crown at Melbourne Park later this month.

“I'm feeling really good. It always takes a little while to get into a new season, it always takes a couple of matches, but regardless I'm going in with a positive attitude,” Serena said.

The 28-year-old also insisted that she isn’t under any pressure to retain her top ranking despite Belgians Kim Clijsters and Justine Henin coming back in the mix in 2010.

“I don't think about it a lot. I've got a lot on my plate. Everyone assumes that I'm No.1anyway. My main goals are always to stay healthy, and that's a huge goal for any athlete. For me, it's all about doing the best that I can,” Serena said.

“Obviously I love playing well in all the grand slams and I hate to lose, regardless of where it is. Whenever I play, I give 200 per cent and whether that's becoming No.1 as a result or becoming No.50, it doesn't matter as long as you enjoy what you do,” she added.

http://www.dnaindia.com/sport/report_serena-williams-claims-to-have-moved-on-from-us-open-foul-mouthed-outburst_1333190

nadlinds
Jan 11th, 2010, 08:54 PM
Serena Williams still a solid No. 1

DAYTONA BEACH, Fla., Jan. 11 - American Serena Williams owns a substantial lead for the No. 1 spot in the women's world tennis rankings.

Williams will take the No. 1 ranking into the year's first major tournament, the Australian Open, which begins next week. Her ratings point total of 9,075 is 1,125 more than No. 2-ranked Dinara Safina.

Monday marked the final rankings release ahead of the pairings draw for the Australian Open. There were no changes among the first 14 places on the list but Belgian Kim Clijsters, who has been in just five tournaments since ending a two-year retirement, has jumped to 15th.

Svetlana Kuznetsova, like Safina a Russian, is ranked third with Danish player Carolina Wozniacki fourth and Russian Elena Dementieva rated fifth.

American Venus Williams is in sixth, with Belarusian Victoria Azarenka in seventh and, in order, Serbian Jelena Jankovic, Russian Vera Zvonareva and Pole Agnieszka Radwanska completing the Top 10.

MrSerenaWilliams
Jan 12th, 2010, 08:41 PM
oh no! :o

BlameSerena
Jan 12th, 2010, 09:12 PM
Thanks for posting this nadlinds.

Olórin
Jan 12th, 2010, 09:15 PM
I think Serena should just skip the clay season and play at RG, it really doesn't seem to make any difference to her performance there :shrug:

nadlinds
Jan 13th, 2010, 07:34 PM
Where do tennis's biggest stars love to go in Melbourne? Shopping, partying, food and the casino are all high on the list of favourites.

SERENA AND VENUS WILLIAMS

The shopping-obsessed siblings flex their bottomless credit cards in Melbourne, and had a rumoured $30,000 private shopping spree at Versace at Crown three years ago, where they are regulars.

They also love to spend big along Chapel St, and in Greville St in Prahran.

http://www.heraldsun.com.au/sport/te...-1225818769989

Bijoux0021
Jan 13th, 2010, 07:46 PM
http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/blog/index?entryID=4819249&name=espntennis

Will New York meltdown weigh on Serena?

Wednesday, January 13, 2010

Posted by Ravi Ubha, ESPN.com

If hell hath no fury like a woman scorned, Serena Williams should be pumped up, or more so than usual, when the Australian Open starts Monday, or Sunday, depending on where you live. Yes, tennis junkies in the U.S. and Europe are in for some crazy hours until the end of January. Let's hope the excitement comes close to matching the Packers-Cardinals thriller last weekend, making the long nights worthwhile.

Williams, of course, was involved in the single biggest incident at the U.S. Open, menacingly threatening a slender female line judge who called her for a foot fault, leading to a double fault, at a critical juncture of her semifinal against comeback queen and No. 1 Kim Clijsters. It set up a match point, and Williams was then penalized for her outburst, handing a stunned Clijsters the match.

There must have been something in the Flushing Meadows air that week, besides the smell of burgers and hot dogs, given Roger Federer's foul-mouthed tirade aimed in the direction of baby-faced chair ump Jake Garner in the men's final.

Williams avoided a suspension but got hit with a record $82,500 fine in November. More bad behavior from Williams, and the double-digit Grand Slam champ could be barred from the U.S. Open in the future.

The Williams camp released one of those tame, pre-prepared statements in the wake of the sanction, with the 28-year-old saying she wanted to put the incident behind her. No sign of anger.

Nearly two weeks later, though, Williams vented on a Web site, suggesting the fine was excessive and two former bad boys on the men's tour, John McEnroe and Jeff Tarango, got away lightly with previous indiscretions.

Williams landed in Australia this week, taking part in Sydney's Medibank International, and again insisted the case was closed.

Nah. She'll be thinking about it and using what she feels is harsh treatment as a little extra motivation.

"I think most athletes who ever feel wronged, for the best ones their aptitude is to come back faster, stronger, better," said Eurosport analyst David Felgate. "I'd be surprised if [the fine] had any negative effect on her."

Felgate, a soft-spoken and polite chap, used to coach Tim Henman, Nicole Vaidisova and Xavier Malisse, all of whom had a bit of a temper. Henman, we shouldn't forget, got disqualified from Wimbledon in 1995 when he fired a ball that (accidentally) struck a ball girl in the head during a doubles match. Ironically, Tarango was one of his opponents.

Williams got robbed by the chair ump in the U.S. Open quarterfinals six years ago and bounced back emphatically, winning the ensuing Australian Open. Williams saved three match points against Maria Sharapova in the semifinals and rallied against Lindsay Davenport in the final.

The entire Williams family feels aggrieved over what happened in Indian Wells, Calif., in 2001. Serena's dad, Richard, says he and Venus were racially abused in the stands.

Williams hasn't played the prestigious mixed event since, and as if to say, "Here's what your missing," she has won the next tournament on the calendar, Miami, the unofficial fifth Slam, five times. Playing near home doesn't hurt, mind you.

Williams might need that little extra push, since defending U.S. Open champ Clijsters and fellow Belgian Justine Henin, comeback queen No. 2, are in good form. They contested what'll go down as one of the matches of 2010 in the final of the Brisbane International, a classic won by Clijsters in a third-set tiebreaker.

Sharapova looked sharp in an exhibition in Hong Kong last week and is one of the few women's players who come close to matching Williams in mental toughness. In short, Williams will have to do more than just get by the likes of Russians Elena Dementieva and Dinara Safina, as she did en route to last year's Australian Open title. Logic dictates Dementieva won't do as well as last year on the circuit, and ditto for Safina.

Williams impressed in her first match of 2010, downing a familiar foe, tricky Spaniard Maria Jose Martinez Sanchez, 6-1, 6-2 in the scorching Sydney heat.

"I feel like I have no pressure on myself," Williams told reporters in Sydney. "If I play the best I can play, I've always said I'm very difficult to beat."

Felgate wasn't about to disagree as he predicted a women's winner.

"If I had to, I'd pick Serena because at her very, very best, she is the best," he said.

nadlinds
Jan 15th, 2010, 07:41 PM
Serena Williams vows to defend title after Elena Dementieva defeat

Serena Williams insisted that she will be fit to defend her Australian Open title despite hobbling to defeat by Elena Dementieva in the final of the Sydney International on Friday

The way that Williams was limping and shuffling around the court during the Russian's 6-3, 6-2 victory was perhaps concerning, but California's world No 1 will still be expected to open her tournament by seeing off Poland's Urszula Radwanska.

"It's just a little pain in my knee and the strapping usually helps the pain go away," Williams said. "I haven't played in two months on a competitive level, so it's good for my body to go through this now. I'm ready to go."

Indeed, thoughts at Melbourne Park are now turning to matters on the court after Jelena Dokic's soap-opera existence continued this week with an 'air-rage' incident on a domestic flight led to the Australian's boyfriend and coach being questioned by police.

Of all the potential matches in the first week of the women's tournament, the most intriguing is the possibility of a second-round meeting between Justine Henin, at the first grand slam since she returned to tennis, and Dementieva, the world No 5.

If the Henin-Dementieva match is to happen, the unseeded former world No 1 from Belgium needs to beat her countrywoman Kirsten Flipkens, and the Muscovite has to get past fellow Russian Vera Dushevina, and no one would be surprised to see both those results.

When Henin played in her first tournament for 20 months, in Brisbane last week, she reached the final, beaten only by Kim Clijsters, another 'unretired' Belgian who had previously been the alpha female of the women's game.

There is no chance of Henin, a former champion, and Clijsters providing an all-Belgian final in Melbourne because they could meet in the quarter-finals.

One match likely to attract the attention of male fans is Maria Sharapova's all-Russian, all-blonde, all-sparkling encounter with Maria Kirilenko. Sharapova, the 2008 champion, missed last year's tournament because of a shoulder injury.

As Laura Robson lost in the second round of the qualifying competition, 6-4, 7-6 to Holland's Michaella Krajicek, Elena Baltacha and Katie O'Brien will be the only Britons in the women's draw.

Baltacha has been paired with France's Pauline Parmentier and O'Brien will play Patricia Mayr, of Austria. Robson will play in the juniors.

nadlinds
Jan 16th, 2010, 09:41 PM
Serena Williams plays down injury fears

MELBOURNE, Jan 16, 2010 (AFP) - Defending champion Serena Williams has played down concerns about her troublesome left knee after cancelling a practice session on Saturday ahead of the Australian Open.

The world number one lost in the semi-finals of the Sydney International on Friday to Elena Dementieva and was inconvenienced by the injury with her knee strapped for the match. She admitted it troubled her from the start, but said it now felt better.

"The knee is much better. It was good for me to get all those matches in," she insisted.

Asked if the injury had hampered her preparation for the opening Grand Slam of the season, she replied: "Absolutely not. If anything, it helped.

"I played a lot of matches in a row, back to back. I had a long three-set match (in the semis)."That was good preparation for me because I do plan on playing both singles and doubles here." Nevertheless, concern remains after she pulled out of her scheduled practice session Saturday. Williams said she had enough practice with the Sydney warm-up event.

"Well, I definitely had a lot of practice with Sydney, getting that far. I don't want to push it, go too far," she said.

"I definitely want to do the best I can, obviously, but I also want to pace myself. Hopefully I can play seven single rounds and six double rounds."

Williams is searching for her 12th Grand Slam singles title at the Australian Open next week to put herself alongside Billie Jean King as one of the all-time greats.

The four-time winner at Melbourne Park is clear favourite to lift the trophy again after a stellar 2009 but faces a tougher task this time with many top players making significant improvements over the past year.

But Williams -- the winner here in 2003, 2005, 2007, 2009 -- has the motivation, knowing one more victory will draw her level with the legendary Billie Jean King with 12 Grand Slam titles.

She acknowledged that her task had been made harder by the return of Kim Clijsters and Justine Henin, but was excited by the new challenge they posed.

"What an amazing effort and quality for her (Justine) and Kim Clijsters. It's so good to see two such good players back," she said, commenting on the classic Brisbane International final this month that featured the two Belgians.

"It's good to be back and be a part of that strong field. Just being in the draw is awesome."

Williams opens her tournament against Poland's Urszula Radwanska, the younger sister of 10th seed Agnieszka Radwanska.

They have played each other before and Williams is not underestimating the challenge.

"I've played her before at Wimbledon. She's a tough cookie, a tough player. And she's definitely no push over," she said.

"She's a younger sister, and younger sisters always want to play really hard and really tough. I know that for a fact."

If she progresses, Williams faces a possible quarter-final against Belarus seventh seed Victoria Azarenka or Russian ninth seed Vera Zvonareva and is projected to meet sister Venus in the semis.

http://www.sundaytimes.lk/100117/Sports/spt6.html

nadlinds
Jan 16th, 2010, 10:15 PM
Serena thankful for intense lead-in

Saturday 16 January 2010

By Matt Trollope


World No. 1 Serena Williams says she is happy with the condition of her knee ahead of her Australian Open title defence.

Williams suffered from knee soreness during her straight-sets loss to Elena Dementieva in Friday night’s Medibank International final in Sydney.

At Melbourne Park for a press conference this afternoon, Williams said her knee was much better and that the injury had not hampered her preparation for the year’s first Grand Slam.

“If anything, it helped. I played a lot of matches (in Sydney) in a row, you know, back to back. I had a long three‑set match. Eventually, you know, I had a quick turnaround time,” she said.

“But that was good preparation for me because I do plan on playing both singles and doubles here (at Melbourne Park).”

The American said she did not like to use injury as an excuse for her 6-3 6-2 loss in the Sydney final.

“I don't know if that would be very nice,” she said.

“I definitely wasn't at my best. But, you know, I feel like it's very comforting to know that I wasn't at my best in that particular match … I think Elena played well. She always plays me well. I think we always have really fun, tough, tough matches. With that being said, I thought she played amazing.

“What athlete really is at 100 per cent every time? Probably never.”

The top seed will begin her Australian Open campaign on Tuesday against Poland’s Urszula Radwanska, who she defeated at Wimbledon in 2008. Williams described her as a “tough cookie”.

“She's a tough player, and she's definitely no push‑over. She's a younger sister (of 10th seed Agnieszka Radwanska), and younger sisters always want to play really hard and really tough. I know that for a fact,” she said.

“It's definitely not an easy first round.”

Talk inevitably shifted to the return of Belgian star Justine Henin, a player with whom Williams shares a fierce – and occasionally acrimonious - rivalry. However, the American said she was pleased to see Henin competing again.

“What an amazing effort and quality for both her and (fellow Belgian comeback queen) Kim Clijsters. It's so good to see two such good players back,” she said.

Williams will be attempting to win her fifth title at Melbourne Park, having previously lifted the trophy in 2003, 2005, 2007 and 2009.

http://www.australianopen.com/en_AU/news/articles/2010-01-16/201001161263620577187.html

nadlinds
Jan 17th, 2010, 06:50 PM
Serena Williams seeking escape from the shadow of her foot-fault shame

There was a nice moment here today during a specially arranged exhibition event in aid of the Haiti earthquake disaster, when Andy Roddick was foot-faulted. "Are you seriously going to foot-fault me in a charity match?" the American said. "Don't you know Serena Williams is over there?"

Roddick followed his quip by gesturing with the ball towards the linesperson. He was referring, of course, to arguably the most dramatic moment of the 2009 season when Williams exploded in her *semi-final at the US Open against the eventual champion Kim Clijsters, having been foot-faulted on a second serve at 5-6, 15-30 in the second set. The double-fault left Williams facing two match points but her expletive-laden outburst, in which she threatened to shove a ball down the *lineswoman's throat, resulted in her receiving a point penalty, handing a bemused Clijsters victory.

The way Williams handled the incident over the next few days was a PR disaster but she eventually apologised and was fined $82,500 (£50,000) and put on probation for two years. If she has another "major offence" at a grand slam over that period, she will banned from the following US Open.

Williams showed a good sense of humour as she put her head in her hands at Roddick's comments but the Australian Open, which begins tomorrow, will offer her the chance to redeem herself. The best way for the 28-year-old to do that is for her to win the title for a fifth time.

As she joined a host of top players including Roger Federer, Rafael Nadal and Clijsters for the charity event, which is expected to raise around A$500,000 (£284,000), Williams looked like she was in good shape. The American said she was suffering from a knee injury as she lost to Elena Dementieva in the final of the *Sydney International warm-up event on Friday, but she is still likely to be the one to beat here. "I definitely had a lot of practice with Sydney," she said. "I definitely want to do the best I can but also want to pace myself. Hopefully I can play seven single rounds and six double rounds."

In the opposite half of the draw are some of the biggest threats to her chances, including Clijsters, the returning Justine Henin and the Russian Maria Sharapova, the champion in 2008. Williams would therefore seem to have every chance of continuing her stunning record at *Melbourne Park, where she won the title in 2003, 2005, 2007 and 2009. At her best, she is still the world's best player, as she showed here last year and again at Wimbledon when she won her 11th grand slam title.

The return of Clijsters and Henin, both former world No1s, and Sharapova, has spiced up the draw, but Williams has been reluctant to get involved in any of the hype. "I think it's a great field every year, to be honest," she said. "It's good to be back and be a part of that strong field. So I definitely look forward to it."

If Williams has been cagey about her prospects, others have not. "I think she's going to be fine," said Darren Cahill, who coached Lleyton Hewitt and Andre Agassi to the world No1 ranking. "I think leading into the Australian Open she's always been a little scratchy. Her form in the normal WTA tournaments has not been good and that's been well-documented, but I've got to say that she looks in good shape and she looks like she's put in a good off-season."

Having first Clijsters and now Henin back in the fold will only increase her desire, Cahill said. "I've got to believe, if anything, it's going to really force her and drive her to become even better and I think we're going to see the best of Serena Williams at the Australian Open."

Williams begins her campaign on Tuesday with a first-round match against Urszula Radwanska, someone she said she will not take for granted. "I've played her before at Wimbledon and she's a tough cookie," Williams said. "She's definitely no push‑over. She's a younger sister [Agnieszka is the No10 seed] and younger sisters always want to play really hard and really tough. I know that for a fact. It's definitely not an easy first round."

http://www.guardian.co.uk/sport/2010/jan/17/serena-williams-australian-open

nadlinds
Jan 17th, 2010, 08:30 PM
The Hit For Haiti

January 17, 2010

MELBOURNE, Australia - The world's top tennis stars joined forces in front of a packed house on Rod Laver Arena in Melbourne on Sunday afternoon in their bid to raise funds for the victims of Tuesday's Haiti earthquake.

Roger Federer was joined by Rafael Nadal, Andy Roddick, Novak Djokovic, Serena Williams, Kim Clijsters, Lleyton Hewitt, Sam Stosur and Bernard Tomic in a fun-filled doubles exhibition event billed 'The Hit for Haiti'. Nearly 17,000 tennis fans, who queued from early in the morning to get tickets to the special fundraiser, were entertained by the players and former Australian Open champion Jim Courier, who umpired the exhibition match.

The players were split into two teams - Team Red (Federer, Hewitt, Stosur and Williams) and Blue (Nadal, Clijsters, Djokovic and Roddick) with team members rotating in and out throughout the mixed doubles match. Aussie Tomic joined in the fun towards the latter stages of the match as part of Team Blue, but it was Team Red that eventually won the Hit For Haiti exhibition, 7-6.

See pics from the Hit For Haiti in the Pre-Aussie Open Gallery!

World No.1 Federer announced the charity exhibition Saturday afternoon and players quickly rallied round him to support the idea: "Yesterday morning I thought we should do something and within 24 hours we were able to pull this off. I am happy it was such a successful event, it was a lot of fun and for us, the players, it was wonderful to see."

Tickets to the event were sold for $10 with children under the age of 12 given free entry. All money raised at the event will be donated directly to Partners in Health, a charity based in Haiti for the last 20 years.

In addition to ticket sales, Australian Open staff collected donations on site and a number of players have made individual contributions. Proceeds raised from the event, along with significant donations made from the ATP World Tour, Sony Ericsson WTA Tour, ITF, Grand Slam Committee and Tennis Australia, will exceed half a million dollars. $159,000 was raised through ticket sales and public donations alone. Signed players racquets will be auctioned off via www.australianopen.com, proceeds also going to the 'Hit for Haiti' fund.

"It's fantastic to see the tennis family from around the globe band together to help make a difference in this time of need," Australian Open Tournament Director Craig Tiley said. "I would like to thank the players, staff and everyone involved in pulling off this event in such a short amount of time."

http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/OffCourtNews/Read/0,,12781~1935205,00.html

nadlinds
Jan 19th, 2010, 08:27 PM
Aside from the bling, Serena Williams just cannot be taken seriously

ON one level Serena Williams, one of the greatest women tennis players the world has seen, wants to be taken seriously.

That is not unreasonable from a player who has so dominated her sport that she has won 11 singles grand slam tournaments. She is in Melbourne chasing a fifth Australian Open.

She won her first round match yesterday easily enough, giving up just three games to Poland's Urszula Radwanska.

Sadly, Williams, 28, is abusing a chance to be a great influence on world sport.

Yesterday she wore earrings that tumbled down the side of her face as avalanches of diamonds might.

She wore a diamond necklace that could be seen on the moon. She dismissed a reporter's suggestion that it might be some sort of Celtic design. It wasn't. It was an item in Williams' private range. The diamonds were real, she reassured us, the price not mentioned. She liked the necklace because it had lots of S's in the design.

Ostentatious, empty and hardly provocative. She has rarely said anything that might cause a journalist to be bewildered by wit or insight.

So when she said yesterday that her $92,000 in fines for abusing a lineswoman in the US Open was more severe because she was a woman we didn't really expect it to be backed up with either evidence or logic.

So a reporter put the question directly: do you feel like it's a double standard that if some man had had the same reaction, he wouldn't have been fined as much?

The answer, such as it was, made no sense at all. Williams replied: "Well, we live in a world that still, you know, men are, you know, just leading a lot of things, as well. In tennis I think we've been able to do really well with having fought so hard to get equal prize money.

I think that's really good.

"But I think we still sort of, say, live in a man's world. I'm the first to say that I like men to be strong, to be leaders. I think that's absolutely important. But I just think at the same time some incidents can bring you back to life and back into reality," Williams said.

Just for the record Williams reportedly told the lineswoman, who had called a foot fault in the US Open semi-final against Kim Clijsters, this: "I swear to God I'm f . . .ing going to take this f . . . ing ball and shove it down your f . . . ing throat and kill you."

As she said it Williams aggressively pushed a ball and her racquet at the lineswoman.

That is worth more than a fine. Williams should not even be here to defend her Open title. Tennis authorities lacked the ticker to suspend her for base commercial reasons.

She is a drawcard. But there is no evidence at all that a man would have been treated more leniently. There is not a lot of precedents for shoving balls down linesfolks' throats.

Surely, it is a distraction used by Williams to turn the focus from what she said and did at the Open to a matter not of conduct but of gender. She cannot be taken seriously.

"I think I admire strong women. I think I'm a strong woman. I think my mom is. She's someone I admire. I just think that the whole incident was a learning experience. And I actually think it was good that it happened, that I got fined, because at the end of the day I'm raising money to help other people who I probably would have done it but not in that way, and I probably wouldn't have raised it," Williams said. And we are not sure what it means either.

But it has something to do with a charity auction.

"I always said what I did wasn't right, but I turned that around and I'm actually raising $92,000 to educate ladies, women, also for my school in Africa. Also I'm giving some money to Haiti, as well, because just the recent things. So, you know, I don't know whoever got fined like that. People said worse, done worse. I just thought it was a bit . . . I think it was a bit much," she said.

"You have the auction. You can go to my website to find more about it. I'm auctioning a dress I wore at the Olympics. Venus gave stuff. She was forced to. We're getting so many cool people to donate stuff. The money is going to a great cause. I don't think it would have happened if I hadn't gotten fined."

Williams stresses the fine as the issue and not her behaviour in threatening a lineswoman, paid a pittance, going about her job as best she can. Williams is sorry she got fined but not necessarily because she humiliated and terrified a sport official.

A chance to set a serious and much needed message about sport etiquette, an opportunity to highlight just everyday good manners goes missing apparently because Williams is, well, a woman.

Williams says that the two-year probation she carries into grand slam events does not impede her.

She is who she is and the probation does not and will not thwart her style.

"I just do the best that I can. I'll say, C'mon. I'll get frustrated. I'll still be human. I'll still make mistakes. I'll still learn from them."

Oh, really?

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/sport/aside-from-the-bling-serena-williams-just-cannot-be-taken-seriously/story-e6frg7mf-1225821398584

Galsen
Jan 19th, 2010, 08:38 PM
what the fuck is that?

doni1212
Jan 20th, 2010, 04:35 AM
Haters as always!

Bijoux0021
Jan 25th, 2010, 11:11 AM
http://www.australianopen.com/en_AU/news/articles/2010-01-25/201001251264411793015.html

Serena sends a reminder

Monday 25 January 2010
By Alix Ramsay
On the eve of Australia Day, Serena Williams was walking a tightrope. She is in Melbourne with for the sole purpose of winning a Grand Slam title, and yet here she was, standing in front of a packed crowd – most of whom were proudly Australian – playing Sam Stosur. And in case anyone had overlooked the fact, Stosur is Australian. What to do?

What she did was impressive; it did little for American-Australian relations, but it was still impressive. Williams steamrolled her way past poor Stosur and headed for the quarter-finals 6-4 6-2. Then, to make amends, she apologised profusely. “I’m sorry, you guys,” she said, looking around at the massed ranks of green and gold. “Sam played really well. But maybe I’ll have a few more fans now.”

Both her public relations efforts and her game plan against the local heroine had been a deliberate ploy on Williams’s part. She knew from experience that partisan spectators do not take kindly to seeing their player beaten and that, having lost to Stosur in their previous meeting, she could not let the Australian get so much as a toehold in the match.

“It's important when you're playing a local girl to not let the crowd get too involved or else they'll kill you,” Williams explained. “That was the plan: to not let them get involved.

“I knew she was capable. She beat me last time and anything can happen. So she's a really, really good player and so dangerous. I was like, you have to be focused when you're playing Sam, for sure.”

Stosur’s biggest mistake had been to beat Williams last summer. The world No.1 is not fond of losing. She particularly dislikes losing at major tournaments, and so she offered Stosur absolutely nothing to work with. There were no weakness, no lapses in concentration and, consequently, no hope for the Queenslander.

The crowd, although disappointed to see the departure of one of their own, took it well. They knew they had seen a champion in championship-winning form. And Williams was right – Stosur had not played badly at all; it was just that Williams had played extremely well.

With 11 Grand Slam cups already stashed away in her trophy cabinet, the world No.1 knows a thing or two about winning major events. The old rule states that no one can win a Grand Slam in the first week, but they can certainly lose one. It is not the performances that matter in the first few rounds, it is the results. But by the start of the second week, the hopefuls have been separated from the contenders, and it is time to step up the pace.

The slight worry for the rest of the field is that Williams was playing exceptionally well in the first week – and now she is getting better in the second. On current form, the champion will take some stopping.

“When someone's playing that aggressively and not giving you anything at all, she's pretty hard to beat,” Stosur said.

“I thought I served well. I thought I stood my ground pretty well during the few rallies that we were able to get into.

“I think she definitely can go all the way. If she plays like that, I can't see too many players being able to stop her.”

Williams could seemingly do no wrong. She dropped just two points on serve in the opening set and just seven in all. Add in 10 aces to that mix and Williams’s serve was all but untouchable. Stosur tried to stay with her from the baseline but Williams was too strong, too aggressive and, quite simply, too good.

If there is a doubt about Williams’s ability to retain her title, is surrounds her fitness. She has been wearing strapping to he right thigh since she arrived in Melbourne, but now she is wearing tape just below he left knee. Williams, though, is three matches away from lifting the trophy, and even if she is standing on one leg and has her arm in a sling, she is not going to let anything stop her.

“I think it's all about adrenaline out there,” she said. “When I step on the court, I feel great. Sometimes before there, I am struggling.”

Unfortunately for the other seven players left in the draw, they are not allowed to play Williams in the locker room and must face her in the public glare of Rod Laver Arena. And out there, Williams is looking invincible.

nadlinds
Jan 30th, 2010, 04:41 PM
Venus and Serena Williams win Australian Open doubles

Defending champions Venus and Serena Williams beat Cara Black and Liezel Huber 6-4 6-3 to clinch their fourth Australian Open doubles title.

The Williams sisters, seeded second, took 86 minutes to overcome the top seeds - taking a close first set before breaking Huber twice in the second.

Venus, 29, and Serena have collected four of the last six Grand Slam titles and have won 11 in total.

Serena, 28, plays Justine Henin in the women's singles final on Saturday.

Venus admitted the actual moment of their doubles triumph took her by surprise, as she had not realised it was match-point so was not expecting Serena's reaction.

"I actually didn't know the score and I thought that it was 5-2," she said with a laugh. "I thought, she's really happy about this break.

"I thought, wow, I've never seen her this happy, but I'll go with it."

The duo are now the third most successful women's doubles partnership in the Open era, after Martina Navratilova and Pam Shriver (21 Grand Slam titles), and Gigi Fernandez and Natasha Zvereva (14).

Serena says their recent success makes them wish they had taken the doubles more seriously earlier in their career.

"We were talking today about how we wished we had have played more when we were younger," she said.

"We still feel like we have so much we can win and just stay focused. We just love being out there and we love the competition.

"More than anything, we really have fun, we smile and we enjoy it."

http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/tennis/8486611.stm

nadlinds
Jan 30th, 2010, 04:49 PM
Serena Williams beats Justine Henin in Aussie final

Serena Williams claimed her fifth Australian Open crown and ended Justine Henin's hopes of a comeback title with a three-set win in Saturday's final.

Henin hoped to cap her first Grand Slam since ending an 18-month retirement with a fairytale win, but Williams was too strong in the final set.

The American, 28, won 6-4 3-6 6-2 in two hours and seven minutes.

Williams has now won 12 Grand Slam singles titles, moving her level with Billie-Jean King in the all-time list.

It was the world number one's magnificent serve that gave her the edge, regularly digging her out of trouble as she saved 11 of 16 points during the match.

And despite having had her right thigh and left knee heavily taped as it had been for much of the tournament, Williams was the stronger in the closing stages as a first Grand Slam tournament in two years finally appeared to take its toll on Henin.

The Belgian, 27, is still without a world ranking as she has yet to play the minimum requirement of three tournaments but she has already done enough to show that she will be vying with Williams for the top spot in the future, telling the Melbourne crowd after the match: "I'll see you next year."

But she could not quite match the achievement of her compatriot Kim Clijsters, who won her first Grand Slam tournament after coming out of retirement at last year's US Open.

Despite having met 13 times previously, with Williams 7-6 ahead, it was the first time that the pair had played each other in a Grand Slam final and they provided a spectacle befitting of their status as the two best women players of the last decade.

Henin - the 2004 champion in Australia - made the better start, her mission to play even more attacking tennis in her 'second career' bringing her three break points in the first two Williams' service games as she went for her returns.

But the champion was able to find big serves at the key moments, and Henin paid the price when a double-fault and a poor forehand saw her fall 3-1 behind.

The Belgian looked to have hit back in the following game when a drop shot was called 'out' but immediately corrected by the line judge on the second break point, but the point was replayed and again Williams found a huge first serve just when it was required.

Henin finally got back on serve when she converted her seventh break point with a forehand winner in game seven but after levelling at 4-4, she lost a tight set when a backhand caught the tape and fell just wide on Williams' second set point in game 10.

Williams looked ready to take control when she had two break points early in the second set but Henin kept her at bay, before the pair swapped breaks in what was becoming a compelling encounter.

Neither player had been able to maintain their best form for any length of time until Henin broke away with 10 points in a row from 3-3 to grab the set, and remind everyone of the level of play that has already taken her to seven Grand Slam titles.

The dream of a comeback title appeared close to reality as Henin swept through a fourth straight game at the start of the final set and then earned two more break points, but Williams wrestled the momentum from the Belgian in brilliant style.

An ace and a nerveless drive volley saw off the danger and the champion was back in the match.

As in the previous set, breaks of serve were traded in games three and four, but it was Williams who made what proved to be the decisive breakthrough as Henin appeared to be feeling the pace in game five.

A blistering cross-court backhand brought up yet another break point and Henin played a tired backhand to give the American a 3-2 lead.

There was to be no comeback this time, and Williams broke serve once again before serving out to become the first back-to-back winner in Australia since 2002.

"I'd like to congratulate Justine for having a fabulous tournament and giving me such a great run today," she said afterwards. "I think it could have gone either way and I definitely think she's back so all you guys back there definitely have a lot to cheer for."

Henin said: "It's been a very emotional two weeks for me. I thought they would never happen again, that I could come back on the court.

"I've really enjoyed my tournament and I think this is the best place for me to start here in Australia because you know tennis so well, you know the culture of the sport so thank you for your support.

"I'd like to congratulate Serena who is of course a real champion so well done again."

http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/tennis/8485951.stm

nadlinds
Jan 30th, 2010, 04:52 PM
Serena Williams 'honoured' to match Billie-Jean King

Serena Williams was thrilled to draw level with Billie-Jean King in the all-time Grand Slam winners' list with victory at the Australian Open.

The American, 28, beat Justine Henin 6-4 3-6 6-2 to claim her 12th Grand Slam singles title.

"I feel really special that I was able to tie Billie Jean King," said the American afterwards.

"I my heart of hearts, I've been going for it and I haven't been able to quite achieve it."

King was among the crowd on Rod Laver Arena for Sunday's final, and Williams was able to catch up with her after the match.

"I didn't speak to Billie about it (beforehand), but after we talked," she said. "We took a picture. I was excited. I said, 'I tied you.' But what an honour."

She added: "Billie Jean is a really big mentor of mine. She was a Fed Cup coach at one time, which was super cool. We had so much fun."

Williams was thankful for her serving prowess as she saved 11 of 16 break points during the final.

"I don't think I served excellent, but I think when it was necessary I served really well," said Williams.

"Even in the first game - I think that first game was like 10 minutes - that game was important. I ended up holding. She had a couple break points, I hit a couple bombs at the right time.

"So that definitely helped me out. Honestly, the longer the match goes the better my serve gets. So I felt like when I walked out there in the third set I was like, 'OK, I'm going to start serving better.'"

The American had heavy strapping on her thigh throughout the tournament and also struggled with ankle and wrist problems.

"Even though I had all the strappings on me, I felt like I was moving well," she said. "Honestly, I felt like the strappings helped me. It helped me to be able to move better and do what I can do at a normal level."

Henin was playing in only her second tournament since ending an 18-month spell in retirement but Williams felt the Belgian was already playing at a better level than in the first part of her career.

"I think her game is definitely better," she said. "I mean, it was excellent before she left but I think she's added a lot to it. She's attacking more, which is always good.

"As you saw today she took me to the umpteenth level. She clearly hasn't like lost a step at all since she's been gone. So I feel like I played a girl who's been on the tour for the past five years without a break."

Henin, who is not likely to return to action until Indian Wells in March, said: "Of course I am disappointed, you are when you lose in the final of a Grand Slam, especially in three sets.

"I got a few opportunities that I haven't been able to take, but this feeling of disappointment cannot take away from all the things I've done in the last few weeks.

"It's just more than what I could have expected. I just have to remember that. Even if it's quite soon after the match now, I'm sure there will be a lot of positive things I can think about in a few days - it's been almost perfect.

"Just the last step, I couldn't make it."

http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/tennis/8489161.stm

BlameSerena
Jan 31st, 2010, 12:29 PM
Williams eyes more success after winning in Australia

The 28-year-old American won the women's singles title for a fifth time, teamed up with sister Venus to win the doubles for a fourth, and has no plans of stopping.

"I don't see an end now," she told reporters after her 6-4 3-6 6-2 over Belgian Justine Henin.

"I feel like as long as I'm happy and I want to do it and I enjoy being out there, (I'll keep playing).

"Sometimes I think it gets a little bit redundant but I really love playing the slams."

Williams's next major goal is the French Open, her least successful grand slam event. She won on the red clay of Paris in 2002 but has not won there since.

"I only have one but hey that's not bad, if at the end of the day that's all I have at least I have it," she said.

"My whole goal is just to get fit because I plan on playing singles and doubles at Paris. So, if I do that, and I'm fit enough, then maybe I'm a chance."

Williams now has 12 grand slam singles titles, joining Billie Jean King in equal sixth place on the all-time list behind Margaret Smith Court (24), Steffi Graf (22), Helen Wills Moody (19), Martina Navratilova (18) and Chris Evert (18).

Although she has no plans to retire, Williams said it was unlikely she would catch all if any of the women in front of her -- so she has set her sights on the men.

92K MISSION

Pete Sampras is the leading American man with 14 while Roger Federer is the overall men's leader with 15, before Sunday's final against Andy Murray.

"I just want to be with Roger. So Roger, can you please let me catch up," Williams said.

"I was trying to hunt him down, but the guy keeps winning. I'm like, dude, stop winning. The guy is amazing."

Williams also wants to start using her success on the court to help the less fortunate.

She has opened a school in Africa and plans to teach a class there in March, and launched her 92k Mission to raise money for the survivors of the Haiti earthquake.

The fund was called 92k because that was the amount of money she was fined by the International Tennis Federation for her foul-mouthed attack on a line judge at last year's U.S. Open.

Williams, who is also on a two-year probation, was on her best behavior in Australia but said she hoped people would forgive her for her outburst in New York.

"I just want to keep people aware that it's okay to make a mistake but learn from it," she said.

"One moment doesn't make one person's career. It's all about the moments you put together. The fine was a little bit exorbitant but that was that and it turned out to be a big thing.

"Sometimes things happen for a reason."

Link (http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE60U0CY20100131)

BlameSerena
Jan 31st, 2010, 12:30 PM
Williams ends even-year jinx at Australian Open

The 28-year-old world number one, who had won four previous Australian Open titles, in 2003, 2005, 2007 and 2009, was at her bustling and aggressive best on Saturday, overcoming Justine Henin 6-4 3-6 6-2 to snap the jinx.

"I never thought about it," Williams said of the victory with the Daphne Akhurst Memorial Cup sitting beside her. "I was always okay with winning on the odd years.

"I was totally okay with losing today or losing in the semis, because it meant that I would win next year.

"So now I don't know. I'm a little nervous. I'm like, I don't know if I'm going to win next year or not."

Williams had entered the tournament under a cloud after a foul-mouthed tirade against a line judge at the U.S. Open ended in her being fined $175,000 and given a two-year good behavior bond for the outburst.

Any subsequent offence at a grand slam could cost her a place at the U.S. Open in 2010, 2011 or 2012, and the American kept her emotions in check throughout the tournament at Melbourne Park.

COMFORTABLE VICTORIES

Williams had few reasons to get upset as she progressed through to the quarter-finals with comfortable victories courtesy of her powerful service game and groundstrokes.

By the time she met seventh seeded Belarussian Victoria Azarenka in the quarter-finals she was the dominant force in the tournament.

She had not dropped a set or been broken in 31 service games in her four previous matches.

Azarenka ended that streak in the first game and held a one set and 4-0 lead before Williams finally woke up and began to reel off aces and service winners.

The pattern continued in the final against Henin, where at one point she lost 15 successive points, which had allowed the Belgian to take the second set and a 1-0 lead in the third.

"Well, I lost so many in a row I thought, 'gosh, I was up 15 40 at one point and could have broke her'," Williams said.

"I thought, 'well, at least I won the first set.'

"So in the third, I knew I would have chances again just to capitalize on that one chance in that one moment.

"I may have hit some aces. So that definitely helped me out.

Honestly, the longer the match goes the better my serve gets."

Williams, who claimed her 11th grand slam doubles title with sister Venus on Friday, said the support from her older sibling helped her in the third set.

"She was really supportive out there today. I remember in the third set, I was down, and I heard her say, 'c'mon, Serena. It's okay, right here, right here'.

"That really got me pumped up."

Williams was so happy after the match that she made a half-hearted attempt to climb into her box to thank Venus after the match.

"I was like, 'okay, that's a hopeless cause'. I was thinking about going inside, taking the elevator and then going inside, but there's no way I would have made it."

Link (http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE60T1FX20100130)

BlameSerena
Jan 31st, 2010, 11:19 PM
My favorite article:

Winners & Winning

by Bobby Chintapalli, TW Contributing Editor

We knew from the start that, even though it’s not 2002 anymore (look up if you don't remember those days), the players to watch were Justine 2.0 and Serena 92K. For me they were the two main questions, yet with the Australian Open women’s singles final here, I find myself surprisingly… surprised.

Maybe it was all the yellow, big Maria’s “Powerade blue”, little Maria’s quarterfinal berth, Kim’s “disheveled” play, Ana’s still-crazy toss, Dinara’s denial about her back, Jelena’s un-JJ-like errors, Svetlana’s dozen tweets, poor Elena D. and Flavia, the breadsticks and bagels, the heads in towels, the towels in weird places, the Chinese, the Russians, the line judges and, yes, Pam Shriver. For some reason, for some time, I stopped focusing so much on Serena Williams and Justine Henin.

Luckily the numbers fill in part of the parts I missed and also foretell some of the story that hasn’t been written yet. Many key stats aren’t tracked of course – Justine’s number of aces following an ‘allez’, Serena’s winner-to-bandages ratio, Justine’s break-point conversions based on number of glances at Carlos Rodriguez, Serena’s number of service holds based on number of late-night tweets. Many key stats are tracked - let’s look at those here.

Serves

Women’s ace leader – Serena Williams
Women’s double fault leader – Justine Henin

Total aces for Henin – 23
Total aces for Serena – 53
Average aces/match for all – 2
Average aces/match for Henin – 4
Average aces/match for Serena – 9

Total DFs for Henin – 33
Total DFs for Serena – 9
Average DFs/match for all – 4
Average DFs/match for Henin – 6
Average DFs/match for Serena – 2

Call her Servena, goddess of the serve, because that serve is heavenly. Serena uses it to go for the kill when things are good and to stay alive when things aren’t. Imagine how comforting it must be for her and how demoralizing for her opponents that she knows (and they know) she always has “a couple of aces” up her sleeve. After her semifinal loss against Serena, Na Li said, “I mean, like if she want win the point, just ace.”

Like at the US Open and Wimbledon before that, Serena served the highest number of aces here. Her serve is no-frills – there’s no underwear-tugging pre-serve ritual, no tossing and retossing… just a few quick bounces, a reliable toss and, more likely than for anyone else, an ace… out wide, down the middle, wherever. As usual Serena managed to reach the top of the ace leader list while staying off the double fault leader list.

Justine, on the other hand, was the double fault leader. We’ve heard the commentators enough to know that’s not as bad as it may seem. For one thing Justine usually double faults because she goes for more on her second serve than others do and not because she gets tentative. While most of her opponents had a faster average first serve speed, only one of them (Yanina Wickmayer) had a faster average second serve speed. Justine’s double fault ‘leadership’ also owes to her retooling of her serve in preparation to hit the green, green grass of Wimbledon with a motion that propels her into the court and toward the net, which is where she wants to finish off more points now.

Volleys

Net approaches won by Justine – 84/127 (66%)
Net approaches won by Serena – 69/97 (71%)

% Points on which Justine approached – 14%
% Points on which Serena approached – 12%

Justine 2.0 is all about Wimbledon and, thus, all about volleying. In preparation for her trip to London, Justine spent some quality time at the net in Melbourne. She won more net approaches than all her opponents. Maybe practice makes perfect, because she also approached more than all but one of her opponents (the once-again-feared Nadia Petrova).

Because of all the talk about the Wimbledonization of Justine’s game, I expected her impressive net stats but was a wee bit surprised by Serena’s, which weren’t too shabby. She approached only a little less than Justine but more than all of her opponents except Victoria Azarenka. When Serena did approach, she won points a little more often than Justine.

Winners & Errors

Winners by Justine – 164
Winners by Serena – 191

Unforced errors by Justine – 225
Unforced errors by Serena – 147

Winner-UFE differential for Justine – Negative 61
Winner-UFE differential for Serena – Positive 44

Serena’s positive winner-to-error differential always makes me smile. (That may say less about Serena’s skills than my lack of a real, non-tennis life.) Watching her play sometimes rough-and-tough tennis, you don’t expect such prim-and-proper numbers. The positive differential owes partly to the fact that aces are included in the winner count. But the rest of it? The rest of it is why she’s Number 1.

Justine is no slouch herself here. She hit more winners than all her opponents except Alisa Kleybanova. Henin also moves and defends well, so Serena’s not likely to hit as many winners against her. If Serena tries to go for more as result, her unforced error count could climb too, making that differential less prim and proper on both ends.

Numbers Schmumbers

As much as stats tell you about aces, winners and volleys, there’s more they can’t tell you, especially when it comes to big matches. How players fill in the gap between what numbers can and can’t show is what separates the great from the Grand Slam champions.

Consider this: Victoria Azarenka was two games away from the match in her quarterfinal loss to Serena and, in the end, lost just three fewer points (102 to 105). Yanina Wickmayer actually won three more points (96 to 93) in her fourth-round loss to Justine. Eventually three points here and there can add up seven Grand Slam titles (Justine) or even 11 (Serena).

Serena already has the most Grand Slam singles titles of any active player, but a win here would take her to a dozen, tying her with Billie Jean King. A win for Justine would extricate her from her tie with the older Williams sister, putting her in a lone second-place spot to the younger Williams sisters (among active players) and one away from Monica Seles’s nine titles.

When Serena and Justine start their 14th match, playing for their 19th combined Grand Slam singles title, with Serena leading the head-to-head 7 to 6, you can forget these numbers and all the rest. Serena for one isn’t manipulating Excel pivot tables as she waits in the locker room, and she isn’t thinking about percentage of net approaches won against Petra Kvitova (100 percent) once she gets onto the court: “I just go out and do whatever I can. Whatever happens, it’s all I can do at that time.” When it comes to the greatest champions on the biggest stages, even the number of winners can’t tell you who’ll do the winning.

Link (http://tennisworld.typepad.com/tennisworld/2010/01/wta-final-preview.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+tennisworld-bodo+%28Peter+Bodo%27s+TennisWorld%29)

doni1212
Feb 1st, 2010, 12:56 AM
Williams ends even-year jinx at Australian Open

The 28-year-old world number one, who had won four previous Australian Open titles, in 2003, 2005, 2007 and 2009, was at her bustling and aggressive best on Saturday, overcoming Justine Henin 6-4 3-6 6-2 to snap the jinx.

"I never thought about it," Williams said of the victory with the Daphne Akhurst Memorial Cup sitting beside her. "I was always okay with winning on the odd years.

"I was totally okay with losing today or losing in the semis, because it meant that I would win next year.

"So now I don't know. I'm a little nervous. I'm like, I don't know if I'm going to win next year or not."


I hate how she kept saying that. She better not have been okay losing that match! :armed:

nadlinds
Feb 1st, 2010, 09:00 PM
Women's Doubles Tennis: A Williams Whitewash We'd Wish To Continue?

Between them they amass an almighty forty-five Grand Slam titles and five Olympic gold medals, establishing themselves as the most successful siblings ever to grace any sport.

In singles events Venus Williams has triumphed on seven occasions with her younger sister Serena eclipsing that with twelve. For a decade now both sisters have well and truly shown a dominance of the sport that matches the current Nadal-Federer stranglehold of the men’s game.

Even if at points the sisters interests seemed invested elsewhere and with results not always going their way they kept themselves part of the staple diet of the women’s game and at times appeared invincible.

A Wimbledon final has now become seemingly required to have at least one William’s sister in competition.

Yet in the last couple of years the William’s sisters have accompanied their singles glories with a barrage of doubles titles which have set them even further apart from the rest of the pack.

In the last two years they have triumphed together at the Australian Open (2009 & 2010), at Wimbledon (2008 & 2009) and at the US Open (2009) and have thus re-affirmed our ideal that one Williams sister is difficult to beat, but two is almost impossible.

Straight sets victories became common place occurrences in any fixture on a doubles court, and defeat for the sisters was always an incredible shock on the few occasions that it happened.

The five recent glories accompanied various victories from 1998-2003 which also included mixed doubles titles (two of each for each sister) accompanying five other women’s doubles titles.

But what about the five year gap in between, where not a single doubles title was achieved?

You would have thought looking at the Grand slam records that Venus and Serena held during these years, that they would have played in doubles continuously alongside their preferred events as both players carried on excelling separately.

But this was not the case as with interests opening up outside of the court it appeared that both Venus and Serena showed little inspiration to continue their early dominance of the doubles circuit and instead allowed other duos to stake a claim to the grand slam crowns. The Bondarenko sisters for example earned credible results in the year or two before the William’s sisters return and probably would have expected to further this run of results.

A few tournaments were played by Venus and Serena but their heart simply was not in it and they rarely troubled the scene for those five years between 2003 and 2008. With such a mountain of doubles championships between them this was always going to be a massive shame.

The women’s doubles game also suffered as it was sidelined by the men’s doubles and the mixed doubles events where more enticing scenes could be witnessed.

The recent run of victories for Venus and Serena may therefore be a strengthening and illustrious run that could be inspired to continue long into this decade.

If recent form is anything to go by this would allow both sisters to compete in their preferred and self limited singles events, but also to compete at the highest level on the doubles arena. They have now shown that they are capable of succeeding in both sets of tournaments, producing solid and determined displays in both.

Records after all are there to be set, and with doubles tournaments featuring at every Grand Slam event the tally of wins that the sisters can collect as a result is remarkably fruitful.

Let’s hope then that the sisters continue their reignited passion for the doubles game and leave behind them a legacy of two sisters that produced the finest women’s tennis ever seen on the courts.

Imagining the current tally that may have existed if the sisters had bothered with the doubles game in the mid noughties is mind blowing. Their semi regular participation however can seemingly be wiped out with a few more years of absolute demolition of the opposition.

They can make themselves an example of what brilliance and perfection really entails, and they can become the doubles pairing that siblings across the world can again seek to emulate.

http://bleacherreport.com/articles/337325-womens-doubles-tennis-a-williams-whitewash

BlameSerena
Feb 3rd, 2010, 12:49 PM
Overall nice write up on their doubles. Finally. However, I still take issue with the same, overdone comments like this:But this was not the case as with interests opening up outside of the court it appeared that both Venus and Serena showed little inspiration to continue their early dominance of the doubles circuit and instead allowed other duos to stake a claim to the grand slam crowns. The Bondarenko sisters for example earned credible results in the year or two before the William’s sisters return and probably would have expected to further this run of results.
There is so much talk of their interests outside of tennis, but rarely any talk of anyone else's, particularly those who've "retired" due to having other interests, certainly an interest to no longer play tennis. You have an admission from guys like Agassi on how much he hated to play, so obviously his interest wasn't strictly with the game, yet the WS keep getting ridiculed for this very thing when it was a lot DEEPER for them than losing interest. They had personal things to work out too...just like those who retired. They were dealing with their own issues, be it tragedy, injury and depression...on top of needing a break from the game to secure what will become of their lives after tennis...yet it's still held over them as a blow to the gut. It's just annoying to me.

BlameSerena
Feb 3rd, 2010, 12:53 PM
In Serena Williams's shadow

* Ron Reed
* From: Herald Sun
* January 30, 2010 12:00AM

Serena Williams has not finished what she has set out to achieve. Picture: Getty Images Source: Getty Images

FEW women's tennis players have dominated their contemporaries more than Serena Williams. And, as Ron Reed reports, she's not done yet.

WATCHING Serena Williams at work this week has been a value-for-money experience for Melbourne sports fans, which isn't always the case in women's tennis.

And it's far from over yet.

After cruising through the first week, dropping just nine games in three matches, the defending champion stepped it up to another level, partly because she could and mostly because she was forced to.

Australia's Sam Stosur, who had beaten her the last time and was therefore regarded as a serious threat, was demolished in two sets of virtually flawless tennis.

Then Williams had to display her fighting qualities to escape from a set and 0-4 down against Belarus's Victoria Azarenka, before China's Li Na gave her another searching workout in a two-hour pair of tie-breakers.

She has survived despite having her right hamstring heavily strapped and left calf bandaged - exactly how much, if any, discomfort or pain she is in has not been disclosed - and has added to the workload by winning the doubles with her sister Venus.

It has been an increasingly intense and diverse challenge, so dispensing tonight with Justine Henin - a proven champion - would round out one of the most impressive performances of her phenomenal career.

It would take her to 12 grand slam tournament wins, drawing level with Billie-Jean King, who will be at Rod Laver Arena.

Ahead still are Margaret Court with 24 (11 in the Open era), Steffi Graf (22) and Chris Evert and Martina Navratilova with 18.

These legends are a long way in front and even further if you count total titles and accumulated wins.

At 28, Williams has plenty of time but will struggle to catch them.

However, in her case the numbers are only part of the equation.

Plenty believe that while she might not necessarily be the greatest performer - not yet, anyway - the game has seen, she has exerted a dominant presence that has rarely if ever been matched.

The same observation might be true not just in tennis but in women's sport in general. Among contemporaries, she is pretty much a one-off.

It's not just her achievements, but her unique aura - intimidating to opponents on the court, fascinating to the fans off it - and the sense that she's capable of anything, such as when she dominated the Oz Open three years ago despite being clearly unfit and ranked in the 80s because she had missed so much tennis.

There is an X-factor, a different dimension, which is partly to do with her proud and sometimes prickly personality, partly with her obvious physical power and even her striking looks.

Perhaps the blinding light of the here and now puts history in the shade sometimes, but one doesn't recall Court, Graf, Evert and Navratilova, for all their eminence, being so much larger than life.

Nor is it easy to think of many women from other sports who had quite the same combination of talent, competitiveness, confidence, resilience and attention magnetism, although they say American Babe Didrickson was an absolute gun at two sports - track and field and golf - and even better at telling people she was.

Not everything about Williams is wonderful, by any means.

She trashed her image with her ugly tirade against a lineswoman at the US Open last year, which saw her fined $190,000 and put on probation for two years.

In her first major event since, she has been on her best behaviour, although still claiming she was hard done by whereas most reckon she got off lightly.

She hasn't necessarily embarked on a charm offensive as such, but she does make a point of thanking the crowd and has let it be known she is contributing to the Haiti earthquake relief and other charities.

But an interesting litmus test of how she is viewed by her sporting elders is coming up.

This week the voting process began for the Laureus Awards - the sporting Oscars - and in a moderate year her wins in the Australian Open and Wimbledon, regaining the No. 1 ranking for the fifth time and becoming the first female tennis player to earn $6 million in a season make her a strong candidate for sportswoman of 2009.

Laureus sent briefing notes to the sports journalists whose votes form the shortlists, with a panel of retired champions then deciding the winner.

Suggested candidates included skiier Lindsay Vonn, swimmers Britta Steffen and Federica Pellegrini, track and field athletes Allyson Felix, Shelly-Ann Fraser, Sanya Richards and Blanka Vasic, ironman triathlete Chrissie Wellington and golfer Ji Yai Shin.

It is a relatively low-key list in which Williams looks like a stand-out.

But the notes pointedly say her "excellent year was somewhat spoiled" by the New York incident.

Whether this is a hint to the judges - who include Australians Dawn Fraser, Steve Waugh and Cathy Freeman, as well as the likes of Ian Botham, Mark Spitz, Sebastian Coe, Nadia Comaneci and Navratilova - is impossible to say.

But Laureus, which brings together upmarket car, watch, communications and investment partners, places great store in the prestige of their 11-year-old awards and their Sport for Good Foundation, which promotes social change.

So whether they would embrace a sportswoman of the year who is on probation for gross bad sportsmanship is an interesting question, to be answered in March.

Williams won the award in 2003 and the comeback of the year award three years ago.

Russian pole vaulter Yelena Isinbayeva - in a discipline with limited opposition - is the only dual winner, so if Williams does salute again it is reasonable to suggest she should be regarded as at least the equal of any sportswoman of the decade.

Colleague Jon Anderson, in his recent list of the top 100 sports performers of the noughties, had golfer Annika Sorenstam at No. 7 and Williams - "a petulant prima donna who is all about herself" - at 11.

Ando's disdain might have some support but Williams won 10 of her 11 majors during that period. Sorenstam won eight in arguably a less competitive environment.

As for all-time, American magazine Sports Illustrated produced its list for the 20th century in 1999. The top 10 were heptathlete Jackie Joyner-Kersee, Didrickson, King, skater Sonja Henie, Navratilova and Evert, skater Bonnie Blair runner Wilma Rudolph, gymnast Nadia Comaneci and swimmer Tracey Caulkins. (Court was 16th, Dawn Fraser 21st.)

For the record, Williams has now won the Australian four times, Wimbledon and the US three and the French once, and at one stage held them all-- the "Serena Slam."

In doubles, she has 11 grand slam titles and two Olympic gold medals.

She is clearly the best female tennis player on the planet right now and on the way to becoming ... what, exactly?

In a league of her own, perhaps.


reedr@heraldsun.com.au

Link (http://www.heraldsun.com.au/sport/in-serena-williamss-shadow/story-e6frf9if-1225824896903)

BlameSerena
Feb 3rd, 2010, 12:55 PM
She is clearly the best female tennis player on the planet right now and on the way to becoming ... what, exactly?

In a league of her own, perhaps.

Absolutely brilliant (although he says she won the AO 4 times when it's 5). I have to e-mail this guy. This is a wonderful article.

nadlinds
Feb 4th, 2010, 07:56 PM
Williams Meets William

MELBOURNE, Australia - Serena Williams has met a number of notable people throughout her career - US President Barack Obama, Michael Jackson... and now she can add royalty to her list, as she met England's Prince William on Thursday in Melbourne. The defending Australian Open champion had the opportunity to chat with the royal, who is touring Australia and New Zealand on an official state visit.

"I'm really excited to have won my match today," Williams said on a video blog posted on her website, "but beyond that, I had a much greater moment - I just met Prince William! He was so cool, so nice and so sweet.

"He asked me if I played today, and when I told him I did, he told me that I get changed really fast. I said 'Yeah, I can just spin line Superman and change! He couldn't quite tell me who his favorite player is, between Venus and me. He's older, so I expected him to say Venus, so I told him that Harry was my favorite because he's younger. So we had a little fun. I have always wanted to meet him, because we're around the same age. Unfortunately he missed my match... I really know that he wanted to see me play. I hope so!"

Though he missed Williams' match earlier in the day, Prince William was able to catch the match between Australian Casey Dellacqua and Karolina Sprem. He was also able to meet men's No. Roger Federer and catch his match against Victor Hanescu. Williams and her mother Oracene posed for a photograph with Prince William during their meeting.

http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/OffCourtNews/Read/0,,12781~1940869,00.html

Tech1
Feb 5th, 2010, 01:26 AM
92,000 Reasons Why Serena Won the Australian Open
by Bill Simons (http://www.insidetennis.com/author/simons/) | Saturday, January 30th, 2010

She only had 92,000 reasons to win the Australian Open.

After all, just five months ago, Serena Williams imploded in New York and her late night x-ranted rant, prompted many to say that she should be banned from even playing in Melbourne. Instead she was fined $92,000.

Serena was not pleased. And its not such a swell idea to get little sis Williams mad. Remember that when her then-boyfriend, NFL star Lavar Arrington, told her to take a hike, the jilted gal went on a crazy-good tear, winning the Serena Slam as she collected four straight Slams. Now again, after her big humiliation in the Big Apple, she was more-than-motivated.

Okay, at the U.S. Open, she had lost to the Belgian mommy, Kim Clijsters. Now in Melbourne looking like a mummy in all her bandages she was determined to provide on-court first aid for her battered n tattered reputation. Focused and powerful her serve on fire and winning her doubles matches with sister V on her off days she plowed through a beloved Aussie (Sam Stosur), a Belarus basher (Victoria Azarenka) and a rising Chinese dynamo (Li Na).

It hardly seemed to matter who was on the other side of the net. Yet, on other side of the draw a cloud was on the horizon. There loomed her greatest rival, yet another twentysomething Belgian star forging an unbelievable comeback the mighty mite, Justine Henin inch-for-inch the craftiest competitor the womans game has ever produced.

But, in the beginning, conventional wisdom told us it would be a modest miracle if the feisty Lady of Leige (Belgium) survived her side of the draw. Her quarter from hell featured the likes of Elena Dementieva, Kim Clijsters and Svetlana Kuznetsova.

But Henin has always relished spitting in the face of conventional wisdom.

Little ladies dont win in this era of Big Babe Tennis.
One just doesnt ever quit in the final of a Slam (think of her no mas moment at the 06 Aussie final).
You never, ever just walk away from the sport when youre No. 1.
You always go to the dance with the game that got you there.But Ms. Impossible is Nothing is nothing if not stubborn. So, inspired by Mr. Wonderful Roger Federer and Mommy Dearest, Kim Clijsters, and determined to finally win Wimbledon, she fell back into the welcoming arms of tennis, the alluring lover she abandoned just 20 months ago.

But always the Euro-thinker uber intense, never quite at ease and addicted to challenge it was not enough just to come back with her old, tried and true game based on speed, defense, grit, smarts, dazzling variety and the most beautiful backhand God ever created. How boring?

Instead, the little engine that could would re-tool her package (that had only gained her seven Slams) into a much bigger, grass-court friendly game: heavier serve and forehand, bold net-charging forays, and an Im in charge first strike mentality that attempted to dictate points.

And it worked! While her once fierce draw imploded as No. 2 seed Dinara Safina, Svetlana Kuznetsova, Clijsters, Maria Sharapova and Jelena Jankovic bid adieu), she handily took care of business, sweeping aside three Russians (including Dementieva and Nadia Petrova,) two fellow-Belgians and Jie Zheng one of those delightfully surprising, who invited you to the semis, Chinese stars.

So, having plowed the field, Justine was now ready to harvest her championship.

But not so fast. Womens tennis (drum rolls please) had at last produced a sizzling final. Justines foe would not be some not-ready-for-primetime Russian who would meekly lay down and fold her tent (think Safina or Dementieva), a sweet teen wannabe (like U.S. Open finalist Caroline Wozniacki) and it would not be one of those all-Williams family semi-snooze-fests.

No, here was a dream final featuring the two fiercest champions of our era: the back where she once belonged lightweight battler and the heavyweight bomber who, despite having 11 majors in her trophy case, very much needed to show the world a thing or two. Here were two No. 1s who had 18 Slams between them, yet inexplicably had never met in a major final.

Keenly aware of the moment, the American who has called herself Rebel X and says you need a wild streakYou need to put it out there that youre reckless and unpredictable, predictably began the battle with an imposing ace.

But oh-so-predictably, Henin promptly fought her way to three break points in the first game. But, in a precursor of the destiny of the day, the Belgian could not convert. Serena held. Again in the third game, Henin had two more break points. Again she fell short. Dispirited and wondering what if, Justine played a loose game and was promptly broken at love to go down 1-3. Let the see-saw battle begin!

Seeking to attack at every opportunity, unwilling to retreat to her traditional wheels n savvy defensive style, with all its sprints and slices which open the court, Justine powered on and managed to break back to even the set at 4-4.

But her supposedly new serve, which had been problematic throughout the fortnight, again faltered. Hitting only 41 percent first serves, she gifted a key double fault and a backhand error, giving Serena her second break, which allowed Williams to go on to claim the first set, 6-4.

Now the stat sheet screamed out, the match was over. After all, Serena had won all 40 of her previous Aussie Open matches in which she won the first set. Its true that Henin had, in her last Aussie Open final, quit with a stomach prob. But today, she had other ideas. Almost broken again, in the second game of the second set, she bounced off the ropes, surviving two break points to hold serve. Emboldened, she broke Serena at love, only to be stopped in her tracks, as Serena broke back. But Henins new-look aggressiveness was at last trending in the right direction. Flowing more freely and attacking Serenas (best in the game) second serve, Henin found her groove, winning 15 straight points and five straight games en route to sending the match into a decisive final set, where as Boris Becker told us, its all about the mind and who wants it the most.
So a key question shouted out loud: is there any better closer in all of tennis, in all of sports than Serena (tap that fury) Williams? If Reggie Jackson was Mr. October, Serena is Little Ms. Crunch Time.

Never mind that Williams and Henin exchanged breaks early in the third set. Williams just stepped up, said enough is enough, and despite her fatigue, grabbed the match by the throat. Power and will in place, her imposing serve soared to a devastating dimension her diminutive foe just couldnt handle .

Finally, this Aussie picture was coming into focus. An inspired lightweight was trying, almost deperately, to handle the blows of a great heavyweight sluggr, picking it up in the final breathless rounds. Now Henin, for all her heart, seemed over matched, as the Floridian sensing history, tasting redemption created seperation, winning the last four games and blasting a laser backhand to the open court to claim the championship bout 6-4, 3-6, 6-2.

Yes, Serena had defended her title (the first time shes ever won down under in an even year). Her fifth Aussie title gave her her 12th Slam overall, tying her with her pal, another fiesty lady, Billie Jean King.
But more than this, it put all the (Im going to shove it down your throat) ugliness of New York in the rear view mirror.

American sports fans who forgave the likes of Kobe Roberts after his rape trial, Alex Rodriquez after his steroid admissions and a lad named John McEnroe after his terrible tantrums, will now probably forgive Ms. Serena, who gave us more than 92,000 reasons to figure out that her competitive heart intense and unflinching is as grand as it is fierce.

nadlinds
Feb 5th, 2010, 08:25 PM
How Does Serena Stack Up?

MELBOURNE, Australia - Serena Williams kept building on her legacy in Melbourne, winning her fifth Australian Open - and 12th overall Grand Slam singles title - with an electric win over Justine Henin. But how does the American stack up against the other Sony Ericsson WTA Tour legends?

Grand Slam Singles Titles: Active Players
1. Serena Williams (12)
2. Justine Henin (7)
Venus Williams (7)
4. Maria Sharapova (3)
5. Kim Clijsters (2)
Svetlana Kuznetsova (2)
7. Ana Ivanovic (1)

Grand Slam Singles Titles: All-Time
1. Margaret Court (24)
2. Steffi Graf (22)
3. Helen Wills Moody (19)
4. Chris Evert (18)
Martina Navratilova (18)
5. Billie Jean King (12)
Serena Williams (12)
7. Maureen Connolly (9)
Monica Seles (9)
9. Molly Bjurstedt Mallory (8)
Suzanne Lenglen (8)

http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/news/20100205/how-does-serena-stack-up_2256076_1955802

BuTtErFrEnA
Feb 5th, 2010, 08:49 PM
My favorite article:

Winners & Winning

by Bobby Chintapalli, TW Contributing Editor

We knew from the start that, even though it’s not 2002 anymore (look up if you don't remember those days), the players to watch were Justine 2.0 and Serena 92K. For me they were the two main questions, yet with the Australian Open women’s singles final here, I find myself surprisingly… surprised.

Maybe it was all the yellow, big Maria’s “Powerade blue”, little Maria’s quarterfinal berth, Kim’s “disheveled” play, Ana’s still-crazy toss, Dinara’s denial about her back, Jelena’s un-JJ-like errors, Svetlana’s dozen tweets, poor Elena D. and Flavia, the breadsticks and bagels, the heads in towels, the towels in weird places, the Chinese, the Russians, the line judges and, yes, Pam Shriver. For some reason, for some time, I stopped focusing so much on Serena Williams and Justine Henin.

Luckily the numbers fill in part of the parts I missed and also foretell some of the story that hasn’t been written yet. Many key stats aren’t tracked of course – Justine’s number of aces following an ‘allez’, Serena’s winner-to-bandages ratio, Justine’s break-point conversions based on number of glances at Carlos Rodriguez, Serena’s number of service holds based on number of late-night tweets. Many key stats are tracked - let’s look at those here.

Serves

Women’s ace leader – Serena Williams
Women’s double fault leader – Justine Henin

Total aces for Henin – 23
Total aces for Serena – 53
Average aces/match for all – 2
Average aces/match for Henin – 4
Average aces/match for Serena – 9

Total DFs for Henin – 33
Total DFs for Serena – 9
Average DFs/match for all – 4
Average DFs/match for Henin – 6
Average DFs/match for Serena – 2

Call her Servena, goddess of the serve, because that serve is heavenly. Serena uses it to go for the kill when things are good and to stay alive when things aren’t. Imagine how comforting it must be for her and how demoralizing for her opponents that she knows (and they know) she always has “a couple of aces” up her sleeve. After her semifinal loss against Serena, Na Li said, “I mean, like if she want win the point, just ace.”

Like at the US Open and Wimbledon before that, Serena served the highest number of aces here. Her serve is no-frills – there’s no underwear-tugging pre-serve ritual, no tossing and retossing… just a few quick bounces, a reliable toss and, more likely than for anyone else, an ace… out wide, down the middle, wherever. As usual Serena managed to reach the top of the ace leader list while staying off the double fault leader list.

Justine, on the other hand, was the double fault leader. We’ve heard the commentators enough to know that’s not as bad as it may seem. For one thing Justine usually double faults because she goes for more on her second serve than others do and not because she gets tentative. While most of her opponents had a faster average first serve speed, only one of them (Yanina Wickmayer) had a faster average second serve speed. Justine’s double fault ‘leadership’ also owes to her retooling of her serve in preparation to hit the green, green grass of Wimbledon with a motion that propels her into the court and toward the net, which is where she wants to finish off more points now.

Volleys

Net approaches won by Justine – 84/127 (66%)
Net approaches won by Serena – 69/97 (71%)

% Points on which Justine approached – 14%
% Points on which Serena approached – 12%

Justine 2.0 is all about Wimbledon and, thus, all about volleying. In preparation for her trip to London, Justine spent some quality time at the net in Melbourne. She won more net approaches than all her opponents. Maybe practice makes perfect, because she also approached more than all but one of her opponents (the once-again-feared Nadia Petrova).

Because of all the talk about the Wimbledonization of Justine’s game, I expected her impressive net stats but was a wee bit surprised by Serena’s, which weren’t too shabby. She approached only a little less than Justine but more than all of her opponents except Victoria Azarenka. When Serena did approach, she won points a little more often than Justine.

Winners & Errors

Winners by Justine – 164
Winners by Serena – 191

Unforced errors by Justine – 225
Unforced errors by Serena – 147

Winner-UFE differential for Justine – Negative 61
Winner-UFE differential for Serena – Positive 44

Serena’s positive winner-to-error differential always makes me smile. (That may say less about Serena’s skills than my lack of a real, non-tennis life.) Watching her play sometimes rough-and-tough tennis, you don’t expect such prim-and-proper numbers. The positive differential owes partly to the fact that aces are included in the winner count. But the rest of it? The rest of it is why she’s Number 1.

Justine is no slouch herself here. She hit more winners than all her opponents except Alisa Kleybanova. Henin also moves and defends well, so Serena’s not likely to hit as many winners against her. If Serena tries to go for more as result, her unforced error count could climb too, making that differential less prim and proper on both ends.

Numbers Schmumbers

As much as stats tell you about aces, winners and volleys, there’s more they can’t tell you, especially when it comes to big matches. How players fill in the gap between what numbers can and can’t show is what separates the great from the Grand Slam champions.

Consider this: Victoria Azarenka was two games away from the match in her quarterfinal loss to Serena and, in the end, lost just three fewer points (102 to 105). Yanina Wickmayer actually won three more points (96 to 93) in her fourth-round loss to Justine. Eventually three points here and there can add up seven Grand Slam titles (Justine) or even 11 (Serena).

Serena already has the most Grand Slam singles titles of any active player, but a win here would take her to a dozen, tying her with Billie Jean King. A win for Justine would extricate her from her tie with the older Williams sister, putting her in a lone second-place spot to the younger Williams sisters (among active players) and one away from Monica Seles’s nine titles.

When Serena and Justine start their 14th match, playing for their 19th combined Grand Slam singles title, with Serena leading the head-to-head 7 to 6, you can forget these numbers and all the rest. Serena for one isn’t manipulating Excel pivot tables as she waits in the locker room, and she isn’t thinking about percentage of net approaches won against Petra Kvitova (100 percent) once she gets onto the court: “I just go out and do whatever I can. Whatever happens, it’s all I can do at that time.” When it comes to the greatest champions on the biggest stages, even the number of winners can’t tell you who’ll do the winning.

Link (http://tennisworld.typepad.com/tennisworld/2010/01/wta-final-preview.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+tennisworld-bodo+%28Peter+Bodo%27s+TennisWorld%29)


:spit:

Marcell
Feb 5th, 2010, 08:49 PM
'SOS Saving Ourselves-Help For Haiti' Announces New Musical Performances and Celebrity Participants To Superstar Lineup

President Clinton Set to Make a Special Appearance, Arriving Directly from Haiti

Chrisette Michele joins Wyclef Jean, Justin Bieber, Keri Hilson, Chris Brown, Jazmine Sullivan, Pitbull, Akon, Ludacris, Mary J Blige, Robin Thicke, Monica, Kirk Franklin, Damian Marley, Nas, Busta Rhymes and India.Arie in Miami

Additional Participants Include Trey Songz, Common, David Banner, Gloria Estefan, Pete Wentz, Jeremih, The Dream, Jason Derulo, Sean Kingston, Mike Tyson, Serena Williams, Joey Fatone, Ryan Leslie, Rickey Smiley, Fonzworth Bentley, Sean Paul, Brian McKnight, Alonzo Mourning, Jim Brown, Omarion, Jimmy Jean-Louis, Andre Berto, Raul de Molina, Travis McCoy, Tyson Ritter and NFL Players Elvis Dumervil, Devin Thomas and Clinton Portis

Hosted by Queen Latifah, Sean "Diddy" Combs and Pharrell, the Telecast will Air LIVE Friday, February 5 at 8:00 P.M., ET/PT on BET, MTV, VH1, CENTRIC, BET International and Live in Haiti on TNH and Tripp TV

BET International in the UK, Middle East and Africa Will Rebroadcast on Saturday, February 6 and MTV Base UK Will Present SOS SAVING OURSELVES-HELP FOR HAITI on Sunday Evening, February 7

Download image NEW YORK, Feb. 5 /PRNewswire/ -- BET Networks aligns with music's brightest stars for "SOS Saving Ourselves – Help for Haiti," benefit concert and telethon. Wyclef Jean, Justin Bieber, Keri Hilson, Chris Brown, Jazmine Sullivan, Pitbull, Akon, Ludacris, Mary J Blige, Robin Thicke, Monica, Kirk Franklin, Nas, Damian Marley, Busta Rhymes, India.Arie and Chrisette Michele will captivate audiences while assisting in the efforts of raising donations for the devastated victims of Haiti. To add to the already stellar lineup, President Clinton lends his time and inspiration, as he will arrive directly from supporting the relief efforts in Haiti with The Clinton Foundation Haiti Fund. Hosted by Queen Latifah, Sean "Diddy" Combs and Pharrell, in partnership with Procter & Gamble and Pepsi, "SOS Saving Ourselves – Help for Haiti" will be taped at the American Airlines Arena in Miami, FL on February 5th at 8:00 p.m. ET/PT and will air simultaneously on BET, MTV, VH1 CENTRIC, BET International in Europe, Africa and the Middle East as well as airing live in Haiti on TNH and Tripp TV. Additionally, MTV Base UK will air the telethon this weekend. Tickets are available now at www.ticketmaster.com.

(Logo: http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20070716/BETNETWORKSLOGO )

In addition to musical performances, celebrity appearances will include Trey Songz, Common, David Banner, Gloria Estefan, Pete Wentz, Jeremih, The Dream, Jason Derulo, Sean Kingston, Mike Tyson, Serena Williams, Joey Fatone, Brian McKnight, Sean Paul, Ryan Leslie, Alonzo Mourning, Jim Brown, Omarion, Jimmy Jean-Louis, Rickey Smiley, Fonzworth Bentley, Andre Berto, Raul de Molina, Travis McCoy, Tyson Ritter and NFL Players Elvis Dumervil, Devin Thomas and Clinton Portis.

Proceeds of the telecast will go to five charitable organizations - Yele Haiti, CARE, Project Medishare, P & G's Children's Safe Drinking Water, and The Clinton Foundation.

Akamai HD Network and iStreamplanet donated for web and mobile streaming services. "SOS Saving Ourselves – Help for Haiti" will also be streamed live over the web and to iPhone and iPod Touch at www.bet.com.

"SOS Saving Ourselves – Help for Haiti" is accepting donations now through the following methods:

•Text: Text SOS to 50555 to donate $10


•Phone: Call 1-877-6-SOS-NOW (1-877-676-7669)


•Online: Visit www.soshelpforhaiti.org


To purchase tickets, please visit www.ticketmaster.com, the AmericanAirlines Arena ticket office (www.aaarena.com) or call 1-800-745-3000 (toll free).

"SOS Saving Ourselves – Help for Haiti" is executive produced by Salli Frattini, in collaboration with BET Networks, Queen Latifah, Sean "Diddy" Combs and Pharrell. Ray Chew is the music director for this event.

For more information on how to help Haiti, visit www.bet.com.

About Yele Haiti

Yele Haiti (http://www.yele.org/about-us/) is a grass roots movement that builds global awareness for Haiti while helping to transform the country through programs in education, sports, the arts and environment. Yele's community service programs include food distribution and mobilizing emergency relief. Haitian born Grammy© Award winning musician, humanitarian and Goodwill Ambassador to Haiti Wyclef Jean founded Yele Haiti in 2005. Questions re: Yele Haiti can be directed to Ken Sunshine or Briele Douglass at Sunshine/Sachs – 212-691-2800.

About CARE

Founded in 1945, CARE (www.care.org) is a leading humanitarian organization fighting global poverty. CARE is continuing to rush aid and emergency team members to Haiti. CARE places special focus on working alongside poor women because, equipped with the proper resources, women have the power to help whole families and entire communities escape poverty. Working in more than 70 countries, women are at the heart of CARE's community-based efforts to improve education, health and economic opportunity.

About Project MediShare

Project MediShare (http://www.projectmedishare.org) is a non-profit organization that has been working in Haiti since 1995. They have been at the helm of the massive earthquake medical relief effort. In an immediate response to the crisis, they mobilized multiple teams of medical personnel and disaster relief workers and will continue to provide the much needed medical care and aid to the country in the coming months.

About Akamai

Akamai® provides market-leading managed services for powering video, dynamic transactions, and enterprise applications online. Having pioneered the content delivery market one decade ago, Akamai's services have been adopted by the world's most recognized brands across diverse industries. The alternative to centralized Web infrastructure, Akamai's global network of tens of thousands of distributed servers provides the scale, reliability, insight and performance for businesses to succeed online. Akamai has transformed the Internet into a more viable place to inform, entertain, interact, and collaborate. To experience The Akamai Difference, visit www.akamai.com.

About P&G's Children's Safe Drinking Water Program

Procter & Gamble's not-for-profit Children's Safe Drinking Water (CSDW) Program is focused on reducing the sickness and death that result from water-borne illness caused by drinking contaminated water. Using some of the same ingredients as municipal water systems, PUR™ Purifier of Water removes pollutants and cysts, and kills bacteria and viruses in contaminated water. Since 2004, P&G has partnered with a diverse network of organizations to help distribute PUR™ Purifier of Water packets. To date, the Children's Safe Drinking Water Program has delivered over 1.9 billion liters of clean drinking water to people in over 50 developing countries including during critical emergency relief situations across the globe. To learn more about the CSDW program, please visit www.csdw.org.

About The Clinton Foundation

President Clinton and the Clinton Foundation have a long history of engagement and involvement in Haiti. The Clinton Foundation works in partnership with the government of Haiti to strengthen healthcare systems and decrease the prevalence of HIV/AIDS and other diseases. After a series of hurricanes ravaged the nation in 2008, President Clinton made a Call to Action for Haiti at CGI's 2008 Annual Meeting. Members responded with over $100 million worth of commitments to help Haiti "build back better." President Clinton was named UN Special Envoy for Haiti in 2009 to assist its people and government as they "build back better" from storm damages and implement their economic vision for the future. President Clinton traveled to Haiti three times in 2009.

In the immediate aftermath of the January earthquake that struck Port-au-Prince, President Clinton established the Clinton Foundation Haiti Fund to support relief efforts. Less than a week after the earthquake, President Clinton traveled to Haiti to deliver food, water, and supplies, made available through the Fund. He also met with Haitian officials and U.S. troops, and toured the General Hospital in Port-au-Prince. The Clinton Foundation Haiti Fund has already distributed $3 million in donations.

About iStreamPlanet

iStreamPlanet® develops and provides digital media strategy, managed webcasting services, and Rich Internet Applications. The company successfully integrates managed services and SaaS-based digital media applications that cover all aspects of a media delivery, enabling enterprises and other content owners to distribute and monetize their digital media across multiple platforms. iStreamPlanet's team of digital media and broadcast experts has managed and enabled the deployment of more than 1,000 large live events viewed online by millions, including the Presidential Inauguration and the Michael Jackson Memorial. The world's top business leaders (American Express, AT&T, Caterpillar, Microsoft), trendiest music festivals (Bonnaroo, Coachella, SXSW), most popular sporting events (Masters Golf Tournament, Championships at Wimbledon, Sunday Night Football) and major broadcasters (CBS Television, Cablevision, Fox International, NBC) rely on iStreamPlanet's digital media solutions. Through its partnership with Smart City, iStreamPlanet also supports over 60 of the largest U.S. convention centers and event facilities. Founded in 2000, the privately held company is headquartered in Las Vegas with offices in Orlando, Florida; Scottsdale, Arizona; and Washington, D.C. More information is available by calling 702-492-5900 or visiting http://www.istreamplanet.com.

About BET Networks

BET Networks, a division of Viacom Inc. ( VIA, VIA.B), is the nation's leading provider of quality entertainment, music, news and public affairs television programming for the African-American audience. BET reaches more than 98 million households and can be seen in the United States, Canada, the Caribbean, the United Kingdom and sub-Saharan Africa. BET is the dominant African-American consumer brand with a diverse group of business extensions: BET.com, a leading Internet destination for Black entertainment, music, culture, and news; CENTRIC, a 24-hour entertainment network targeting the 25- to 54-year-old African-American audience; BET Digital Networks - BET Gospel and BET Hip Hop, attractive alternatives for cutting-edge entertainment tastes; BET Home Entertainment, a collection of BET-branded offerings for the home environment including DVDs and video-on-demand; BET Event Productions, a full-scale event management and production company with festivals and live events spanning the globe; BET Mobile, which provides ringtones, games and video content for wireless devices; and BET International, which operates BET in the United Kingdom and oversees the extension of BET network programming for global distribution.


SOURCE BET Networks

RELATED LINKS
http://www.bet.com

nadlinds
Feb 6th, 2010, 07:42 PM
Injured Serena Williams pulls out of Paris Indoor Open

World number one Serena Williams has pulled out of next week's Paris Indoor Open because of a leg injury.

The 28-year-old American picked up the injury on the way to winning the Australian Open for the fifth time in Melbourne last month.

Williams has lifted the Paris trophy twice in five appearances, winning both her titles in 1999 and 2003 against France's Amelie Mauresmo.

Mauresmo won last year's event but has since retired from the sport.

Russia's Elena Dementieva is the now the highest-ranked player taking part in the tournament, which starts on Monday.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/tennis/8501840.stm

BlameSerena
Feb 8th, 2010, 08:03 PM
^^Do you have a link for this one? Thanks in advance.

nadlinds
Feb 11th, 2010, 08:10 PM
Serena & Venus Williams To Join Forces For Kastles

February 11, 2010 - World TeamTennis (WTT) Washington Kastles

In today's World TeamTennis Marquee Draft, the Kastles pulled off a blockbuster trade with the Philadelphia Freedoms to acquire 20-time Grand Slam champion Venus Williams for financial considerations. The trade should significantly enhance the Kastles chances of returning to the WTT Finals by bringing together Kastles headliner Serena Williams and sister Venus as teammates.

"The historic opportunity to have both Serena and Venus on our team is a thrill, both for the success of our team and for our fans," said Kastles owner Mark Ein. "They are the epitome of what is great about the sport of tennis and will lead an unprecedented collection of talent for us on the court in 2010."

With the addition of Venus, the Kastles roster now has a total of 61 Grand Slam titles including 19 women's singles, 26 women's doubles, six men's doubles and 10 mixed doubles championships.

Kastles Coach Murphy Jensen is ecstatic about having the Williams sisters to lead the Kastles' title defense. "It takes world-class talent to win championships and there are no more accomplished athletes than Serena and Venus," Murphy noted, "Last summer was truly a dream season for us, and come July 5, the dream continues in DC."

The 2010 season will be the third for Serena in DC and the world #1 is focused on bringing back to back titles to Washington: "I'm looking forward to returning to Washington, DC this summer and helping my Kastles teammates defend our WTT Championship title."

Serena is coming off of a tremendous year of tennis which has catapulted her back to the #1 ranking in the world after capturing the past two Australian Open singles championships and the 2009 Wimbledon singles crown. Serena now has 25 career Grand Slam titles, 12 in singles, 11 in women's doubles (all with Venus) and two in mixed doubles. She holds more Grand Slam titles than any other active female player and has won more prize money than any woman in the history of professional sports.

Venus has won five Wimbledon singles titles, is the reigning Australian Open, Wimbledon and US Open women's doubles champion with Serena and has a total of seven Grand Slam titles in singles, 11 in women's doubles and two in mixed doubles. She also has won three Olympic gold medals including one in singles.

The rest of the Kastles roster will be determined during the March 16 WTT Roster Draft.

Additionally, another star-studded lineup will be coming to Kastles Stadium in 2010 including John McEnroe (New York Sportimes) and Anna Kournikova (St. Louis Aces).

Fourteen-time Grand Slam champion Martina Hingis (New York Buzz) and former world #1 Lindsay Davenport (St. Louis Aces) have also joined the World TeamTennis 2010 lineup. The Kastles will find out whether Hingis and Davenport will be visiting Kastles this summer when the WTT schedule is released in late February/early March.

http://www.oursportscentral.com/services/releases/?id=3962901

nadlinds
Feb 12th, 2010, 07:27 PM
Laureus Nods for Stars

ABU DHABI, UAE - Sony Ericsson WTA Tour stars Serena Williams and Kim Clijsters are among the international sports figures who have been nominated for 2010 Laureus World Sports Awards.

The nominees, determined by a ballot of the world's media, were unveiled by Laureus World Sports Academy chairman Edwin Moses and Academy members Kapil Dev and Mika Hakkinen at the Emirates Palace in Abu Dhabi. The winners will now be decided by the Academy's jury of 46 sporting greats, and announced at a glittering ceremony in Abu Dhabi on March 10.

World No.1 Williams, a two-time Laureus winner, is nominated for the Laureus World Sportswoman of the Year Award after winning two Grand Slam titles - the Australian Open and Wimbledon - in 2009. The American also finished the year on a high with victory at the Sony Ericsson Championships in Doha, securing her second season-end finish in the top ranking. Her rivals for the Laureus crown include swimmers Federica Pellegrini and Britta Steffen, athletes Shelly-Ann Fraser and Sanya Richards, and US ski racer Lindsey Vonn.

As expected, Clijsters is nominated for the Laureus World Comeback of the Year Award, in recognition of her stunning run to the US Open title after two years out of the game. The 26-year-old Belgian's fellow nominees include Tour de France cyclist and two-time Laureus winner Lance Armstrong, golfing legend Tom Watson, American Football quarter-back Brett Favre and athletes Jessica Ennis and Blanka Vlasic.

Also from the world of tennis, four-time Laureus World Sportsman of the Year Award winner Roger Federer has been nominated again. Japanese wheelchair tennis player Shingo Kunieda, who is unbeaten in 77 matches dating back to 2007, is nominated for the Laureus World Sportsperson of the Year with a Disability award.

http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/OffCourtNews/Read/0,,12781~1963798,00.html

nadlinds
Feb 18th, 2010, 08:34 PM
Serena Williams to visit Kenya next week

Fourteen months after her inaugural visit to Kenya, the world's women tennis number one, Serena Williams is poised to return to the country on a charity mission.

Ms Williams will officially visit Kenya for three days next week to inaugurate a school built using her funds and several other partners. The School named the Wee Secondary School is in Makueni District in Eastern Province.

The school was built through partnership between Hewlett Packard the world's largest technology firm and Build African Schools initiative - an American non profit making organization.

As part of its commitment, HP will set up a digital computer laboratory by equipping the school with , computers, printers, internet connectivity and facilitate the training of the local teachers and students.

During her last visit to the country, Ms. Williams inaugurated the Serena Williams Secondary School which is a few Kilometres from the new school.

According to the Organizers of the visit, HP and BAS, Ms. Williams will check the progress of the previous school and hold a one hour teaching session with the students of both institutions.

Build African Schools and HP have joined together since 2004 to help children in Africa have access to education. By building schools and equipping them with electricity, computers and other teaching aids.

http://www.kbc.co.ke/story.asp?ID=62372

nadlinds
Feb 20th, 2010, 07:48 PM
Serena Williams out of Billie Jean King Cup exhibition with leg injury

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS (CP) – 3 hours ago

NEW YORK — Serena Williams has pulled out of an exhibition at Madison Square Garden because of a left leg injury.

Williams announced her withdrawal from the BNP Paribas Showdown for the Billie Jean King Cup on Thursday. She'll be replaced in the four-player field by former No. 1 Ana Ivanovic.

The 12-time Grand Slam singles champion was to face Kim Clijsters on March 1 in what would have been their first meeting since Williams' infamous tirade during the semifinals at the 2009 U.S. Open that drew a record US$82,500 fine.

The leg injury has forced Williams to miss tournaments in Paris and Dubai.

Williams' sister, Venus, will play Svetlana Kuznetsova in the other semifinal at the one-night event in New York.

http://www.google.com/hostednews/canadianpress/article/ALeqM5gRRUTw_8ReZhjuQwPI_Hp8FmUShA

nadlinds
Feb 23rd, 2010, 07:31 PM
Serena Inaugurates Second Kenyan School

MAKUENI, Kenya - Just over a year after visiting Kenya to open the Serena Williams Secondary School in Matooni, Kenya, Serena Williams returned to the country to follow up on her humanitarian efforts. Williams arrived on February 22 for a three day charity mission where she will inaugurate the Wee Secondary School in Makueni, Eastern Province, Kenya.

The new school lies roughly 50 kilometers from the first one. While in the country, Williams will follow up on the progress of the Matooni school and will hold a tennis teaching session with the students at both schools.

Williams has partnered with technology giant Hewlett Packard and the Build African Schools initiative. She is a global ambassador for the firm and has also worked with the Starfishgreatheart Charity for orphans in South Africa.

Hewlett Packard will equip the school with computers, printers and internet connectivity, while facilitating the training of the local teachers and students.

Ken Mbwaya, Hewlett Packard's managing director for East Africa, said: "As our ambassador, Serena was touched by the plight of children from these areas. This has made many keen to learn, even with daily challenges and limitations. Education is the best platform to invest in as it empowers whole communities.

"Sixty-two percent of Kenyans live in absolute poverty, which means that some very bright children are hindered from achieving their potential. This is an actual impediment to the realization of Vision 2030 and we need to tackle this before we seek IT penetration into rural Kenya. Education is the best platform to invest in as it empowers whole communities."

http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/OffCourtNews/Read/0,,12781~1974908,00.html

Marcell
Mar 10th, 2010, 02:55 PM
Bolt, Serena Williams win 2010 Laureus Awards


ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates (AP)—Jamaican sprinter Usain Bolt has won his second Laureus Sportsman of the Year award, and American tennis player Serena Williams won the woman’s prize.

Bolt won three gold medals at last year’s athletics world championships and set world records in the 100 and 200-meter races. Williams, who also earned the award for a second time, won the Australian Open and Wimbledon and regained the No. 1 ranking.

The Laureus Sports Awards recognize achievements in 2009.

Belgian tennis player Kim Clijsters earned the award for the Comeback of the Year. Clijsters won the U.S. Open last year after she was absent from tennis for almost two years, getting married and giving birth.

The Witch-king
Mar 10th, 2010, 03:38 PM
Omg i always wanted Serena or Venus to win this award again!!

BuTtErFrEnA
Mar 10th, 2010, 03:41 PM
:cheer:

BuTtErFrEnA
Mar 10th, 2010, 03:41 PM
Omg i always wanted Serena or Venus to win this award again!!

:angel: fixed it

doni1212
Mar 10th, 2010, 03:59 PM
:lol:

The Witch-king
Mar 10th, 2010, 06:24 PM
:angel: fixed it

I forgot to add "and Jelena". :hearts:

sweetpeas
Mar 10th, 2010, 06:54 PM
Happy happy happy>>>>>>>>>

nadlinds
Mar 10th, 2010, 07:48 PM
Grand Slam Queen Serena Williams Wins Record Third Laureus World Sports Award

3/10/2010

ABU DHABI, March 10, 2010 – Serena Williams became the first woman in history to win three Laureus World Sports Awards after she was proclaimed 2010 Laureus World Sportswoman of the Year at the Awards Ceremony in Abu Dhabi.

The American tennis star won her second Laureus Sportswoman Award, seven years after her first, following Grand Slam victories in 2009 in Australia and at Wimbledon. It was her third Laureus Award in total, after she also won the Laureus Comeback Award in 2007. Only Roger Federer, with four, has won more Laureus Awards.

In 2009, Serena Williams re-established herself at the peak of tennis by regaining the world No 1 ranking for the fifth time in her career. She also broke the record set by Justine Henin for the most prize money earned by a female tennis player in one season with a total of US$6,545,586 during the year.

Serena said: “I am just so delighted to win this Award, but very disappointed I cannot be in Abu Dhabi to say thank you in person. It’s my third Laureus Award which is amazing and I would like to say thank you to all the Academy Members who voted for me and to the world’s media who nominated me. Last year had its ups and downs, so to get this support is fantastic.

“As a tennis player you look at the amazing names of the Academy Members - like John McEnroe, Martina Navratilova, Boris Becker and Monica Seles - who have won so many Grand Slams and they know what it takes to do that. There is nothing better in sport than being acknowledged by the people that you looked up to when you were a young player.

“The Laureus Awards have been a constant reflection of my career, winning in 2003 and 2007, and I think I was also nominated four more times. I know only Roger Federer has more Awards, so it would be cool to catch him up.

“I’ve had a few injury problems over the years, so it’s been great to get back to the top and be World No 1 again. It’s going to be an interesting year with Justine Henin back, but I’m playing well and it was great to win in Australia, and I still want to win every tournament I play. It’s going to be a very exciting 2010,” added Serena.

In the 2009 Australian Open final, Serena defeated Dinara Safina 6–0, 6–3 in 59 minutes to take her fourth Australian title, tying the record for most victories at the event with Steffi Graf, Monica Seles, Margaret Court and Evonne Cawley. At Wimbledon she beat her sister Venus in the final 7–6, 6–2, to win her third title there. At the end of 2009, Serena had taken her total of career Grand Slam singles victories to 11, putting her seventh on the all-time list. In total, she had won 23 Grand Slam titles - 11 in singles, ten in women's doubles and two in mixed doubles. In addition, she has won two Olympic gold medals in women’s doubles. She has won more career prize money than any other female athlete in history.

A little of the gloss of the year was lost at the US Open after an on-court row with a lineswoman who foot-faulted her in the final set of the semi-final against Kim Clijsters. As a result, she was penalised a point for unsportsmanlike conduct and lost the match, and later fined. However she was back to winning ways in the next Grand Slam, the 2010 Australian Open, just after the close of the Laureus qualifying year, beating Justine Henin in the final. Her victory was her fifth Australian Open, and her 12th career singles Grand Slam title.

Laureus World Sports Academy Member Monica Seles, herself a winner of nine Grand Slam titles, said: “It hasn’t been an easy few years for Serena with injuries being a problem, but she comprehensively proved last year that she was the undisputed No 1 player in the world and deserves this Award. And her victory over Justine Henin in the Australian Open final showed that she is determined to hang on to the No 1 position. It’s going to make for a very exciting 2010 in women’s tennis.”

The 2010 Laureus World Sports Awards, which recognise sporting achievement during the period January 1 - December 31, 2009, are the premier honours on the international sporting calendar. The winners are chosen by the Laureus World Sports Academy, the ultimate sports jury, made up of 46 of the greatest sportsmen and sportswomen of all time. The living legends of sport honouring the great athletes of today.

The names of the winners were announced at a televised Awards Ceremony staged at the Emirates Palace in Abu Dhabi which also celebrated the first ten years in the life of Laureus and was attended by global figures from the world of sport and entertainment.

The members of the Laureus World Sports Academy present were: Giacomo Agostini, Marcus Allen, Franz Beckenbauer, Boris Becker, Ian Botham, Sergey Bubka, Nadia Comaneci, Kapil Dev, Emerson Fittipaldi, Sean Fitzpatrick, Dawn Fraser, Cathy Freeman, Mika Hakkinen, Tony Hawk, Mike Horn, Kip Keino, Edwin Moses, Nawal El Moutawakel, Robby Naish, Alexey Nemov, Morné du Plessis, Hugo Porta, Monica Seles, Daley Thompson, Alberto Tomba and Steve Waugh.

Double Oscar-winning Hollywood star Kevin Spacey hosted the glittering Awards Ceremony. Among the guests in a packed auditorium at the Emirates Palace were Oscar-winning actress Gwyneth Paltrow, British film stars Hugh Grant and Clive Owen, American actors Kyle MacLachlan from Desperate Housewives and Michelle Rodriguez who played leading roles in the Oscar-winning movie Avatar and the TV series Lost, Grammy nominated singer-songwriter Mika who earlier drew up to the red carpet in a spectacular gull-wing Mercedes-Benz, England Test cricketer Andrew Flintoff, Formula One winner David Coulthard, world boxing champion Amir Khan, Olympic rowing legend Steve Redgrave, and supermodel Jessica Michibata.

The 2010 Laureus World Sports Awards are supported by Host Partner Aabar Investments PJSC. Abu Dhabi, the capital city of the United Arab Emirates, offers a fascinating combination of the old and the new; a blend of Arabian hospitality and mystique where a mixture of culture and tradition come together against a backdrop of the most modern world-class infrastructure. Abu Dhabi is developing a reputation as a leading international sporting venue. The Laureus World Sports Awards is the latest high profile sports event to be staged in Abu Dhabi. Last year Abu Dhabi was chosen to stage football’s FIFA Club World Cup, and the Abu Dhabi Formula One Grand Prix and the Abu Dhabi Golf Championship are now highlights of the sporting calendar in the city.

The Awards were announced in seven categories. The winners were:
Laureus World Sportsman of the Year: Usain Bolt
Laureus World Sportswoman of the Year: Serena Williams
Laureus World Team of the Year: Brawn GP Formula One
Laureus World Breakthrough of the Year: Jenson Button
Laureus World Comeback of the Year: Kim Clijsters
Laureus World Sportsperson of the Year with a Disability: Natalie du Toit
Laureus World Action Sportsperson of the Year: Stephanie Gilmore

There were two additional Awards: The Laureus Lifetime Achievement Award was presented to athletics legend Nawal El Moutawakel, while American basketball star Dikembe Mutombo won the Laureus Sport for Good Award for his charitable work in the Congo.

For full biographies of the winners go to http://www.laureus.com/awards/2010/winners

http://www.aroundtherings.com/articles/view.aspx?id=34458

nadlinds
Mar 12th, 2010, 10:03 PM
Venus and Serena Williams: Boycotting Indian Wells 9 Years and Counting

At the Indian Wells Masters Series Tennis Tournament in 2001, Venus Williams pulled out of a semifinal match against her sister, Serena Williams, just four minutes before the match was scheduled to start. The enthusiastic crowd, assembled and anxious to see the dynamic duo take the court, were upset and booed the sisters.

The match was to be televised nationally on ESPN2. When Venus and her father, Richard Williams, entered the stadium the next day to watch Serena in the finals against Kim Clijsters, they were booed, as was Serena all during her match.

Even as Serena held the championship trophy aloft, the crowd voiced their displeasure with the Williams sisters, feeling that Venus’ withdrawal was a contrived way out of a difficult match for the close-knit family. The crowd felt deceived and let down. They let everyone know the extent of their displeasure.

Was the crowd wrong? Yes. Players retire due to injury all the time. To accuse Venus of this action was unjust. At the time, the Williams sisters were a rarity in the world of professional tennis. They were both top-notch exciting tennis players capable of beating anyone else on tour.

But their matches against each other often lacked the fire of their matches against other professionals. Venus seemed far too tender, and she rarely defeated Serena in the big finals, except at Wimbledon. In those days there were often subtle comments made in certain media quarters, hinting that the outcome of their matches was pre-ordained.

It was, of course, all nonsense with no foundation. It is not even logical that the sisters would engage in such subterfuge because there was no compelling reason to do so. Sisters compete. From the day they are born until the day they die, sisters vie for attention and the top spot. It is human nature. Most siblings are life-long competitors.

But the sisters, egged on by their father, decided to punish the fans at Indian Wells and the tennis world for booing them. Calling the taunts against them as racially based, the sisters vowed never again to return to the California desert to compete in the Masters Series Tournament at Indian Wells.

And they never have.

Since 2001, the sisters have not stepped foot on the grounds at Indian Wells saying they were subjected to racial slurs. That, of course, may be true. The reason, however, for the crowds displeasure—the reason for the boos—was not based on race. The assembled fans were upset by the last-minute withdrawal from a much-anticipated match between the two sisters.

There are idiots everywhere in the world. Some of them may have been at Indian Wells and may very well have said some unkind, stupid things to the sisters based on their race...just as they probably do to Dwyane Wade and Kobe Bryant in the heat of the moment during an NBA contest.

No professional athlete is insulated from prejudice when his or her very presence on the floor or on the field may signal defeat for some fan’s beloved team or individual sport star. Think Tiger Woods.

There are no laws against being a loud-mouthed boor, unfortunately.

But the sisters have veered too far in the other direction to justify their on-going reaction to being booed. To continue to boycott this major tournament for the actions of a handful of rowdy fans almost a decade ago seems excessive and self-indulgent.

A year or two, maybe. But this has gone on far too long—to the point of backlashing against the Williams sisters. It seems petulant and childish at this point—like they are sticking out their tongues at the WTA and the tennis promoters at Indian Wells, saying they can do whatever they want, and the tennis hierarchy is powerless to stop them.

Really. It is the truth. The WTA is impotent against the star power of the Williams sisters.

In an effort to rein them in, the WTA initiated a rule for mandatory attendance at certain tournaments including this event, then backed off, saying essentially, “Well, if you do not participate at Indian Wells, then you must do some 'promotional activities' in the area of the forsaken tournament.”

Please! What kind of punishment is that? It is not even a good slap on the wrist.

Why pass rules that you will not enforce? The sad truth is that the WTA does enforce its rules, except some tennis superstars get special treatment. That is by far worse than no rules at all.

It is time for the Williams sisters to rise above the fray, and do the right thing by coming back to their roots at Indian Wells. Back in the beginning when the world was just learning about the teenage tennis stars-in-the-making, Indian Wells granted them wild cards into the event and helped the Williams sisters jump start their professional careers.

Indian Wells continues to extend a welcoming hand to the sisters in the hope they will return to play there. It would show great maturity on their part if the William sisters would return, extending the fans in California a chance to make up for their rude and boorish behavior back in 2001.

It is the right thing to do. But let’s face it, how many would have the faith and courage to do the “right thing” in this day and age of skepticism and self-aggrandizement?

http://bleacherreport.com/articles/361673-venus-and-serena-williams-boycotting-indian-wells-9-years-and-counting

Galsen
Mar 12th, 2010, 10:14 PM
I'm glad they don't play

serenafann
Mar 13th, 2010, 02:26 AM
Serena deserved that award,Congrats.

sweetpeas
Mar 13th, 2010, 08:18 PM
Yes Serena does deserved that award!So happy.

doni1212
Mar 14th, 2010, 05:39 AM
I don't know how reliable this newspaper is, :scared: I've found the article in two Indian newspapers and on a site called www.contactmusic.com

http://www.newkerala.com/news/fullnews-69036.html
Rapper Common to marry Serena Williams?

London, March 12 : Rapper Lonnie Rashid Lynn, better known as Common, has fuelled rumours that he will marry Serena Williams by going public with his love for the tennis champion.

"Serena is a beautiful, fun and a strong woman. I love her heart and her strength. She's a warmhearted human being. I think she's incredible," contactmusic.com quoted Common, 38, as saying.

They have been dating for two years and despite a 10-year age gap, the recording star insists he's smitten with the 28-year-old tennis ace.

jpfasho
Mar 14th, 2010, 06:41 AM
Wow you must have read that same article at the exact same time as we because I was just about to post it at the very moment you posted. But yeah I really don't know what to think of this. Don't know if it is true or not but I def want her focused on tennis, but as long as she is happy right...

The Witch-king
Mar 14th, 2010, 07:31 AM
Sorry but how does talking about her in public = i'm going to marry her?

Marcell
Mar 14th, 2010, 12:27 PM
Sorry but how does talking about her in public = i'm going to marry her?


My sentiment exactly!

Tech1
Mar 19th, 2010, 06:23 PM
Serena: Fitness Mag's Champ of Health & Fitness

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_Wcl_lWbgvDQ/S5mGzFS-evI/AAAAAAAAFjI/GomIdooziNk/s200/serenahealthy.jpg (http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_Wcl_lWbgvDQ/S5mGzFS-evI/AAAAAAAAFjI/GomIdooziNk/s1600-h/serenahealthy.jpg)Fitness Magazine lists First Lady Michelle Obama, Serena Williams and sports broadcaster Rich Eisen as "Champions of Health and Fitness." In their first annual Champions of Health & Fitness awards, Fitness Magazine salutes the role models, innovators, and activists who are helping Americans shape up, live healthy, and reach for the best. The list consists of people who are committed to bringing opportunities for healthy living, exercise, and better nutrition to more communities. To find out more, go to http://www.fitnessmagazine.com/health/superstars/champions-of-health-fitness/.

nadlinds
Mar 20th, 2010, 11:28 AM
Serena Williams, del Potro withdraw from Sony Ericsson Open

Top-ranked Serena Williams, who was going for a record sixth title at the upcoming Sony Ericsson Open on Key Biscayne, withdrew Friday due to a knee injury.

Williams injured the knee during the Australian Open and has not played since.

Defending U.S. Open champion Juan Martin del Potro, a rising Argentine star, also pulled out Friday with a wrist injury.

"Obviously, we are disappointed when any of the top players pull out,'' tournament director Adam Barrett said. "When you are talking about one of the most prolific players in the game, a player like Serena, it is extremely disappointing, especially for the fans who won't get to see her.

"We want the best players versus the best players, but we still have a great field with many of the top players in the world. Only difference is this year, we know Serena won't win it. But if a player isn't at 100 percent and can't play their best, it's better for them to sit out. We're here for the long haul. I'd rather see Serena have a long career than have her play in Miami two weeks and jeopardize her health.''

As for Del Potro, Barrett said the Argentine fans in particular will miss out.

"He's a very exciting player and has been a big draw here,'' Barrett said. "The good news is, he's young, and I expect him to come back next year and for 10 or 12 years after that. You're always going to lose some players to injury, but that doesn't diminish the tournament.''

Williams' older sister, Venus, a seven-time Grand Slam champion, will replace her as part of the featured night match at 7 on Thursday. Venus Williams has won three Sony Ericsson Open titles, the last in 2001.

Earlier in the week, former No.‚1 players Maria Sharapova and Dinara Safina, and Nikolay Davydenko all withdrew.

Despite the withdrawals, the tournament features the most impressive field outside of the Grand Slam events. Among the names are: top-ranked Roger Federer, No. 2 Novak Djokovic, No. 3 Rafael Nadal, No.‚4 Andy Murray (the defending champion), defending U.S. Open champion Kim Clijsters, seven-time Grand Slam champion Justine Henin, No.‚8 Andy Roddick and No.‚2 Svetlana Kuznetsova.

Qualifying rounds begin Monday. The women's main draw begins Tuesday (a day earlier than in years past) and the men's main draw begins Wednesday. Federer opens play next Saturday night.

Tickets are available by phone (305-442-3367) or internet at www.sonyericssonopen.com. The two-week tournament ends with the women's final on Saturday, April 3, and the men's final on Sunday, April 4.

http://www.miamiherald.com/2010/03/20/1538633/serena-williams-del-potro-withdraw.html

Galsen
Mar 20th, 2010, 12:36 PM
Serena Williams, del Potro withdraw from Sony Ericsson Open

Top-ranked Serena Williams, who was going for a record sixth title at the upcoming Sony Ericsson Open on Key Biscayne, withdrew Friday due to a knee injury.

Williams injured the knee during the Australian Open and has not played since.

Defending U.S. Open champion Juan Martin del Potro, a rising Argentine star, also pulled out Friday with a wrist injury.

"Obviously, we are disappointed when any of the top players pull out,'' tournament director Adam Barrett said. "When you are talking about one of the most prolific players in the game, a player like Serena, it is extremely disappointing, especially for the fans who won't get to see her.

"We want the best players versus the best players, but we still have a great field with many of the top players in the world. Only difference is this year, we know Serena won't win it. But if a player isn't at 100 percent and can't play their best, it's better for them to sit out. We're here for the long haul. I'd rather see Serena have a long career than have her play in Miami two weeks and jeopardize her health.''

As for Del Potro, Barrett said the Argentine fans in particular will miss out.

"He's a very exciting player and has been a big draw here,'' Barrett said. "The good news is, he's young, and I expect him to come back next year and for 10 or 12 years after that. You're always going to lose some players to injury, but that doesn't diminish the tournament.''

Williams' older sister, Venus, a seven-time Grand Slam champion, will replace her as part of the featured night match at 7 on Thursday. Venus Williams has won three Sony Ericsson Open titles, the last in 2001.

Earlier in the week, former No.‚1 players Maria Sharapova and Dinara Safina, and Nikolay Davydenko all withdrew.

Despite the withdrawals, the tournament features the most impressive field outside of the Grand Slam events. Among the names are: top-ranked Roger Federer, No. 2 Novak Djokovic, No. 3 Rafael Nadal, No.‚4 Andy Murray (the defending champion), defending U.S. Open champion Kim Clijsters, seven-time Grand Slam champion Justine Henin, No.‚8 Andy Roddick and No.‚2 Svetlana Kuznetsova.

Qualifying rounds begin Monday. The women's main draw begins Tuesday (a day earlier than in years past) and the men's main draw begins Wednesday. Federer opens play next Saturday night.

Tickets are available by phone (305-442-3367) or internet at www.sonyericssonopen.com. The two-week tournament ends with the women's final on Saturday, April 3, and the men's final on Sunday, April 4.

http://www.miamiherald.com/2010/03/20/1538633/serena-williams-del-potro-withdraw.html

woow that person is really nice :)

nadlinds
Mar 22nd, 2010, 10:10 PM
Viewpoint: Women’s Tennis Landscape Is Bleak Sans Sisters

Every March, the California sun gives us a glimpse of the WTA Tour’s future, a not-so-distant day when the Williams sisters will spend all their time (rather than some of it) designing clothes, perfecting the art of the manicure, and making movies. It’s not a pretty preview. The sisters haven’t played Indian Wells since 2001, and in that time my level of optimism about the future of women’s tennis has decreased. Markedly. This year it’s near zero.

Why? Because Indian Wells, without the Williams sisters, is a fabulous opportunity for the rest of the field. There’s a chance for a young woman to make a name for herself by winning an important title without having to beat two of the finest players in the game. There’s a chance for stardom, a chance to build confidence, a chance to get everyone talking about the next big thing in the sport. And no one is up to that challenge.

Only three players of merit—Justine Henin, Kim Clijsters, and Maria Sharapova—have won this event since the Williams sisters began their boycott. Each of those three women lost early this week, and none of them represents the future of the tour. Henin and Clijsters have already retired once, and Sharapova has struggled at top tournaments since her return from shoulder surgery last year. The other women who have won this event since 2001 have one major between them and are not likely to add to that collection. They are Daniela Hantuchova (she’s about to turn 27); Vera Zvonareva (she’s 25 and routinely falls apart at majors); and Ana Ivanovic (the former French Open champion and world No. 1 will fall outside the Top 50 after another dispiriting performance).

At the Australian Open this year, the women did something that they hadn’t done in a long time—they outshined the men, thanks largely to a flat performance by Andy Murray in the final. When this tournament began, I thought we were in for another treat. The sisters are irreplaceable, but at least Henin, Clijsters, and Sharapova were back. Elena Dementieva, a woman who deserves a major title if there ever was one, would be motivated; so would Victoria Azarenka and Caroline Wozniacki. Of those six women, only Dementieva and Wozniacki remain.

Why isn’t there an heir apparent to the Williams sisters (and also to Henin, who will turn 28 in June)? I wish I knew. In the years since the sisters joined the tour, only one player, Sharapova, has done something that made every tennis onlooker stop dead and stare. Her performance at Wimbledon in 2004, when she was 17, seemed to crack the Williams code. Maybe it was possible to hit the ball harder than Serena and Venus, and to do it more consistently. Maybe it was possible to be better. That future hasn’t come to pass, which isn’t too surprising—one performance does not a career make. But it is surprising that no one else has taken what Sharapova did then and built on it. More women from more countries play tennis today, and they’re in better physical condition (on average) than in years past, yet the quality of play isn’t improving. Here are few (speculative) reasons:

*The sisters have advanced the game more than we thought. In the history of tennis, there has always been a next step, even when that next step seemed impossible. Pete Sampras is the perfect example. Sampras rewrote the tennis record books, only to see his own history rewritten a few years later by Roger Federer. On the women’s side, the Williams sisters are at the top of the evolutionary chain; there’s never been anyone who has played like them. Maybe they’re more ahead of their time than anyone has realized. It might be 10 years or more before someone catches up.

*Technology: Good for men’s tennis, but not for women’s tennis. I’m an opponent of “change the game” strategies—abolish the second serve, shrink the service box, require wooden racquets, to name a few—because I’m a believer in the law of unintended consequences. The men’s game ignored many calls for change and thrived (tough to complain about the quality of men’s tennis in the Federer Era).

I’ll stick with my principles and say a change isn’t warranted for the women, but matches like the one Jelena Jankovic and Sara Errani played this week tempt me to reconsider. Racquet technology has been great for groundstrokes and the return game. The problem is, those were already strengths in the women’s game. What you get now are matches where the serve is meaningless; it just starts a point. When breaks of serve become the norm, rather than rarities like goals in soccer, tennis is difficult to watch. The Williams sisters have adapted to modern racquets and slower courts, mostly because they serve much, much better than anyone else.

*No reason, we’re just in a lull. Let’s hope this is the answer. Lulls are part of life, and the Williams sisters seem likely to play several more years, at least. Maybe that will be enough to spare us from a future in which every women’s tournament looks like Indian Wells.

Tom Perrotta is a senior editor at TENNIS. Follow him on Twitter.

http://www.tennis.com/articles/templates/features.aspx?articleid=4609&zoneid=9

Gdsimmons
Mar 22nd, 2010, 10:41 PM
This article is AMAZING

nadlinds
Mar 25th, 2010, 09:12 PM
Sony Ericsson WTA Tour Player Awards Announced

The Sony Ericsson WTA Tour announced the 2009 winners of the annual Player Awards during a special ceremony Wednesday at the Sony Ericsson Open in Miami, Florida. Seven players were honored for their remarkable on and off court achievements during the 2009 season.

Serena Williams was voted the Sony Ericsson WTA Tour’s 2009 Player of the Year for the third time in her career, having previously earned the accolade for the 2002 and 2008 seasons. Serena had a stellar 2009 season, winning two Grand Slam singles titles (the Australian Open and Wimbledon), the prestigious year-end Sony Ericsson Championships in Doha, and reaching the final of the Sony Ericsson Open in Miami.

Additionally, she was a semifinalist at five more Tour events and recorded 14 wins over Top 10 opponents during the season. Williams finished 2009 as the top ranked singles player in the world, marking the fifth time in her career that she ascended to the pinnacle of the rankings.

Serena and Venus Williams won the Doubles Team of the Year award for their collective achievements in 2009, highlighted by winning four titles which included three Grand Slams (the Australian Open, Wimbledon and the US Open) and the Bank of the West Classic in Stanford. The pair ended the year with a 24-2 win-loss record.

“2009 was one of the best seasons of my career and winning the Player of the Year award for the third time is a great achievement for me,” said Sony Ericsson WTA Tour World No.1 Serena Williams. “2009 will always be memorable for me not just for my singles accomplishments, but because Venus and I won four titles together and I am thrilled to be sharing the Doubles Team of the Year award with my sister.”

“I love playing doubles with Serena as we have so much fun on the court together,” said Sony Ericsson WTA Tour World No.5 Venus Williams. “At the beginning of the 2009 season Serena and I decided to put a lot of emphasis on doubles and I am thrilled that we were able to achieve so much together.”

Yanina Wickmayer, Belgium’s rising star, won the Most Improved Player award after a breakthrough season highlighted by capturing her first two Tour titles – the Estoril Open (Estoril) and the Generali Ladies Linz (Linz) - and reaching her first Grand Slam semifinal at the US Open (losing to Caroline Wozniacki). As a result of a great 2009 season, Wickmayer broke into the World Top 20 during the week of October 19th. Additionally, she reached the finals in both singles and doubles (with Michaella Krajicek) at the Ordina Open ('s-Hertogenbosch).

Comeback Player of the Year honors went to Belgium’s Kim Clijsters who made a sensational return to the Tour in August, reaching the quarterfinals of the Western & Southern Financial Group Women’s Open (Cincinnati) in her first tournament back from retirement. She then went on to reach the third round at the Rogers Cup (Toronto) prior to embarking on a memorable run at the US Open, winning her second Grand Slam singles title in only her third tournament back on Tour. Clijsters became the first wildcard in history, and the first mother since Evonne Goolagong’s Wimbledon triumph in 1980, to win a Grand Slam singles title.

In addition to winning the Comeback Player of the Year award, Clijsters was honored with her 7th Karen Krantzcke Sportsmanship Award, recognizing her conduct, attitude and sense of fair play. No player in Tour history has won the Sportsmanship Award more times than Clijsters.

American Melanie Oudin picked up the Tour’s Newcomer of the Year Award. Oudin’s first Top 50 season was highlighted by a breakthrough performance at Wimbledon where, as a qualifier, she reached the fourth round, defeating former World No.1 Jelena Jankovic. At the US Open, Oudin reached the quarterfinals, defeating Elena Dementieva, Nadia Petrova and Maria Sharapova in successive three-set matches along the way. She rose to a career-high World No.42 during the week of September 28th.

The Player Service Award was won by Liezel Huber for the fourth time. A long-term member of the Player Council, Huber is one of the most respected members on Tour and works tirelessly on her fellow players’ behalf. Huber is the second player in the history of the Tour to win the Player Service Award four times (Nicole Pratt).

Huber is devoted to charitable work and has been successful in getting her fellow players involved in such causes as raising money for victims of Hurricane Katrina and “Locks of Love”, a non-profit organization that provides hairpieces to financially disadvantaged children suffering from long-term medical hair loss.

The fans of the Sony Ericsson WTA Tour voted online for their Favorite Singles and Doubles Players of the Year. Russia’s Elena Dementieva won the most votes for the Fan Favorite Singles Player of the Year while Serena and Venus Williams ran away with the Fan Favorite Doubles Team of the Year honors.

"2009 was a truly memorable year on the Sony Ericsson WTA Tour, highlighted by amazing achievements on the court and excellence off the court,” said Stacey Allaster, Chairman and CEO of the Sony Ericsson WTA Tour. “I congratulate the winners for their tremendous efforts and contributions to the popularity of women’s tennis and thank them for making it the world’s premier global sport for women.”

“Once again, the stars of the Sony Ericsson WTA Tour proved why women’s tennis is a hugely popular sport around the world,” said Aldo Liguori, Corporate VP and Head of Global Communications & PR, Sony Ericsson. “Sony Ericsson is proud to be associated with these world-class athletes.”

The winners of the annual player awards for Player of the Year, Doubles Team of the Year, Most Improved Player of the Year, Comeback Player of the Year, and Newcomer of the Year are determined by the global tennis media, with Sony Ericsson WTA Tour players themselves selecting the winners of the Player Service and Sportsmanship Awards. The Fan Favorite Singles Player and Doubles Team are chosen by tennis fans voting on www.sonyericssonwtatour.com.

Additionally, the Sony Ericsson WTA Tour players voted on their favorite tournaments and chose the BNP Paribas Open in Indian Wells as their favorite Premier event and the Abierto Mexicano TELCEL presentado por HSBC in Acapulco as their favorite International event.

2009 Sony Ericsson WTA Tour Player Awards:
Player of the Year: Serena Williams
Doubles Team of the Year: Serena Williams and Venus Williams
Most Improved Player of the Year: Yanina Wickmayer
Comeback Player of the Year: Kim Clijsters
Newcomer of the Year: Melanie Oudin
Player Service: Liezel Huber
Karen Krantzcke Sportsmanship Award: Kim Clijsters
Fan Favorite Singles Player of the Year: Elena Dementieva
Fan Favorite Doubles Team of the Year: Serena Williams and Venus Williams
Favorite Premier Tournament: BNP Paribas Open (Indian Wells)
Favorite International Tournament: Abierto Mexicano TELCEL presentado por HSBC (Acapulco)

http://www.sonyericssonopen.com/News/Tennis/2010/Tournament/Miami-Wednesday-Sony-Ericsson-WTA-Tour-Player-Awards.aspx

nadlinds
Mar 30th, 2010, 08:33 PM
Serena Williams pulls out of Andalucía Tennis Experience

World Number One Serena Williams officially announced today that she has had to pull out of the Andalucía Tennis Experience to be held in Marbella from April 3rd to 11th. Williams has been absent from the circuit since the Australian Open and was due to make her reappearance in the Andalucía Tournament, but has now had to put off her comeback for at least another week as the knee trouble that’s kept her out is still bothering her. After missing the Miami Tournament last week, Williams had set her sights on making her comeback in Marbella, but the persistence of her injury has finally forced her to pull out of the tournament.

“It’s a real pity that we be seeing Serena. I know she’s made every effort to be fit enough to make it, but in the end it just wasn’t possible. The Tournament still has a very high level and even without Serena, we have a lot of the most important names on the circuit coming to the Andalucía Tennis Experience”, commented Tournament Director Conchita Martínez after hearing the news that Serena had been forced to pull out.

http://www.andaluciatennis.com/news/noticia.php?i=2&id_n=14

Vaidisova
Mar 31st, 2010, 05:01 PM
ROME (AP) — Top-ranked Serena Williams has not entered the Italian Open, although she could still play as a wild card.

Tournament director Sergio Palmieri told The Associated Press on Wednesday that he recently spoke with Williams in Miami, and she asked him to hold a wild-card spot open.

http://www.foxnews.com/sports/2010/03/31/serena-williams-questionable-italian-open/

BuTtErFrEnA
Mar 31st, 2010, 05:24 PM
serena pulling rank :rolls:

"yea hold a WC spot open for me....I MIGHT play...depends on how I feel that morning"

Gdsimmons
Mar 31st, 2010, 05:38 PM
Lmao. And they probably will too
I hope she does play Rome. She's won it in the past.
The more points the better

nadlinds
Apr 2nd, 2010, 09:56 PM
Serena & Kim Meet Alicia

MIAMI, FL, USA - While in Miami, Serena Williams and Kim Clijsters had an amazing opportunity to meet with R&B sensation Alicia Keys backstage prior to her performance at American Airlines Arena on Saturday.

Due to a strained knee, Williams had to withdraw from the tournament, where she has taken the singles title no less than five times. However, the world No.1 is spending the fortnight in Miami to promote the event via appearances and to support sister Venus Williams, who has made it to the final of the event.

Williams has been active on her Twitter account throughout her time in Miami, and fans have had the opportunity to follow along during her time in town.

"At the Alicia Keys concert!!! :) Fun times!" Williams exclaimed via the micro-blogging site. "She's doing a great job!!!"

Clijsters, who has also had amazing times at the Sony Ericsson Open, taking the title in 2005 and reaching the final again this year, has also been updating fans throughout the tournament via her Twitter feed.

"Had a blast at the concert, Serena and I got to meet Alicia beforehand -- she's a cool girl!" Clijsters posted. "I love 'Empire State of Mind,' reminds me of NY and the Open... Brings out the best in me!!!"

Follow Serena, Kim and a number of other top players' Twitter feeds via our brand new social media one-stop hub, SuperFans!

Alicia Keys is widely known as the No.1 female R&B singer in the world. She has sold over 20 million albums and has won nine Grammys since 2002.

http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/OffCourtNews/Read/0,,12781~2013139,00.html

nadlinds
Apr 3rd, 2010, 09:23 PM
Serena Being Serena: Partying, Jet-Skiing, Not Playing Tennis

MIAMI -- Serena Williams is on spring break in South Florida. We've seen pictures of her playing on the beach in a bikini, heard word of her going to parties. She has blogged recently about her experience in manicure school, something she has wanted to do for a long time.

She also has been sitting in the stands at the Sony Ericsson Open watching her sister, Venus, run to the finals.

One person's spring break is another's physical rehab, I guess, because Serena has been pulling out of one tournament after another, including this one in Miami, citing a knee injury. She's now unsure about playing the Italian Open in May, which would mean more than half a year with just two tournaments for her.

Isn't this the time to be a little concerned, when the best player in the world, the golden goose of women's tennis, has been out so long?

She won the Australian Open, which was sandwiched between being too tired to play in the Fed Cup and too hurt to play in New York, Paris, Dubai, Miami, all events she had signed up for and then withdrawn from.

No concern. Instead, you hear crickets chirping. This smells like Williams pulling a fast one on the rules, finding loopholes to get out of mandatory tournaments by faking an injury to avoid playing in a bunch of tournaments she doesn't care about.

No one doubts she will be ready for the next major, the French Open, in May.

She has cried wolf over injuries so many times that no one even takes this seriously.

You know, it is possible that she is true to her word. And 28 is a dangerous age for a tennis player, especially one who is much stronger, but also much bigger than the usual player. Who knows what kind of beating those knees have taken over the years.

So I sent an email to her agent last week asking about the injury. What is it? Has she been to a doctor? Is it getting better? Has she been able to practice ? Stuff like that.

No answer. The truth is, we cannot know what the truth is.

Even the women's tour doesn't know.

But Williams has brought the doubts on herself. All tennis players are hurt at some level. It's a balancing act to decide whether the pain is greater than the importance of the tournament.

In Serena's case, no tournament, other than the majors, counts. She has made that clear by simply not trying in the non-majors, a ripoff to ticket-buying fans. So maybe this way is better, simply not playing rather than tanking matches.

"Serena and I have done some great career-planning, and we're playing really at the peak of our tennis right now,'' Venus said, declining to give specifics about Serena. "I think tennis has been a sport where people play this insane schedule from 14-years-old, so of course at 26, it's over. We've really paced ourselves in order to play great tennis as long as we want.''

I think that's what Serena is doing, pacing herself. Taking a vacation.

And maybe that's smart, allowing her to avoid the burnout that other players have gone through. But the WTA Tour has given players most of November and December off. And the sport needs as much of Serena as possible.

Meanwhile, Venus beat Marion Bartoli in the semis Thursday, 6-3, 6-4.

"Yeah, you know, holding the Williams flag still,'' she said. "The big W.''

Somehow, Venus always seems to be there not only for herself, but also for her sport, whenever she can.

Serena is coming off like Ferris Bueller. (If you're too young to remember that movie, look it up.) When Rafael Nadal announced last year that his knees would keep him away from the tour for a while, the tennis world nearly panicked. He missed 2 1/2 months.

Serena is going to pass that.

So why doubt her? For one, she has done this before, saying she's hurt, but not showing any evidence.

When Nadal announced his injury, he almost immediately said what the doctors had diagnosed. Williams has said nothing other than it's her knee.

Nadal all-but disappeared when he got hurt, presumably spending his time trying to rehab his the knees and get ready to go. Williams had fun on the beach for photographers.

But most importantly, Nadal was known to fight to the end no matter where he was.

Serena? This is the time last year when she started losing in her first match in a string of tournaments, to people named Zakopalova, Schnyder, Schiavone. All far beneath her.

In October, during the tour championships, Williams pulled out of the Fed Cup just a few days after giving her word that she'd play for the U.S.

Instead, she said she would be too tired.

So she won the tour title, missed the Fed Cup, reached the final in Sydney, won the Aussie Open. Unlike Nadal, Serena had no noticeable drop-off in her play.

Well, Williams hasn't been seen since then, and ... wait, what am I saying?

She has been seen plenty, out on the beach and at parties, rehabbing the knee.

http://tennis.fanhouse.com/2010/04/01/serenas-recovery-really-her-break-point

nadlinds
Apr 9th, 2010, 08:51 PM
SERENA WILLIAMS WITHDRAWS FROM FAMILY CIRCLE CUP

Charleston, SC (Sports Network) - Serena Williams has pulled out of this month's Family Circle Cup for a second straight year, this time due to a continuing knee injury.

Williams hasn't played since winning the Australian Open earlier this year, when she beat Justine Henin in the final.

"I was really hoping my knee would heal in time to play the Family Circle Cup, as it's one of my favorite stops on the Tour," said Williams. "Unfortunately my knee has not fully healed in time and I am now looking forward to returning to the WTA Tour in Europe. I wish the tournament, players and fans a great week."

Last year, Williams pulled out of the event due to a left leg injury.

http://www.tsn.ca/tennis/story/?id=317227

Bijoux0021
Apr 13th, 2010, 10:59 AM
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/2010/04/13/sports/AP-TEN-Italian-Open-SWilliams.html?_r=1

Serena Williams Gets Wild Card for Italian OpenBy THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Published: April 13, 2010

Filed at 6:37 a.m. ET

ROME (AP) -- Top-ranked Serena Williams has asked for and received a wild-card entry for next month's Italian Open, signaling that she's ready to return from a lingering knee injury.

Having been sidelined since her Australian Open title in January, Williams originally did not enter the tournament in Rome, which begins May 3 and is a key clay-court warmup for the French Open.

Williams won the Italian Open in 2002 en route to her only title at Roland Garros.

Tournament organizers announced the wild card for Williams on Tuesday, adding that nine of the top 10 women have entered, with No. 10 Kim Clijsters the only exception.

Tech1
Apr 16th, 2010, 08:56 PM
Top Dog Roger Federer and Queen Bee Serena Williams Make Roman Return
Marianne Bevis


Written on April 16, 2010

Roger Federer and Serena Williams bestride their respective tennis worlds rather as Everest and K2 dominate the Himalayas.

They may be just two amongst many world-beating champions, yet they remain the standard against which those others are measured.

They can be conquered by the fittest, most ambitious, most determined of individuals, just as those two mighty mountains can, but they remain head and shoulders above the rest. The rankings say it all.

Williams has topped the women’s tour since November 2009 and is currently more than 1,500 points clear of the field. Federer has topped the ATP rankings since Wimbledon 2009 and currently towers over the chasing pack by more than 3,000 points.

This is all the more striking because the two No. 1s of tennis have been notable by their absence since they both reasserted their superiority over the competition on the Grand Slam stage of the Australian Open.

Take Williams. Though she is clear of the pack in the rankings, she has played eight fewer tournaments in the last 12 months than second-place Caroline Wozniacki: just 16 events.

In fact, only one other player in the top 20 has played fewer tournaments than Williams, and that is Kim Clijsters, who only rejoined the tour last August.

Even more remarkable, though, is that Williams has played just two tournaments this year, reaching the finals in Sydney and winning the Australian Open. That’s just 11 matches, 10 of them wins.

She did add some court time to her year by playing—and winning—the doubles in Melbourne as well. But since then, she has been laid low by a knee injury, so she has not played a single match since the end of January.

Then last week, Williams pulled out of the Premier event in Charleston. She was not scheduled to play at Rome either, but the good news is that she just announced she has taken a wild-card entry for the Italian Open after all.

The return will be intriguing. How will her fitness be after three months with no match-play? Will she be prepared for the sudden transition to clay after her intensive fortnight in Melbourne brought the curtain down on her hard court season?

Well, somewhat surprisingly, she could actually gain ranking points over the next month or so. Last year, she was bounced out of Marbella, Rome, and Madrid in the first rounds, so she only has to win a few matches in Rome and Madrid to add substantial points.

Meanwhile, the rest of the top five women all have points to defend over the same period.

So despite her long break, and her failure to gain any court time or match wins since Australia, she is likely to hold that top spot for a while longer.

Federer’s time-line has been very similar. He has played just 16 matches so far in 2010, and lost three of them. Even taking into account Federer’s usual careful scheduling, this is a restrained start to the season.

For two years in succession, he was forced to pull out of Dubai: this year with a lung infection, last year with back problems.

Yet by this week a year ago—the second round of Monte Carlo—he had played 23 matches, for during March last year, Federer reached the semi-finals of both Indian Wells and Miami. This March, he lost early in both tournaments.

It came as a shock, therefore, that he declined the proffered wild card to the Monte Carlo Masters this week.

It’s surprising for several reasons.

It means he will have played just five matches in the three months between his victory in Melbourne and his appearance in Rome. During the same period last year, he played 12.

It also means he will have played no matches at all on clay once he does reach the Eternal City. Yet he squeezed in two rounds at Monte Carlo last year, despite getting married just a week earlier.

He appeared unaffected by either injury or illness during the North American tournaments, and left his final press conference saying that his early losses had made him all the more keen to get back to practice—after a short holiday. But he has not been seen since.

He may be soaking up sun in the Maldives, he could be holed up in his Dubai training camp, or he might be laying low in his Swiss home.

Whether he’s after some respite from the media, or some rest due to the lingering effects of that lung infection, he’s done it under the radar: no mean feat for one of the most sought-out sportsmen on the planet.

What stands out about these two champions, and their decisions so far in 2010 demonstrate this, is that they’ve both determined to achieve their own aims in their own way.

They have shunned calls to conformity: they don’t play more tournaments than they consider good for them, nor pull in coaches when things are not going right.

They are self-reliant, out-spoken, and strong-willed. They keep their family and friends close, seeming to draw confidence from their presence.

And if there is any doubt that their very individual handling of their careers is successful, look at the similarities in their records.

Williams has reached 15 Grand Slam singles finals and won 12, tying her in sixth place with Billie Jean King (Williams has 25 titles if doubles are added). Federer has reached 22 finals and won 16—an outright record.

Both are 28, and so have notched up Grand Slams over a wide time span. Williams’ first was in 1998 and her latest was this year, making her one of only three women ever to win a Slam in three different decades. Federer’s first was in 2003 and his most recent, too, was this year.

Their longevity also means they have outstanding statistics when it comes to holding the No. 1 ranking. Federer has the longest consecutive span at over four-and-a-half years. He is now only eight weeks shy of the total number of weeks held by Sampras.

Williams has accumulated rather fewer weeks, 98, the seventh highest by a woman. But she was year-end No. 1 as far back as 2002 and again, of course, in 2009.

Federer won his first ATP title in 2001 and has won at least three every year since (though he has failed to find a win so far in 2010).

Williams won her first WTA title in 1999 and has taken another title in every subsequent year barring 2006: a remarkable achievement bearing in mind her recurrent knee injuries and surgery through the middle of the last decade.

Both Federer and Williams, incidentally, won Olympic doubles gold in Beijing, too.

The durability and quality of their careers has had one further benefit commensurate with their achievements. They hold the records for both single-year earnings and career earnings.

And the figures are eye-watering: Williams has earned, respectively, $6.5 million and $30.5 million; Federer has earned more than $10 million and approaching $55.5 million.

So despite their unusual and, on the surface, undercooked preparations for Rome, and ultimately the French Open, it’s impossible to take issue with their decisions.

Williams won her first Italian Open title in 2002, and Federer was runner-up in 2003 and 2006, so both have a considerable incentive to lift the trophy this year.

They may march to their own tune when it comes to managing their tennis, but that tune seems to have reaped plenty of success up to now, as a glance at the their career win-loss stats confirms: Williams’ percentage is 82.4, Federer’s is 80.9.

It would therefore be foolhardy to bet against them sharing the spoils in the Foro Italico at the end of the month. And one thing's for sure: it will be good to have them back in the mix.

nadlinds
Apr 18th, 2010, 08:13 PM
Williamses to speak at Best of Preps

Apr. 18--Two of the world's most recognized professional athletes, Venus and Serena Williams, will be the guest speakers for this year's Chattanooga Times Free Press Best of Preps awards banquet.

The annual banquet, which honors hundreds of area high school athletes, will be held June 10 at the Chattanooga Convention Center. Tickets go on sale today and you can purchase them directly by clicking this link to our best of preps web page.

Last year the event featured record-smashing swimmer Michael Phelps, who has won 14 Olympic gold medals.

Serena Williams currently is ranked as the No. 1 women's singles tennis player in the world, while her sister is No. 4. The Williams sisters have combined to win 32 Grand Slam titles -- including 11 as a doubles team -- and three Olympic gold medals. Serena has won more than $30 million playing tennis, and Venus has earned more than $25 million in prize money, making them the top two female money winners in professional sports history.

They won 2009 doubles championships at three of the four Grand Slam events -- the Australian Open, Wimbledon and the U.S. Open -- and Serena is the reigning Australian Open and Wimbledon singles champion. She has won more Grand Slam titles than any other active female player.

The sisters have played each other in 23 professional matches dating back to 1998, with Serena winning 13 of those. Their meeting in the final of the 2001 U.S. Open was the first Grand Slam final contested by two sisters in the open era.

''It's an honor for the Chattanooga Times Free Press to have the ability to bring world-renowned athletes to town for our annual 'Best of Preps' awards program," said Jason Taylor, president of the newspaper.

''We know that these experiences assist in shaping athletes as they prepare themselves for the future. Nothing pleases us more than being able to honor the region's top athletes, and we look forward to welcoming Venus and Serena Williams to Chattanooga."

http://www.mlive.com/sportsflash/index.ssf?/base/sports-287/1271597835189220.xml&storylist=sports

Serenita
Apr 21st, 2010, 05:18 PM
The 75 Greatest Women of All Time

She's in there with the likes of Joan of Arc/Queen Elizabeth, and many more:worship:

Esquire magazine has Serena at no 75

check out the list here

http://www.esquire.com/women/women-issue/greatest-women-in-history

nadlinds
Apr 21st, 2010, 08:03 PM
Serena out of Fed Cup; Venus to decide

WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. — Serena Williams is not going to play for the U.S. against Russia in the Fed Cup semifinals this weekend. Venus Williams still needs to decide whether she'll be on the team.

Both sisters have been dealing with leg problems, and U.S. captain Mary Joe Fernandez has been holding open a spot for the matches at Birmingham, Ala.

The roster can be changed up to one hour before Friday's draw, but Venus was expected to tell Fernandez her status Tuesday. The matches are Saturday and Sunday.

Serena has been sidelined by a left knee injury since winning the Australian Open. Venus wore wraps on both legs in the tournament final on April 3 in Key Biscayne, Fla.

The rest of the team includes Melanie Oudin, Bethanie Mattek-Sands and Liezel Huber.

http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5iJYaS7pBvcU8PTfSEnQp__cA_LaAD9F70UT00

Marcell
Apr 22nd, 2010, 04:15 PM
Sandra Bernhard: Self-Professed Venus-and-Serena-Phile

By David Rosenberg April 21, 2010






Sandra Bernhard is an entertainer who crosses boundaries. She’s hard to categorize, because her performances comprise a mixture of humor, pop culture satire, monologues, fantasy and song. It should come as no surprise, then, that Bernhard is drawn to two WTA Tour players who have consistently sought outlets outside of the tennis court: Venus and Serena Williams, or “the girls” as Bernhard calls them. I noticed Bernhard tweeting about the Williamses, so I called her up to chat about her interest in the sisters, the persistence of racism in sports today, and “flipping out.”

TENNIS.com: I noticed on Twitter you’ve been following Venus and Serena. Are you a tennis fan?
Sandra Bernhard: I’m specifically a Serena and Venus fan. I have to say I liked Martina (Navratilova) and John McEnroe. I don’t think there are many players that come along with that much emotion. And the girls, Venus and Serena—to me when they play they put their whole life and their whole souls into it. You feel their emotion. You feel where they come from and the struggle they’ve gone through in their life every time they hit the court. It takes you on some kind of a journey and it’s compelling.

When I was thinking of you I couldn’t help but think of Venus and Serena and how you all seem to cross borders in your careers.
That’s right. I feel like when you have interests in the world and you have innate talent the way they do and without patting myself on the back, the way I do… I mean, I’ve just been drawn to different areas of entertainment, as a performer and a writer and artist. It spills over into a lot of different areas. For the girls it’s a natural crossover to want to design clothes or occasionally be an actor. Why should anything be precluded?

Venus and Serena have often been criticized for that. Do you feel people are threatened by someone having other interests?
I think for the girls, so many sports figures have just always had that (sport). It’s all kind of exploded now. If you have the persona and personality and you want to cross over, I think it’s just natural. Venus and Serena back it up with their immense talent and commitment to their sport. They have incredible personality. The minute they win the match or the tournament this whole other side of them comes out and you’re like “oh my God, you’re so sweet” you just want to run out on the court and hug them and take them to dinner, take care of them. I have this sisterly vibe towards them, they’re so close to their family and they’ve had a certain amount of tragedy and they’ve had this incredible struggle. I can’t say I relate to it as an actual experience but being from Michigan originally and I think the girls were born in Michigan (editor’s note: Serena was born in Saginaw, Mich.), there is a certain camaraderie and understanding to the afro-American experience in this country and I came from another era when it was different, more visceral. It’s still there, the racism. I was just looking at some pictures of Serena in Jane Magazine when there was a picture of her nude and there are ten pages of responses and some of them are positive and some are downright racist.

We’ve come so far, we have a black president and all these amazing sports figures and entertainers but there is a big portion of our culture that resents a strong, successful black woman. They can’t quite wrap their mind around it, and every time they step on the court they still have to battle that and I have a lot of compassion for them. It’s sad to me we’re still stuck on that in our society.

Do you think their other interests have helped them?
I think their side interests have kept them healthy and with a passion towards playing. You can have that outlet and break and have some fun and some other things in your life. What’s really funny, Serena was saying, “I’m studying, I’m doing something it takes 365 hours” and I was like “what is this?” and I find out she’s doing the manicuring school, which is funny because I was a manicurist to support myself when I first started performing. She tweeted back with me and I was like “oh my god, I went to the Charles Ross school of beauty in Beverly Hills,” and she said “what was it like?” It was really cute. I mean, I don’t know why she wanted to go take a manicuring course but I found it so adorable. She goes from high-high to low-low: going to major Hollywood parties and turning it out and looking like a million bucks, to sitting on a curb with her friends at manicuring school. I find that extremely interesting and diverse and inspiring that a person is willing to throw themselves into all kind of settings.


Will the Williams sisters be incorporated into Bernhard's act? (Stan Barouh)
As a performer, do you relate to the almost rock and roll lifestyle tennis players lead, always on the road, living in hotel rooms?
That amazes me. As a performer on the road, it is disorienting and hard to wake up in a hotel room or be in a bus or on a plane and have to hit the stage. There is a big responsibility. But the sheer physicality of having to go out on the tennis court under all circumstances and have to give it your all, and really throw yourself into it no matter what you’ve just gone through… it’s pretty shocking people can do it. They’re young women and it’s pretty nice their mom travels with them, and I think they have their people who make sure they’re okay, which is wonderful. But you’re still the one alone on that court who has to do it. I marvel at that constantly, from the French Open to Wimbledon to the U.S. Open and Australian Open to all the smaller tournaments they play. It’s a sport for the young and healthy. You can’t sustain it after a certain point. It’s physically impossible. I think it’s a real testament to their commitment and excitement for the sport that makes them as good as they are and also makes them so understanding and compassionate to the world around them. I just think they are really good people.

I’ve seen you perform many times and you often create these wonderful, fantastical stories that involve famous women like Stevie Nicks. Have you ever thought of incorporating Serena and Venus into your act?
You know what? Now that you’ve said that, I’m going to write something about them! I can’t believe I haven’t done it so far but you’re right, they’re the perfect people to put in my show and do something crazy, one of my little celebrity flights of fancy and wrap it up with some sort of great song and really pay tribute to them.

Well, Serena is supposedly with Common.
Right, I’ll find a Common song! He is so handsome and so cute. It’s a fun idea.

What about your daughter? Does she play tennis?
We take her to Central Park in the spring, but her hand-eye (coordination) is not great. My girlfriend is a real tennis buff and she played when she was young. I can hit the ball across the net but we all love to watch it. It’s another strange thing: we never see it live. There is something about being in the bedroom in bed and waking up early or getting home late depending on when the girls are playing and just Tivo-ing it and coming home. During the Australian Open my girlfriend knew who won and I was like “Don’t tell me! Don’t tell me! Was it Serena? You’ve got to tell me! I can’t take it!” And when she finally told me I could relax and watch the match. We really need to get to the U.S. Open; this is getting ridiculous. I have to make sure it’s on a day when the girls are playing.

Did you watch Serena’s infamous semifinal against Kim Clijsters last year?
Yeah, yeah. Listen, I don’t know what the total circumstances were. Maybe she was just burned out and hitting the wall. Nobody wants to see a great person lose it like that. I’m sure it was just a terrible experience for her. Or maybe it was a great experience for her. Maybe it was both! It was edgy. Listen, coming from someone who can fly off the handle and be super bitchy, I can understand it. She just flipped out. Everyone has their moments.

Serena and Venus are two of the only players who really make an effort, fashion-wise, on court.
Venus and Serena, they plan the shit! They got their color-coded tournaments. They come out and they give you headwrap. They give you big hoop earring. They give you big jewelry. They play with all that and they work it! And it’s so much excitement and glamour and you get swept up in it. It’s theatrics and a huge show they put out besides being fierce players. I just think it’s really exciting and they are just two of the most dynamic people in sports to me. Obviously I just adore them and I’d love to hang out with them sometime. Maybe in the right setting I could hang with them (laughing) but I’m not going to harass them, that’s for sure.

Sandra Bernhard will be performing live throughout the summer. For dates and information, go to www.sandrabernhard.com or follow her on Twitter.

David Rosenberg is TENNIS magazine's photo editor and a frequent contributor to TENNIS.com's Daily Spin column. Follow him on Twitter.

http://www.tennis.com/articles/templates/thespin.aspx?articleid=5041&zoneid=8

nadlinds
Apr 24th, 2010, 09:11 PM
Williams sisters won't level with U.S. squad

It's time to call B.S. on Venus and Serena Williams when it comes to Fed Cup, an event they profess to love but consistently stiff in a way that's so transparent that I wonder how Mary Jo Fernandez, our Fed Cup captain, can face the rest of the women on the squad.

Clearly, Fernandez hasn't embraced the wisdom in the expression, "Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on me."

I'd feel badly for Fernandez if it wasn't obvious that the captain and the USTA, which fields the Fed Cup team, are throwing the rest of the team under the bus, time and again, by kowtowing to the Williams sisters, hoping against hope that Venus and Serena might have a "road to Damascus" experience and actually play Fed Cup again.

The latest episode occurred a few day ago, when Venus finally deigned to announce that her knee wasn't sufficiently healed for her to play. (The nature of that knee injury is a mystery, but never mind.) The squad had already assembled in Birmingham, Ala., for this weekend's tie against Russia; Fernandez was presumably sitting by the phone, biting her nails and glancing at the clock.

The episode before this one occurred just a few months ago, when Serena announced toward the conclusion of the WTA year-end championships in Doha, Qatar, that she was too beat up and exhausted to take part in the Fed Cup final against host Italy (a relatively short flight away) the following weekend. Never mind that Williams-less U.S. squad had performed heroically to reach its first final in six years. Serena wasn't too banged up to win the YEC just hours later, and she wasn't sufficiently incapacitated to fly from Doha to London for a photo shoot while the U.S. team convened for the match in Reggio-Calabria, a resort town in Italy (that's a whole other story).

In both cases, Venus and Serena strung along the USTA, Fernandez and, worst of all, the other women on the squad -- some of whom might have benefited just a teensy-weensy bit from knowing for certain if they were to play or not at least a little while before the 11th hour.

Neither of the sisters has played Fed Cup since 2007. Ordinarily, this would be no big deal. For one thing, it's their lives -- let them play where and when they want. For another, both of them have done distinguished service on behalf of Fed Cup and the USTA up to now.

And we all know how much Venus and Serena have done for tennis, both in the U.S. and worldwide. Throw in the fact Fed Cup doesn't carry anything like the heft of even the Davis Cup -- never mind a Grand Slam event (the only events the sisters seem really interested in these days) -- and I can see why they would choose not to play.

In that case, why couldn't they (wo)man up, like that pair of Davis Cup stalwarts Andy Roddick and James Blake did when they announced in January that they were not playing Davis Cup this year? Nobody held that against the boys; their dedication is proven. The clarity of that situation allowed Davis Cup captain Pat McEnroe to make other plans and begin building for the future with Sam Querrey and John Isner. It was all clean, honest and above board.

But all these protestations from the sisters about how much they love to play for the U.S., how eager they are to serve, how patriotic they really feel, ring false and self-serving. It's painfully obvious that the sisters are just blowing smoke. Sure they'll play Fed Cup again -- I presume they want to compete in the next Olympic Games, and in order to qualify for that they must play at least a little Fed Cup.

So why can't they just announce that they'll play just enough Fed Cup to make sure they're eligible for the London Olympics?

Meanwhile, the toll on the morale of the U.S. team, and on the confidence those other women feel in their captain and the USTA, and the dedication they feel to Fed Cup, is significant. Fernandez comes off looking like a puppet at best, which never landed anyone in the coaching hall of fame.

I expect a disillusioned and sullen U.S. team to get waxed by a B-team of Russians this weekend in the same city where the Davis Cup men, featuring Roddick and Blake, so recently defeated Switzerland in a crackling-good tie before a full house in the same Birmingham-Jefferson Convention Center Arena where the Fed Cup competition starts today.

In a statement Wednesday, Venus said: "The USTA and [captain] Mary Joe Fernandez have been supportive through this rehabilitation process, and I am appreciative of their efforts as well as the kind words that I have received from so many people in the Birmingham community. I will be rooting for a United States win and look forward to returning to Fed Cup competition."

Awfully big of her, isn't it?

http://espn.go.com/sports/tennis/blog/_/name/bodo_peter/id/5128963/williams-sisters-level-fed-cup-fans

Tech1
Apr 25th, 2010, 12:24 AM
Serena earns 'A' - for absent

WTA Tour first-quarter report card gives Williams sisters top marks

By STEPHANIE MYLES, The GazetteApril 20, 2010

Serena Williams hasn't played since the Australian Open.

Tour is two weeks into the second quarter of its infernally long season.

And while it's lovely that Samantha Stosur won the Family Circle Cup, and we're so pleased Francesca Schiavone took Barcelona, the players who matter are the ones we've yet to see.

Serena Williams. Venus Williams. Dinara Safina. Ana Ivanovic. Justine Henin. And but for a brief cameo in Marbella after accepting a last-minute wild-card invitation, Kim Clijsters.

As we hand out our first-quarter grades today, the only one deserving an 'A' is the player to whom most would probably give an 'A' for absent, Serena Williams.

Williams hasn't played since the Australian Open, nursing a knee injury even as she gads about south Florida, hitting the beach, karaoke, perfecting her French manicure technique, and hawking her costume jewelry on the Home Shopping Network.

But we don't buy into the notion that Serena somehow "owes it to the game and to herself" to play more. Those who say that aren't dragging that big body around at warp speed around the court.

She and sister Venus, 29 and 30 this year, respectively, played a relatively full season in 2009. They ended it swathed in enough bandages for an entire emergency room. They've started 2010 the same way.

If Serena could play more, she would. And if taking it easy now means she will be 100 per cent for the French Open and Wimbledon, so be it.

Venus Williams (A-): After four events, she is 19-2. If the two losses were disappointments (especially the lopsided Miami final against Kim Clijsters), Williams is still ahead of last year's pace.

She is close enough to the No. 2 ranking that a good result in Paris, where she lost in the third round a year ago, will make things intriguing. But that big leg wrap, a fixture for nearly a year, may dictate otherwise.

Justine Henin (B+): Getting to the Aussie Open final in her first Grand Slam back from "retirement" was nearly as impressive as Clijsters's feat in New York last summer. Since then, she's been solid; her only mystifying loss was to Gisela Dulko in Indian Wells.

Henin fought through some world-class draws to reach the final in Melbourne and the

semifinal in Miami (where she lost another third-set tiebreaker to Clijsters). The litany of small, nagging injuries is either something to be expected, or something that bears watching.

The clay-court season will tell us more.

Kim Clijsters (B): When the Belgian returned to action last summer after her sabbatical, everything seemed so easy. A U.S. Open title in her third tourney back? Piece of cake. When she and Henin met in the final in Brisbane in January, going to a third-set tiebreak, you thought: "Well, all is right in women's tennis."

But as the novelty has worn off, the interim has been a bit of a roller-coaster ride.

Ana Ivanovic (F): She's in Majorca preparing Plan C - or is it Plan H or Z? - in her quest to be what she once was: a contender. In all likelihood, that's over, and that has to be hard to take. Come the summer, her slump will "celebrate" its two-year anniversary.

The Serb is down to No. 57 in the rankings, is 5-6 on the season and is skipping Serbia's Fed Cup playoff tie vs. Slovania this weekend.

Dinara Safina (DNF): A year ago today, Safina reached No. 1 in the world - and her world got complicated. She spent months unfairly having to defend the validity of that ranking before her back gave out; she played the rest of 2009 on painkillers.

In Australia, it went again - two stress fractures and a muscle tear. She's in Croatia practising, but there's no set date for her return.

To sum up the first quarter, it would have been an incredible few months for women's tennis - if the best players were healthy and playing their best.

Since that was decidedly not the case, we can only hope things will get better.

http://www.ottawacitizen.com/sports/Serena+earns+absent/2928409/story.html#Comments

yassiesj20
Apr 26th, 2010, 11:20 AM
Williams sisters won't level with U.S. squad

It's time to call B.S. on Venus and Serena Williams when it comes to Fed Cup, an event they profess to love but consistently stiff in a way that's so transparent that I wonder how Mary Jo Fernandez, our Fed Cup captain, can face the rest of the women on the squad.

Clearly, Fernandez hasn't embraced the wisdom in the expression, "Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on me."

I'd feel badly for Fernandez if it wasn't obvious that the captain and the USTA, which fields the Fed Cup team, are throwing the rest of the team under the bus, time and again, by kowtowing to the Williams sisters, hoping against hope that Venus and Serena might have a "road to Damascus" experience and actually play Fed Cup again.

The latest episode occurred a few day ago, when Venus finally deigned to announce that her knee wasn't sufficiently healed for her to play. (The nature of that knee injury is a mystery, but never mind.) The squad had already assembled in Birmingham, Ala., for this weekend's tie against Russia; Fernandez was presumably sitting by the phone, biting her nails and glancing at the clock.

The episode before this one occurred just a few months ago, when Serena announced toward the conclusion of the WTA year-end championships in Doha, Qatar, that she was too beat up and exhausted to take part in the Fed Cup final against host Italy (a relatively short flight away) the following weekend. Never mind that Williams-less U.S. squad had performed heroically to reach its first final in six years. Serena wasn't too banged up to win the YEC just hours later, and she wasn't sufficiently incapacitated to fly from Doha to London for a photo shoot while the U.S. team convened for the match in Reggio-Calabria, a resort town in Italy (that's a whole other story).

In both cases, Venus and Serena strung along the USTA, Fernandez and, worst of all, the other women on the squad -- some of whom might have benefited just a teensy-weensy bit from knowing for certain if they were to play or not at least a little while before the 11th hour.

Neither of the sisters has played Fed Cup since 2007. Ordinarily, this would be no big deal. For one thing, it's their lives -- let them play where and when they want. For another, both of them have done distinguished service on behalf of Fed Cup and the USTA up to now.

And we all know how much Venus and Serena have done for tennis, both in the U.S. and worldwide. Throw in the fact Fed Cup doesn't carry anything like the heft of even the Davis Cup -- never mind a Grand Slam event (the only events the sisters seem really interested in these days) -- and I can see why they would choose not to play.

In that case, why couldn't they (wo)man up, like that pair of Davis Cup stalwarts Andy Roddick and James Blake did when they announced in January that they were not playing Davis Cup this year? Nobody held that against the boys; their dedication is proven. The clarity of that situation allowed Davis Cup captain Pat McEnroe to make other plans and begin building for the future with Sam Querrey and John Isner. It was all clean, honest and above board.

But all these protestations from the sisters about how much they love to play for the U.S., how eager they are to serve, how patriotic they really feel, ring false and self-serving. It's painfully obvious that the sisters are just blowing smoke. Sure they'll play Fed Cup again -- I presume they want to compete in the next Olympic Games, and in order to qualify for that they must play at least a little Fed Cup.

So why can't they just announce that they'll play just enough Fed Cup to make sure they're eligible for the London Olympics?

Meanwhile, the toll on the morale of the U.S. team, and on the confidence those other women feel in their captain and the USTA, and the dedication they feel to Fed Cup, is significant. Fernandez comes off looking like a puppet at best, which never landed anyone in the coaching hall of fame.

I expect a disillusioned and sullen U.S. team to get waxed by a B-team of Russians this weekend in the same city where the Davis Cup men, featuring Roddick and Blake, so recently defeated Switzerland in a crackling-good tie before a full house in the same Birmingham-Jefferson Convention Center Arena where the Fed Cup competition starts today.

In a statement Wednesday, Venus said: "The USTA and [captain] Mary Joe Fernandez have been supportive through this rehabilitation process, and I am appreciative of their efforts as well as the kind words that I have received from so many people in the Birmingham community. I will be rooting for a United States win and look forward to returning to Fed Cup competition."

Awfully big of her, isn't it?

http://espn.go.com/sports/tennis/blog/_/name/bodo_peter/id/5128963/williams-sisters-level-fed-cup-fans

What a twat:rolleyes::mad:

BuTtErFrEnA
Apr 26th, 2010, 11:59 AM
these so called "jounalists" need to get a life :spit:

rucolo
Apr 26th, 2010, 08:21 PM
Serena 100 weeks at #1!:eek::bounce::worship::hearts:

http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/news/20100426/serenas-100th-week-at-no1_2256076_2035082


Serena's 100th Week At No.1

April 26, 2010
Nineteen players have held the Sony Ericsson WTA Tour's No.1 ranking, but only six of them had done it for 100 weeks - until now. Serena Williams became the seventh player ever to hit triple digits at the top this week.

Williams spent her first 57 weeks at No.1 from July 8, 2002 to August 10, 2003; it took her over five years to return to the top of the rankings but she did it, spending four more from September 8 to October 5, 2008; 11 more from February 2 to April 19, 2009; two more from October 12 to 25, 2009; and now, having returned there on November 2, 2009, her 26th straight (and 100th overall).

Williams is preceded in the '100 Club' by fellow Tour legends Steffi Graf (377), Martina Navratilova (332), Chris Evert (260), Martina Hingis (209), Monica Seles (178) and the still active Justine Henin (117).

Williams is a 12-time Grand Slam champion, winning five Australian Opens (2003, 2005, 2007, 2009, 2010), one French Open (2002), three Wimbledons (2002, 2003, 2009) and three US Opens (1999, 2002, 2008).

Check out the full list of Weeks At No.1 in the Press Center.

oside
Apr 28th, 2010, 03:28 AM
Would you say there is greater or less interest in the Williams sisters now versus five years ago?

Marcell
Apr 28th, 2010, 11:05 PM
Dear Venus and Serena...

by Julian Johnson Correspondent

SATIRE — We hate you.

We hate your brown skin and your mindless athleticism.

We hate the fact that all of that talent sprouted in South Central Los Angeles, a community nurtured and sustained by racism/white supremacy, a dynamic that failed to keep you where we wanted to keep you...

We hate that all of those Grand Slam trophies were conceived, born and flourished in one n*gg*r, eyesore of a family (an amazing achievement....if only it were the Oudin girls).

Let's face it: we just hate you, and hating you is a sport unto itself (plus it doesn't have an offseason). If we didn't have you to hate, we'd have to talk about things like junior development and the (nonexistent) state of USTA or USPTA minority recruitment.

We know that your racist father has forced you to withdraw from matches with phantom injuries and has prearranged the outcomes of others.

It was Richard Williams like a ghetto Paul Revere, who yelled out the racist epithets at Indian Wells so you could come off looking like a pair of bespeckled Rosa Parkses amidst a mob of tanning booth troglodytes.

You are sneaky.

You are unfair.

You don't complement the real American women.

You don't share.

For these and so many other reasons, we hate you with a purple passion reserved for commies, dictators, you and OJ.

To quote a most recent article by one of our great gatekeepers of tennis' "Skinlympics" {translation added}:

"Its time to call B.S on Venus and Serena" = You fork tongued, uppity negresses should "get back to where you once belonged" a.k.a. the caboose, with your skillets and fatback.

"They "stiffed" and "strung along the USTA, Fernandez and, worst of all, the other women on the squad" = "Who do you deceitful heifers think you are, not asking how high when we say jump?! WE get to decide when to strap you into the halter and have you plough our fields. Not you! After all, haven't we allowed you to play this great game of ours?

"They need to "(wo)man up" = You could never truly be women by our "Oil of Olay" standards, but if you want us to dial down the hot plate, you'd better learn to buck dance, watusi and play Fed Cup, or else.

Others (like James Blake) act and are "clean, honest and above board." But not you Williams Sisters, who consistently "ring false" and are "self-serving." = The only behavior of yours which WE will tolerate is head scratching, buttermilk grinning, yassa-bossin' servility.

Really, we have nothing against you. Its only constructive criticism we offer, nothing more. Its motivation. We have NO hidden agenda! Its what we'd say about any other player. Really!!!

Signed,

George Orwell and the White Tennis Fam!



http://bleacherreport.com/articles/385590-dear-venus-and-serena

Gdsimmons
Apr 29th, 2010, 01:42 AM
This guy can't be serious??

DOUBLEFIST
Apr 29th, 2010, 01:57 AM
Dear Venus and Serena...

by Julian Johnson Correspondent

SATIRE — We hate you.

We hate your brown skin and your mindless athleticism.

We hate the fact that all of that talent sprouted in South Central Los Angeles, a community nurtured and sustained by racism/white supremacy, a dynamic that failed to keep you where we wanted to keep you...

We hate that all of those Grand Slam trophies were conceived, born and flourished in one n*gg*r, eyesore of a family (an amazing achievement....if only it were the Oudin girls).

Let's face it: we just hate you, and hating you is a sport unto itself (plus it doesn't have an offseason). If we didn't have you to hate, we'd have to talk about things like junior development and the (nonexistent) state of USTA or USPTA minority recruitment.

We know that your racist father has forced you to withdraw from matches with phantom injuries and has prearranged the outcomes of others.

It was Richard Williams like a ghetto Paul Revere, who yelled out the racist epithets at Indian Wells so you could come off looking like a pair of bespeckled Rosa Parkses amidst a mob of tanning booth troglodytes.

You are sneaky.

You are unfair.

You don't complement the real American women.

You don't share.

For these and so many other reasons, we hate you with a purple passion reserved for commies, dictators, you and OJ.

To quote a most recent article by one of our great gatekeepers of tennis' "Skinlympics" {translation added}:

"Its time to call B.S on Venus and Serena" = You fork tongued, uppity negresses should "get back to where you once belonged" a.k.a. the caboose, with your skillets and fatback.

"They "stiffed" and "strung along the USTA, Fernandez and, worst of all, the other women on the squad" = "Who do you deceitful heifers think you are, not asking how high when we say jump?! WE get to decide when to strap you into the halter and have you plough our fields. Not you! After all, haven't we allowed you to play this great game of ours?

"They need to "(wo)man up" = You could never truly be women by our "Oil of Olay" standards, but if you want us to dial down the hot plate, you'd better learn to buck dance, watusi and play Fed Cup, or else.

Others (like James Blake) act and are "clean, honest and above board." But not you Williams Sisters, who consistently "ring false" and are "self-serving." = The only behavior of yours which WE will tolerate is head scratching, buttermilk grinning, yassa-bossin' servility.

Really, we have nothing against you. Its only constructive criticism we offer, nothing more. Its motivation. We have NO hidden agenda! Its what we'd say about any other player. Really!!!

Signed,

George Orwell and the White Tennis Fam!



http://bleacherreport.com/articles/385590-dear-venus-and-serena

Hysterical. :haha:

And could have just as easily been written by a handful of posters on these boards.

...and OJ. *DEATH*

This is something I could have easily seen Dave Chapelle doing in white face. :lol:

MrSerenaWilliams
Apr 29th, 2010, 06:15 AM
OJ :eek: :sobbing:

iDie :sobbing:

Bijoux0021
Apr 30th, 2010, 10:58 AM
http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1984685_1984949_1985247,00.html

The 2010 TIME 100

In our annual TIME 100 issue we name the people who most affect our world

Heroes

Serena Williams

By Billie Jean King

Thursday, Apr. 29, 2010

http://i41.tinypic.com/1zpmu5u.jpg

Serena Williams is one of those rare champions who have transcended sports and impacted our society. In tennis, she is as focused as she has ever been at any point in her career, and it shows. (She recently picked up her 12th Grand Slam title, the same number I won.)

But in addition to the people who follow her on the court, she has a growing legion of fans outside the sport. Serena, 28, is committed to making a difference in the lives of others. Her work with children in Kenya and here in the U.S. stresses the importance of education.

Through her charitable efforts, people are seeing her in a larger context. She has several interests — yes, tennis is one of them — but it is this new combination of success on the court and stability in her life that is creating new opportunities, for her and the people whose lives she touches.

Miss Atomic Bomb
Apr 30th, 2010, 11:16 AM
This woman is just amazing :worship:

BlameSerena
Apr 30th, 2010, 12:46 PM
Serena Williams is one of those rare champions who have transcended sports and impacted our society.
Yes, Yes she is. :worship:

nadlinds
Apr 30th, 2010, 09:36 PM
Williams Sisters In Demand For First Fed Cup Since 2007

NewsCore) - Serena and Venus Williams haven't played the Fed Cup tennis tournament since 2007 and declined an invite to play in the United States' 3-2 win over Russia last weekend.

But U.S. Fed Cup captain Mary Joe Fernandez says that she might ask them to rejoin the team in November at home against Italy, even though they've never played for her, FOX Sports reported Thursday.

While it's unlikely that they both will say yes, if they do Fernandez will have to push some women off the team. New Fed Cup heroine, Bethanie Mattek-Sands, who won two matches on the final day against Russia or gritty up-and-comer, 18-year-old Melanie Oudin, who will be the foundation of the team for years to come, may be on the chopping block.

Doubles standout Liezel Huber, who has answered the call every time when she's been asked and has won three deciding fifth rubbers for her, could also be pushed out.

Both Mattek-Sands and Huber have expressed disappointment with the Williams' refusal to play and should one of them be bumped off the team for the final when they have put in so much hard work this year, the team chemistry could be spoiled.

Since it's doubtful that both Williamses will play, maybe Fernandez can get away with selecting one, likely Venus, who has relationships with the aforementioned three, while Serena apparently does not. Then it will just be a matter of selecting who will play singles, and by the time November rolls around, it will be clear who is in good form and who isn't.

Even though both Mattek-Sands and Oudin deserve shots at playing singles, Fernandez knows that if she names them above a Williams sister, she'll be taking a risk against defending champion Italy as Flavia Pennetta and Francesca Schiavone are both excellent players who on good days can take down both Oudin and Mattek-Sands, even on a fast indoor hardcourt.

If Fernandez is unable to recruit Venus or Serena, they will go into the tie as underdogs and that's not a position that the U.S. wants to be when they are in search of their first title since 2000.

"Our main goal is to win," she said.

http://www.myfoxtampabay.com/dpps/sports/williams-sisters-in-demand-for-first-fed-cup-since-2007-dpgonc-km-20100429_7302133

2moretogo
May 1st, 2010, 12:07 AM
That Time 100 is awesomeness!! What exactly is the fallout from last year's USO?

BuTtErFrEnA
May 1st, 2010, 01:15 PM
someone should quote that to aces :lol:



"Our main goal is to win," she said. :haha:

MrSerenaWilliams
May 1st, 2010, 04:56 PM
I was just thinking that :sobbing:

sweetpeas
May 1st, 2010, 05:12 PM
We' still playing tennis,too! Serena is fabulous,in every way.:wavey::bounce::kiss::worship::D:cool::cool:

doni1212
May 1st, 2010, 08:42 PM
http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1984685_1984949_1985247,00.html


(She recently picked up her 12th Grand Slam title, the same number I won.)


This isn't about you Billie! :lol: J/P

Tech1
May 5th, 2010, 06:51 AM
Reduced Rome field gives Serena opportunity for triumphant return

Bruce Jenkins
Sports Illustrated
May 4, 2010

I can't imagine Serena Williams merely strolling onto the grounds of the Italian Open, where she is making her return to the game this week. More likely, she sashayed in. This is a woman who knows how to make an entrance, and she'd better make an impression after taking nearly four months off.

The tour has missed her, no doubt, in a catty kind of way. It's just not the same when Caroline Wozniacki or Melanie Oudin becomes the big story of a woman's event; they can't summon Serena's brand of drama, to say nothing of her awe-inspiring talent. And if you're gone for that long, especially if you're Serena, you're going to hear the usual complaints about a multi-faceted lifestyle, along with accusations (however vague) that you've found ways to get out of mandatory tournaments by faking an injury.

Nobody really knows for sure what's going on with Serena. We do know that she sounded decidedly humbled in talking about her chances in Rome, indicating it might take her a while to get match-tough. But as you examine the field, you can't help but wonder: Why can't she win the thing?

Going down through the rankings, starting with No. 2 (yes, Serena remains No. 1): Wozniacki has been playing with a sore ankle and clearly isn't 100 percent. Dinara Safina, coming off a serious back injury, lost on Tuesday to Romania's Alexandra Dulgheru. Venus Williams can rise to any occasion, but she's generally the underdog in any matchup with her sister.

Svetlana Kuznetsova? Already out of the tournament. Elena Dementieva? Forever wistful. Jelena Jankovic isn't healthy (big shocker there) or consistent. Samantha Stosur, who had an 11-match winning streak on clay before losing the Stuttgart final to Justine Henin, pulled out of the draw. Agnieszka Radwanska simply isn't in Serena's class, and never will be. Victoria Azarenka, who gave Serena a titanic run before getting driven out of the Australian Open quarterfinals, appeared strangely listless in a 6-3, 6-3 loss to Russia's Anna Lapushchenkova in Stuttgart.

That takes care of the Top 10, although the biggest stories lie beneath. Maria Sharapova and Kim Clijsters, neither of whom fears Serena in the slightest, are out with injuries. Henin, who won Stuttgart despite a broken little finger on her left hand, is taking a break. That leaves Serena with an alluring path to glory, a notion certain to disturb most everyone around the tour. They all know that Serena is the best player, one of the sport's best drawing cards and an all-time great. To see her walk off the street (almost literally) and hoist a trophy would be troubling, to say the least.

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2010/writers/bruce_jenkins/05/04/serena.rome/index.html

doni1212
May 5th, 2010, 11:17 AM
Sharapova doesn't fear Serena in the slightest?!!! :lol:

The Witch-king
May 5th, 2010, 12:03 PM
^ that's the first comment i wanted to make.

Anyway i don't under stand what this writer is getting at. Serena aka world number 1 winning Rome would be bad for tennis how? Cuz she took off 3 months? And what about those players that took off 2 years? Granted, my interpretation of the article may be wrong...

nadlinds
May 7th, 2010, 10:27 PM
SERENA RUES MISSED OPPORTUNITIES
“There was no excuse for not having won”

Despite coming within a point of making the final of her first tournament in three months, Serena Williams was her own harshest critic after her three-set loss to Jelena Jankovic

She missed a match point at 5-4, had another chance to serve out at 6-5 and lead 5-2 in the deciding tie-break, but each time she left a chink of light for Jelena Jankovic, and that was all that the Serb needed, running out a 4-6, 6-3, 7-6(5) winner.

“I really should have won the match. There was no excuse for not having won it,” the world No.1 said with her usual candour after the match, “I was not playing the points right. I felt that I should have won and I felt that I could have won but I cannot beat myself up over it. I just came back and I have not played a match since January. Whether it was mental or not, it was more about just making errors and winning the important points. I don’t know if that is match-toughness or just…. I don’t know. I am looking forward to Madrid and this is what I do know.”

“Maybe I was living the moment too much,” she smiled as she thought back to her match point. “I was looking at that amazing serve and I was thinking ‘Man, that's great!’. She played an incredibly lucky shot - it was a framer – but I don’t want to be a person that dwells. It is what it is.”

Having come back from a knee injury and got four valuable matches under her belt however, she can afford to take the positives from a trip to Rome she originally intended not to make, benefitting from a late wild card from the tournament organisers. “I was sliding like a machine. I felt good and I feel I’ve been working on clay for a long time. Man, that was tough. I was doing a lot of injuries but you have to play nowadays on this tour if you are injured or not, so I was out there I was doing my thing.”

http://www.internazionalibnlditalia.it/1/PopNews.asp?LNG=EN&IDNews=593

Gdsimmons
May 7th, 2010, 11:54 PM
Great article!! For not having played a match since January and making the Semis, pretty good stuff from Ms Serena

sweetpeas
May 8th, 2010, 08:28 PM
So true Gdsimmons.

serenafann
May 9th, 2010, 12:27 AM
Yeah,Serena should be happy for the most part,playing pretty well,after 4 months off.

Diesel
May 9th, 2010, 05:05 PM
Serena Williams surprised at own form after injury


MADRID (AP)—Serena Williams (http://sports.yahoo.com/ten/players/134/;_ylt=Al5Jl0xzx68LwjuTJ0bKtXsgv7YF) is impressed with her clay court form since returning from an injury layoff and had not expected to fight for titles so quickly, she said Sunday.

Williams played her first tournament since the Australian Open last week in Rome, losing in the semifinals of the Italian Open to Jelena Jankovic (http://sports.yahoo.com/ten/players/404/;_ylt=Av_7tk7vyQkcunxuSSwuUc8gv7YF) after squandering a match point.

“I was surprised to do so well in Rome,” Williams said at a news conference ahead of the Madrid Open.

The top-seeded Williams has a bye in the first round in Madrid and then plays the winner between Vera Dushevina (http://sports.yahoo.com/ten/players/3783/;_ylt=AsBfAkNIi8HOCYDcW_x6bgcgv7YF) of Russia and Belarusian qualifier Kirsten Flipkens (http://sports.yahoo.com/ten/players/468/;_ylt=Aj7bdpxHdWM4g2n6CcCitGogv7YF).

During her absence, the United States still managed to defeat Russia in the Fed Cup semifinals using a younger and less experienced lineup, as Williams’ sister Venus was also nursing an injury.

Williams hinted that she may sit out the final against Italy in November as well.

“They obviously don’t need the Williams sisters to be part of their team; they’re doing really well without us,” she said. “But it’s great. It just shows that there are so many good players in the U.S. besides me and Venus.”

Having a break from tennis wasn’t all bad either. Williams said she used the extra spare time to improve her manicure skills.

“I went to nail school, so that helped a lot,” she said. “Everyone else should do it too.”

http://sports.yahoo.com/tennis/news?slug=ap-madridopen-swilliams

BuTtErFrEnA
May 9th, 2010, 05:35 PM
:rolls: trust serena to promote her nails

rucolo
May 11th, 2010, 06:56 PM
http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/news/20100510/serena-survives-longest-match_2256076_2048805


Serena Survives Longest Match

May 10, 2010

MADRID, Spain - She played - and lost - a nail-biter in her last match in Rome, but history didn't repeat itself in Madrid, as Serena Williams battled for nearly three and a half hours to beat Vera Dushevina in the first round of Mutua Madrileña Madrid Open, even saving match point en route to the win.

Williams, ranked No.1 in the world for a 102nd career week this week and the Premier event's top seed, got past Dushevina, 67(2) 76(5) 76(5). She had three set points in the first set, both on the Russian's serve - one at 5-4, two at 6-5 - but didn't convert. And in the second set she saved a match point down 6-5.

In the third, Williams squandered a 5-2 lead and would eventually have to fight back from 0-4 in the tie-break to pull out the three-hour, 26-minute win. It was the longest match of her career.

"I think I played seven matches today," Williams said. "I definitely wasn't playing my best tennis, but after playing for that long, I didn't want to lose."

Williams fell to Jelena Jankovic in the semifinals of the Internazionali BNL d'Italia, 46 63 76(5), despite holding match point at 5-4 in the deciding set.

"I felt bad about the last time when I had match point. I had to hang in there."



Article is wrong, it was R2, not R1 match.:p
Serena had a BYE in R1.

Longest match of Serena`s career!:speakles:
Great fight from Serena in this drama match!:worship:


"I think I played seven matches today," Williams said.

Poor Serena!:lol:

Tech1
May 13th, 2010, 07:33 AM
Serena – favourite by default

Wednesday, May 12, 2010
While she has not yet hit the big 3-0 in terms of age, and while it doesn't do to talk about a lady's age, Serena is not getting any younger. Chris Evert and Steffi Graf both managed to win French Open singles titles 12 years apart, but that feat might be a bridge too far for the younger of the two Williams sisters. It could even be argued that 2010 is now or never – the perfect opportunity for her to take a second title in Paris to add to the one she won in 2002.

Since that victory, secured at the expense of her sister Venus, Serena has not been able to add to her tally on the Paris clay, making the French Open the only Slam she has not won on more than one occasion. In fact she has not even reached the semis here since 2003, so why should things be about to change this year, on her least favourite surface? Coming into the WTA Premier tournament in Madrid, she had played the grand total of three matches on clay this year, falling in the quarter-finals in Rome to Jelena Jankovic, having held a match point. "It was like I hadn't played since January 1942," said the world No.1 with a broad smile, underlining the fact that she had not played since winning the Australian Open.

No.1 mentally
And this is what Serena does best – coming into Grand Slam tournaments under-prepared and playing her way into form. She is also spurred on by the possibility of yet another incredible achievement – winning a calendar Grand Slam (her "Serena Slam" where she held all four Majors at the same time ran between 2002 and 2003). Her win in Melbourne in January proved that she is still very much the No.1 on the women's circuit in terms of mental strength, and so even though she may not be at her very best coming into Roland Garros, she has every chance of winning the tournament. Particularly since the competition is in disarray at the moment…

Who would the other favourites be? Title-holder Svetlana Kuznetsova is in free-fall, having won four matches in total at her past five tournaments. World No.2 Caroline Wozniacki from Denmark is young and inexperienced, particularly on clay, while 2008 and 2009 finalist Dinara Safina will barely have played half-a-dozen games by the time the French Open comes around after returning from a serious back injury.

There is of course four-time champion Justine Henin to contend with, but she is not yet back to her best after taking a two-year sabbatical, as her first round defeat in Madrid illustrated. 2008 winner Ana Ivanovic finally seems to be emerging from the spiral of defeat which has dogged her ever since winning here two years ago, but one tournament (a semi-final appearance in Rome) does not a revival make. Fellow Serb Jelena Jankovic is on good form at the moment but she has yet to prove her credentials at Grand Slams. Maria Sharapova is also struggling in terms of fitness and in any case has even less affinity with clay. Sister Venus is also not a fan of the red brick, and has fallen in the third round at Roland Garros every year since 2007.

Who will win the women's singles therefore is anyone's guess, but Serena – the world No.1 – has an aura and a stature which none of the others have. A win on the Paris clay would give her a 13th Grand Slam title, putting her ahead of the legendary Billie Jean King. As if she needed any extra motivation…

http://www.rolandgarros.com/en_FR/news/articles/2010-05-12/201005121273674815139.html?promo=rss

rucolo
May 16th, 2010, 01:51 PM
Article about Madrid R3 loss to Petrova::p

http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/news/20100512/nadia-serves-up-serena-upset_2256076_2050938


Nadia Serves Up Serena Upset

May 12, 2010

MADRID, Spain - World No.1 Serena Williams wasn't able to follow in her big sister's footsteps at the Mutua Madrileña Madrid Open on Wednesday, losing to Nadia Petrova in the third round of the Premier-level stop.

Williams, the top seed, broke Petrova in the penultimate game of the first set and served a love game to take that set, 6-4; Petrova's 1-1 service game in the second set would be a turning point, however, as it went to 10 deuces.

Petrova, the No.16 seed but having an impressive season on the Sony Ericsson WTA Tour and perhaps playing better than that number, was in command of the match upon winning that pivotal point. Including that 1-1 game she won 11 of the last 15 games to prevail, 46 62 63, her second straight win over Williams. She beat her in Beijing last fall, too.

"I have a doubles match tomorrow. I hope to win that and be in Madrid a little longer," Williams said of her next steps before Roland Garros, where she was the champion in 2002. "I also live part-time in Paris, so I'll go back there too."

Petrova out-aced Williams, 11-2. Going into the match they both had 120 aces on the year, most among anyone on the Tour; now Petrova sneaks ahead.

This was Petrova's third career win over a No.1, having beaten Justine Henin at the 2004 US Open and Amélie Mauresmo at the 2006 Tour Championships.

With Venus Williams winning her match earlier in the day, the Williams sisters will be No.1 and No.2 when the new rankings come out Monday. It will be the first time the sisters hold the Top 2 spots in over seven years.

"It's amazing. We work really hard, Venus works even harder than I do," Serena said. "We really fight and do the best we can to be the best that we can be."

"That's what we play for but we both want to be No.1," Venus said. "Everybody's like, 'Oh cool, No.2! Yeah!' but that's not the way it is. We're trying to get that No.1 ranking in doubles too. Maybe one day we can both be on top of both."

rucolo
May 16th, 2010, 01:56 PM
Serena/Venus win Madrid doubles title::D

http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/doublesnews/20100515/venus-serena-claim-doubles-crown_2256567_2053244


Venus & Serena Claim Doubles Crown

May 15, 2010

MADRID, Spain - A dream clash between one of the greatest teams of all time and the hottest team of the year took Manolo Santana court for the doubles final of the Mutua Madrileña Madrid Open on Saturday night - and it was the Williams sisters who managed to come out on top.

Having recently won their 11th Grand Slam title together at the Australian Open and seeded No.1 here, Venus and Serena came out on fire against No.8 seeds Gisela Dulko and Flavia Pennetta, flying out to a 62 30 lead. Dulko and Pennetta won five of the next six games to lead 5-4 with Pennetta getting a chance to serve for the set - but the Williamses regained control in a big way, taking 12 of the last 15 points of the match to dust off a 62 75 victory.

"We're really excited to win. We've worked really hard. Today we played a team that is doing really well, too," Serena Williams commented. "We just try to be the best and have fun, whether No.1 comes with that or not. Our goal right now is to do well at the French - we didn't do well there last year.

"Venus is in the singles final here too - she's playing really well."

The Williams sisters now have 18 doubles titles as a team: 11 Grand Slam titles, two Olympic gold medals and five Sony Ericsson WTA Tour titles. They have an incredible 140-18 win-loss record together as a team (an 88.6 winning percentage). On Monday, they will rise from co-No.3s on the doubles rankings to co-No.2s - the highest they've ever been in the team discipline.

Dulko and Pennetta had won 17 matches in a row, capturing titles at Miami, Stuttgart and Rome and reaching the finals here. It was the longest doubles winning streak since Cara Black and Liezel Huber won 22 matches in a row at the beginning of 2007; neither comes close to the all-time record however, set by Martina Navratilova and Pam Shriver in the mid-1980s - 109 in a row.


:worship:

Olórin
May 16th, 2010, 04:33 PM
It's a shame they lost in the YECs otherwise they'd have a 30+ match winning streak going right now.

Soothing
May 23rd, 2010, 07:50 PM
Serena Williams seeks serenity but is not afraid to face her foes. Charity work is now the major passion for the world No1, but she will still be fiercely competitive on court
Kevin Mitchell The Observer, Sunday 23 May 2010

Billie Jean King, when asked to nominate a contemporary hero, described Serena Williams in Time magazine recently as "one of those rare champions who have transcended sports and impacted society".

People everywhere, King said, were "seeing her in a larger context", recognising her as someone who was sharing some of what she has got – a career record of $30m (£21m) in prize money, plus many millions more from her designer apparel business – with those who have not got much at all.

It was a generous accolade, one that recognised Williams's charity work at home and in Africa and suggested that tennis should cherish the best player in the women's game as long as she remains interested. Indeed, Williams increasingly gives the impression at 28 that tennis, celebrity and the riches they bring are secondary to her bigger mission. Two years ago, she set up a school in Matooni, three hours south-east of Nairobi, and was ecstatic on her recent return to Kenya to see that it is thriving. There are more to come. She also has a charity that puts disadvantaged kids from the ghettos through college in America, an obsession she inherited from her father, Richard.

"Tennis is never my priority," she says, as we chat on a shaded terrace at the Foro Italico in Rome, scene of her first tournament since winning her fifth Australian Open title on virtually one leg in January. It turns out her concerns are more spiritual than physical. "Tennis is an opportunity. I've been so blessed to be born healthy, to have two parents who are around and who care and want me to do well. Maybe that's why I'm good at tennis: so I can help others."

On the face of it, then, hers seems a perfect world. She is prominent enough an athlete to have invitations to the White House arriving at her mansion in Florida's Palm Beach Gardens, jostling for attention with good-news statements from her accountant. She has been ranked No1 in the world, a distinction she has earned five times over eight years, for a total of more than 100 weeks.

Yet, for someone who seems to have it all, for someone whose name suggests tranquillity and who walks with ease in the company of the powerful and the poor, calm does not attend Serena's every move. Eight months on from the biggest public trauma of her career – a spectacular, foul-mouthed bust-up with a lineswoman during the US Open – she tries to give the impression that all is well. Her troublesome left knee is fine, she says, she is looking forward to the French Open, where she hopes to douse the challenges of a field missing the injured Kim Clijsters but containing her bête noire and the favourite, Justine Henin, as well as last year's champion, Svetlana Kuznetsova, to whom she lost in a three‑set quarter-final.

"And I can't wait for Wimbledon," a bubbling Serena says. Her smile is wide, her mood relaxed.

A few moments earlier, however, Williams was not so happy during a brief and edgy press conference. She had tried to beat down inquisitors who had pitched a couple of mildly tendentious questions at her, and her mix of sarcasm and a come-on wink left the room filled with an awkward silence. It was hardly the first time she has duelled with journalists.

In her serial war with writers and commentators, she attaches aphorisms on Post-it notes to the inside of her kit-bag, private rallying thoughts such as: "Be strong. Be black. Now's your time 2 shine. Be confident. They want to see you angry. Be angry, but don't let them see it." Mostly they work. One night they did not.

At Flushing Meadows on 12 September, she hit a nadir not touched upon by King but agonised over by the media. When the New York tabloids the following day chose to repeat in full her tirade at the lineswoman who foot-faulted her when she was 6-4, 6-5 (15‑30) down to Clijsters in the semi-finals, it is fair to say her sainthood was compromised. "I swear to God," she shouted, "I'll fucking take the ball and shove it down your fucking throat, you hear that? I swear to God! You better be glad ... glad that I'm not ..."

It was not the sort of rant tennis wanted to hear a God-fearing Jehovah's Witness screaming live on television at a defenceless official. It was as if the image, the smile and the cape of goodness fell away in one roar from deep inside Serena's soul. It was a snapshot moment, much like the night a few months later when Tiger Woods crashed his Cadillac into a fire hydrant outside his gated house in Florida, then watched the media crawl over what was left of his reputation as the benign face of golf. Two black athletes, utterly dominant in middle-class sports that historically have been "white", had let down their sensitive benefactors.

Woods went through mental hell and a public confession; Serena expressed indifference, regret, then simmering bitterness. In contrast to the way Woods has engineered his rehabilitation, she has not come to terms with what she perceived then to be unjust punishment and regards still as "a joke". She was initially fined $10,000, plus $500 for racket abuse but, once the men in blazers had stroked their chins, she copped an additional $175,000 plus two years' probation. If she transgresses again in that time, she will be banned. John McEnroe in his pomp did not reach such heights of villainy. Her crime, it seems, was to defend the outburst as normal, as something players regularly inflict on officials. In Tigerspeak, but in a wholly different context, she felt "entitled".

Some in the media reckon her level of Christian repentance was not appropriately full, and that her occasional spikiness in mandated press conferences is uncalled for. While there is validity in that view, there are those among her detractors who privately delight in such indiscretions by a player they regard as "difficult", even a little "weird". It may be her "preachiness"; Serena is a particularly vocal member of the God Squad, giving it up ad nauseam for the Lord. Maybe it is a subliminal race thing. You would hope not, but it is hard to tell; would tennis embrace with such coolness two blonde, white sisters so brilliant in their calling as she and Venus have been the past decade?

Then there is her backside. It is not small (although she protests she is "really, really fit" right now). Some in the women's game resent the fact that Serena can turn up at a major tournament and huff and puff her way to yet another title, seemingly short of peak condition. She has 12 slams to her name, the same as King, and her detractors would like her to be more conventionally Superwoman. Whatever the root cause, there is mutual and palpable antagonism between Serena and those who chronicle her deeds.


Serena did well to get to the semis in her comeback tournament but, if she wins in Paris over the next fortnight then keeps her Wimbledon crown, by the time she returns to the New York bear pit in August she will be on the verge of sealing an historic same-year grand slam (although she has done four in a row before: a "Serena Slam", as she calls it).

Is it going to be traumatic going back to the scene of her supreme embarrassment? "No. I'm really just going to be trying to do the best I can and win it. I'm not even thinking about that."

But was it a very bad time? "No ... more than anything it was bad for me personally and spiritually. I'd really been fighting to do well spiritually ... Other than that, it is what it is."

Do you think you were unfairly treated? "Absolutely. I think the fine was outrageous. And I'm on probation. OK guys, I'm on probation. Ooh. If I do somethin' bad, I'm gonna get arrested. Get outta here. Ha, ha [breaks up laughing]. Honestly, who's done that before? It's hot, though. I wanna meet this guy. I haven't had a meeting with my probation officer yet. Ha [cracks up again]. I think I should check in every month.

"In five years, 10 years, I'll be telling my kids, like, Mommy was on probation. It's so funny. I had to pay the fine. I got fined more than American football players who beat up people, punch people and break their necks, and kill people. It's a joke and I'm not afraid to say it's a joke, either."

Nearby, PR guys from the WTA shuffled their feet. Williams is still the most volatile personality on the circuit. And she is utterly sure of her aura. But maybe she did not need all this any more, after 15 years of winning almost at will, garnering titles on all surfaces against the game's best, as well as two Olympic gold medals in the doubles and more money than any women has ever earned from tennis.

"Winning Australia, winning all these grand slams are awesome and really cool, but cutting that ribbon to open my school in Africa for kids that have less than nothing just takes my breath away and brings tears to my eyes, every time. That is my priority. The better I can do at this, the more opportunities I can have for these other people.

"It's coming along, though. I feel good. It took a long time to get fit again and there were so many ups and downs, and even a few tears now and then. But I always knew it would heal. I don't know any athlete who doesn't play injured. I'm not going to complain. There are some injuries you can't play through, though."

Again, she returns to motivation, and where it comes from. "It doesn't matter who I play against. I feel honoured every time He makes me able to have an opportunity to just walk out there and do it. Some people can't walk. Some people can't see. And here I am, I have both, and I'm playing professional sports. It's cool. It's awesome. I'm so blessed. I'm playing for people who can't do it, people I can help by doing well."

If she meets Henin again in Paris, there might be sublimated bad memories of their 2003 semi-final, when Serena complained in defeat of gamesmanship and was booed by the partisan spectators. Some say she cried. "It was," she said at the time, "a tough crowd – the story of my life."

That year, her elder sister Yetunde was shot and murdered in a gangland drugs war in Compton, LA, the crime zone she had returned to with her boyfriend while Venus and Serena were building a new life around tennis in comfortable Florida.

There are the four things, then, that have brought Serena to tears: pathos, physical pain, injustice and personal tragedy. All in all, it paints the picture of a normal, vulnerable human being, albeit a famous one struggling to be understood. But Wimbledon, with its tradition and po-faced sense of protocol, looks to be a safe port for her in stormy seas – as St Andrews may prove to be for Woods at the Open.

You get the impression Serena wants to please – but she will go only so far. She is in conflict, ultimately, between the joy of being on court and at her schools, where her contentment is easily defined, and the ritual of submitting herself to the judgment of others.

She has a god for that, she would say. And maybe she would be right.

I'm assuming the writer's reference to a "press conference moments ago" was in reference to a RG press conference. Anyone know what the awkward moment was about?

nadlinds
May 23rd, 2010, 07:57 PM
Serena Williams refuses to reject claims she mocked French Open rival Justine Henin

SERENA WILLIAMS and Justine Henin face a stormy French Open meeting after the American refused to deny she slagged off her Belgian rival earlier this month.

The pair are seeded to meet in the fourth round in Paris having not looked over the net at each other since Serena won a three-set Australian Open Final. World No.1 Williams allegedly hit out at Henin after a semi-final loss to Jelena Jankovic at the Italian Open.

Jankovic complained to the umpire about Williams' slow play and at the end the American apologised and said something like: "I'm not Justine."

There have been suggestions Henin deliberately employs delaying tactics during matches.

Asked about the incident Williams said: "I don't even remember that. I remember I had a match point and I should have won.

"After the match I said something to her but I don't know. I don't remember the whole gist of the situation."

Top seed Williams must beat Stefanie Voegele in round one and 22nd seed Henin faces Tsvetana Pironkova. Serena is aiming for a 13th Grand Slam singles title but only a second French Open.

The 28-year-old added: "I've won one but I think this is my fifth good chance. So maybe one of these years I'll be able to do it."

Henin has revealed she will be using her old locker for her first French Open since completing a hat-trick of wins in 2007. She said: "It's a good luck charm."

http://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/sport/tennis-news/2010/05/23/serena-williams-refuses-to-reject-claims-she-mocked-french-open-rival-justine-henin-86908-22279240/

Gdsimmons
May 23rd, 2010, 08:57 PM
Everytime I see the word Henin I feel dirty and wanna take a shower. ugh.

But the article before that was really good

The Witch-king
May 24th, 2010, 05:25 AM
^ :lol:http://farm1.static.flickr.com/95/242782485_beef77e3a6.jpg

i'm curious as to where the interview transcripts we usually see at the slams are. Anyone know?

doni1212
May 24th, 2010, 12:31 PM
They finally posted the transcripts on the FO website this morning under the news and photos tab.

Diesel
May 24th, 2010, 04:32 PM
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/05/25/sports/tennis/25williams.html

Enigmatic Serena Williams Wins Paris Opener


By JOHN BRANCH (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/b/john_branch/index.html?inline=nyt-per)

Published: May 24, 2010


PARIS — She should no longer be a mystery at this point, but even after all these years and all those championships, it can still be difficult to figure out Serena Williams (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/w/serena_williams/index.html?inline=nyt-per).

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2010/05/25/sports/24serena1/24serena1-articleInline.jpg

Despite all her Grand Slam championships, Williams adds intrigue to any tournament she plays because tennis often seems like just another way to fill her schedule until the major tournaments come around.

That adds an element of surprise wherever she goes. After winning the Australian Open in January, Williams did not play a match again until this month, saying she was resting a sore left knee.

During her time away, she traveled to Kenya to open a school in her name and took courses to become a nail technician.

“I was injured, and then I was twiddling my thumbs at home,” Williams, 28, said last week. “I had nothing to do. I was just working out and just trying to get better. I was bored, and that’s how I got into nail school.”

Williams has become a busy tweeter on Twitter (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/news/business/companies/twitter/index.html?inline=nyt-org), too, and many of her observations have little to do with tennis.

“Omg! There is a condom dispenser on the streets of paris??” she posted a few days ago. “Am I being naïve to be shocked??? Wowzers.”

Nothing should surprise those who have followed Williams’ career. Eight years after winning her lone French Open (http://topics.nytimes.com/topics/reference/timestopics/subjects/f/french_open_tennis/index.html?inline=nyt-classifier) — the only major title that she has not won at least three times — Williams is the No. 1-ranked player and the top seed.

Yet she may not be the favorite. After all, she has not advanced past the quarterfinals at Roland Garros since 2003 — a match best remembered for a dust-up with eventual champion Justine Henin (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/h/justine_henin/index.html?inline=nyt-per) over whether Henin had raised her hand to call for time as Williams missed a serve. The chair judge did not see it, and Williams fumed — and lost.

Still, no player on the women’s side can match Williams when she is healthy and motivated. Even now, it is hard to tell if she is both, or either.

Williams, who declared herself fully healthy before the tournament began, struggled to wriggle past Switzerland’s Stefanie Voegele on a hot afternoon at Court Philippe Chatrier on Monday.

For a time, Voegele, ranked 76th, matched Williams’ big serves and powerful forehands and the occasional overhead smash, and there was a buzz over whether Williams would be the first big-name player to tumble from the tournament.

Voegele, whose tour biography lists Williams and Roger Federer (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/f/roger_federer/index.html?inline=nyt-per) as the players she most admires, pushed Williams to a first-set tiebreak. Along the way, the taut back-and-forth occasionally elicited the type of emotional fist pumps and screams that Williams unleashes when provoked.

Williams surged to score seven of nine points to capture the set. Having found her footing, and perhaps having broken Voegele’s spirit, Williams cruised to a 7-6(2), 6-2 victory.

Most other upset hopes on Monday evaporated in the heat. Federer, the men’s No. 1 seed, coolly handled Australian Peter Luczak, 6-4, 6-1, 6-2. No. 3 Novak Djokovic took an extra set to dispense Russian Evgeny Korolev. The women’s third seed, Caroline Wozniacki, breezed to a 6-0, 6-3 victory over Alla Kudryavtseva.

Still, especially amid the relative parity of the women’s tour, no one draws the attention the way Williams does, even as she seems oblivious to the commotion. At last year’s United States Open (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/subjects/u/united_states_open_tennis/index.html?inline=nyt-classifier), she lost in the semifinals to Kim Clijsters (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/c/kim_clijsters/index.html?inline=nyt-per) in a match best remembered for Williams’ finger-pointing threat to a line judge on the final point.

A few weeks ago in Rome, Williams raised a hand during a serve from Jelena Jankovic, who complained to the umpire to no avail. Jankovic went on to win the semifinal match, and cameras appeared to pick up the sound of Williams saying to Jankovic afterward that she did not cheat, that she’s “not Justine.”

On Friday, Williams claimed not to understand the issue when it was raised at a pre-tournament news conference. After an even-keeled give-and-take with a reporter, Williams eventually said that she did not fully recall the exchange with Jankovic.

“I remember after the match I said something to her, but I don’t know,” Williams said. “I don’t even remember the whole gist of the whole situation.”

Of Williams’ 36 tour victories, 12 of them have come in majors, a remarkably high ratio. That, too, has subjected her to criticism from officials and fans of the women’s tour who want the star players to appear at more tournaments.

Williams warmed up for the French Open by appearing in two clay court tournaments. After Rome, she lost in the round of 16 in Madrid to Nadia Petrova.

“It’s always something, you know,” Williams said. “If you’re winning Slams, you don’t care about the other ones. If you win the other ones, then you can’t win Grand Slams. It’s a win-win or lose-lose situation. I don’t really care or really listen or really it doesn’t really matter to me what someone else is saying, because they’re not out there physically playing every week, you know, for 20 something years.”

Williams sister Venus (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/w/venus_williams/index.html?inline=nyt-per), the French Open’s second seed, won her first-round match on Sunday and watched Serena Williams in the stands with other family members. The last time the two were the top two seeds at a Grand Slam event was at the 2003 Australian Open.

The legacies of the Williams sisters are still unfolding, but they are the dominant female players of the century’s first decade. On paper, because Venus Williams’ seven Grand Slam victories do not include wins at either the French or Australian opens, Serena Williams might be the more accomplished.

Yet eight years after her only win at Roland Garros, she might be just as much a mystery as ever.

jpfasho
May 28th, 2010, 12:35 AM
Serena, Maria coming to Cowboys Stadium
May, 27, 2010 May 275:30PM CTEmail Print Share By Calvin WatkinsCowboys Stadium is doing some big things.

It's held basketball games, boxing matches, soccer games and of course football games in the $1.2 billion facility.

Add tennis to the list of events.

Cowboys Stadium will host the inaugural Cowboys Tennis Slam on July 10, featuring a match between Serena Williams, the No. 1 women’s tennis player, against Maria Sharapova.

The match will be followed by Austin native Andy Roddick facing John Isner. Each match is best two-out-three.

The event will come six days after the Wimbledon championships.

“This will be an exciting event for us to hold at Cowboys Stadium,” Cowboys owner Jerry Jones said in a statement. “We have seen the flexibility our new stadium has for holding spectacular events of all kinds and this event should be like no other. Being able to attract some of the best tennis players in the world under one roof for a night like this will be something special.”

The tennis court will be placed across the end zone at Cowboys Stadium with a seating capacity of 20,000.

The match first match is scheduled for7:30 p.m.

doni1212
May 28th, 2010, 02:27 AM
Wow...

edificio
May 28th, 2010, 08:42 AM
I really don't find Serena to be enigmatic (maybe Venus, a little). Seems as though they want to pin Serena down like a specimen butterfly, categorize her, but she won't let them.

When I read the article about the exhibition, I thought Serena would play Roddick and Sharapova Isner and then switch up. Seemed nuts. But, now that I read it correctly, I wonder why they would invite Isner? I guess two big servers, but Isner is not really anyone just yet. Also, Sharapova wants to play Serena again? Really? Must be a lot of money involved.

Diesel
May 28th, 2010, 11:45 PM
http://tennisworld.typepad.com/thewrap/2010/05/stars-sammy-and-swiveling-ivan-friday-at-the-french.html

The view from my desk got much better on Friday. Two days of heavy clouds and umbrellas were behind us. The sun, and a ton of tennis matches, were in front of us. There was nothing to do but get out and see a few. When I sat down to write about them, I couldn't think of anything better to do, on such a vivid day of tennis, but paint a few portraits—or, if that sounds too lofty, take a few snap shots—of the players who were part of it.

***

Serena Williams is under control. So under control that her purposeful presence keeps the crowd inside Court Suzanne Lenglen unusually quiet as well. She rules the moment without even trying. But sometimes Serena needs to remind herself not to lose that control. When she misses a shot, she stops, stands still, and puts her left palm out parallel to the court. “Take it easy, take it easy,” is the message. After bad misses, Serena turns downright delicate. She stops, looks down, and pushes her feet up and down into the red dirt, like a cat pushing into a blanket.

Serena doesn’t need to worry today. Her opponent, Germany’s Julia Goerges, is flailing. She catches the ball late and sends it into the alleys. She knows the the pace is coming, but she can’t adjust her strokes to keep up with even a routine ground stroke from Serena. Who can? Eight years ago, I saw Serena play a match at Wimbledon right before Tim Henman. There was no question who hit the ball harder.

Late in the first set, Goerges gives Serena a short ball. Serena is out of her normal baseline stance and on top of it, with her racquet back, more quickly, with less extraneous motion, than anyone I’ve seen here. Serena walks slowly, almost gingerly, between points, so slowly and gingerly you have a hard time believing she can get those feet to move so quickly when she needs to. She stores up a lot of energy.

Serena hits with a wider open stance, on each side, than anyone else. This gives her a head start on covering the court after she hits, and helps her on clay, where she’s at a disadvantage because she rarely slides into the ball. It also lets her set up farther to the left of the hash mark on the baseline, giving her more shots at her forehand. But playing so open can get in her trouble. When she misses, it’s often because she comes off the ball and doesn’t lean into it, the peril of hitting with this stance. On clay, she needs all of her power; even today, the surface holds up some balls that would have penetrated on another court. She’ll have to hit the ball more crisply than she does today if she’s going to win the tournament.

Serena gets tight for a few minutes at the beginning of the second set, but Goerges can’t do anything with the opportunity. The interest on this morning isn’t in the competition. It’s in Serena’s command of her surroundings. Other players nod at the ball kids when they want the ball tossed to them. Serena looks at them. While her opponent stops at the first changeover of a set for a drink, Serena, like her sister and only her sister, follows the original rules and walks around the other net post without stopping. When she does walk to her chair, Goerges stops to let her go by first. Serena doesn’t look up, but there’s no arrogance in the gesture. It’s understood: She’s in control here.

“What can you learn from [this match] in terms of the kind of form you’re in for the rest of the tournament?” Serena is asked afterward.

“How can I get them to all be like that.”

nadlinds
Jun 4th, 2010, 10:25 PM
Williams Sisters Strike Twelve in Paris

PARIS, France - The Williams sisters shook off singles losses and won their fourth Grand Slam doubles title in a row, taking the French Open title with a 62 63 win over Kveta Peschke and Katarina Srebotnik.

The Williams sisters, seeded No.1, won the first four games of the match and barely looked back, a break against them early in the second set their only hitch. They were playing No.12 seeds Peschke and Srebotnik for the first time.

It was the Williams sisters' 12th Grand Slam doubles crown, adding to four previous Australian Opens (2001, 2003, 2009, 2010), one French Open (1999), four Wimbledons (2000, 2002, 2008, 2009) and two US Opens (1999, 2009). It was their fourth in a row - they haven't lost a Grand Slam match since the third round of last year's French (to Bethanie Mattek-Sands and Nadia Petrova).

"It's really tough when you play one Williams. When you play two, it's really not an easy win," Venus said. "Kveta and Katarina played really well this whole tournament. We just played the big points a little bit better today.

"Doubles for us isn't just for fun - we're playing for the title."

"It feels great. I mean, we have a Williams Slam," Serena said on the four straight majors. "When you're out there playing singles, it's a great feeling. But to play doubles with your sister, your flesh and blood, that's even better."

"We're the longest standing doubles team. We've been playing since the '80s," Venus said. "We've got quite a record. We don't even remember the first time."

"I remember a couple of things," Serena replied. "My dad told Venus to cross more, so I think she got upset and crossed when the person was serving. She ended up volleying the serve. It was so funny. My dad, he's so positive, he was like, 'Oh, no, no, Venus, not that. Just wait until after the serve.'

"I promise you, every tournament I think about that when we're in doubles."

"I remember that," Venus added.

Venus and Serena are the third-most successful partnership in the Open Era in terms of Grand Slam doubles titles won together, after Martina Navratilova and Pam Shriver (20) and Gigi Fernandez and Natasha Zvereva (14).

Given their semifinal win over Liezel Huber and Anabel Medina Garrigues, the Williams sisters will be co-world No.1s on the doubles rankings starting next week, taking over from Huber. Serena Williams will be the sixth player ever to hold No.1 in both singles and doubles simultaneously, after Navratilova (who did it for 103 weeks), Arantxa Sánchez-Vicario (7 weeks), Martina Hingis (29 weeks), Lindsay Davenport (3 weeks) and Kim Clijsters (3 weeks).

http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/doublesnews/20100604/williams-sisters-strike-twelve-in-paris_2256567_2064906

nadlinds
Jun 10th, 2010, 09:32 PM
The Most Dominant Duo?

Martina Navratilova and Pam Shriver are widely considered the greatest doubles team in Sony Ericsson WTA Tour history. Among their Open Era records are longest match win streak, most career titles and most majors. While it appears most of their marks are safe, for now at least, some say the Williams sisters can at least make an argument for best duo ever.

Serena and Venus, though they have made doubles more of a priority the last couple of years, did not play much doubles for big chunks of their careers. Therefore, they fall short of Navratilova and Shriver - who played doubles about as often as possible - when comparing many statistics, however, stats like match win percentage can provide a better idea of which team was better in their era. Of course, the Williamses are still in their primes, so they have time to draw closer in some of the statistical categories in which they trail.

So, which is the more dominant team? Let the numbers decide.

Match Records
Navratilova/Shriver: 390-25 (93.976%)
Williams/Williams: 145-18 (88.957%)

Longest Match Win Streak
Navratilova/Shriver: 109
Serena/Venus: 21
Notes: After losing a final in Orlando on April 24, 1983, Navratilova and Shriver did not lose again until the 1985 Wimbledon final on July 6, 1985 … The Williamses' streak does not factor in a 2000 US Open semifinal match that they withdrew from … The sisters currently have a 15-match win streak in effect.

Titles
Navratilova/Shriver: 79
Williams/Williams: 19
Notes: Two of the Williamses' titles were Olympic gold medals in 2000 and 2008, and while Shriver did win a gold alongside Zina Garrison in 1988, she never played with Navratilova at the Olympics.

Grand Slam Match Records
Navratilova/Shriver: 158-12, 92.941% (41-1 at Australian Open, 24-0 at French Open, 50-6 at Wimbledon, 43-5 at US Open)
Williams/Williams: 93-7, 93.000% (33-3 at Australian Open, 13-1 at French Open, 29-1 at Wimbledon, 18-2 at US Open)

Grand Slam Titles
Navratilova/Shriver: 20
Williams/Williams: 12
Notes: Navratilova and Shriver are the only team to win all four majors in the same year, 1984, and in fact, captured eight straight majors in between 1983 and 1985. They also won a non-calendar Grand Slam three times … With their French Open victory last week, the Williamses achieved their first non-calendar Grand Slam, as they are now the defending champs at all four majors … The Williamses have the third most majors in the Open Era, trailing Navratilova and Shriver and Gigi Fernandez and Natasha Zvereva, who have 14.

http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/doublesnews/20100610/the-most-dominant-duo_2256567_2068535

nadlinds
Jun 11th, 2010, 09:56 PM
Williams sisters make connections in Chattanooga

Of all the attractions Chattanooga had to offer Venus and Serena Williams, it was one of its oldest that deserved a special visit.

It was one that brought back fond childhood memories for the two sisters who between them have won three Olympic gold medals and more than 30 Grand Slam titles on the tennis circuit.

Chattanooga Bakery, maker of MoonPies.

"We never tried strawberry or orange before," Venus said before Thursday's Best of Preps banquet. "We had no idea they were made here, but we grew up on them and love them.

"I haven't had a chance to taste them yet, but after dinner I'm ready."

Added Serena: "I'm just going to take them one at a time; I'm focused on them."

Serena admitted she grew up a double-decker MoonPie fan, while Venus endorsed the banana flavor.

The sisters' day in the Scenic City consisted of a trip to T.C. Thompson's Children's Hospital, a trip to Baylor to speak at a tennis camp and trips to the home of MoonPies and the Southern Star restaurant, all before the banquet.

It was their firsttrip to Chattanooga. Venus said she had been as close as Memphis before.

"I like it better than Memphis," she said. "It seems to have a more Southern feel to it. There are some great eating spots here."

Serena admitted to having interest in another event Thursday night. Although more of a Kobe Bryant fan in basketball, she said she would like to see the Boston Celtics pull out Game 4 of the NBA finals in Boston.

"I'm a Lakers fan, but if they win tonight it won't be a series," Serena said.

Venus admitted she hadn't kept up much with the series, as both sisters had just returned from Paris and the French Open.

"I'm just not that big of a sports fan," she said with a laugh. "I know that sounds funny, but I'm just not into sports except for football."

The sisters recently became part-owners of the Miami Dolphins.

"I love the Dolphins," Venus noted. "I love going to their games."

Serena had words of advice for all the student-athletes in attendance.

"Never give up," she said. "Whatever route you take -- whether you play professionally or decide to go to college -- you can't give up and you have to enjoy what you do."

The two put on a show during the banquet, talking about topics ranging from childhood memories playing tennis and conversations with their dad about eventually being No. 1 and 2 in the world, to Venus' desire to return to No. 1, leapfrogging her sister.

"I like being No. 2, but I would like to be No. 1 again," she said with a laugh.

While taking pictures with the award winners, they were encouraging and captivating. They were fascinated themselves while watching the video of Heart and Desire Award winner Jonathan Blevins of South Pittsburg.

According to Sarah Evans, the Guerry Award winner for tennis, they were easy to talk to.

"It was just so exciting to meet the top two players in the world," she said. "I had never met anybody famous before and didn't know how to respond, but they were very nice."

Said Venus: "It was just a great event. The best part of it all was being able to talk with the kids; as athletes we can relate to each other. I've been that age and been an athlete, so just seeing where they are and seeing them being so successful is really touching.

"It was a great event and we were honored to be a part of it."

http://www.timesfreepress.com/news/2010/jun/11/moonpie-memories/?sports

nadlinds
Jun 11th, 2010, 09:58 PM
Williamses show their closeness

As sports fans, we've all watched Venus and Serena Williams on the tennis court. Whether for their championship play, intense arguments with officials or even their attire, they are headline makers at every stop on the tour.

But Thursday evening, as they entered the backstage area before the annual Best of Preps awards banquet, they did so in a strikingly different manner, walking the hallway arm-in-arm, siblings enjoying an "off day" away from the court.

"I'm not sure how many people actually know just how close we really are," Venus said as Serena gave a knowing nod while checking her cell-phone messages. "We've lived together for about 10 years now, even though we're both grown-ups. We've got an understanding: She cooks and I eat.

"It's really great to have a buddy, a support system, with you at all times. We're each other's biggest fans."

In their first visit to the Scenic City, the Williams sisters tried to soak up every bit of Southern hospitality during their brief stay, stopping to pick up MoonPies and even have a salad at the Southern Star restaurant. They were engaging throughout the evening, answering every question candidly, including Serena revealing to the sold-out banquet hall that Venus has "a candy addiction" and is somewhat of a "geek" because of all the online classes she has taken and that if they play for fun, they do so left-handed, just to make it interesting.

"I think the way we were brought up by our parents, it just made all of us a very tight-knit group," Venus said. "If I have a bad match, I know I can count on a text message from Serena telling me I'm still the best. I can be really down, but hearing that from her kind of lifts me up. That means a lot."

They stayed long after the final award had been presented, leaving a lasting impression on each young athlete as they posed for pictures with each award winner before exiting, once again arm-in-arm and all smiles.

"It was pretty neat to see them in person and get to have our picture taken with them," said Howard track star LaQuisha Jackson, who won two awards, including the Scrappy Moore Female Athlete of the Year honor. "They've accomplished a lot in their careers, and it was special to get to hear them talk about growing up and setting goals.

"This was an exciting night for me and actually makes me want to go work harder for next year."

http://www.timesfreepress.com/news/2010/jun/11/williamses-show-their-closeness/?bestofpreps2010

Tech1
Jun 14th, 2010, 07:53 AM
Doing Downward-Facing Dog with Serena Williams (http://www.vanityfair.com/online/daily/2010/06/serena-williams-nike-trainer-ones.html)
by Jessica Flint (http://www.vanityfair.com/contributors/jessica-flint)
June 10, 2010, 6:38 PM

http://blog.vanityfair.com/online/daily/serenawilliamdandjohnmcenroe.jpgSerena Williams and John McEnroe on June 9, 2010, in New York City.

“Tell me about the French Open,” John McEnroe said to Serena Williams last night at an intimate gathering at a penthouse apartment in New York City, “because I thought you were going to win.”

“I did too. I really did,” Williams said with genuine vulnerability. “I thought I had the singles title in my hand. I’m still recovering from that loss. I was able to win the doubles, but it just wasn’t the same. But I’m hoping I can take over the Wimbledon singles.”

Williams had just flown in from Europe earlier that morning to help Nike launch its Air Max Trainer One, a women-specific cross-training shoe with roots dating back to McEnroe’s heyday. (In the 1980s, a Nike shoe designer had given McEnroe a prototype of an Air Trainer cross-trainer, telling McEnroe he could lift weights or run in it, but he shouldn’t wear it on the court. McEnroe, who liked the shoe’s cushion, ignored the instructions—does this surprise anyone?—and played in the shoes. He won his first match in months and refused to wear anything else for the rest of the season.) Two decades later, Nike decided to update the shoe with women in mind, specifically Williams, soccer goalie Hope Solo, and snowboarder Gretchen Bleiler.

With the shoe just hitting the market, a small group of high-heeled ladies were invited to hear Williams talk about the sneaker and then try out the kicks during a high-intensity dynamic yoga workout alongside the world’s current No. 1-ranked women’s tennis player. McEnroe’s showing up to greet the group before he popped over to an art show in SoHo made for a surreal experience.

Williams recalled seeing an early version of the shoe. “I said, ‘These are John McEnroe’s shoes!’ I remember when I was younger watching tennis—I was always into fashion—and he wore this super-cool shoe. I was like, Wow, those aren’t like a tennis shoe.” Looking stylish on the court is important to Williams. “I’m a really big part of everything I wear on the court,” she said. (For Grand Slams, Williams takes seven dresses with her, “because I’m confident that I’m going to play seven matches, and for doubles, I have six outfits—six because you play six matches.” Confidence? Now that’s stylish, too.)

During last night’s event, Williams was wearing a special pair of limited-edition Black Avenue Trainer Ones, which were designed specifically for her. The Black Avenue shoe, made from special tennis-ball-like fuzz in honor of the U.S. Open’s night matches, was inspired by Williams’s on-court play, but is the training shoe she wears for off-court fitness. (Tennis shoes have to be more durable than cross-trainers. Raphael Nadal, for example, can destroy a pair of tennis shoes in just one match. Some players will even swap shoes during a match if they feel the sneakers blowing out.) “When I’m meeting with the designers, I’m always like, O.K. guys, let’s make these shoes, like, fashion.
Obviously there can’t be a heel, but …, ” Williams said, joking that she’s rarely seen off the court not wearing sky-high shoes. In fact, she has only about eight pairs of sneakers at any given time—the rest of her closet is dedicated to stilettos. “This is a fashion shoe that’s into training,” she said of her Trainer Ones. “I think it’s really hot.”

Only 128 shoes Black Avenue sneakers were produced—because Williams’s fastest clocked serve is 128 m.p.h.

“At the French Open, when I was playing this year, they do it in kilometers over there, and I did like a 208, and I was like, Yes! I broke my record! Nike is going to have to change the shoe!” Williams said. “And then I calculated it, it was 128—I was like, Awwwww. I’m still working on it! I’m trying to go for it!”

She’ll have her next chance to nail an even bigger serve as the defending champ at Wimbledon, which is less than two weeks away. “I don’t think of it as defending a title,” Williams said. “My sister Venus, she said, ‘Think of it as you are going to win Wimbledon.’ That takes the pressure off of me.”

Williams has been revving up for the Grand Slam by practicing on the court for two hours per day, then heading to the gym for an hour of training. (She’s not a fan of running, but she’ll do it, and she hasn’t done weight training in years—she prefers using Thera-Bands.) She’ll also mix it up by adding in some extra cardio and yoga.

http://blog.vanityfair.com/online/daily/serenawilliamsyoga.jpgWilliams doing yoga in a pair of Nike Airmax Trainer Ones.

Speaking of which, it was time for all of the ladies to go downstairs, put on Trainer One sneakers and racer-back black tank tops, and do some downward-facing dogs.

For the record, while Williams is doing yoga, she doesn’t grunt/scream—a noise she has perfected on the tennis court. “Growing up I liked Monica Seles,” Williams said. “She was the first one that really used to grunt. So I would grunt like her. Grunting is actually like a part of breathing. There are a lot of guys that grunt … It’s just a different form of breathing and kind of releasing energy. Sometimes when a match gets really intense I will grunt more, and sometimes I will grunt less.”

Despite the fact that yoga is a breathing-intensive activity, there wasn’t any grunting in the penthouse during the class, but after a workout that incorporated a fast-paced, athletic flow and quick pose changing, there were a lot of sweaty red faces in the room. Not exactly the way you want the world’s best tennis player to remember you. Which perhaps explains why Williams gets glammed up for her tennis matches.

“One time I was wearing these great earrings. They were like down to here,” she said, motioning at her shoulders, “and they were super cool. And one of the few times I did come to the net—when I wasn’t shaking my opponent’s hand [laughs]—I hit a volley and the earrings hit me in the eye. And I was like, Eh! Now I practice in my jewelry before I play. When you are on the court you are sweating, you are grunting, it’s not your best look. So I try to accessorize.”

Tech1
Jun 14th, 2010, 08:10 AM
Sisters speak at sports banquet

LFO star recognized as top male athlete
By: Stephen Hargis
Friday, June 11, 2010

Lakeview-Fort Oglethorpe High School wrestler and football star Derrick Laney was named the Scrappy Moore Male Athlete of the Year at Thursday’s annual Best of Preps awards banquet.

More than 1,100 people were in attendance at the Chattanooga Convention Center to honor the area’s top high school athletes.

LaQuisha Jackson of Howard School of Academics and Technology was named Female Athlete of the Year, and Soddy-Daisy’s Clifford Kirk was Coach of the Year.

Tennis superstars Venus and Serena Williams were the featured speakers, advising all the young athletes to set goals for not only their athletic careers but beyond.

“It’s important for young people to have a goal, give themselves something to strive for,” Venus Williams said.

“Even beyond their high school or college careers, it’s always good to have something you’re working for and to try to better yourself,” she said.

Nineteen awards were presented to area athletes and coaches, including the three prestigious Scrappy Moore awards.

Continue reading more Best of Preps 2010 coverage. (http://www.timesfreepress.com/news/sports/preps/bestofpreps/2010/coverage/)


http://media.timesfreepress.com/img/photos/2010/06/10/0611_web_ng1_bop_2r_t305.jpg?ba7ba0dd8d7f1e464d5eb 01fb9ba8c10bd9c61fe

_____________________________________

Williams sisters highlight "Best of Preps" banquet

CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. (WRCB) -- Derrick Laney has won countless awards as a high school football and wrestling standout at Lakeview-Fort Oglethorpe.

But one that includes a chance to meet Venus and Serena Williams will be hard to top.

"Three or four years ago, catching a glimpse of ESPN, I never thought I'd be standing beside these two. So it's pretty cool," said Laney, who was named the paper's Male Athlete of the Year.

The top two tennis players in the world according to recent WTA rankings were made a stop in Chattanooga to take part in the Times-Free Press "Best of Preps" banquet Thursday night.

The event, which honors the top prep athletes across eleven different sports, was one that hit home celebrity guests.

"It wasn't long ago we were in their shoes," Venus said in an exclusive pre-event television interview with Channel 3. "We remember those times, and want them to know that we're proud of their accomplishments.

Miss Atomic Bomb
Jun 14th, 2010, 10:59 AM
“Tell me about the French Open,” John McEnroe said to Serena Williams last night at an intimate gathering at a penthouse apartment in New York City, “because I thought you were going to win.”

“I did too. I really did,” Williams said with genuine vulnerability. “I thought I had the singles title in my hand. I’m still recovering from that loss. I was able to win the doubles, but it just wasn’t the same. But I’m hoping I can take over the Wimbledon singles.”



I wish she hadn't said this, now that loss hurts even more :hysteric:

Gdsimmons
Jun 14th, 2010, 03:32 PM
Giving back to the kids is always a good look!

Tech1
Jun 14th, 2010, 04:30 PM
Giving back to the kids is always a good look!

I concur, but that wig is not!

MrSerenaWilliams
Jun 14th, 2010, 05:22 PM
I will say, though....for all of the shade that I threw at it earlier. It does look better in a ponytail (a la the yoga picture)

Gdsimmons
Jun 14th, 2010, 09:33 PM
I concur, but that wig is not!

Lol so true though. Sometimes she gets it right, and sometimes its just wrong

Marcell
Jun 16th, 2010, 11:48 PM
Cowboys Stadium postpones Tennis Slam

ARLINGTON, Texas (AP)—The Cowboys Tennis Classic, scheduled for July 10 at Cowboys Stadium, has been called off.

A tersely worded statement from Cowboys Stadium officials on Wednesday said “a future date has not been set and all tickets will be refunded.”

No reason was given for what the statement called a “postponement.” Calls to the Cowboys weren’t returned.

Last month, Cowboys owner Jerry Jones had announced the event to be held six days after Wimbledon at his $1.2 billion stadium. It was to host a pair of best-of-three matches, featuring Serena Williams against Maria Sharapova, and Andy Roddick against John Isner.

Williams, Sharapova and Roddick all have been ranked No. 1. The 6-foot-7 Isner is the second-highest ranked American men’s player behind Roddick, and is known for a serve that can top 140 mph.



http://sports.yahoo.com/tennis/news?slug=ap-cowboystennisslam

MrSerenaWilliams
Jun 17th, 2010, 12:15 AM
wierd :shrug:

Gdsimmons
Jun 17th, 2010, 12:39 AM
Serena has a wedding to go

Diesel
Jun 17th, 2010, 01:01 AM
Cowboys Stadium postpones Tennis Slam

ARLINGTON, Texas (AP)—The Cowboys Tennis Classic, scheduled for July 10 at Cowboys Stadium, has been called off.

A tersely worded statement from Cowboys Stadium officials on Wednesday said “a future date has not been set and all tickets will be refunded.”

No reason was given for what the statement called a “postponement.” Calls to the Cowboys weren’t returned.

Last month, Cowboys owner Jerry Jones had announced the event to be held six days after Wimbledon at his $1.2 billion stadium. It was to host a pair of best-of-three matches, featuring Serena Williams against Maria Sharapova, and Andy Roddick against John Isner.

Williams, Sharapova and Roddick all have been ranked No. 1. The 6-foot-7 Isner is the second-highest ranked American men’s player behind Roddick, and is known for a serve that can top 140 mph.



http://sports.yahoo.com/tennis/news?slug=ap-cowboystennisslam

I don't know how tennis is in Texas but unless this was going to be a slam, they weren't going to fill that stadium up.

doni1212
Jun 17th, 2010, 03:00 PM
Serena has a wedding to go

That's exactly what it is, :lol:

Toxic
Jun 19th, 2010, 02:39 AM
Serena fine-tunes her title defence

You would think Serena Williams might have more important things on her mind right now other than her music collection, but just the other day the defending Wimbledon champion appealed, via Twitter, for her followers to come up with some song suggestions.

To be fair, her request was in part related to the 2010 Championships. "What should I listen to during Wimbledon?" she tweeted. "I need great music that will inspire me. I trust that you all will help me, right?"

It is perhaps understandable why the three-time Wimbledon champion and holder of 12 Grand Slam singles titles is seeking a little motivation and stimulation at the moment. Despite starting the year tremendously, winning her fifth Australian Open singles trophy at the beginning of the season, her body has not been kind to her.

A persistent left knee injury forced her to withdraw from the Paris Indoor and Dubai tournaments in February, Miami in March and Marbella and Charleston in April. May proved to be a better month for the younger Williams sister, who was able to compete in Rome, Madrid and Roland Garros.

Partnering Venus at the French Open, the lady who famously wore a t-shirt which read 'Are you looking at my TITLES?' in her post-final 2009 Wimbledon press conference, pocketed her 12th Grand Slam women's doubles title, a result which pushed the siblings to the No.1 ranking.

However, Serena’s performance in the quarter-finals of the singles left her bitterly disappointed when, after holding a match point, she fell to Sam Stosur in a thrilling duel that lasted nigh on two-and-a-half hours. The American was particularly hard on herself after the match.

"I made so many errors and I definitely was nowhere near my best today," a glum Serena said, adding that her opponent played ‘really well. I expected to play better. I’m a little disappointed obviously in the way I played. I was definitely off. I didn’t play as well as I did in my other four rounds. Had I played better for two minutes, maybe the result could have been different, but it didn’t work out."

Indeed, the match is probably one she would rather push to the back of her mind but there is a likelihood the two could meet again in the semi-finals, should they both make it to that stage. Before that potential hurdle however, Serena could face Maria Sharapova in the fourth round in a remake of the 2004 final when the Russian denied Williams her third consecutive Wimbledon crown.

Earlier this week, the 2000 and 2008 Olympic doubles gold medallist returned to the SW19 lawns and has been training hard all week. If she was feeling low of spirit after Paris, there is no sign of it now. The top seed has been in a distinctly jolly mood on the practice courts and on Thursday night was thoroughly enjoying herself at the pre-Wimbledon WTA Tour Party.

The 28-year-old appears to be clearly comfortable in the south east of England trophy-hunting ground and her love affair with Wimbledon looks set to continue. No doubt she will be on song when she opens up proceedings against Portugal's Michelle De Brito on Centre Court on Tuesday.

http://www.wimbledon.org/en_GB/news/articles/2010-06-18/201006181276869902321.html

Good Luck, Rena!!! :D

nadlinds
Jun 20th, 2010, 06:30 PM
Williams sisters planning to continue family monopoly

Serena and Venus Williams, the greatest double act in the history of tennis, have a self-confidence that some find grating.

So when Serena, the defending Wimbledon champion, suggests that it is the sisters against the rest of the tennis world, she knows the critics will interpret her statement as just another sign of their arrogance.

The reality is, though, that the Williams sisters are the favourites again to contest the women’s final for a fifth time in nine years — and they are the reigning doubles champions at all four Grand Slam tournaments.

‘Sure, it’s us against the WTA Tour,’ said Serena starkly last week.

In the past decade only Maria Sharapova and Amelie Mauresmo have managed to prevent one of the Williams sisters from parading around the Centre Court with the winner’s Venus Rosewater Dish.

‘The other day, I had to think did I win last year, or did Venus?’ said Serena.‘Practising with Venus every day, it does get confusing.’

Rather than arrogance, the sisters prefer to liken their self-assurance to a shield. ‘Venus and I are really close,’ said Serena.

People always want to take us out and play their super-best game against us. We are taking on these players, who, basically, find a different level when they play us. I always take it as a compliment. It’s us against them.’

From their early childhood days in Compton, a ghetto of Los Angeles, the Williams sisters have always lived — and played — outside the establishment.

Yet the prospect of playing in front of The Queen when she takes her seat in the Royal Box on Thursday for the first time since she watched Virginia Wade crowned Wimbledon champion in her Silver Jubilee Year, 1977, captivates Serena.

‘I hope I am playing on Centre Court that day as that would be super-cool,’ she said.

‘Maybe I’ll even use my Members’ Badge to get into the Members’ area. I never go there.’

As someone who has been entitled to the privileges of membership of the All England Club for eight years, it is revealing that until now Serena has never felt a need to visit areas denied to the vast majority of players.

The Williams sisters are a club of two — and untroubled if that causes offence.

They remain an intimidating presence and cast a shadow over the game from which rivals struggle to emerge.

Maybe the fact we are a little talented has played a major role in why we are still at the top of the game,’ said Serena.

‘We’ve taken our careers into our own hands.’

By which she means that they play when, and where, it suits them — to the unspoken irritation of the Sony Ericsson WTA Tour. Serena has played just five tournaments this year, while Venus has managed only two more.

Serena explained: ‘It’s hard when you have been doing something since you were two years old, it’s a long time to be mastering your career.

'We won’t play if we are injured, no matter what the consequences are.

‘As an athlete, you and live and die for these moments at tournaments like Wimbledon, or the US Open.’

Venus is the more even tempered of the two.

‘Venus is much more calm than I am, much more sensible,’ explained Serena.

‘Venus thinks things through. I do, too; but not as thoroughly. She is a real good leader and a role model for me.’

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/tennis/article-1288020/WIMBLEDON-2010-Us-world-Williams-sisters-planning-continue-family-monopoly.html

rucolo
Jun 24th, 2010, 12:05 PM
Wimbledon R1 match vs Larcher De Brito::p

http://www.wimbledon.org/en_GB/news/match_reports/2010-06-22/201006221277201176142.html


Serena off to flying start in title defence

Tuesday, 22 June 2010
After all the shenanigans of the opening day, it was time for someone to take charge of proceedings on day two of The Championships. Enter, stage left, Serena Williams, the defending champion, to begin her campaign.

And in 63 minutes, Williams had moved safely into the second round, beating Michelle Larcher De Brito 6-0, 6-4 (note to R. Federer: if you remember from years gone by, Roger, that is how you begin a title defence).

Normally, both Serena and her sister take their time to warm up at any Grand Slam tournament. The first week is important - but not that important, so the early rounds are useful for ironing out the wrinkles in a champion's game and getting used to the surroundings. As the old saying goes: no one can win a Grand Slam in the first week but anyone can certainly lose one.

But when Serena took a look at the draw, she spotted her name next to that of Larcher De Brito - and that could spell potential trouble. The only other time the two have met, Larcher De Brito pushed the world No.1 to three tense sets in Stanford two years ago. Best be ready for anything then.

To add a little spice to the encounter, Larcher De Brito arrived on Centre Court with a fair amount of baggage. Last year, her grunt was the topic of much debate and not an inconsiderable amount of tut-tutting. Aravane Rezai had found the wail so infuriating at the French Open that year that she complained to the umpire about it. By the time Larcher De Brito had made her way to Wimbledon, the ladies and gentlemen of the press had dusted off their gruntometer and were ready and waiting to record the decibel level of the young Portuguese.

The grunt was so long and so loud that it started when her racket strings touched the ball and continued long after it had bounced on the other side of the net. And it could be heard from the top of Church Road.

This time around, though, Larcher De Brito was on her guard. She knew all about the ways of Fleet Street and was keeping quiet. The only trouble was that Larcher De Brito shorn of her grunt was a little bit like Samson shorn of his locks - not a lot of use to anyone.

Then again, she was facing the Mighty Serena. And the Mighty Serena was in no mood to hang about. For 22 minutes, Larcher De Brito kept close counsel as the champion ran away with the set. It was not that she was playing badly - far from it - it was just that she was being completely and utterly dominated.

There were moments when Larcher De Brito had Williams pinned to the wall - the odd whipped backhand, one brilliant flying forehand played around the netpost and in for a clean winner, for example. But every time she managed to apply a little bit of pressure, Williams walloped down an ace or a service winner. As Williams pounded away, it did look like she was taking a sledgehammer to crack a nut - but the champion knew from experience that Larcher De Brito was not to be taken lightly.

Sure enough, the small but fiery Portuguese finally won her first game after 32 minutes. The crowd, knowing that they were watching a fine young player in the making, responded with thunderous applause. They wanted to see more of this intriguing battle and Larcher De Brito, digging in for battle, was happy to oblige.

By the time she had won her second game, the crowd were enthralled. She had Williams running hither and thither, chasing after the full range of her ground strokes. And the wailing grunt was very much in evidence. It was still not earsplitting (Ms Azarenka tops the class in that subject) but it was there all the same.

At the other end, Williams was cranking up the volume, too. She is hardly a shrinking violet on court and when she feels she is being pressed, she roars herself on to a higher level. That, in turn, brought out the much anticipated and now world famous elongated, two-tone Larcher De Brito wail, much to the amusement of the crowd. Grunting they knew about; wailing was a new departure, and one that made them titter.

But however loud she grunted and however hard she hit the ball, Larcher De Brito was not going to get past Williams. Not today. Not at Wimbledon. The champion was on a mission and Larcher De Brito was merely in her way. With her 15th ace, Williams was through and on day two of the tournament, order had been restored.

by Alix Ramsay

rucolo
Jun 24th, 2010, 12:12 PM
http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/news/20100622/serena-in-openers-43-0_2256076_2076354


Serena In Openers: 43-0

June 22, 2010

LONDON, England - She was perfect going in and perfect coming out. Serena Williams improved to 43-0 lifetime in first round matches at Grand Slams with a 60 64 victory over Portuguese teenager Michelle Larcher de Brito.

Stepping onto Centre Court at 1pm Tuesday, the traditional starting time for the women's defending champion, the No.1-seeded Williams stormed through the first set in just 22 minutes and, although her opponent managed four holds of serve in the second set, quietly closed it out with her 15th ace of the match.

Larcher de Brito had pushed Williams to three in their only previous meeting, in fact she led 64 20 in that match at Stanford in 2008, but not this time.

"She's a good player. I knew what to expect," Williams said. "She doesn't look it, but she definitely packs a punch. Most people nowadays hit really hard. It was good for me to get someone who hits that hard early on in the tournament."

Williams was sporting a unique dress: "We dubbed it Strawberries and Cream. The red is the strawberries and the white is the cream. It's not a pure white, it's more of a cream. The red symbolizes what I do in Africa, along with a lot of the work, like the red laces. Everybody that buys a pair can pretty much save a life in Africa. The tournament and the things I do in Africa mean so much to me."

Williams leads all active players in career Grand Slam titles won with 12: five Australian Opens, three Wimbledons, three US Opens and one French Open. Venus Williams and Justine Henin are next with seven majors each.

Awaiting the defending champ in the second round will be Anna Chakvetadze, who beat last week's 's-Hertogenbosch runner-up Andrea Petkovic, 36 64 64. Chakvetadze was ranked as high as No.5 in the world in 2007 but is now a lowly No.118 after a series of on and off-court struggles over the last few years.

In their only previous match, it was Chakvetadze that won - by retirement, in the season-ending Sony Ericsson Championships in 2007, round robin stage, when Williams had to stop with a knee injury after losing the first set. Chakvetadze has also had success on grass before, winning one of her seven career Sony Ericsson WTA Tour titles on the surface ('s-Hertogenbosch in 2007).


Serena:worship:

Tech1
Jun 24th, 2010, 04:02 PM
SW19 Diary: Serena match proves too hot for Queen to handle
By Nick Harris
Thursday, 24 June 2010

The SW19 Diary can reveal that an apparently bizarre and potentially explosive decision by the scheduling committee about today's play on Centre Court is not as bizarre as it first appears. The powers that be have decided not to put the defending champion Serena Williams on the main showcase court on the day that the Queen visits for the first time in 33 years. And they have decided this despite Serena having talked publicly and at length about her glee at the monarch's visit, and how she has been working on her curtsy.

So why have the schedulers decided to put the match featuring Caroline Wozniacki and Kai-Chen Chang ("Who?" asks everyone) on Centre, between matches featuring big names Andy Murray (against Jarkko Nieminen) and Rafa Nadal (against Robin Haase)? The official response is "because the good matches need to be spread around". That's why Serena will be playing her match with Anna Chakvetadze on Court No 2.

But the Diary understands it could be more complex than that, and that Serena is not on Centre Court not because she's been snubbed by the All England Club, but actually to avoid the possibility of a perceived snub by the Queen.

How so? Because the Queen will not necessarily stay all day at the Club. And imagine the headlines if she stayed for Murray and then left before Serena played. That would look really bad. The odds about her staying as long as the second match on Centre are deemed to be long. As someone familiar with the situation suggestion to the Diary: "It's boiling hot. She's 84. And she f***ing hates tennis."

One last note: Serena's curtsy practice will not have been in vain. She will get to meet the Queen in a special ceremony on the lawns here before play starts.

Phew! Panic over.

http://www.independent.co.uk/sport/tennis/sw19-diary-serena-match-proves-too-hot-for-queen-to-handle-2008531.html

MrSerenaWilliams
Jun 24th, 2010, 09:02 PM
Well I think most of us knew there was a reason Sarin didn't get CC. And it wasn't because she is too controversial :lol: I just wish she at least got Court 1. But :shrug: either way, she would have gone on at about the same time.

rucolo
Jun 25th, 2010, 09:41 PM
Wimbledon R2 match vs Chakvetadze::p

http://www.wimbledon.org/en_GB/news/match_reports/2010-06-24/201006241277372747925.html


Queen Serena reigns on trip to No.2 Court

Thursday, 24 June 2010
There was a time when Wimbledon's No.2 Court was known as the graveyard of champions, but that was the old venue known by that name, which has been pulled down with the ghosts of title dreams in days gone by buried beneath it for good.

The new No.2 Court - in the far corner of the All England Club - has yet to require a similar repuation during its year and four days of tournament operation. And if Serena Williams has anything to do with it, that is the way it will remain - after she clumped Anna Chakvetadze 6-0, 6-1 to move into the third round.

On the day, she formally met the Queen - and curtsied with quite extraordinary bending of the knee - Miss W was in the mood for queening it over everyone else and Chakvetadze had the misfortune to the first person she bumped into.

Summoned to work at suppertime, she was in no mood to hang about. John Isner and Nicolas Mahut were more than welcome to their record for the longest match ever played - Williams was trying to break the land-speed record for getting into the third round and back into the locker room. It took the champion fully one game to get her bearings on the unfamiliar court before she put the pedal to the metal and roared off into the sunset after just 48 minutes on court.

Chakvetadze was once ranked as high as No.5 in the world but that was three years ago. Now her position in the pecking order has slumped to 118 and against that level of opposition, Williams was not going to crumble.

For that opening game, Chakvetadze was in with a chance. Williams was misfiring on almost every stroke - she was not missing by much but she still needed to do a bit of fine tuning to be at her best. Two break points presented themselves to the Russian but she could not take them. Williams whipped them from her racket strings - one was snatched back with an ace - and from then on, Chakvetadze was in serious trouble.

It was all very well having a few chances against the Williams serve, but they were of no use unless she could take them. And, quite simply, she couldn't. Worse still, Williams was making it quite clear that they were the only chances Chakvetadze was going to get.

The first set whistled by in just 23 minutes and the second set was going much the same way until suddenly, out of the blue, Chakvetadze held serve. It had taken 44 minutes but at least the Russian had won a game.

A huge wave of applause washed around the court and Chakvetadze grinned from ear to ear in appreciation. "You're on your way back!" called a wag from the crowd. All credit to Chakvetadze, she even grinned at that. Many a player taking such a pasting would struggle to raise an eyebrow much less a smile.

But that one game was all that Chakvetadze was allowed and a few moments later, Williams was through to the third round in good time to make it back home in time for dinner.

by Alix Ramsay

rucolo
Jun 27th, 2010, 09:24 PM
Wimbledon R3 match vs Cibulkova::p

http://www.wimbledon.org/en_GB/news/match_reports/2010-06-26/201006261277545831663.html


Serena enjoys another bagel on way to victory

Saturday, 26 June 2010
One fact is becoming clear this Wimbledon: Serena Williams likes to start her day with a bagel - of the tennis variety, that is. For the third time in as many rounds, she kicked off her match today with a 6-0 set.

But Dominika Cibulkova provided much more to chew on in the second set and prolonged that one to 7-5, an overall result that, nonetheless, left Williams looking a long way short of thrilled.

That first set today really was a steamroller job, and lasted all of 14 minutes. Again following the pattern of her previous two rounds here this year, Williams broke her opponent at the first opportunity.

Cibulkova momentarily looked to be settling at the start, but then promptly double faulted for break point and sent a forehand way out of court. By contrast, Williams opened with two service games to love. It was grim stuff for the world number 46, and it was to get a lot worse. The idea of actually breaking Serena was fantasy.

The one point Williams dropped on her serve in the opening set was nothing to do with Cibulkova, but an unforced error, and Williams looked thoroughly disgusted with herself. Goodness knows why, given the pace of events. At this rate it would all be over inside half an hour.

But commendably Cibulkova had other ideas. Diminutive Dominika might be 5ft 2in, but she has a big game - after all, this time last year she was number 12 in the world, and that doesn't happen by accident.

She was not deterred by Serena's touch-play any more than she was by her power, and an early break point against the 21-year-old Slovakian passed safely. Really good work got her name on the scoreboard - wow, a whole game.

But importantly she followed it by not only preventing Williams from notching up her fourth love service game to date, but also taking her to deuce. Two aces from Serena ruled out any fancy ideas about an actual break, but Cibulkova was sufficiently encouraged to hold twice more.

At 3-3, she came up with her single best point of the day, concluding with a lungeing crosscourt passing shot of which any player would be rightly proud. At 4-4, she was still in it. At 4-5, both women were on full attack - Williams to capture the straight sets victory, Cibulkova needing the game to stay in the match.

A fighting rally saw Serena command her first match point, but Cibulkova replied with equal spirit to punch away the danger. Commendably and unexpectedly, she had taken it to 5-5 with the clock ticking past the hour. But the tie-break was out of reach. Serena was just too good and at last broke to take the match 7-5, although her expression was positively gloomy.

But the fact is the defending champion is serving supremely well going into the second week, and that should give all upcoming opponents cause for concern.

by Kate Battersby

rucolo
Jun 27th, 2010, 09:28 PM
http://www.wimbledon.org/en_GB/news/articles/2010-06-26/201006261277567441099.html


Serena aiming for perfect sixes each time

Saturday, 26 June 2010
Only a 12-time Grand Slam champion can be disappointed with a week that included three comfortable victories where she dropped just 10 games. But Serena Williams is a perfectionist.

The defending Wimbledon champion was honest enough to admit she is not playing anywhere near the high standards she expects despite her comfortable 6-0, 7-5 over Dominika Cibulkova. For the third consecutive match this week, she started with a 6-0 set but failed to match that in the second set.

"I just honestly don't think I played that great in the second," said the American. "I think I played well in the first. You can't play one set and expect to win the tournament.

"I just kind of came off the gas a little too much. You just can't do that in big Grand Slams like this."

Serena wrapped up the first set in just 18 minutes to dish out a first set "bagel" for the third consecutive time, but the second was more of a struggle to leave the 28-year-old with some time for soul-searching.

"I've always been insatiable," she admitted. "I've always had a desire to be really good. You know, if you become too satisfied, then I don't know how you can reach that.

"You can't play one set and expect to win the tournament. It's important for me to stay level and stay with my game. But I wasn't able to do that."

The No.1 seed believes she was in much better shape this time last year and will need to up her game ahead of a potential fourth round clash with Maria Sharapova, a rematch of the 2004 final.

"I thought I was playing a little better last year, so hopefully I can pick it up," she said. "I'm going to have to, obviously, in the next match or next couple."

Serena was happy about one aspect of her game though - her serving.

"I serve well at Wimbledon for some unknown reason," she said after sending down 19 aces. "I want to keep doing it. I wish I could serve like this every tournament.

"For the most part my serve works when I'm in trouble. At Wimbledon it works the whole match."

by Ian Baker

rucolo
Jun 27th, 2010, 09:34 PM
Preview Wimbledon R4 match vs Sharapova::)

http://www.wimbledon.org/en_GB/news/articles/2010-06-27/201006261277579903176.html


Serena and Maria eager for battle

Sunday, 27 June 2010
The fourth round clash between the defending champion, Serena Williams, and Maria Sharapova is one that is eagerly anticipated by both women.

Sharapova, who defeated Serena in the 2004 Wimbledon final at the age of 17, has won only one of their subsequent five matches but she is adamant that the encounter has not come too early for her in the tournament.

"Absolutely not," she insists. "I love playing against her. She's the defending champion, she's great on this surface, she's won numerous Grand Slams. If there's a challenge ahead of you, it's definitely playing her, and I enjoy that." Serena agrees that their meeting has not come too early . "It is what it is. You always have to be ready."

The two have not met on grass since that 2004 final, but the American feels they are thoroughly familiar with each other's game. "I think she really knows my game," says Serena. "She really studies it. And I pretty much know her game. So I don't think much has changed."

Sharapova thinks it is difficult to draw any conclusions from the 2004 match. "It was many years ago. This will be a new day. I don't really think about yesterday or the day before. Whoever I play, when I go out there, it's a new match. It's new, you've got to start from scratch."

As for Serena's memories of that bad-news day in 2004, she claims: "I just remember I was really nervous. I think I put too much pressure on myself. It didn't work out. That was that."

Sharapova dropped off the tour from August 2008 to May 2009 because of injury to her right shoulder, which required surgery in February 2009. Having slipped to 126 in the rankings, she is now back up to 17. As to the question of whether her shoulder is functioning at its best again, she admits: "I think there are still some improvements to be done and things to get better. To be honest, I look back and it's tough to compare yourself to what you were a few years ago."

Serena is happy at the Russian's return. "It's really good for the tour that Maria has come back," she says. "It's always good to see a champion returning and doing well, winning tournaments already."

Sharapova dismisses talk of a rivalry between the two women. "I'd call it a rivalry when I win a few more against her," she smiles [Serena leads their head-to-head 5-2]. "But I absolutely enjoy playing her, it's what I thrive on. I love going on court and playing someone who is obviously the favourite to win the match."

As for the key to the match, Serena plumps for the need to relax, adding: "Whatever happens, it happens." For Sharapova, it's execution and aggression. "She is a really big hitter, she is a big server," she says."You've got to take your chances when you have them. And stick to what you do best as well. Serena and I know each other's game pretty well now, even though we haven't played in a while, but we play the same tournaments."

In the end, in Sharapova's opinion, it may not all depend on power, at which Serena excels. "On grass it's a big key to the game, but I don't think that's everything in tennis," says the Russian.

by Ronald Atkin

rucolo
Jun 28th, 2010, 09:18 PM
Wimbledon R4 match vs Sharapova::p

http://www.wimbledon.org/en_GB/news/match_reports/2010-06-28/201006281277718716518.html


Serena's sweet revenge over Sharapova

Monday, 28 June 2010
There was a deserved standing ovation on Centre Court for both women as Serena Williams defeated Maria Sharapova 7-6, 6-4 in a fourth round contest in which they hammered the ball at each other for an hour and 36 minutes.

Serena, the defending champion and the harder hitter, came out on top but Sharapova had her chances in the first set tie-break, missing three set points before Williams took it by 11 points to nine. Thereafter, though, it was an inexorable march towards victory by Serena as she pounded down a match total of 19 aces and proved, if proof is needed, that on this surface and in this form, she is the best in the world, with the possible exception of her sister, Venus.

Serena went into this match with a 5-2 career head-to-head lead, but Sharapova had been the winner of their only previous grass court clash, the Wimbledon final of 2004. Since then the Russian has undergone shoulder surgery and it was evident that she is still working her way back towards peak form.

Sharapova was intent on matching Serena blow for blow, ace for ace, winner for winner. But the truth is that nobody in women's tennis is capable of that and when Serena is in the groove, as she was today, she is virtually unstoppable.

Intentions were made clear on the first point, a resounding Williams ace, rapidly followed by two more to win the opening game. Two further aces followed in Serena's next service game and when she broke for a 3-1 lead there seemed a danger that Sharapova would be washed away by the world No.1's power game.

However, Sharapova also knows what it is like to be top-ranked in women's tennis and she bravely hit back with a service break of her own, helped considerably by the errors which were creeping into the Williams game.

As they slogged their way towards a first set tie-break - the first they had ever played - Serena changed her shoes at 5-4. But her flat-out attack game plan was unchanged and Sharapova's tendency to double-fault as she went in pursuit of service power looked like costing her dear as she fell 3-1 behind in the breaker, only to sweep five of the next six points and stand at set point. Maria missed that opportunity, and two more, before another double-fault set up Serena for her own third set point which she clinched with her 13th ace.

Although Serena continued with her outrageous mix of great winners and gross errors, the match was flowing inexorably in her direction from the moment she broke for a 2-1 lead in the second set. This time, as Sharapova tired in the heat, there was no question of her breaking back and the champion marches into the last eight.

by Ron Atkin

Diesel
Jun 28th, 2010, 10:55 PM
Serena Williams Proves Timeless in Win Over Sharapova

http://tennis.fanhouse.com/2010/06/28/serena-williams-proves-timeless-in-win-over-sharapova/?ncid=edlinkusspor00000003

6/28/2010 2:28 PM ET By Greg Couch (http://www.fanhouse.com/staff/greg-couch/)

WIMBLEDON, England -- They play the longest, most grinding season of any sport in tennis. And in the end, it's all done just so the players can define themselves in a few brief moments.

Those moments change a direction, decide a momentum, draw a conclusion. And the whole grueling year is forgotten. The moments don't even have to decide a championship.

This was the moment Monday: Serena Williams (http://tennis.fanhouse.com/players/wta/serena-williams/168339) beat Maria Sharapova (http://tennis.fanhouse.com/players/wta/maria-sharapova/183786) 7-6 (11-9), 6-4 in the fourth round at Wimbledon (http://tennis.fanhouse.com/). See? Just a fourth-round match. Two superstars in a sport that is lacking in star power. Head-to-head. And in 96 minutes, we learned everything possible about them both.

Williams just keeps surviving time and generations. Characters change, and then even change back, and Williams is still there. She's still the best. It's hard to see her losing here.

And Sharapova? What we learned about her is that she's ready to get back into the fight, where she is comfortable. That's assuming her arm doesn't fall off. The shoulder surgery she had in late 2008 is not going to finish her off after all. She has now had two of these moments in the past three weeks, counting her French Open loss to Justine Henin (http://tennis.fanhouse.com/players/wta/justine-henin/168354). And while she lost both matches, she showed her old self again.

"I was very happy that I was put in these situations," Sharapova said. "I certainly could have done a little bit of a better job I executing. You know, I can sit here and whine about that, but the fact that I gave myself a chance and I'm feeling just really happy to be playing out there the way I want to play ... It's just a joy to be out there again."

Of course, it takes winning some of these moments to know for sure. Sharapova hasn't gotten past the quarterfinals in her past eight majors, going back 2 1/2 years. But last year, she had lost all of her nerve on her serve, and remember her moment at the U.S. Open?

She could not get her serve in, and the 6-foot-2 player was rolled over by tiny American Melanie Oudin (http://tennis.fanhouse.com/players/wta/melanie-oudin/404946).

So when she talks about being happy to be back in these situations, she's talking about the moments. She is just glad to have another crack at them.

The second Monday at Wimbledon is maybe the most exciting day of the tennis year, other than when major finals are played. All 16 of the final men's and women's singles players competed, meaning all sorts of moments. One was Kim Clijsters (http://tennis.fanhouse.com/players/wta/kim-clijsters/168424) beating Justine Henin 2-6, 6-2, 6-3. Henin was crushing her at first, and then Clijsters decided to become super-aggressive. It worked.

And these two Belgians making comebacks showed this: Clijsters is her old self again. Henin is not.

"Doesn't change anything to the fact that I said before coming here, (it) was still a year with a lot of things to improve," Henin said. "A year of transition."

She keeps saying that, but it sounds as if she's trying to buy time. She came back from retirement and immediately reached the final of the Australian Open, but I think everything got serious from there. To that point, it was all fun. Any success was a surprise. Now, she has to deal with the pressures that got to her before.

As for Clijsters, she has had some wildly inconsistent swings, but mostly it has been good, including three wins this year over Henin. She isn't going to be as obsessed as before, now traveling with her baby daughter.

There have been other defining moments here. John Isner (http://tennis.fanhouse.com/players/atp/john-isner/395344) is the big one that comes to mind. Just a first-round match, but when you win 70-68 in the fifth set, it shows that you are a winner who never gives up. All that, even though he lost easily, while exhausted, in the second round. Unknown two weeks ago, really, he will do Letterman's top 10 list on Monday.

But whatever the big picture meaning, these matches are just fun, too.

"It's definitely tense," Williams said. "She's (Sharapova) so good and mentally focused and she's so in it for every point. It's every moment."

The first set was classic. At the start, Williams was serving big, and Sharapova's second serves were so soft that Williams was crushing them. But Sharapova stayed with Williams.

It's hard to describe Sharpova's fight, really. It's just an extra determination that seems to win points for her. She had three set points in that tiebreaker, including one that ended with an easy forehand in the net. So it was a year narrowed into a moment, narrowed into one shot.

"I served well today," Williams said. "It forced me to serve really well."

That's the other thing that happens when two great players face each other. Their games are raised to another level. So far this Wimbledon, Williams has come out fighting in the first set, won 6-0 and then fallen asleep, as no one was fighting back.

On Monday, both players forced the other to play better.

For Williams, this moment didn't really define her, of course. She was already the best. It doesn't hurt to have that reinforced.

She has gone through so many tennis generations. At one point, it was Martina Hingis, who is playing senior doubles here with Anna Kournikova. She fought wtih Lindsay Davenport, who played mixed doubles here for fun. Sharapova before, and now again. Henin and Clijsters the first time around for them, and already this time.

And Jennifer Capriati, retired for years, who was rushed to a hospital Sunday for an overdose of some sort.

"I will definitely see how that goes," Williams said, "and pray for everyone involved."

The point is that whether people get old, burn out, flake out, tire out, get hurt, whatever, Williams is always there. And there she was again Monday, winning the moment.

rucolo
Jun 30th, 2010, 06:31 PM
Wimbledon QF match vs Li::p

http://www.wimbledon.org/en_GB/news/match_reports/2010-06-29/201006291277803390945.html


Serena's patience pays off as Li cracks

Tuesday, 29 June 2010
Serena Williams was smiling. "Nothing is ever as good as the first time, but it never gets old," she said. She should know: she had just reached her seventh Wimbledon semi-final by beating Na Li 7-5, 6-3. And that ticket to the last four felt good in her hands.

She has yet to drop a set at these championships and while a couple of women - Li included - have had the temerity to push her a bit, no one has had the strength, be it physical or mental, to threaten her.

Playing Serena at any Grand Slam tournament is not a job for the faint hearted. No matter how well or badly she is playing - and Serena has been playing mighty well in the past five rounds - she will not give up on the chance of lifting another trophy, not if there is still breath in her body. She bullies the opposition, piling on the pressure until the hapless foe is crushed.

The only way to combat this relentless attack is to play eyeballs-out. Serena may just be playing her game, but her rival is playing at 100 per cent, and sometimes a little more. And that is when the errors creep in.

It is a little like taking a piece of elastic and stretching just as far as it will go. Serena does the stretching, holds on and then waits for inevitable snap as the elastic breaks and her opponent is left helpless.

It took 40 minutes for Li's elastic to ping under the strain. Until that point, she had kept pace with the champion and more or less matched her shot for shot. For those opening 10 games, the error count was much the same and the winner tally was almost identical. Admittedly, Li was having to work a good deal harder to hold on to her serve than Serena, but that was about all. The champion was collecting free points in every game and had cracked down seven aces so far - and 11 by the final point - but, then again, Li had clumped a couple of her own.

And then Li blinked. From 40-0 up, she dropped her serve in a flurry of errors - Serena's patience had paid off and Li's resistance had snapped. That was the first set done and dusted.

The two had met five times before and while Serena had won all but one of those encounters, it had not been easy. When Li took her to two to tie-breaks in the Australian Open semi-finals in January, she returned to Beijing a star. Landing at 5am, she walked off the plane to find a gaggle of TV crews waiting to record her every utterance. She had come within touching distance of a Grand Slam final and her achievement was worth noting. Given a second shot at the Chinese at a major championship, Serena was not going to let Li anywhere near the next round.

This time, as her husband and hitting partner, Jiang Shan looked on - he wraps the grips on her rackets, brings her take-aways, mixes her drinks and, as Li gleefully pointed out, "he's for free" - there would be no TV reporters when they got home. Li could not cope with the overwhelming force of Serena on the hunt for a fourth Wimbledon title.

Li tried her best to hang on in the second set but she could last no more than 20 minutes before Serena broke her again. And then again. Even though Li did get one of those breaks back just as Serena was serving for the match, she dropped her own serve again in the very next game and that was that. She should have known from the start: when facing Serena in search of a major trophy, resistance is futile.

by Alix Ramsay

rucolo
Jun 30th, 2010, 06:35 PM
http://www.wimbledon.org/en_GB/news/articles/2010-06-29/201006291277836239473.html


Serena must win title without big sister

Tuesday, 29 June 2010
This could be tricky. As SW19 reeled with the news that Venus Williams, the five-time champion, had been sent packing in the quarter finals, her little sister, Serena, was safely through to last four having beaten Na Li 7-5, 6-3. Surely the title was now Serena's for the taking. Serena was not so sure.

You see, the three times that Serena has lifted the Venus Rosewater Dish, she has done so after beating big sis in the final. True, she has also lost to Venus in the final but when she wins, she beats Vee. That is the way it has always been. But should she beat Petra Kvitova, she would be playing a newcomer on Saturday. This could be tricky indeed.

"It's not mine to lose [the title], it's mine to win if I can get it," she said. "There's three other people that are vying to win it. They have just as good a chance as I do."

The champion - who started the tournament as the favourite and is now the overwhelming favourite - was being diplomatic. She had been doing a lot of that as the afternoon had progressed. Before she took to the court to play Li, she had bumped into Venus on her way back from her defeat at the hands of Tsvetana Pironkova. That cannot have been an easy conversation.

"That was a private conversation," she said, trying to repel the prying reporters. "I don't know if it [Venus's loss] affected my play too much. I just had to keep playing and focusing."

But given that the sisters share a house in Wimbledon and that they are still in the doubles, Serena knows that she will have to do a bit of tea-and-sympathy with Venus over the coming days. Having leant on her sister's shoulder from time to time, she knows the routine.

"Having Venus around definitely makes it easier sometimes," she said. "If you lose, it's always nice to have a sister that's been through the same experience kind of, can really only understand what you're going through."

With 12 grand slam titles to her name already, she also understands what it takes to win a major title. Rule one is simple: do not get ahead of yourself. She still has two matches to play if she is to get her hands back on the trophy and the most important of those two is the next one. The match immediately ahead is always the key match of the tournament - and even defending champions need to remind themselves of that daily.

"I feel like last year was last year and this year is this year," she said. "For me, I'm really trying to focus on doing well this year. Sometimes if I get too caught up, then it doesn't end well."

by Alix Ramsay

rucolo
Jun 30th, 2010, 06:40 PM
Preview Wimbledon SF match vs Kvitova::)

http://www.wimbledon.org/en_GB/news/articles/2010-06-30/201006301277899465245.html


Pre-match analysis: Williams v Kvitova

Wednesday, 30 June 2010
The style of tennis Serena Williams plays is potent on every surface other than clay, where she struggles with her movement as she isn't comfortable sliding into her shots.

On grass, she possesses the necessary weapons to be wholly effective; a powerful first serve, a fantastic second serve, aggressive returns and a will to win that's second to none.

And so far in The Championships she's excelled in all of the above. Her quickest serve was struck at 125mph, three miles an hour shy of the fastest that was hit by sister Venus. Where her serve really comes into its own is in the variation she's able to use when stepping up to the line.

Serena is able to hit both a slice and a flat serve off the same ball toss so it is extremely difficult for opponents to read, and therefore she's been able to win so many more free points than any of her peers. She leads the event in regard to total aces served with a gargantuan 73 and, to put that into prospective, Venus is in second place with a relatively paltry 30.

Serena is also ahead for those left in the event in terms of the effectiveness of her first serve. She has won 156 of the 175 points she has played when her first serve has gone in, which equates to 89%. Vera Zvonareva is closest as far as the semi-finalists are concerned at 79%, Serena's semi-final opponent, Petra Kvitova, has won 74% and Tsvetana Pironkova trails in last in this regard with 73%.

So Serena has a huge advantage over all of her opponents given she can hold serve much more comfortably. In fact, she's only dropped two service games so far; one against Maria Sharapova and the other against Na Li.

So that will be the challenge that faces Petra Kvitova of the Czech Republic. Will she be able to return well enough to make a difference?

Unfortunately, there's more bad news for the 20-year-old. As a left-hander, her favourite serve will naturally go out to Serena's backhand, which is her strongest groundstroke. The American's favourite serve is the slider out wide to the deuce court, which will expose Kvitova's backhand and open up the court for Williams to expose.

They have only met once previously and that was earlier this year at the Australian Open in a match that Serena dominated from start to finish, eventually winning 6-2, 6-1. Few would bet against the outcome being any different this time around.

There's no question that Kvitova has hit a rich vein of form. Her victory over Victoria Azarenka and her demolition of Caroline Wozniacki were truly outstanding. But, given her lack of experience at this level, the importance of the occasion and the fact that she's up against the best player on the planet, the Wimbledon final is surely still a world away.

by Jason Goodall

kitb
Jul 1st, 2010, 08:50 PM
Hey guys, I know it's no official competition, but it's a brand new piece of information so, apparently, Serena will be playing the exhibition match against Kim in Brussels next week, replacing Justine who's injured...

doni1212
Jul 2nd, 2010, 02:34 AM
Noooooo way!! Seriously?!

kitb
Jul 2nd, 2010, 11:57 AM
Yep!
The official site's not in English but have a look at the home page: They've added Serena in the pic ;)
http://www.sport.be/bestofbelgium/2010/fr/

Plus Kim tweeted about it yesterday :)

Oh and I forgot to mention that Serena's gonna be part of that possible world record ;)
Cool innit?

rucolo
Jul 2nd, 2010, 04:25 PM
Wimbledon SF match vs Kvitova::p

http://www.wimbledon.org/en_GB/news/match_reports/2010-07-01/201007011277981254101.html


Serena sweeps into final after early scare

Thursday, 1 July 2010
It's no good expecting fairytales at the sharp end of elite sport. David's task against Goliath was a pushover by comparison with that facing Petra Kvitova in the semi-final on the Centre Court. Her opponent Serena Williams is the world number one, a three-time Wimbledon champion, and a 12-time Grand Slam champion. By contrast Kvitova, who had never previously won any match on grass before this Wimbledon fortnight, came into this Wimbledon as the world number 62.

She was bidding to become the lowest ranked finalist in SW19 since rankings were introduced in 1975. Not a single unseeded woman has ever reached the final here, and this year will not change that. Commendably Kvitova was no pushover, and her standard of play in the first set showed she relished the biggest stage in the global theatre of tennis. But Williams it is who goes through to meet Vera Zvonareva in the final, winning 7-6 (7-5) 6-2.

These two had met once before, earlier this year in the second round of the Australian Open where Williams permitted 20-year-old Kvitova just three games. It rapidly became clear this was to be no repeat. Far from being overawed by the occasion, Kvitova rose to it. Serena was having trouble dealing with the spin from left-handed Kvitova's serve, and indeed any left-hander is an unusual sight on the women's tour.

Encouragingly the Czech took 28-year-old Williams to break point at the first opportunity, although when Kvitova's own serve came Williams forced the error for a break point of her own. Not to worry. It passed safely. Kvitova was trying to be aggressive, and she delivered a love game for 2-2, before conjuring up two more successive break points in the next. The second showed great touch with a fabulous backhand volley, and the break was hers. No doubt her illustrious fellow Czechs Jan Kodes and Hana Mandlikova, watching in the stands, were suitably impressed.

Kvitova had her nervy moments, and throughout the set won more points behind her second serve than her first. She was doing great work at the net, and had a point for 5-3. But she had no option other than to go for her shots, with the result that Williams was able to level it for 4-4. Kvitova declined to crumble and took it into the tiebreak. Initially Serena motored away to a 4-0 advantage. But although Kvitova got it back to 4-3, the Williams serve was at its most fearsome. Kvitova fended off two set points, but the defending champion served it out. The first set had required just under one hour of her time, which was a great deal more than many had anticipated for the entire match.

The second set, perhaps unsurprisingly, was less of a tussle. Williams grabbed hold of it early and never let go. At 2-2 Kvitova surrendered an unforced error for break point and could not stay in the rally for 2-3. In her next service game the Czech double-faulted to give Williams the chance for the double break. That was when the two women played a truly extraordinary rally - the point of the entire women's tournament to date - with both women retrieving the ball time and again in ways which seemed impossible. Splendidly, Kvitova won that point. But Williams forced another chance, and Kvitova double faulted to make it 2-5. Serena allowed two match points to escape her before converting the third courtesy of the netcord, to win through to the sixth Wimbledon final of her career, and her third in succession. She marked the occasion by greeting victory with a smile for the first time this fortnight.

By making this semi-final Kvitova's ranking will jump to around 30, and she deserves praise for making a match of today's encounter. She will have learned volumes from this. But Serena Williams has not surrendered a set yet this Wimbledon. Vera Zvonareva will need to be at her very best in Saturday's final, and even then it may still not be enough by some distance.

by Kate Battersby

rucolo
Jul 2nd, 2010, 04:30 PM
http://www.wimbledon.org/en_GB/news/articles/2010-07-01/201007011277981344175.html


Queen Serena surprised as Kvitova refuses to bow

Thursday, 1 July 2010
The King may already be back at home in Switzerland, buffing his crown and trying to get the sparkle back, but the Queen is still holding court at Wimbledon.

Serena Williams showed her subjects just why she is the world No.1 - by a wide margin - by beating Petra Kvitova 7-6, 6-2 and will be back to defend her Wimbledon crown against Vera Zvonareva on Saturday. And sometime in between, she might want to have Kvitova banished. Exiled. Sent hither, never to darken her doorstep again. Kvitova put up a great fight in the semi-final and she was not going to bow the knee to anyone, no matter how many Grand Slam trophies they have won.

Now, this came as something of a surprise to both Queen Serena and to her courtiers on Centre Court. The normal pattern of events in a Williams match is that the opposition puts up a decent show for half a dozen games or so and then quietly goes away. There are one or two possible variations, the most usual being the opponent takes one look at the world No.1 and faints.

It is not so much the physical power of the champion that makes the difference - although it hardly hinders her - it is her mental fortitude that crushes the spirit of the women in front of her.

When this theory has been put forward before, it has elicited a furious response from some quarters along the lines of "give her due credit - there is more to Serena that muscle and guts". And of course there is, but there are many players with stunning forehands, blistering serves and thumping backhands but there is still only one Serena. It is the street fighter's ability to take those weapons and use them in the deepest, bleakest, darkest moments of a match that separates the champions from the players.

But in Kvitova, the champion recognised something familiar. The 20-year old Czech was also a scrapper, she was also powerful and she also did not consider the possibility of defeat. With a swinging left-handed serve, she had Serena on the run. Her forehand, when it went in, was a huge shot that she could rifle crosscourt at the most outrageous of angles. She liked to come forward and take control of the net. And she fought. She simply would not go away.

The scoreline suggests that Kvitova faded away meekly in the second set, but she did anything but. She had taken the lead in the opening set, been reined back and then come back from a 4-0 deficit in the tie-break only to lose it by a whisker. Lesser players would have crumbled after a disappointment like that. Not Kvitova.

Even when she was a break down in that second set, she still would not give in. One stunning rally had both women chasing and scrambling all over the court to retrieve smashes, lunge after lobs and generally pull off the impossible. When Kvitova won the point, she punched the air with a clenched fist. That was dangerous play in front the Queen of Centre Court. That was a beheading offence.

What held Kvitova back was her lack of experience of playing at this level. That rally left her gasping for breath and a couple of points later, she had dropped her serve again. But as she climbs the rankings - she should have cracked the top 30 after her run here - she will get to play the top women on the big stages on a more regular basis. The more she plays, the more she will learn. And the more she will threaten the big names.

When they met six months ago at the Australian Open, Kvitova could only win three games. This time Serena did win - she usually does around these parts - but she had to work. Serena was still the queen of all she surveyed but she will be keeping a close watch on Miss Kvitova in the future.

by Alix Ramsay

rucolo
Jul 2nd, 2010, 04:34 PM
http://www.wimbledon.org/en_GB/news/articles/2010-07-01/201007011277981394445.html


I'm aiming for another level, says Serena

Thursday, 1 July 2010
Defending ladies' champion Serena Williams says she hopes to take her game to another level when she takes on Russian Vera Zvonareva in Saturday's final with her eyes firmly focused on a fourth Wimbledon singles crown.

The world No.1 booked her place in her sixth - and third successive - ladies' final with a 7-6 (7-5), 6-2 victory over unseeded Czech Petra Kvitova in which she started sluggishly. But she is confident she can raise her game by another notch against the Russian 21st seed.

"I'm hoping to still peak in the final," said the champion of 2002, 2003 and 2009. "I won't know until I play. Hopefully I can serve better than I did today and just be more consistent off the ground."

Williams admitted Kvitova had played well in her first semi-final at a major, particularly on her own delivery. "She served really well," admitted the top seed, who is yet to drop a set at this year's Championships. "It wasn't very easy, but I still had some opportunities that I probably could have capitalised on."

Williams will go into the final as hot favourite having won five of her six previous meetings with Zvonareva but says she must guard against complacency. "On paper it looks like I should win," she said. "But she's beaten some good people.

"Her last two matches she's been down a set, so she's obviously a fighter. She never gives up. The biggest thing is for me to stay positive and not put too much pressure on myself."

And if Williams does go on to lift the Venus Rosewater Dish on Saturday afternoon, she says she will treat us to a special celebration - her world-famous curtsey. "I will if I win," she promises. "So we'll see."

by Lee Goodall

nadlinds
Jul 2nd, 2010, 09:27 PM
Serena expected to replace Henin against Clijsters in July 8 Brussels exhibition

WIMBLEDON, United Kingdom — Serena Williams is expected to fill in for an injured Justine Henin and play against Kim Clijsters in an exhibition match at a 40,000-seat stadium in Brussels next week.

Organizers have been hoping to break the record for highest attendance at a tennis match — the 30,492 at the 1973 "Battle of the Sexes" between Billie Jean King and Bobby Riggs at the Houston Astrodome.

Henin pulled out of next Thursday's match against Belgian rival Clijsters after injuring her right elbow at Wimbledon.

Asked Friday by a Belgian journalist at Wimbledon whether she'll be in Belgium next week, Williams replied, "Yeah, I think I'll come if you guys want me to."

http://www.google.com/hostednews/canadianpress/article/ALeqM5ik2nojromW-MHy9U3850ug9x2-Jg

Tech1
Jul 3rd, 2010, 05:07 PM
Serena reigns supreme at Wimbledon

by Steve Griffiths 47 minutes ago



LONDON (AFP) - Defending champion Serena Williams (http://sports.yahoo.com/ten/players/134/;_ylt=ArQ8FrVKXxHqJ1dSyC7JNzukurkF) won her fourth women's singles title at Wimbledon with a crushing 6-3, 6-2 victory over Russian 21st seed Vera Zvonareva (http://sports.yahoo.com/ten/players/153/;_ylt=AiOoQC905.tL7SIlkesTC9.kurkF) in the final on Saturday.

Williams displayed all her trademark power and poise to overwhelm Zvonareva on Centre Court and clinch the 13th Grand Slam crown of her career.

The 28-year-old's triumph means the Venus Rosewater Dish awarded to the women's champion was held aloft by a Williams for the ninth time in 11 years, sister Venus accounting for the others.

Serena, who pocketed one million pounds (1.5 million dollars) in prize money, has been by far the most impressive performer in the women's event this year and is now just one Wimbledon title behind Venus.

Not one of Serena's seven opponents here ever seriously threatened to upset her and it would be no surprise if the world number one was back to collect another title in 12 months time.

Although Zvonareva was unable to make any impact in her first Grand Slam final, the Russian can at least take consolation from seeing her ranking rise into the top 10 in the world.

Zvonareva, the second lowest ranked player ever to appear in the women's final, has been dogged by doubts about her temperament for years after crumbling under pressure in big matches.

But the 25-year-old's talent has never been in doubt and she has been a more confident, mature player over the last fortnight.

She knocked out three seeds on her way to the final, with fourth seed Jelana Jankovic and US Open champion Kim Clijsters among her scalps.

Taking on Serena in a final was another matter entirely though.

Serena's three previous titles here were all clinched with final victories over Venus, but her sister had suffered a quarter-final exit against Tsvetana Pironkova this year.

Watched by a cavalcade of former Wimbledon champions, including Evonne Goolagong-Cawley, Billie Jean King, Martina Navratilova and Jana Novotna, Serena showed why she deserved to be mentioned in the same breath as the tournament's all-time greats.

The top seed hadn't dropped a set en route to the final but even that impressive statistic paled in comparison to her record total of 80 aces.

She increased that total on the second point of the match as she took the opening game to love.

That was quite a statement of intent. Zvonareva made a brave effort to respond with some clever groundstrokes, but the pressure of facing such constant controlled aggression gradually began to reveal cracks in her game.

After keeping Williams at bay for the first seven games, Zvonareva found it impossible to stem the tide any longer.

Serena couldn't take her first break point in the fifth game. But she made no mistake when another came her way at 4-3 and drilled a forehand winner before celebrating the break on one knee.

That gave Serena the chance to serve for the set and she did just that with ruthless efficiency.

Zvonareva had competed well to that point but the prospect of coming from behind to win in three sets must have seemed like only the faintest of possibilities as she slumped in her chair at the break.

She would have known Serena was never going to let up for a moment and the American didn't disappoint as she broke again in the first game of the second set.

Zvonareva's morale was shattered now and Serena went for the kill, breaking again for a 4-1 lead before serving out yet another Wimbledon triumph in just one hour and seven minutes.

rucolo
Jul 3rd, 2010, 06:15 PM
Preview Wimbledon Final vs Zvonareva::)

http://www.wimbledon.org/en_GB/news/articles/2010-07-02/201007021278103136825.html


Day 12: Ladies' final preview

Friday, 2 July 2010
The motivational reasons may be obscure, but Serena Williams, the defending champion, the world number one and the overwhelming favourite to win her 13th Grand Slam title on the lawns of south-west London this afternoon, says she intends to prepare for the demands of her final against the Russian, Vera Zvonareva, by catching up on some missed episodes of Desperate Housewives.

One might have thought that, if the distraction of a TV screen was necessary, Serena might have gone for something with the word "million" in the title - a rerun of the Clint Eastwood movie Million Dollar Baby perhaps. Except that in this case Serena will be punting for a million pounds rather than dollars, the first time the Wimbledon prize money has hit seven figures. Not that someone whose earnings from the sport have already exceeded $30m is going to be overly concerned about the financial incentives on offer. It's the honour, the prestige, the excitement of holding aloft the Venus Rosewater Dish, emblematic of world domination, which will spur on Serena, plus the desire to extend the astonishing domination exerted by the Williams family on this title for the past decade.

"It's been a great decade and I feel honoured to have been a part of it," said Serena on the eve of today's final, going further with the comment that "just to have my name mentioned at Wimbledon is amazing". Hardly anybody's else's name, except that of her older sister Venus, has been mentioned here since the Millennium in fact. Their domination, plotted by their canny father, Richard, has been one of the wonders of any sport, never mind tennis. And they will be back next year, Serena promises.

Since the tennis world is teeming these days with players from eastern Europe with names that terminate in "ova" or "eva" it is fitting that the opposition for Serena will come from one of that battalion, Vera Zvonareva, resident of Moscow and the 21st seed here.

Maria Sharapova was the last "ova" in a Wimbledon final and she did a comprehensive demolition job on a certain Serena Williams in 2004. And let us not even begin to think about forgetting Martina Navratilova, nine times the champion here, albeit as an American citizen by that stage of her brilliant career.

Can our Vera emulate Martina and Maria? The omens are not propitious. Apart from a walkover in San Diego six years ago, Zvonareva has come out on top only once in six battles with Serena, and has lost to her in the Grand Slams of France and the United States.

She has, however, been playing some nifty tennis over the past fortnight. She has won six rounds in just 115 games, a mere three more than Serena required. Her won/lost record of 75/40 compares most favourably with Serena's 76/36 and she has spent only 11 minutes longer on court winning those six rounds. Only when it comes to aces is Vera lagging.

The younger Williams has walloped 80 so far, the highest total ever recorded by a woman at Wimbledon and exceeding her previous record of 72 set last year. Vera's total is 23 and the difference has not escaped her notice. "Serena can serve hard but also with precision," she observes. "She doesn't need to use the full power. She can put the ball on the lines and that's what makes it difficult against her." But the Russian further points out: "She's lost a few matches in the past, it's always possible to beat her. I will just have to try to play the game that's bothering her the most."

Actually, she has already done just that, teaming with Elena Vesnina to knock the Williams sisters out of the doubles on Thursday at the semi-final stage. Sensibly, Vera acknowledges that today is a new day and that, since she has never played Serena at singles on grass, the road is likely to be a rough one.

Serena has let on that she would rather be playing her sister, as she has done in four previous Wimbledon finals "because I would know for certain one of us is gonna win something and take something home".

But now, she reckons, she has a 50-50 chance. Most of the bookmaking fraternity would tend to tilt the odds rather more heavily in Serena's favour, and they will be happy to hear that she never considers herself guilty of over-confidence on occasions such as this. "I did that once a long time ago and ended up losing the match. So you never do that again."

Applying such wisdom has brought riches indeed to Serena Williams: 36 titles, including 12 Grand Slams, the most for any active woman player, and a firm grasp on the number one ranking, which she has held for in excess of 100 weeks. Plus the aforementioned millions of dollars.

Zvonareva is contesting her first Grand Slam final, and seven previous Wimbledons have yielded nothing more rewarding than a couple of fourth round showings, though she was a semi-finalist at the 2009 Australian Open.

Capturing the title at Pattaya City was her personal highlight of the 2010 season until Wimbledon, but she has done well to get back into competition after missing much of the 2009 season with an ankle injury and subsequent surgery. There have also been problems in the past with what her media conference questioners have diplomatically referred to as "emotions".

These occasions are stoutly defended by Vera: "I think emotions are good. They should be there. It's sport. It shows that you care, that you are trying your best out there." Which she will be doing today, and good luck to her.

by Ronald Atkin

rucolo
Jul 3rd, 2010, 06:18 PM
http://www.wimbledon.org/en_GB/news/articles/2010-07-02/201007021278073778972.html


Serena determined to keep hold of title

Friday, 2 July 2010
Defending ladies' champion Serena Williams says she will do everything in her power to hang on to her Wimbledon title when she faces surprise Russian challenger Vera Zvonareva in the final.

The 28-year-old world No.1 is gunning for her fourth Wimbledon singles crown and her 13th Grand Slam overall but says she's still desperate for more success at The Championships.

"It's like always - once you have something, you always want it and want to keep it, so it's always something that I desire," said the favourite and top seed.

Serena and older sister Venus have eight Wimbledon ladies' singles trophies between them and at least one of them has featured in nine of the past 10 ladies' finals days at the All England Club.

"It's been a great decade and I feel honoured to be a part of it," admitted the younger of the two siblings. "Just to have my name mentioned at Wimbledon is amazing. Hopefully, we'll still be around [during the next decade]. But there's so many other things that we already have going on that we want to continue to do."

The sisters have faced one another in the past two Wimbledon singles finals and, while it was always difficult competing against her sister for a Grand Slam title, their record may be something she has taken for granted up to now.

"Honestly, I would feel like I would almost rather play [Venus] because at least I know for certain one of us is gonna win something and take something home. But now it's a 50-50 chance. So in a way, I didn't realise how good a feeling that was."

She revealed the 24 hours before the final will be spent unwinding - along with a bit of TV. "I'm just gonna relax a little bit. I'm going to watch some Desperate Housewives because I have to catch up. So I'm excited about that."

by Lee Goodall

rucolo
Jul 3rd, 2010, 06:28 PM
http://www.wimbledon.org/en_GB/news/articles/2010-07-02/201007021278073755244.html


Pre-match analysis: Countering Serena's serve

Friday, 2 July 2010
Serena Williams possesses the best serve we have ever witnessed in women's tennis - it is as simple as that.

She has only dropped three service games in the tournament thus far, so for opponents it is quite an achievement to get into a tie-break let alone win a set.

Coming into the final, Serena has served 80 aces - six more than Andy Murray - which is a record for a woman here at the Championships.

Her fastest serve was hit at an astounding 125mph, which is only one mile an hour slower than Rafael Nadal's fastest serve in his quarter-final encounter with Robin Soderling.

So far, she has won 87% of the points when her first serve has gone in, a proportion way ahead of any of her rivals, and 10% better than her opponent in the final, Vera Zvonareva.

However, the Russian has been returning exceptionally well over the course of the last couple of weeks, having won 98 points in total when having to deal with opponents' first serves compared with Serena's 83.

And she has done even better when she has had the chance to pounce on a second serve, winning 136 points all told, compared to Serena's 127.

So that is the challenge that the Russian faces: will she be able to deal with Serena's serve well enough to become competitive?

The one thing you simply have to do when up against a big server is take care of business on your own serve and Zvonareva's has been her Achilles heel throughout her career.

She still occasionally has trouble controlling her ball toss when she gets really nervous, and that obviously has to be a consideration given the enormity of the occasion.

Serena has so much experience to draw upon at this level whereas it will be Vera's first major final, so nerves are bound to inhibit the Russian to some degree, and the end result will depend on just how well she is able to hold her nerve.

There is plenty of history between these two as they have met six times previously, and Serena has won five of those clashes (the exception was in Cincinnati back in 2006), so that will give the American even more confidence.

There is no question that it is a huge ask for anybody to beat Serena on any surface other than clay at the Grand Slams, and for Vera to spring a surprise she has to hope that her opponent gets out of the wrong side of the bed and serves extremely poorly.

She also has to then play the match of her life and hold her nerve when it gets really matters, otherwise it is surely Serena who will eventually prevail given her far superior firepower and experience at the highest level.

by Jason Goodall


Serena`s serve :worship:

rucolo
Jul 3rd, 2010, 07:11 PM
Road to the final - Serena Williams

http://www.wimbledon.org/en_GB/news/articles/2010-07-02/201007021278064905534.html

rucolo
Jul 3rd, 2010, 07:16 PM
Wimbledon Final vs Zvonareva::p

http://www.wimbledon.org/en_GB/news/match_reports/2010-07-03/201007031278168450640.html


Superb Serena smashes her way to fourth title

Saturday, 3 July 2010
It was all so easy for Serena Williams as she hunted down her fourth Wimbledon title and 13th Grand Slam. Just 67 minutes were all the 28-year-old American needed to swat aside the challenge of Russia's Vera Zvonareva 6-3, 6-2 on a sunlit Centre Court to retain the Ladies' Singles Championship.

The £1m prize money, the highest ever, will be a welcome aside for the world No.1 and top seed. What she was really after was yet another trophy for the Williams family at the world's leading tennis tournament and to kick off a new Wimbledon decade after the Noughties were dominated by her and older sister Venus. After today's victory, the title tally is Serena 4 Venus 5, but the 28-year-old younger sister is catching up fast.

Zvonareva, the 21st seed and appearing in her first Grand Slam final, paid full tribute afterwards. She told Serena, as the winner clutched the Venus Rosewater Dish: "You are a great player and also a great champion. You really deserved to win today." And so she did.

Williams opened with a flourish, holding serve to love and throwing in an ace timed at 114mph, and though Zvonareva's serve was matching the American's - for accuracy if not power - the ball was invariably coming back at her faster than she had dispatched it.

Trying for service power cost the Russian the occasional double-fault but she had better luck when driving the ball high to the baseline, particularly on Williams' backhand, rather than hitting flat and hard.

Williams' ferocity was made clear on her regular aces, which generally clocked in at around 115mph, and despite the loud support for "our Vera" from a crowd keen to see an equal match, it was Williams who started to press for the advantage. She had a break point in the sixth game as Zvonareva went for the lines and narrowly missed three times, but the break was saved with a brave forehand and Zvonareva held with an ace.

But that merely postponed the inevitable until Zvonareva stepped up to serve again at 3-4. Despite having two game points for 4-4, she was reeled in by the relentless Serena, who needed three break points to clock up a 5-3 lead but achieved it, brilliantly, at the third time of asking with a sensational forehand pass.

Throwing another ace into the mix, Williams served out for a one-set lead after 36 minutes, and while the Russian was still reeling Serena also poached the opening game of the second set to accelerate the Zvonareva slide. Now Williams was in full majestic, athletic flow and there is no-one else in the world of women's tennis capable of containing her in such a mood.

She broke again for a 4-1 lead, courtesy of a Zvonareva double-fault and the Russian's fate was virtually confirmed. In the last couple of games, the 25-year-old Muscovite looked in urgent need of body armour as Williams pounded down some huge shots. The final game started with Williams' fastest ace of the afternoon at 122mph. It was also her 89th ace of the fortnight, a record for any woman here at Wimbledon.

As if to underline her powerful grip on the game, the tournament and the world of women's tennis right now, she followed that up with a succession of thunderous overheads, the last of which sealed her fourth title.

At the moment of victory, the racket which had propelled the ball so fast and so accurately was hurled high into the air as Williams did a quick bow to the crowd and then raised prizefighter-style double clenched fists. The undefeated champion once again.

by Ronald Atkin


Serena :bowdown:

rucolo
Jul 3rd, 2010, 07:23 PM
http://www.wimbledon.org/en_GB/news/articles/2010-07-03/201007031278171099375.html


Ladies' singles final: match analysis

Saturday, 3 July 2010
The only chance that Vera Zvonareva had of winning Wimbledon was if Serena Williams served poorly. Unfortunately for the Russian, it didn't pan out that way.

Serena has served incredibly well throughout the Championships and the American continued in that rich vein of form.

She served nine aces in her 6-3, 6-2 victory, and in doing so took her tally to a record-breaking 89, which incredibly is 59 more than her nearest rival.

Amazingly she won 31 of the 33 points that she contested when she got her first serve in, which meant that Vera was always up against it.

The Russian tried to make the most of all of the looks she got at Serena's second serve, winning 10 of the 17 points (59%) when that happened but it wasn't enough for her to be able to garner a single break point in either set.

And then once the two players got involved in baseline rallies Serena's superior weight of shot was evident for all to see.

And if Zvonerava ever dropped the ball short she was severely punished; the American posted perfect numbers in that regard winning all 14 of her approaches to the net.

Zvonerava needed to serve well to stand any chance and she did; making 75% of her first serves but it was only a matter of time before Serena manufactured an opportunity to break and overall she converted three of her seven break points to end up a comfortable winner.

Serena's played well throughout the Championships but she's served magnificently well, surely better than anybody else ever has here in SW19, and that's the one shot that has separated her from everybody else in the draw, and because of that she thoroughly deserves to be crowned champion.

by Jason Goodall

rucolo
Jul 3rd, 2010, 07:29 PM
http://www.wimbledon.org/en_GB/news/articles/2010-07-03/201007031278171892951.html


Champion Serena still putting the SW into SW19

Saturday, 3 July 2010
There'll always be an England, so the wartime song goes. These days at Wimbledon it feels very much as if there'll always be a Williams. Ten times in the last 11 years at least one of the sisters has reached the final here, and on nine occasions now the name Williams has been inscribed on the Venus Rosewater Dish.

This afternoon the initial 'S' appeared next to that surname for the fourth time. Perhaps the tournament should be called Williamsdon - as Serena keeps putting the SW into SW19.

Eleven long years after her first Slam victory at the US Open, does she remember each triumph individually? Thirteen Grand Slam titles down the road of her career, the latest still seemed to mean everything to her, judging by her girlish delight in her moment of triumph.

When she brought up her three Championship points, she shouted at herself in bellowing encouragement, as if the result was on a knife-edge. In the nanosecond that she knew she had successfully defended her title, she threw her racket in the air, squealing at the thrill of it all, before bending forward with her hands on her knees as if overcome that this could possibly be happening to her.

In fact this is all very familiar to 28-year-old Williams now, and if anything her win rate seems to be accelerating. Today's victory took her past the Slam total amassed by Billie Jean King, and she knew it. Invited to say a few words when she was still on court, Serena looked up at the Royal Box where her fellow American was sitting and called: "Billie, I got you!"

There are those who unkindly find the apparently everlasting success of the Williams sisters not so exciting; but a great many of us find them endlessly fascinating. They are not kids any more, yet the two of them not only retain their hunger but seem ever more famished for further Major success.

How brilliantly they manage their careers, concentrating their efforts on the tournaments that matter the most - remember, this was just the fifth competition of Serena's year. Never mind a warm-up tournament, the defending champion arrived here only on the Wednesday before it all kicked off, yet she was absolutely supreme throughout the fortnight.

Her record 89 aces struck throughout the tournament exceeded any other rival's total by 60. More than once an opponent came near to depriving her of a set, but not once did Serena permit such a calamity, and today Vera Zvonareva was never grated so much as a single break point. The right woman is champion here; of that there can be no doubt.

For this observer, one of Serena's finest days at Wimbledon was ironically one where she was eclipsed by her opponent. It was the 2004 final, the day Maria Sharapova's star was born, and it was Serena on the receiving end of defeat that afternoon. Losing utterly crushes the competitive elite in a way we ordinary mortals simply cannot grasp. They live for victory. Defeat is a bewildering rejection of everything they know. That afternoon in 2004, Williams retained a smiling post-match grace throughout the extraordinary scenes following Sharapova's win.

Of course she has not always done herself such credit, and the damage done by her conduct during last September's US Open semi-final will unfortunately live long in many minds. But it should not define her, as some seem to want it to.

If anything must define her competitive life, it should be the words she spoke in her own post-match tribute to Zvonareva today. She congratulated the Russian on never giving up, telling us this is what it means to be a champion. She should know.

How long ago it seems since that period five or so years ago when Serena and Venus shifted their gaze beyond tennis for a while, and had their careers written off. You won't find too many writing them off now. Slam number 13 had nothing to do with luck for Serena - and she isn't done yet.

by Kate Battersby

Tech1
Jul 4th, 2010, 12:35 AM
Breadmaker 07/03/2010 - 3:01 PM http://tennisworld.typepad.com/images/main/dotted_line_title.gif
http://tennisworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451599e69e20134852ef1ff970c-320wi (http://tennisworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451599e69e20134852ef1ff970c-popup) by Pete Bodo
I have a date with Serena Williams. That's the good news. The bad news is that it's in 10 years, by which time I might be coyote bait. So someone prepare to act as my stand-in. It all started in the press conference after Serena's stunning 6-3, 6-2 win over Vera Zvonareva in the ladies' singles championship match here at Wimbledon (see match report, in the next post down).

At one point in that interview, someone asked Serena if she had a career timetable; did she always think she'd still be playing tennis at 28?

She replied, "Who knows? I'm always trying to stay healthy and do the best I can. I never think about how long I'm going to play."

I couldn't help but blurt out, "Is there a chance you'll still be playing at 38?"

"If I am," she replied, "I want you to personally take me off and escort me off the court. There's no way I need to be out here at 38."

But let's remember that very, very few of the great players ever quit the game as early as they once thought they would. Not by choice. Tennis is in a dominant champion's blood. Heck, it's in even a journeyman's blood, although probably for more practical reasons. So I thought this might be a good subject to return to when a handful of us met with Serena later in the day, in a small-group round table.

It was an informal, friendly session, and Serena was at her best, as she often is in those smaller environments. She talked about how much she envied the other children, growing up, when on hot summer days they would all be chasing the ice cream truck, or swimming, while Venus and Serena endured grueling two-a-day training sessions on the burning asphalt courts.

"When you're young," she said, softly, "You don't think about that kind of thing. Yeah. I remember, dad would go next door to little liquor store and get us whatever new sports drink they had. . . you have all those memories, all that hard work, and when it pays off, those are the moments you really remember."

Serena cited some of those memories at Wimbledon this week. When we asked how she'd developed that serve, the greatest ever in the women's game, the one that she rode to the title—her 13th major—today, she laughed and averred that when her father Richard was watching, she and Venus would hit serves. Then when his back was turned, they would just talk and giggle the way little girls do, about little things.

They come a long, long way, all of these youngsters. And Venus and Serena further than most. Which is why it seemed so puzzling when, as all players invariably do, either of the sisters seemed to stress the "other" things they do, when they sought to develop sides of themselves and interests that had nothing to do with that little optic yellow ball.

But in tennis, as Andre Agassi can tell you, you can always go home again. Hateful and embittering and demanding and harsh and debilitating as the game can often seem, it's always there, waiting for you to give it a go.

Serena seems to be discovering that, and it's cause for smiling. She put it this way: "It is difficult. i used to not want to have much to do with it. But the older I get, I realize I would like to be involved, in some sort of way. Maybe I'll do a 'fashion special,' go behind the scenes. Do something that's never been done before. That would be cool."

So, are we witnessing a reconciliation of the kind we saw with Agassi? Well let's not get carried away, but she's off to a good start, what with her charitable activities in Africa, her crossover appeal (is there a more potent, potential role model for young girls, and most particularly African-American girls, than either Williams sister?) and continuing ability to plaster 125 mph aces all over the court, and otherwise play the kind of tennis that can make you forget the familiar, sex-based DMZ that exists between the tours. I think Serena is beginning to see the convergence of different tributaries in her life.

"This (tennis) is what I do," she said. "This is definitely my core, the breadmaker. I don't want to lose sight of that. I want to continue doing it."

Does that mean that she enjoys tennis more now than she did during that recent period of discontent? "No," she answered, honestly. "I don't think I can ever like tennis more than that first two years on the tour. Everything was new. You see all the people you grew up watching. You might even end up playing a few of them (in her case, Steffi Graf, who Serena admired and not only played but defeated). That atmosphere, it's an amazing feeling and nothing can match that."

Another reporter rekindled the question from the original presser. Where do you see yourself in 20 years? In a nice house in some suburb, with five kids running around?

"At the rate I'm going, probably not," she replied, in one of those signature Serena moments. "I won't be able to live. . . I'll probably still be living with Venus in 10 years. Yeah, live together with some dogs. I can't quite picture it (the suburbs, the kids). I would love. . . my dream was always to have a ton of dogs, live with them. I've proven myself difficult to live with."

Not for us, you haven't. It's been mostly good, and still getting better all the time.

The little gathering ended on that note, and as everyone switched off his tape recorder and rose to go, Serena said to me, "Remember, we have a date in 10 years."

I laughed.

"I mean it," she said, "You be there, with all the equipment, ready to take me off."

"I'll have a walker, or a wheel chair ready for you. I'll be standing by."

"Alright. Just remember."

Like I could forget. I'm going going on eBay, tonight. And marking my calendar.

http://tennisworld.typepad.com/tennisworld/2010/07/the-breadmaker.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+tennisworld-bodo+%28Peter+Bodo%27s+TennisWorld%29

jefrilibra
Jul 4th, 2010, 01:24 AM
Great piece by Nick Bollettieri (The Independent UK)

http://www.independent.co.uk/sport/tennis/nick-bollettieri-grace-hunger-athleticism-serena-really-has-got-the-lot-2017840.html

Nick Bollettieri: Grace, hunger, athleticism... Serena really has got the lot

Holy mackerel! If anyone had the smallest flicker of doubt about how much this title meant to Serena Williams then it was in the first set, eighth game, with Vera Zvonareva serving, break point down.

Serena slams a pass, a winner, and drops to one knee, balls her fist, lets out a guttural scream, and punches the air. It was the breakthrough moment. Her whole demeanour said: "I want this. And now the match is heading my way, baby!"

Serena served out for the set and when Zvonareva was broken in the first game of the second set, it was effectively over. Serena climbs to sixth place on the all-time Slam singles list, with 13 titles now, four of them at Wimbledon to add to five from the Australian Open, three from the US Open and one from the French. That must be one big trophy cabinet.

The only women now ahead of Serena in numbers of Slam singles titles are a roll call of the greatest players to have held a racket: Margaret Court (24), Steffi Graf (22), Helen Wills-Moody (19), Chris Evert and Martina Navratilova (18 each). Serena overtakes Billie Jean King (12), and jeepers she's pleased about it.

Serena had another awesome day serving, and that provided the substantial foundation on which this victory was built. It wasn't all about the serve, by any means, but that serve does warrant some attention because it is, as Navratilova rightly said yesterday, the greatest serve the women's game has ever seen.

Serena hit nine aces in the match, at up to 122mph, to take her tournament total to 89 aces, the most ever by a woman at one Wimbledon. That tally made toast of her own record of 72.

Serena won 94 per cent of her first serve points. That is astonishing, pure "Gee whizz!" territory. Nobody else has those kind of numbers. They put Serena on a whole different level.

Vera's strategy was to get into the net but how could she possibly attack that serve? How could she even come in? She couldn't, and quickly she didn't. You can't. She did everything within her capabilities, and the pair went blow for blow for most of that first set. But there's only so much a girl can do when Serena is serving like that and backing it up with good all-round play.

Serena has that massive physical power as one asset, but there were others on display. She was angling the ball, trying to avoid hitting north-south as much as possible to take Zvonareva out wide. Serena's court coverage was excellent, her movement fluid. To achieve that – to be able to move that frame with such grace – takes an enormous amount of physical fitness. To make it look so easy takes one heck of a lot of time in the gym, believe me.

I've known the Williams sisters since they were little girls, and it's worth repeating: they are the finest female athletes ever, in any sport, in terms of their physical attributes. On the court, they are warriors. Off it, full of grace. And on that subject we must give Vera huge credit for reaching the final and the manner in which she played.

For a long time, she's lived in the shadow of the other Russians, and in the shadow of injuries that threatened her career. At one stage it was so bad that she feared she may never play again. Heck, it tells you something of her journey when she even invites her surgeon to sit in her box.

Her story is an inspiration, that hard work and faith do sometimes have their reward. Yes, she lost, but the salient point is that she reached the final, and was then the best that she could be. That's all you can ask of any student: be the best that you can be. I was also impressed by the eloquence of the post-match speeches on court by both girls. They both thanked their support staff. They acknowledged that many different people help them – players in an individual sport – to achieve what they do. You'd be surprised how many players don't acknowledge the help.

serenafann
Jul 4th, 2010, 01:55 AM
Nice articles,concerning the Wimbledon victory. :yeah:

Tech1
Jul 4th, 2010, 02:17 AM
Serena flexes muscle at Wimbledon to move up all-time Slams title list

Three quick thoughts from the women's final at Wimbledon on Saturday:

• Nobody's going to remember much about the tennis. In the category of "How did that happen?" among Wimbledon women's finalists, Vera Zvonareva was right up there with Nathalie Tauziat (1998), and Serena Williams' 6-3, 6-2 victory was the most predictable since the heyday of Martina Navratilova (routing Andrea Jaeger in '83 and Zina Garrison in '90).

Serena had some other opponents in mind, though, namely history and perception. It wasn't so long ago that people questioned her commitment and fitness, but behold her today: the most consistent elite player on tour, trimmer and more mobile than she was two years ago, and moving up the all-time list with 13 major singles titles.

Most players and tour insiders rank Wimbledon and the U.S. Open as the most prestigious of the Grand Slam events, and consider this: Serena now has seven titles in those two events, just one short of Margaret Court and Chris Evert, and two behind Billie Jean King. If anything, Serena is a better player than ever before, with no end to her career in sight. History is going to look favorably upon this woman.

• "I'm going to take this match seriously," promised Mary Carillo on the NBC broadcast, and we were all hoping to do the same. At least Zvonareva kept her composure, in the wake of numerous emotional breakdowns in the past, and her Wimbledon performance (she also played in the doubles final) gave a boost to Russian women's tennis. Going into the tournament, Elena Dementieva was the only Russian in the WTA's top 10 .

• Looking ahead to the U.S. Open, Serena has another mountain to climb: Erasing last year for good. She has been a model of comportment since her epic confrontation with a line judge, and considering that her opponent that night was Kim Clijsters, that would make for a pretty decent final in September. Serena-Maria Sharapova sounds like a gem, as well. With so many other top players either injured or erratic, scant few alternatives come to mind.

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2010/writers/bruce_jenkins/07/03/wimbledon.womens.thoughts/index.html?eref=si_tennis&utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed:+rss/si_tennis+(SI.com+-+Tennis

Tech1
Jul 4th, 2010, 05:25 AM
Wilson Racquet Sports - Serena Williams Wins Wimbledon Title



http://images.quickblogcast.com/6/1/2/8/1/228331-218216/SerenaWilliamsWimbledon10.jpg?a=6


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE




July 3, 2010




A NEW QUEEN OF WIMBLEDON


Defending Champion Serena Williams
Captures 4th Wimbledon Title and 13th Grand Slam


[CHICAGO] – Serena Williams made her presence known as she defended her Wimbledon title to Vera Zvonareva of Russia during the final match on Saturday.

The match was all about Serena's well known power game as she defeated Zvonareva in straight sets, 6-3, 6-2. “It feels incredible to defend my title here at Wimbledon,” Serena said after her victory. “Vera is such a great competitor but I knew that if I stuck to my game, I had a good chance of winning.”

With her [K] Blade Team racket, the 13 time Grand Slam champion held strong throughout the entire tournament and did not drop a set over two weeks at the All England Club. Serena knows that her powerful serve gives her an advantage on any opponent and hit 9 aces Saturday, taking her tournament total to a Wimbledon record- 89.

This title gives Serena her 4th Wimbledon in the span of eight years and her 13th Grand Slam overall. She is back at world No.1 and certain to stay at the top, where she has reigned for 110 weeks altogether. Serena currently stands as world No.1 at both singles and doubles, only the sixth woman in history to do so.

With this 13th title, Serena surpasses Billie Jean King’s 12 Grand Slam title record, and Chris Evert and Martina Navratilova are Williams' next goal, with 18 majors each. "Honestly, I'm just doing what I can and working hard," Williams said. "These great champions give me the motivation to reach my goals.”

Wilson Racquet Sports is a division of Chicago-based Wilson Sporting Goods, one of the world's leading manufacturers of sports equipment and owned by Amer Sports. Wilson designs, manufactures and distributes sporting goods throughout the world and focuses on making technologically advanced products which help players of all levels perform better. Wilson's core sport categories include: Football, Basketball, Baseball, Volleyball, Soccer, Youth Sports, Uniforms/Apparel, Golf, Footwear and Racquet Sports (Tennis, Racquetball, Squash, Badminton and Platform Tennis). For more information, visit www.wilson.com (http://www.wilson.com).

http://blog.gvtnews.com/2010/07/03/wilson-racquet-sports--serena-williams-wins-wimbledon-title.aspx?ref=rss

nadlinds
Jul 4th, 2010, 09:15 PM
Lucky No.13 For Serena

LONDON, England - World No.1 Serena Williams kept adding to her grand legacy in London, defeating Vera Zvonareva in straight sets for her fourth Wimbledon crown and 13th overall Grand Slam title.

Williams, the No.1 seed, and Zvonareva, No.21, went toe-to-toe from the baseline in the first six games of the match, but from 3-all Williams' big stage experience really began to shine, as she took the power level up a notch - particularly on her serve and crosscourt backhand - and she took a 6-3 first set.

After winning the first set at a major Williams was 174-3, and after winning the first set in major finals she was 10-0 - the 28-year-old American's record was phenomenal in the situation and that trend continued, as she made it 175-3 and 11-0 with a 63 62 victory, serving it out at love and ending it with a big smash.

Williams tied Billie Jean King for fourth most Wimbledons in the Open Era (Martina Navratilova nine, Steffi Graf seven and Venus Williams five). She passes King for sixth most overall majors in the Open Era (Margaret Court 24, Graf 22, Helen Wills Moody 19 and Navratilova and Chris Evert 18 each).

"This one's very special. Hey Billie, I got you," Williams said in the on-court interview with Sue Barker. "I want to congratulate Vera. She played amazing here. She's been through so much in the last year. Everyone should give her a round of applause... she defines what a champion and never giving up means."

Williams' serving throughout the tournament was a centerpiece of her success. She was out-acing even the best men's players in the world (going into the semifinals she had over 1.6 aces per service game while none of the men's semifinalists even had 1) and she smashed the women's tournament ace record of 72 (which she set herself last year), finishing with 89 after the final.

"I've honestly never served this well," Williams added. "Whenever I come on this grass, on this amazing Centre Court, I start serving well. I want to keep it up."

This was Williams' sixth career Wimbledon final. She is now 4-2 in those, winning in 2002, 2003, 2009 and 2010, and finishing runner-up in 2004 (losing to Maria Sharapova) and 2008 (losing to Venus Williams).

How far is Williams planning to go? She was asked in press: "I love my dogs; I love my family; I love going to the movies; I love reading; I love going shopping. I would love to open more schools in Africa or in the United States, and I would love to help people. I would like to be remembered like, 'She was a tennis player, but she really did a lot to inspire and help other people.' That's what I think about not about Serena Williams won X amount of Grand Slams."

Zvonareva was playing in her first Grand Slam final. It was the 30th Grand Slam tournament she has played - the fourth-longest wait for a first final after Nathalie Tauziat (42), Francesca Schiavone (39) and Zina Garrison (34).

"I could have done better today, but Serena played really well. She didn't give me chances to get into the match," Zvonareva said after the match. "I'm such a perfectionist I wouldn't consider this a fabulous result, and I feel like I could have done better, but I was able to come through a lot of difficult matches for the past two weeks, and it gives me more confidence moving forward."

http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/news/20100703/lucky-no13-for-serena_2256076_2083839

samira_86
Jul 5th, 2010, 12:23 AM
http://www.heraldscotland.com/sport/other-sports-news/battle-of-the-sexes-serena-admits-she-would-be-no-match-in-men-s-game-1.1039204

Serena Williams famously finds it hard to keep track of her grand slam victories.

The trophies are spread out between Florida and LA and variously used as make-up brush holders or repositories from which to serve lemonade. Some of her US Open trophies have been polished so infrequently they have started “to go bad”. So perhaps it was a good thing on Saturday night that so many others were prepared to do a stock take on her behalf.

After she clinched her fourth Wimbledon title, and her 13th major altogether, with an almost contemptuous 6-3, 6-2 dismissal of Russia’s Vera Zvonareva, journalists the world over were left with one question on their lips. Just how good is Serena Williams?

The straightforward answer is that she is the sixth best female tennis player the world has ever known, and probably the best server the women’s game has seen. Her 13th grand slam victory inched her ahead of Billie-Jean King on the all-time list, and at 28 years of age she is still young enough and fit enough to easily overhaul Chris Evert and Martina Navratilova on 18, let alone all-time leader Margaret Court’s 24.

But who really cares about all that stuff? Far more interesting is the entirely theoretical conundrum of whether she could hold her own if the WTA tour disappeared tomorrow and she had to compete on the men’s tour instead. Williams practises with a male hitting partner called Sasha Bajin and it often seems unfair when her physique and power comes up against mere female mortals. John McEnroe has suggested Serena would find a ranking of 600 if she decided to mix it with the men. Andy Murray thinks it would be closer to 1000.

I personally hate to lose so any loss whether it is at Wimbledon or at a small tournament – I don’t like it Serena Williams, Wimbledon champion
And, rather amazingly, there is actually some kind of precedent to consider. Back in 1998, when the Williams sisters were just starting out on the tour, a challenge was put out to play a friendly match against a man ranked somewhere near the 200-mark. German Karsten Braasch, then the World’s 203, took them up on it, just around the time of the Australian Open. Out on one of the back courts at Melbourne Park, “after a leisurely round of golf and a few shandies”, Braasch beat Serena 6-1 and then Venus 6-2. The next time he met Venus, she said ‘see that thing in Australia, it never happened’.

“I think women’s tennis and men’s tennis are totally opposite,” was Serena’s take on the matter yesterday. “The men are just way stronger. I even have trouble with my hitting partner and he is not professional – although he would make a good professional player. It really is comparing apples to oranges.

“First of all I would have to go into serious training for about two months,” she added. “I would have to get seriously fit. Then I would have to play seriously well. But I definitely think if anyone is going to hang there then it would be me or Venus because we have more of a power game and are seriously fast. I would have to go to bootcamp though – no sweets, no nothing for about two months – then I think I would have a good chance. A good chance against someone who is way outside the top 100 – not inside otherwise I think I would have no chance.”

This is good news for the tour and the sponsors but bad news for the rest of people who actually play women’s tennis. Serena, after all, has now won five of the last eight grand slams and few would bet against her putting last year’s US Open semi-final line judge shame behind her at Flushing Meadow or equalling her big sister’s tally at Wimbledon next year.

The pair have always been hugely supportive of each other, but drawing level with her at SW19 is a prospect which delights Serena. “It would be cool to equal her,” Serena said. “I just want to keep our name on that board, just keep our name going. Williams, Williams, Williams, Williams every year is really cool.”

Her victory here – without conceding a single set all tournament long – was even more remarkable considering she has only competed in six events on the tour all season long. Her Wimbledon win accompanies a victory in the Australian Open in January and her dominance was such that it is legitimate to wonder how in the world she allowed Elena Dementieva, Jelena Jankovic, Nadia Petrova and Samantha Stosur to take her scalp in the rest.

“I am amazed too at how I can lose in other tournaments,” Serena said. “I personally hate to lose so any loss whether it is at Wimbledon or at a small tournament – I don’t like it.”

Williams has no shortage of other stuff going on in her life, but the last couple of years have seen her more committed to her fitness than ever before. She puts it down as much to personal vanity as anything else. “It sounds ridiculous but I mostly do it because I want to look good,” she said. “When I am running I am not thinking about winning Wimbledon, I am thinking about looking good when I am wearing my bikini. It keeps me extremely motivated. I want to live a fit life and it helps keep the injuries away. Staying fit and being healthy just makes life a lot easier.”

Williams insists “her whole thing isn’t materialistic” and has yet to work out what she will do with her £1m prize money. “I am just working on paying off my mortgage,” she said. That must be some house.

jefrilibra
Jul 5th, 2010, 02:50 AM
Posted?

Read full story: http://www.harpersbazaar.com/fashion/fashion-articles/serena-williams-body-0810

http://fashiontribes.typepad.com/.a/6a00d834515e6669e20133f20acdb3970b-550wi



Serena Williams Looking Wimbledon-Champion Hot in August Harper's Bazaar

While yet another Wimbledon title (her 4th!) and £1 million in prize money (the highest ever) is all good and well, not to mention 26 Grand Slam titles, it is Serena Williams's new body is arguably her biggest victory yet. The tennis champ shows off her svelte silhouette in a glam swimsuit by Eres in the August issue of Harper's Bazaar - on newsstands July 20. "I was 23 when I realized that I wasn't Venus," she explains in the accompanying interview. "She's totally different. I'm super curvy. I have big boobs and this massive butt. She's tall and she's like a model and she fits everything. I was growing up, wanting to be her, wanting to look like her, and I was always fitting in her clothes, but then one day I couldn't. But it's fine. Now I'm obviously good, but it's a weird thing. . . . To this day, I don't love my arms. People want more fit arms, but my arms are too fit. But I'm not complaining. They pay my bills."

Serena williams new body harpers bazaar She also opens up about dating, why she broke up with rapper/actor Common, and the joys of embracing her curves and body image. "Since I don't look like every other girl, it takes a while to be okay with that. To be different. But different is good. I feel so much sexier with short hair. I wanted to reach inside me and feel better. I don't want to hide behind a facade of hair."

jannishal
Jul 7th, 2010, 04:35 AM
Here's a lovely article on the WS;

by
Dexter Rogers
Dexter Rogers

National Sports Columnist, Examiner.com
Posted: July 6, 2010 03:51 PM
BIO Become a Fan
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The Real Face of American Tennis, Serena Williams Wins Wimbledon


There must be happy times in the Williams' household. Serena defeated Vera Zvonareva of Russia 6-3, 6-2 to claim her 13th Grand Slam title and cement her status as the No. 1 ranked player in the world.

As Serena embraced her trophy her parting words for the crowd were, "Dreams do come true. Stick to them and work hard."

How true it is.

America is always asking for the next up-and coming American. The media asks, "Who is the face of American tennis."

No, it's not Andy Roddick. Since his split with Brad Gilbert he hasn't been the same player. He won the 2003 US Open but that's it in terms of majors.

The media wanted to anoint Melanie Oudin after her great run at last years US Open. One great run and playing Fed Cup doesn't get you recognized. Winning does.

The tennis world has anointed Maria Sharapova as the face of tennis. In my opinion it's not even a discussion of extensive debate. Without question Serena Williams is the face of tennis and the Williams' sisters continue to carry the sport forward.

While some don't want to admit it the Willliams sisters are the face of American tennis whether you want to accept it or not.

The Williams sister's story is the epitome of the American dream: They spawned from the mean streets of Compton, California to hoisting Grand Slam trophies. Venus and Serena have essentially dominated the tour over the past decade. Over the last decade they've won nearly half all singles grand slams played. They've also combined to 12 Grand Slam doubles titles.

At the past 10 Wimbledon's one of the sisters was in the finals every year accept one. Venus or Serena has 9 of the last 11 crowns. Venus has 5 titles and Serena has 4. As the rankings stand Serena is ranked No.1 and Venus is ranked No. 2 in the world.

This is exceptional because Richard and Oracene Williams have raised not one, but two top tier champions. What other sport can you name that has had two champions in one home?

What if Tiger had another brother battling him on Sundays for major championships? What if LeBron James had a brother who played in the Western Conference and they'd battle consistently to win the NBA title? What if Roger Federer had a little brother going toe-to-toe at major championships?

The Williams' sisters have taken over a sport that's largely dominated by whites. Historically it's been a lily-white sport that hasn't catered to African-Americans. Despite the latter the sisters have taken the sport to new heights and they did it their way.

Foundation was set at home by Richard and Oracene Williams. They have been coached by Rick Macci, Morris King Jr. and Nick Bollittieri at various times, but the family has been the core.

While it's great to see the sisters dominate on the court it's a shame that the pipeline isn't being filled with those who have the ability but lack the notoriety and means to excel.
What has the USTA done to induce African-American presence? What has the higher-ups done to encourage an African-American presence in decision-making capacities?

Rodney Harmon was in charge of player development but suddenly he was replaced by Jose Higueras in 2008. Why?

Zina Garrison was seemingly forced out as Fed Cup Captain. She sued the USTA and there was an out of court settlement. Why?

How many African-American umpires do you see?

The Williams' family got to the top their way, look what it got them. Doesn't it make sense to embrace their efforts?

Doesn't it make sense to incorporate some of the wisdom from the family to make the game better?

Doesn't it make sense to have more of an African-American presence in the sport of tennis?

For as American as the Williams family are they are depicted as anti-American by a small contingent in this country because they are not Christians, don't play Fed Cup and do things their way.

I say big deal. Let's look at the facts. They win on the court. They aren't in any trouble and they excel off the court. The Williams sisters are part owners the Miami Dolphins, clothing lines, and they embrace education. To me those things are as American as you can be.

Why not incorporate the Williams' into the fray? They've raised not one but two champions. It diversifies the game and creates opportunities for upward mobility for African-Americans in the sport. Not everyone can be Serena Williams but they can be athletic trainers, instructors, journalists or hold prominent USTA positions.

If you just work hard, network and consistently puts yourself in positions -- one day you shall succeed. As Serena stated as she finished her on court interview, "Dreams do come true."

Yes they do.


Follow Dexter Rogers on Twitter: www.twitter.com/DextersVPoint

Tech1
Jul 7th, 2010, 10:35 PM
UPTOWN magazine article:

http://uptownmagazine.com/2010/06/advantage-serena/

Tech1
Jul 8th, 2010, 03:10 AM
http://www.californiamuseum.org/exhibits/halloffame/inductee/new-inductee-10 (http://www.californiamuseum.org/exhibits/halloffame/inductee/new-inductee-10)



Serena selected for CA Hall of Fame

http://www.californiamuseum.org/sites/default/files/imagecache/width200/sites/default/files/Williams_200x200.jpg
Currently ranked the number one female tennis player in the world, Serena Williams has transcended sports to become a pop culture icon who devotes her considerable energy to improving children’s lives.

Born in Michigan, Williams moved to California as a baby and, along with her older sister Venus, learned to play on the public tennis courts of Compton, a suburb of Los Angeles. She was just five years old when she first picked up a racquet under the guidance of her father, a tennis coach. She began playing professionally in 1995, and at seventeen she won her first major singles title when she defeated No. 1 Martina Hingis in the U.S. Open final.

Since then, her many wins have placed her in the top spot in women’s tennis five times. She currently holds thirteen grand slam singles titles (meaning a championship in one of the Majors – Wimbledon and the U.S., Australian, and French Opens) – the most of any player active today – along with eleven grand slam doubles titles and two in mixed doubles. She has won more prize money than any other female athlete in history. She also has two Olympic gold medals, won with Venus in doubles in 2000 and 2008.

Noted for her unique style both on and off the court, Williams launched her own brand of designer apparel in 2004, and recently added a line of signature handbags and jewelry.

She has thrown herself into philanthropy with a passion, using her wealth and celebrity to advance a variety of charitable causes, from funding breast cancer research to providing tennis clinics for at-risk youngsters. Her foundation has two main goals: supporting youth who have been affected by violent crime and furthering education for underprivileged children around the world. To that end, she has underwritten scholarships in the U.S. and has helped found two schools in Kenya.

In recognition of her philanthropic work, business acumen, and outstanding tennis career, TIME magazine named her as one of the world’s top 100 most influential people for 2010.

nadlinds
Jul 9th, 2010, 08:41 PM
Kim, Serena & 35,681 Fans

BRUSSELS, Belgium - It wasn't the all-Belgian affair initially billed, but that was hardly going to stop a world-record breaking tennis crowd turning out to see local heroine Kim Clijsters play world No. 1 Serena Williams in Brussels' massive King Baudouin Stadium on Thursday night.

Two-time US Open champion Clijsters, who was originally due to take on her compatriot Justine Henin, defeated the Wimbledon champion in straight sets, 63 62. Precisely 35,681 people witnessed the match, surpassing the previous record of 30,472 set in 1973 when Billie Jean King beat Bobby Riggs in the so-called 'Battle of the Sexes' match at the Houston Astrodome.

"I was here often as a little girl to come and watch football," said Clijsters, whose late father, Leo, played soccer in the stadium. "That I can actually play here is very special and emotional. I said to myself a few times: 'Remember this moment well.'"

Spectators at the glittering occasion included Belgium's Prince Filip and Princess Mathilde, but a more familiar tennis face called the shots: 18-time Grand Slam champion Martina Navratilova served as umpire, her face beamed onto on large screens. When Clijsters nearly hit the all-time great with a missed return, Navratilova joked: "Did I say something wrong?"

Former world No.1 Henin, who was forced to withdraw from the gala after injuring her right elbow at Wimbledon, was nonetheless present. So too was French Open champion Francesca Schiavone, who acted as understudy for the players.

"It was magnificent," said Williams, who broke her 12-major tie with King last Saturday and took part despite a foot injury. "In all my years on the circuit, I've never experienced anything like it. So much attention to tennis is fantastic."

As well as raising money for charity, the Best of Belgium vs. Best of the World extravaganza - which also included a concert and fireworks - marks the opening of the nation's six-month presidency of the European Union.

When the event was launched earlier this year, Belgium's prime minister, Yves Leterme noted the global impact of his country's two best-known daughters: "When I talk to world leaders, whether it is in China or the United States, they talk about Kim and Justine."

http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/news/20100708/kim-serena-smash-spectator-record_2256076_2088090

BlameSerena
Jul 10th, 2010, 07:02 PM
Serena Williams Invited to the White House by Michelle Obama

The Williams sisters are taking over D.C. as they are the anchor players for the Washington Kastles, whose season just started this week. And things just got even better for Serena, a recent Wimbledon winner. She was invited to the White House by First Lady Michelle Obama.

The South Lawn will be turned into a tennis court so that Serena can participate in a fitness event involving “interactive tennis activities.” See if you can see Serena through the gates on July 14.

Also, Mayor Adrian Fenty has been a mainstay at the Washington Kastle games. On Wednesday night, he took his whole family to see the match featuring Venus Williams.

Link (http://dcfab.thefabempire.com/2010/07/09/serena-williams-invited-to-the-white-house-by-michelle-obama/)

BlameSerena
Jul 10th, 2010, 07:03 PM
Rafael Nadal and Serena Williams Share More Than a 2010 Wimbledon Championship - They Both Use Power Plate(R)

The two top tennis pros have similar training methodologies including Power Plate whole body vibration training

IRVINE, Calif., July 9 /PRNewswire/ -- Reigning champion Serena Williams powered through round after round in the women's singles line up this weekend to win her fourth Wimbledon title and surpass her personal idol, Billy Jean King, for the number five spot on the women's singles Grand Slam all-time history list. Rafael Nadal followed the next day to win in straight sets for his second championship at the All England Club, and with it, recaptured his number one ranking on the Men's side. Like many other athletes who perform at such elite levels on the court, both Williams and Nadal turn to Power Plate exercise off-court to get the extra edge.

Following a much scrutinized injury after the Australian Open, all eyes were on Williams as she returned to the court with ferocity to defend her Wimbledon title and earn her 13th Grand Slam title. With a demanding tour schedule compounded by injury recovery, athletes like Williams need to maximize training time to aid their body in recovery as well as maintain peak physical fitness and power. "On tour, playing back to back matches is tough on your body. Being ready the next day is the difference between winning or losing. If I can accelerate the recovery and healing process, I have a definite advantage. With my Power Plate, I have that advantage," says Williams. Nadal also overcame an injury-plagued season in 2009 to capture his 8th Grand Slam title. "This is the way I work out regularly," commented Nadal.

"Elite athletes around the world choose Power Plate exercise to increase core strength, muscle tone and power, as well as to decrease joint and muscle pain," says Mark de Gorter, President of Power Plate North America. "We congratulate both Serena Williams and Rafael Nadal on their superb victories, and are very proud to have them on the Power Plate team."

Power Plate Acceleration Training™ provides one of the most efficient and dynamic total-body workouts in less than 30 minutes utilizing scientifically-proven Advanced Vibration Technology™ that triggers involuntary muscle reactions 25-50 times per second while you exercise. The result is a high-intensity exercise that increases strength, improves muscle tone and balance and helps reduce body fat. A recent study found that Acceleration Training™ exercise helped participants achieve a 57% improvement in weight loss compared to traditional exercise.

Williams, known for maintaining power and speed, crushes opponents on the court and doesn't slow down when she steps off the court. "Off-court training is as important to me as on-court. With the Power Plate, I'm able to accelerate my off-court training and maximize the benefits," says Williams.

Used by elite athletes such as baseball players Manny Ramirez of the Los Angeles Dodgers, Dustin Pedroia of the Boston Red Sox, Justin Morneau of the Minnesota Twins and Evan Longoria of the Tampa Bay Rays; celebrities like Courteney Cox, Hilary Swank and Clint Eastwood and people from all walks of life, Power Plate equipment benefits include: increased fitness, strength, muscle tone, flexibility, bone density and range of motion as well as improved blood circulation and lymphatic system activation. The complete Power Plate line of fitness equipment is designed for health clubs, wellness centers, spas, hospitals, physical therapy and rehabilitation clinics, professional and collegiate athletic training facilities, private fitness trainers and home use. Power Plate North America is headquartered in Irvine, Calif. www.powerplate.com.

Link (http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/rafael-nadal-and-serena-williams-share-more-than-a-2010-wimbledon-championship---they-both-use-power-plater-98140069.html)

Diesel
Jul 10th, 2010, 08:26 PM
Serena Williams Invited to the White House by Michelle Obama

The Williams sisters are taking over D.C. as they are the anchor players for the Washington Kastles, whose season just started this week. And things just got even better for Serena, a recent Wimbledon winner. She was invited to the White House by First Lady Michelle Obama.

The South Lawn will be turned into a tennis court so that Serena can participate in a fitness event involving “interactive tennis activities.” See if you can see Serena through the gates on July 14.

Also, Mayor Adrian Fenty has been a mainstay at the Washington Kastle games. On Wednesday night, he took his whole family to see the match featuring Venus Williams.

Link (http://dcfab.thefabempire.com/2010/07/09/serena-williams-invited-to-the-white-house-by-michelle-obama/)

:worship:

Olórin
Jul 10th, 2010, 08:34 PM
Serena Williams Invited to the White House by Michelle Obama

The Williams sisters are taking over D.C. as they are the anchor players for the Washington Kastles, whose season just started this week. And things just got even better for Serena, a recent Wimbledon winner. She was invited to the White House by First Lady Michelle Obama.

The South Lawn will be turned into a tennis court so that Serena can participate in a fitness event involving “interactive tennis activities.” See if you can see Serena through the gates on July 14.

Also, Mayor Adrian Fenty has been a mainstay at the Washington Kastle games. On Wednesday night, he took his whole family to see the match featuring Venus Williams.

Link (http://dcfab.thefabempire.com/2010/07/09/serena-williams-invited-to-the-white-house-by-michelle-obama/)

These kinds of things make me harken back to the USO last year where people were acting like Serena committed a crime and was going to be derided forever for it :tape:

Still good enough for her second trip to the White House in as many years it seems. Many legendary film and music stars and world leaders don't get as much. She's doing well.

Tech1
Jul 13th, 2010, 02:08 PM
http://tennisworld.typepad.com/tennisworld/2010/07/mornin-its-cool-damp-and-rainy-here-in-game-rich-andes-today-so-my-thoughts-are-returning-to-home-and-work-the-headlines.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+tennisworld-bodo+%28Peter+Bodo%27s+TennisWorld%2
Pete Bodo
7/13/10

'Dios Serena

http://tennisworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451599e69e20133f2407de7970b-600wi (http://tennisworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451599e69e20133f2407de7970b-popup)

Mornin'. It's cool, damp and rainy here in game-rich Andes today, so my thoughts are returning to home and work. The headlines offer pretty slim pickin's today. Victor Hanescu falls in Stuttgart! Serena Williams to miss the entire (four-match, for Serena) World Team Tennis season!
Apparently, Serena cut her foot and the wound required stitches. Jill Smoller apparently was unavailable to explain just how Serena sustained her injury, but we know that girl is a dancing fool. I'm thinking there be an exuberant crowd, including celebs (see above), an impromptu concert by Ludacris, and an errant, carelessly tossed champagne flute involved in this one.

But let's face it, this isn't exactly Tom Brady going down on the eve of the Super Bowl, or Derek Jeter pulling a hammie before the rubber match of a home stand against the Boston Red Sox. I guess you can count the Washington Kastles (what's with the name, an owner with a big ego, or did someone not do less well in spelling than derivates trading?) out of the WTT title hunt. You know how WTT operates; Serena's sub will probably be a girl who played third singles for Prince Georges Community College in nearby Maryland.

My takeaway? We may not see Serena swing a racket in anger until the U.S. Open rolls around.

Anyhow, use this space to discuss any tennis that might move you today; I'll be back tomorrow with something a little more worthy of gnawing upon.

Lulu.
Jul 13th, 2010, 08:54 PM
Thanks for posting the article. :)

I really hope she is playing in this tournament to win it.

maja.amelie
Jul 13th, 2010, 09:03 PM
Turkey is wonderful country! Warm, nice, traditional. Hope Serena really plays there.

50Sense
Jul 13th, 2010, 09:04 PM
Wait is she for real gonna play? She could milk this foot thing for a hot ass minute.

Marcell
Jul 14th, 2010, 07:27 PM
Raining in Washington: Michelle Obama tennis event postponed.







***POSTPONED*** - The White House South Lawn Series event featuring tennis - scheduled for this morning with the First Lady and young people from the Washington, DC area - is postponed due to rain.


The following event will still be taking place today:


Wednesday, July 14th, The First Lady, Dr. Jill Biden and Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius will join doctors, nurses, families, and leaders from health community to make an announcement regarding new preventive health care coverage made available under the Affordable Care Act at George Washington University Hospital at 2:15 PM EDT. Chronic and often preventable diseases, such as heart disease, cancer, and diabetes, are responsible for 7 of 10 deaths among Americans each year and account for 75 percent of the nation's health spending. In addition, obese individuals have health care costs 39 percent above average. High-quality preventive care helps Americans stay healthy, avoid or delay the onset of disease, lead productive lives and help reduce costs. Under the Affordable Care Act, new insurance plans are required to provide preventive care without cost-sharing, which will remove financial barriers for many Americans to preventive services such as mammograms, colonoscopies and immunizations, help prevent disease and reduce costs. This event is pooled press.

swim4life227
Jul 14th, 2010, 07:47 PM
Wait is she for real gonna play? She could milk this foot thing for a hot ass minute.

Nah, She wants that USO bad this year so shove it in the faces of those naysayers. This year bitch isn't messing around, she might actually dare to attempt to win a tour title (not named Miami), alert the presses people!

nadlinds
Jul 14th, 2010, 08:06 PM
Serena Williams plays down praise

Serena Williams insists she is not concerned about where she ranks among the great players in the game after winning her fourth Wimbledon title.

The American beat Vera Zvonareva 6-3 6-2 to secure a 13th Grand Slam title, taking her past Billie Jean King to sixth in the all-time list.

Chris Evert and Martina Navratilova are next on the list with 18 Slams each.

But Williams said: "I'm happy to win 13. You never know what tomorrow brings and I'm happy to have gotten this far."

King was in the Centre Court royal box to see her mark of 12 Grand Slam titles overtaken, and Williams said: "This one means a lot because it's 13 and I was able to pass Billie, that's always nice. I don't know where it rates but to have four Wimbledons is really, really exciting."

And asked about how concerned she is to be considered among the great players, she added: "It's definitely important. I never thought about it but I think I'd be mentioned regardless of whether I won here or not. It's cool.

"I don't think about that kind of stuff. My thing is I love my dogs, I love my family, I love going to the movies, I love reading, I love going shopping - it's not on my list to be the greatest.

"At the end of the day, I'd love to open more schools in Africa or the United States. I would love to help people and be remembered, 'Yeah, she was a tennis player but she really did a lot to inspire other people.'

"That's what I think about, not 'I'm Serena Williams and I won X amount of Grand Slams.'"

Williams was in superb form at the All England Club, sweeping through all seven matches without dropping a set, but she admitted: "I honestly didn't think I was going to win this tournament because I felt like my strokes were off, especially in practice.

"I just felt like I was connecting late and I'm really happy to have got through it."

Martina Navratoliva said before the final that Williams has the best serve in the history of the women's game, but despite hitting 89 aces in the tournament the champion herself was not about to agree it is the best ever.

"Is that what it's dubbed now?" she said. "I have a really consistent serve and I might not hit it as hard (as some) but I place it really well."

And the 28-year-old said she has no timetable for the rest of her career, saying: "I just try to stay healthy and do the best that I can, I never try to think about how long I'm going to play.

"Will I still be playing at 38? If I am, I want you to escort me off the court. There's no way I need to be out here at 38."

Zvonareva had been a huge underdog going into her first Grand Slam final against the three-time champion but was not about to make excuses for her swift defeat.

"I think it's great to be in the final and I'll realise that later but at the moment I think I'm still a bit disappointed with the performance today," said the 25-year-old. "Not with the result but more the way I played, I think I could have done better.

"I didn't show my best and it's a bit disappointing because it's the final, and you don't reach the Wimbledon final every day. But Serena played really well, she didn't really give me a chance to get into the match."

Williams fired nine aces past the Russian, who failed to force a single break point, but Zvonareva would not entertain the thought that the American was all but invincible on the grass.

"She's beatable - she's a human being, not a machine," she said. "It's very difficult to beat her, you have to play your best, but you can do it."

And after a long struggle with injuries, Zvonareva was keen to look ahead after finally reaching a Grand Slam final.

"It was definitely a good experience for me," she said. "It's been a great week and hopefully it can help me in the future."

http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/tennis/8785948.stm

Tech1
Jul 15th, 2010, 04:05 PM
Federer, Serena claim top honours at 2010 ESPY Awards
By RohitSharma (http://www.tennisearth.com/profile/contributor/RohitSharma-2.htm) (TennisEarth.com) (http://www.tennisearth.com/index.htm), Submitted On 15-Jul-2010 06:29:00 CDT



Five of the brightest tennis players in the current circuit were awarded the 2010 ESPY Awards in various categories in a gala event that took place at the famous Nokia Theatre in Los Angeles, USA.

Tennis stars Serena Williams, Roger Federer, Kim Clijsters, Nicolas Mahut and John Isner emerged victorious at the just concluded ESPY Awards being held at the Nokia Theatre in Los Angeles, California.

Williams, who claimed her 13th major title earlier this month (http://www.tennisearth.com/commentary/The-Championships-10_Women-Singles_Final_Serena_Zvonareva_309602.htm) was adjudged the best Female Tennis Player of the year. This is Serena's fourth Best Female Tennis Player award and fifth overall, which include the top most 'Athlete of the Year' honours for the 2002-03 season. Williams edged sister Venus and Kim Clijsters for the Female Tennis player of the Year award this year. Williams was also nominated for the Athlete of the Year award but lost the race to Skiing champion Lindsey Vonn.

Meanwhile, Roger Federer bagged the Male Tennis Player of the year award for his phenomenal success that includes a record 16th major crown in Australia in January (http://www.tennisearth.com/commentary/Australian-Open_Men-Singles_Final_Federer_Murray_305181.htm) this year. Federer beat Rafael Nadal and Juan Martin Del Potro as the other two nominees in the same category.

Belgian Kim Clijsters became the 2010 Comeback player of the Year winner for claiming the U.S. Open Championship as the only unranked player in the history of the game. Clijsters continued her astonishing run with two more titles this year in Brisbane and Miami, where she beat Venus Williams in the final.

Despite, Federer and Serena's hegemony at the Awards function, American John Isner and Frenchman Nicolas Mahut stole the limelight by the virtue of their momentous performance at this year's Championships at Wimbledon. Their marathon match (http://www.tennisearth.com/news/tennisNews/Longest-Match-of-mammoth-proportions-at-Wimbledon-2010-breaks-numerous-records-on-its-completion-285050.htm)won the Best Record Breaking Performance of the year award with nominees including Usain Bolt (100 and 200 meter World Records) and Roger Federer (record 16th major triumph).

http://www.tennisearth.com/news/tennisNews/Federer-Serena-claim-top-honours-at-2010-ESPY-Awards-304214.htm

nadlinds
Jul 15th, 2010, 07:42 PM
Serena & Kim Win ESPYs

LOS ANGELES, CA, USA - Serena Williams and Kim Clijsters were both winners last night at the prestigious ESPYs awards ceremony. Although Williams missed out on the award for Best Female Athlete, she did take home the prize for Best Female Tennis Player. Meanwhile, Clijsters took the win for Best Comeback following her win at the US Open last September.

The ESPY Awards celebrate the biggest, best and most incredible moments from the sporting year. Held annually in Los Angeles, they attract the biggest names in US and Worldwide sports.

Williams and Clijsters were among the standouts of the last 12 months.

Williams was unstoppable at Wimbledon; she won the title without dropping a set, beating Vera Zvonareva 63 62 in the final. Her victory moved her to sixth place on all-time Grand Slam title leaders, one ahead of Billie Jean King.

Clijsters announced her retirement in 2007, but returned to the Sony Ericsson WTA Tour two years later having given birth to daughter Jada Ellie during her time off. In her third tournament back she won the US Open, making the record books for being the first unranked player and wildcard to win the title and the first mother to win a Slam since Evonne Goolagong in 1980.

Clearly relishing the festive mood, Williams hosted a celebrity-studded pre-ESPYs party in a palatial Bel Air home, which she decorated with chandeliers and orange and pink roses. Sister Venus Williams surprised her younger sibling by giving her a tier of scrumptious Wimbledon colored cupcakes.

"I always miss events so I was like, 'I'm having my own party,'" she said.

http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/OffCourtNews/Read/0,,12781~2093326,00.html

nadlinds
Jul 15th, 2010, 09:47 PM
Major Surprises

Vania King and Yaroslava Shvedova's Wimbledon doubles triumph a couple of weeks ago was quite a surprise, given that they had only played two previous events together and were unseeded. In fact, they were just the fifth unseeded duo to capture a Grand Slam title in the last 30 years. So which of the unseeded champs from the last couple of decades overcame the greatest odds?

Vania King and Yaroslava Shvedova at 2010 Wimbledon
Prior Experience: This was their third Sony Ericsson WTA Tour event together, all of them in 2010. Their best previous result was a runner-up showing in 's-Hertogenbosch.
Path To Title: Beat four seeds, highlighted by straight set upset of No.3 seeds Nadia Petrova and Samantha Stosur in round of 16.
Final: Beat unseeded Elena Vesnina and Vera Zvonareva in straight sets. Lost two sets during fortnight.
Notes: Their semifinal victims, Liezel Huber and Bethanie Mattek-Sands, had just beaten them a few weeks before in the semis of Birmingham ... Vesnina and Zvonareva pulled off a monumental upset of the Williams sisters in the quarterfinals ... This was King's third doubles title of 2010, all three with different partners ... This was Shvedova's second career Tour doubles title.

Alona and Kateryna Bondarenko at 2008 Australian Open
Prior Experience: This was their 37th Tour event together, but they had only won one prior title.
Path To Title: Beat four seeds, highlighted by straight set upset of No.1 seeds Cara Black and Liezel Huber in quarters.
Final: Beat 12th-seeded Victoria Azarenka and Shahar Peer in three sets. Lost two sets during fortnight.
Notes: Have only won one title together since.

Nathalie Dechy and Vera Zvonareva at 2006 US Open
Prior Experience: This was their fourth Tour event together, all of them having been in 2006. Their best previous result was quarterfinal showing at French Open that year.
Path To Title: Beat four seeds, highlighted by three set win over No. 4 seeds Daniela Hantuchova and Ai Sugiyama in third round.
Final: Beat eighth-seeded Dinara Safina and Katarina Srebotnik in straight sets. Lost two sets during fortnight.
Notes: Played eight more events together the rest of their careers, never going beyond the semifinals ... Dechy actually paired up with Safina at the 2007 US Open and was victorious again, her second and last doubles Slam title ... Zvonareva has won just won doubles title since '06 US Open.

Serena and Venus Williams at 2001 Australian Open
Prior Experience: This was their 25th Tour event together and they had already won seven titles, including three majors and an Olympics.
Path To Title: Beat three seeds, highlighted by three set victory over No.3 seeds Anna Kournikova and Barbara Schett.
Final: Beat seventh-seeded Lindsay Davenport and Corina Morariu in three sets. Lost three sets during fortnight.
Notes: The Williamses' title was hardly a surprise and they were only unseeded because of how seldom they played doubles at the time, though they were not nearly as accomplished a duo as they are now ... In semifinals, defeated Martina Hingis and Monica Seles, who they had lost to earlier in the year in Sydney.

Martina Hingis and Mirjana Lucic at 1998 Australian Open
Prior Experience: This was their first event together.
Path To Title: Beat four seeds, highlighted by three set win over No.1 seeds Lindsay Davenport and Natasha Zvereva in final. Lost two sets during fortnight.
Notes: Only played two more events in their careers together, both also in 1998, winning Tokyo Pan Pacific by beating Davenport and Zvereva again in the final and losing to them in the semifinals of Indian Wells a round after knocking off the Williams sisters ... Australian Open title not a huge shock, in that Hingis ended up with 37 Tour doubles titles, including nine majors, although Lucic has no Tour doubles titles, other than her two with Hingis.

http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/d...256567_2093278

doni1212
Jul 16th, 2010, 01:51 PM
Wait is she for real gonna play? She could milk this foot thing for a hot ass minute.

That's what I think will happen, :lol:

adamserenavenus
Jul 17th, 2010, 12:54 AM
Has anyone seen any phots of Serena's US Open dress and her US Open series outfit

nadlinds
Jul 17th, 2010, 08:41 PM
Serena To Miss Istanbul, Cincy & Montréal

World No.1 Serena Williams is having to withdraw from Sony Ericsson WTA Tour events in Istanbul, Cincinnati, and Montréal as a result of a necessary procedure on her right foot. Last week Williams was cut on a broken glass while at a restaurant. At the time, the extent of the injury was unknown.

Quote From Serena
"I'm so upset I won't be able to play in the upcoming events because of this foot surgery. Thank you for all of your support. I can't wait to get back on the courts."

http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/news/20100717/serena-to-miss-istanbul-cincy-montreal_2256076_2094809

nadlinds
Jul 18th, 2010, 05:50 PM
Serena Williams: Thank God I am Jehovah's Witness Otherwise...

Serena Williams is still angry about being fined a record $82,500 after losing her temper at the 2009 US Open, saying, "it was definitely sexist.

I mean, the very next day Roger Federer did the same thing I did and got fined 1,500 bucks. Are you kidding me? Come on."

The reigning Wimbledon tennis champion, who was punished for allegedly verbally abusing a lineswoman in New York last year, says if it weren't for her religious beliefs she probably would have said a lot more. "They better be glad I'm a Christian or else I would have had much worse words for them," the 28-year-old tells the magazine.

The devout Jehovah's Witness says: "I only felt bad because that's not who I am. I have a temper, but it's all about staying in control."

http://foreign.peacefmonline.com/entertainment/201007/60521.php

Serena's Ace
Jul 18th, 2010, 10:05 PM
Serena To Miss Istanbul, Cincy & Montréal

World No.1 Serena Williams is having to withdraw from Sony Ericsson WTA Tour events in Istanbul, Cincinnati, and Montréal as a result of a necessary procedure on her right foot. Last week Williams was cut on a broken glass while at a restaurant. At the time, the extent of the injury was unknown.

Quote From Serena
"I'm so upset I won't be able to play in the upcoming events because of this foot surgery. Thank you for all of your support. I can't wait to get back on the courts."

http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/news/20100717/serena-to-miss-istanbul-cincy-montreal_2256076_2094809

I wonder what type of activity she was doing that cause her foot to get
cut that bad

*Wishes Serena for a speedy recovery*

Tech1
Jul 19th, 2010, 06:13 AM
Facebook:

http://profile.ak.fbcdn.net/hprofile-ak-snc4/hs351.snc4/41782_14185406833_6384_q.jpgSerena Williams (http://www.facebook.com/SerenaWilliams)I would like to thank all of you for your comforting words! I am home with my family healing! Thank you for your support! Stay tuned for a blog on www.serenawilliams.com!

Marcell
Jul 19th, 2010, 07:17 PM
http://www.vogue.com/feature/2010_August_Serena_Williams/?mbid=rss_feature



Serena Williams has more than just a killer backhand up her sleeve. Marina Rust gets a manicure from one of tennis's greatest champions.

Photographed by Derek Kettela.

"You're meeting Serena Williams, and she's going to do your nails?" asked my husband, incredulous about this assignment.

"Well, it wouldn't work to rally."

That weekend: A posh seaside hotel in Palm Beach. Serena Williams, tennis star and soon-to-be-certified nail technician, has been on her home court all morning, training for the summer tournaments. This afternoon, she's come to see me at the Omphoy with her assistant, hair and makeup, and her Hello Kitty nail caddy, filled with the tools of her new trade.

Or not so new. "When I was fifteen, sixteen, I made half my room into a nail salon. I had the table, the chair, the rack against the wall with 50 nail polishes," she says. As a young girl, she'd become interested in nails watching Florence Griffith Joyner win gold at the 1988 Seoul Olympics. "Flo Jo had those long, awesome nails. I can't have her titles, I thought, but I can have her nails."

Griffith Joyner was a runner. Isn't tennis tougher on nails?

"Forehands are. That's why you'll see me doing a lot of backhands."

Today, Williams's own nails are sheer, pavéed with tiny red, white, and gold flowers, the intricate work of which she did herself. Soon she'll complete certification as a nail technician in the state of Florida. "You need to do 240 hours—25 manicures, 40 acrylics, 20 pedicures." There is an upside: Students work on fellow students. "I'll be, like, 'I need a pedicure,' and I'll go to class."

A lot of women enjoy manicures, but they're not the number-one tennis player in the world. Why get certified?

"I'm coming out with a nail line eventually. I like to know how things work. As an athlete, I want to invent something that maximizes wear."

The possibilities for shade names are too good. "Love All"?

Serena's ahead of me on this: "Strings.…Match Point.…"

Might she get certified for skin care as well, maybe branch into that? "I have skin care already; it's part of my fashion line."

Williams has a fashion degree, too, and designs looks (with Nike) for her tournaments. Nails are part of the look.

Friends joke about her backup plans; to me it seems more like empire building. "I'd love to have a salon in Palm Beach," she says. "Then someday, who knows?"

For her own nails, she'll wear any color except blue (not good on her skin, she says, though she sees it as a future challenge: "I can do it!"). She loves reds best ("so sexy, so classic"). Her favorite reds: Russian Roulette, from Essie; OPI's Vodka & Caviar.

Selecting an emery board, Williams inspects my nails. "You like them square?"

"Roundish square, squarish round," I reply automatically, just as I do at Angel Nails down my block, which feels weird.

"I changed my shape recently. I wanted to go more rock star," she tells me.

Rock star?

"Rock star is more oval; round makes my fingers look longer; square is definitely more professional."

As a child, Williams used to bite her nails. She started doing manicures every four days to get herself to stop biting. Then, as now, she could never go around with a chipped nail. "It would drive me nuts. One time, I was at Wimbledon, and I was going for this shot, and I fell and broke a nail. I was so mad I stopped the game. I had to focus that anger on the other player, the one that made me break that nail." Serena won the match.

We look at Essie's pale pinks—she knows my comfort zone. I like Starter Wife, I say, but I can't wear it; I think it's bad luck. Williams nods. "If I don't like the name, I won't wear the color. You know what you'd like? Mini How High. It goes on really sheer."

The photographer suggests she put down the file.

"Let me just finish this hand," she says. She brushes on CND's SolarOil and explains how cuticle oil is the most important part of the manicure. "It makes your polish look refreshed, vibrant, and it smells yummy." She gives a great hand massage, asks if I have kids. We chat about my daughters' names. "I love my name, but it has nothing to do with me," says Williams. "I am the most un-serene person in the world. I'm not peaceful, I'm not calm."

Nor is she dull. This afternoon has been a lot of fun. More than once, Serena and entourage break into song and practice choreography from the Spice Girls and Pussycat Dolls for their karaoke act. (Yes, she excels at everything, even that.)

As my nails dry, I ask if she has any tips to make a manicure last, aside from running to my backhand.

"Don't use nails as tools," she says. "My nails last forever. I'm really femme; I don't open a door."

We're done; my hands are perfect. Williams's assistant packs up the caddy and provides the card she gives friends with the E-mail address for "Kandse," her alias as manicurist. "Friends E-mail, asking, 'Is Kandse in town?'"

I thank her and keep the card, for posterity. Or—fingers crossed—an appointment.

"She's Got Game" has been edited for Vogue.com; the complete story appears in the August 2010 issue of Vogue.

jannishal
Jul 20th, 2010, 12:08 AM
http://globalgrind.com/channel/gossip/content/1680062/what-you-always-wanted-to-know-about-my-cousins-by-rra/?pc=1&pi=

Here is another article about Vee & Ree

Tech1
Jul 20th, 2010, 05:42 AM
Serena’s Feet in Hot Water Again.

July 18, 2010

http://view2.picapp.com/pictures.photo/image/9320064/tennis-2010-best-belgium/tennis-2010-best-belgium.jpg?size=380&imageId=9320064 (http://view.picapp.com/pictures.photo/entertainment/tennis-2010-best-belgium/image/9320064?term=serena+williams)
After winning her fourth Wimbledon title which earned her the “GOAT” title by many tennis fans and journalists, world No.1 Serena Williams has once again found her feet in hot water with the sports world. Williams recently announced that she would not play any events before the U.S. Open as she required surgery to heal a cut on her right foot suffered at a Belgian restaurant prior to her exhibition match against Kim Clijsters. And although Williams displayed two bandages on her foot in photos taken at a pre-ESPY’s party and at the wedding of NBA player Carmelo Anthony, many are not convinced that the injury is that serious or even legitimate.

Williams, who was scheduled to play World Team Tennis for the Washington Kastles, as well as appear at events in Istanbul, Cincinnati and Montreal issued the following statement on the WTA Tour’s website –”I’m so upset I won’t be able to play in the upcoming events because of this foot surgery. Thank you for all of your support. I can’t wait to get back on the courts.” Williams’s withdrawal from playing this summer, including the Istanbul event in which tournament organizers confirmed they had paid Williams a $150,000 appearance fee to show up, immediately caused a backlash by many in the media who disputed the exact cause of the injury and went on to say that Williams is not injured at all but is using it as a smokescreen so she won’t have to play in non-Slam events.

Williams, who was defaulted from the semifinals at last year’s U.S. Open and later fined $92,000 by the International Tennis Federation for verbally abusing a lineswomen who called a foot fault on Williams, caused a similar backlash this spring when she withdrew from playing at the Sony Ericsson Open due to a knee injury although she was later seen enjoying herself on a Miami beach in a two-piece bikini. Williams’s “footgate” is even sparking fierce debate on the U.S. Open and Australian Open’s official Facebook pages. Soon after each site posted the news about Williams, some fans of those pages “liked” the news that Williams would not be playing which set off heated comments on both sides.

Whether you believe, don’t believe or could care less about Williams’s injury, this current brouhaha continues to underscore the still uneasy relationship Williams shares with both the tennis world and the sports media. In the span of almost 12 months, Williams has been on a see-saw of public opinion, from hearing calls she be suspended from playing because of the U.S. Open “incident” to being lauded as the “GOAT”. Now with her absence this summer, the debate will continue over how important Willliams’s presence, or lack thereof, is for the rest of the sport, especially on the women’s side. Public opinion aside for a moment, television ratings, including for this year’s Wimbledon final, prove that Williams draws viewers in, whether they root for or against her. And with a lack of any real rivalries or other names that generate interest among casual sports fans, the WTA Tour will continue to rely on Williams not only to play, but to create buzz for the sport even if at times it’s viewed in a negative light by many.

It’s very likely that Williams’s injury and the debate surrounding it will lose interest once the U.S. Open starts and last year’s “incident” gets replayed over and over prior to the start of play. Williams will still go in as the favorite to win in New York and if she does, then for a brief moment, all will be forgiven. But I would expect a few more see-saw moments between Williams and the media before Williams hangs up her racquets for good.

http://adjustingthenet.com/2010/07/18/serenas-feet-in-hot-water-again/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+AdjustingTheNet+%28Adjusting+ the+Net%29

adamserenavenus
Jul 20th, 2010, 08:35 PM
Tech1 How dare you comment on here and have the nerve to say that Serena is faking her injury when there is clearly a problem with her foot otherwise she would not be having surgery. Serena does not hate non Grand Slam events she just choose's to peak at the Grand Slams. I fully supported Serena when she kicked off at that silly line judge when she claimed that Serena foot faulted WHICH SHE DIDN'T and I am pleased that Serena was not suspended she did not deserve a fine either. I am sick of racist people like you who are always critisizing Serena & Venus just because they are black, Serena & Venus are very talented players and deserve all the respect and support in the world if you want to pick on anyone for faking injuries then pick on ugly cheating JUSTINE HENIN she is definately faking her injury. Serena Williams will be back better stronger and fitter than ever. Get your facts right in future before commenting on here this page is for Serena fans if you do not like her then leave.

Tech1
Jul 20th, 2010, 09:37 PM
Tech1 How dare you comment on here and have the nerve to say that Serena is faking her injury when there is clearly a problem with her foot otherwise she would not be having surgery. Serena does not hate non Grand Slam events she just choose's to peak at the Grand Slams. I fully supported Serena when she kicked off at that silly line judge when she claimed that Serena foot faulted WHICH SHE DIDN'T and I am pleased that Serena was not suspended she did not deserve a fine either. I am sick of racist people like you who are always critisizing Serena & Venus just because they are black, Serena & Venus are very talented players and deserve all the respect and support in the world if you want to pick on anyone for faking injuries then pick on ugly cheating JUSTINE HENIN she is definately faking her injury. Serena Williams will be back better stronger and fitter than ever. Get your facts right in future before commenting on here this page is for Serena fans if you do not like her then leave.

http://images-partners-tbn.google.com/images?q=tbn:luVBbJiYD_BB4M::www.pages.drexel.edu/~atb28/willispage_files/image003.jpg

I am a Serena fan!!! This article was not written by me. You really need to get your facts together before you come at me with your nonsense. Check my history on this board. I am a S&V fan to the heart. Please save your:bs: for a hater.

adamserenavenus
Jul 20th, 2010, 09:39 PM
Tech1 I am sorry about that I thought you had written it please forgive me btw do you follow Serena & Venus on twitter i do

Tech1
Jul 21st, 2010, 04:51 AM
Tech1 I am sorry about that I thought you had written it please forgive me btw do you follow Serena & Venus on twitter i do

Forgiven...I don't have a twitter account

nadlinds
Jul 22nd, 2010, 10:07 PM
Serena & Venus Top Poll

Serena and Venus Williams are two of the most powerful athletes in women's sports history, and the dynamic sisters are also everyone's favorite. For the second year in a row, Serena and Venus are No.1 and No.2 on the Favorite Female Sports Star list, according to the Harris Poll.

With a collective 80 career titles, including 32 Grand Slam titles - 11 as a doubles team - and three Olympic gold medals, the Williams sisters have transcended into the most ubiquitous, winning faces in women's tennis. From teen sensations, they have become favorites on the court and off with their competitive spirit and warm hearts. Both have achieved the world No.1 ranking, and they are the only two women to surpass $25 million in career prize money.

They have captured fans' attention with their dazzling athleticism but also with their balanced lifestyles. Both have become authors and minority owners of the Miami Dolphins football team. Each started their own clothing line with Serena's brand Aneres and Venus' EleVen. Venus started an interior design company, and Serena is about to become a certified nail technician while building schools in Africa. These sisters are very busy, yet both invite fans into their personal lives via Twitter, and they wouldn't have it any other way.

By demographic men and women's favorite player was Serena Williams. African Americans chose Serena as well, while Hispanics chose Venus. Whites chose race car sensation Danica Patrick, who finished third in the polls.

However, the WTA Tour's players owned seven spots in the poll's Top 10. Maria Sharapova finished No.5 followed by Anna Kournikova. Rounding out the Top 10 were tennis legends Billie Jean King and Martina Navratilova, who tied for 10th. Former tennis star Chris Evert Lloyd finished ranked 8th last year but has since fell out of the Top 10 this year.

The Harris Poll was conducted online within the United States from June 14 to June 21, 2010, among 2,227 adults aged 18 and over.

http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/OffCourtNews/Read/0,,12781~2098739,00.html

adamserenavenus
Jul 22nd, 2010, 11:34 PM
Hi everyone my name is Adam Dawson and I have created a group on facebook called Tennis Talk for people to about any tennis player, tournament, schedules etc please add me on facebook it is the one with a picture of Serena Williams on it just type in Tennis talk to the search bar on facebook

shoryuken
Jul 23rd, 2010, 02:07 AM
Serena' agent, Jill said she didn't step on glass and that the cut was above her foot and had a deep laceration that required surgery to repair

http://tennis.fanhouse.com/2010/07/22/serena-williams-playing-a-dangerous-game-with-foot-injury/

Quick quiz: How did Serena Williams hurt her foot?

A) She stepped on broken glass in a restaurant.
B) She didn't. It's an act so she doesn't have to play mandatory
tournaments that don't interest her.
C) She got a little carried away in the celebration after winning
Wimbledon.
D) Some other reason, not related to anything we've heard.
E) Don't know.

I'm going with E, although I've believed all the other options at some point in the past 10 days, since Williams withdrew from the World TeamTennis season and three tournaments leading up to the U.S. Open. Williams' fans don't like it when there is suspicion about her, usually blaming racial motives or jealousy or something. But the reason for the suspicion this time is Williams herself.

This will be another divisive moment for her. Pick a side. There's your truth. Williams inflames the debate.

If you have believed her in the past, then you will see any doubts about this injury as just more hating. If you haven't believed, then this will be further proof of her insincerity. "She didn't step on glass," said Williams' agent and spokesperson, Jill Smoller. "So I don't know where that came from. Her foot was cut. There was a deep laceration. She had surgery Thursday in Los Angeles ... to repair a deep laceration on top of her foot."

Surgery to repair a cut? Does that mean stitches? A torn tendon? What?

"I'm not going to go into that," she said.

See? This is an act of faith. According to her agent, Williams did hurt the foot with broken glass in a restaurant in Germany, where she had gone with a few friends after winning Wimbledon. She just didn't step on the glass. Let's see then. Top of the foot, not bottom. Broken glass, but not stepped on. Restaurant. Surgery for some unknown reason.

Hmm. Maybe a waiter broke a glass and the shards fell onto her foot? Didn't anyone see this happen to the world's most famous female athlete? We're still left guessing. Smoller said it was "a freak accident" and that she could only go so far with the details, pointing out that Williams and her sister Venus don't talk about injuries. They don't want them to come off as excuses.


Fine, but that doesn't apply here. This isn't about making excuses for a loss. Williams is out. There must be a reason. And more importantly, fans who have paid for tickets to see her play deserve answers from her. More answers from the Williams camp: When will she be able to play? As soon as she's ready. When does the doctor think that will be? She's a quick healer.

Williams is reportedly "questionable" for the U.S. Open, whatever that means. Imagine if Drew Brees had pulled out of the Super Bowl citing an injury regarding glass and foot surgery for an undisclosed reason. But actually, this brings up question No. 2 in the quiz: Is Williams "questionable" for the U.S. Open?

A) Yes
B) No.
C) Don't know.

I'm going to go with C. In this fog, it's questionable whether she's questionable. This part of the story is not Williams' fault. When word of Williams' injury first came out, you had to be skeptical. Her record is terrible on following through on her word to play tournaments that aren't majors. The tour must know what she's up to, which led me to believe it was going along with the charade.

The Associated Press quoted a Women's Tennis Association spokesperson by name saying that Williams is questionable for the Open. I asked another WTA spokesperson about it, which led to a ping-pong match of e-mails.

"The word 'questionable' was used by AP, not the WTA. The WTA confirmed she is entered to play in the U.S. Open."
But the AP actually quotes a WTA official saying she's questionable. "Answered in the first response to your questions ..."
The AP says that the WTA says something, but the WTA says the AP is the one who said it. Was the WTA misquoted?
"We have answered your question from the initial email you sent ..." If Williams wants to play only in majors, the tour should just let her. That way she doesn't have to throw matches, as she was doing last year, or fake injuries to get out of lesser events.

In November, she gave her word to play the Fed Cup finals. Then, a few days later, during the tour championships, she said she was too tired. She won the tour championships, revived in time for the Australian Open, said her knees hurt, and skipped everything until a French Open warm-up tournament. Then came Wimbledon. Now, she got hurt, played anyway in an exhibition in Belgium, came back to the U.S., wore high heels for photographers in a red-carpet like event, and now is skipping everything until the U.S. Open. She has had her photo taken while shopping near Hollywood with crutches and one of those boots you wear after foot surgery. How hard is it to put on a boot for 10 minutes where you know paparazzi will be?

Well, I'm going with the idea that she does, in fact, have an injury of some sort that required surgery for whatever reason.

Just a hunch. Other players give details when they're out. You know, Williams was going to get at least $150,000 to play in
Istanbul, and could have won $350,000 in Montreal and $350,000 more in Cincinnati. She's also out $400,000 from a tour bonus pool. That's more than $1 million, at least. Is she suing that restaurant?

"At this point," Smoller said, "there are no plans."

Last quiz question: If Williams plays in the U.S. Open, what does that say?

A) She is courageous and made a quick recovery.
B) Her injuries have suspiciously great timing.
C) Both will have to serve as the full truth.

jefrilibra
Aug 11th, 2010, 02:12 PM
http://i0.simplest-image-hosting.net/168bf183b2abe8bc9188aacc163dd507/10.gif

http://i0.simplest-image-hosting.net/168bf183b2abe8bc9188aacc163dd507/-033.jpg

http://i0.simplest-image-hosting.net/168bf183b2abe8bc9188aacc163dd507/-034.jpg

nadlinds
Aug 15th, 2010, 09:30 PM
Style And The City

New York. One of the fashion capitals of the world, which in 14 days' time will host the final Grand Slam of the year.

In recent years, players have embraced the city's love of individual style and glamour, making their own fashion statements on the tennis court. Here's a look back on some of the most daring, glitzy and unique outfits.

Two-thousand-and-two was the year we were treated to Serena Williams' cat suit. Skin tight and jet black, the figure hugging outfit showed off her supremely athletic body, an asset she's proud of: "If you don't have a decent shape this isn't the best outfit to have," she told People magazine.

Two years later Williams strutted the rock chick look. Arriving for her first round match she looked fierce in knee length black leather boots, a denim mini-skirt, a studded black crop top and a black bandana.

Bethanie Mattek-Sands is fearless in pushing tennis fashion boundaries, having sported a number of eccentric outfits. In 2004 and 2007 she prowled around the court in matching leopard print hot pants, vest top and visor. Cowboy hats and knee high socks are other memorable accessories that have earned the American the title of the Lady Gaga of tennis.

Elegance is the word associated with Maria Sharapova's stylish tennis attire. She usually wears pretty dresses, often her own designs, which suit her tall, slim frame. In 2006 she won her second Grand Slam title at the US Open and throughout the tournament dazzled in an Audrey Hepburn inspired black dress. With beaded crystals on the front and a revealing slit on the back, she proved that little black dresses aren't just for cocktail parties.

What trends will be set this year in the city that never sleeps? Will Mattek-Sands go more Gaga, will Maria's new turquoise dress be a hit and will Serena be able to come up with an outfit that surpasses the cat suit? All will be revealed.

http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/OffCourtNews/Read/0,,12781~2122062,00.html

50Sense
Aug 15th, 2010, 09:47 PM
Every time I see this thread has a new post I get nervous as hell :lol:

doni1212
Aug 15th, 2010, 11:16 PM
Me too, :lol:
I'm kind of expecting it, :o

MrSerenaWilliams
Aug 15th, 2010, 11:18 PM
Seriously :sobbing: I'm a wreck

Miss Atomic Bomb
Aug 15th, 2010, 11:32 PM
Every time I see this thread has a new post I get nervous as hell :lol:

There will be a 100pg thread in GM before THAT News is even posted in this thread :p

But yea, every time I visit TF, I check GM for THAT news :sobbing:

edificio
Aug 18th, 2010, 03:24 AM
Those old foot injury articles really piss me off all over again. Some of those bloggers just stir up shit to get page views. Fuckers.

nadlinds
Aug 20th, 2010, 10:07 PM
Serena Williams Withdraws From US Open

LOS ANGELES, CA, USA - For the first time since the inception of computer rankings in 1975, the Sony Ericsson WTA Tour's No.1 player will miss the US Open, as Serena Williams has withdrawn with a right foot injury.

"It is with much frustration and deep sadness that I am having to pull out of the US Open. Due to the surgery I had on my foot earlier this month, my doctors have advised against my playing so that my foot can heal," Williams said in a statement on Friday afternoon. "I take great pride in playing the Grand Slam tournaments and have not missed one since 2006; not being able to be part of this year's US Open is one of the most devastating moments of my career. Playing in front of the electric crowd of New York at the US Open and competing against the best female athletes in the world is always a highlight, and I look forward to getting back on the court as quickly as possible."

Williams has 13 Grand Slam titles to her name, five Australian Opens (2003, 2005, 2007, 2009, 2010), one French Open (2002), four Wimbledons (2002, 2003, 2009, 2010) and three US Opens (1999, 2002, 2008).

http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/news/20100820/serena-williams-withdraws-from-us-open_2256076_2129711

nadlinds
Aug 20th, 2010, 10:09 PM
Forbes List Full Of Tour Stars

Tennis players again dominated the Forbes list of top-earning female athletes, with five Sony Ericsson WTA Tour stars landing in the Top 10 for the fiscal period from June 2009 through June 2010. All five of them have been the Tour's No.1-ranked woman at some point in their careers.

No.1 on the list was Maria Sharapova with $24.5 million in income, thanks in large part to an eight-year deal with Nike she signed earlier this year that could be worth as much as $70 million, and endorsements with Sony Ericsson and Tiffany, among others. She also was atop last year's list.

No.2 was Serena Williams with $20.2 million. In addition to becoming a minority owner of the Miami Dolphins with sister Venus last summer, she made a Tour record $6.5 million in prize money in 2009. She also has the Tour's record for career prize money, with Venus in second place. Speaking of Venus, she was No.3 on the Forbes list with $15.4 million. Her endorsements include Oreo, Powerade, Tide and Wilson.

No.7 on the list was Ana Ivanovic with $7.2 million. She signed a lifetime deal with adidas in February. No.8 was fellow Serb Jelena Jankovic with $5.3 million. She signed an apparel and shoe deal with China sportswear company Anta in 2009.

In compiling the list, Forbes took into account prize money, endorsements, appearance fees and exhibitions.

http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/OffCourtNews/Read/0,,12781~2129456,00.html

rucolo
Aug 21st, 2010, 05:08 PM
Serena Williams Withdraws From US Open

LOS ANGELES, CA, USA - For the first time since the inception of computer rankings in 1975, the Sony Ericsson WTA Tour's No.1 player will miss the US Open, as Serena Williams has withdrawn with a right foot injury.

"It is with much frustration and deep sadness that I am having to pull out of the US Open. Due to the surgery I had on my foot earlier this month, my doctors have advised against my playing so that my foot can heal," Williams said in a statement on Friday afternoon. "I take great pride in playing the Grand Slam tournaments and have not missed one since 2006; not being able to be part of this year's US Open is one of the most devastating moments of my career. Playing in front of the electric crowd of New York at the US Open and competing against the best female athletes in the world is always a highlight, and I look forward to getting back on the court as quickly as possible."

Williams has 13 Grand Slam titles to her name, five Australian Opens (2003, 2005, 2007, 2009, 2010), one French Open (2002), four Wimbledons (2002, 2003, 2009, 2010) and three US Opens (1999, 2002, 2008).

http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/news/20100820/serena-williams-withdraws-from-us-open_2256076_2129711

:bigcry:

oh well, at least she won 2 Grand Slams this year.:)

Speedy recovery, Serena!:hug:

jannishal
Aug 25th, 2010, 01:16 PM
Aug. 20 2010 - 5:30 pm | 1,755 views | 0 recommendations | 2 comments
Serena Williams Out Of The Open Is Bad News For CBS
By KURT BADENHAUSEN
Serena Williams of the US reacts after defeati...

Image by AFP/Getty Images via @daylife

Serena Williams, the top-ranked player in the world, withdrew from the U.S. Open today as she continues to recover from a cut to her foot last month. The three-time champion was a big favorite in the event before her foot injury. She was bounced last year in the semi-finals in spectacular fashion when she berated a line judge and was assessed a point penalty on match point.

Serena is the second highest-paid female athlete in the world, earning $20 million over the past year by our count. She had a huge year on the court in 2009 when she earned a record $6.5 million in prize money. She also has lucrative endorsement deals with the likes of Nike, Hewlett-Packard, Wilson, Kraft Foods and Gatorade. Her Nike deal is very Grand Slam heavy though according to industry sources, so it pays big when she wins Grand Slam events and not so much when she loses or doesn’t play.

The biggest loser from Williams’ withdrawal is likely to be CBS. The network began showing the women’s final in prime time in 2001 and it got lucky that year when Serena and Venus Williams reached the final and produced a massive rating (for tennis anyway) of 6.8. The Tiffany Network earned a 5.2 rating the following year when the sisters had a rematch and a respectable 3.3 in 2008 when Serena faced Jelena Jankovic in the Finals.

But ratings have been bleak when an American does not make the Finals. Ratings for finals not featuring a Williams sister (the only Americans to make the Finals since 2000) were 2.5, 2.2, 2.7, 2.4 and 2.1 between 2003 and 2007. They bottomed out last year at 1.1 for the match between Kim Clijsters and Caroline Wozniacki which aired on ESPN2 (part of the reason behind the low rating).

The U.S. tennis audience has repeatedly shown that it is mainly interested in watching matches that feature Americans. That is bad news for CBS as the odds are stacked against an American coming out on top in Queens this year with Venus Williams being the only American besides Serena ranked in the top 40 on the WTA Tour (things are not much better on the men’s side with no American ranked in the top 10). The women’s final is scheduled for 8 PM on Sept. 11 on CBS.

jefrilibra
Aug 25th, 2010, 01:21 PM
But ratings have been bleak when an American does not make the Finals. Ratings for finals not featuring a Williams sister (the only Americans to make the Finals since 2000) were 2.5, 2.2, 2.7, 2.4 and 2.1 between 2003 and 2007. They bottomed out last year at 1.1 for the match between Kim Clijsters and Caroline Wozniacki which aired on ESPN2 (part of the reason behind the low rating).

:lol:

jefrilibra
Aug 25th, 2010, 01:24 PM
http://www.hamptons-magazine.com/home-page/articles/love-all


http://s3.amazonaws.com/cmi-niche/assets/pictures/2012/content_cover1.jpg?1281982321 http://s3.amazonaws.com/cmi-niche/assets/pictures/2013/content_cover2.jpg?1281982469 http://s3.amazonaws.com/cmi-niche/assets/pictures/2014/content_cover3.jpg?1281982486

Love All

She is one of the most accomplished women’s tennis players of all time. But lately, Serena Williams has been focusing on several off-court pursuits.

BY JO PIAZZA

SERENA WILLIAMS HASN’T HAD A CHANCE to take a breather since her professional debut in 1995. Lately, it seems the tennis star is always busy doing something: winning tournaments, building schools in Kenya or guest-starring on television shows. So while the surgery on her right foot that had her spending most of the summer recovering was unfortunate, she admits it also gave her some much-needed time to relax.

“I can actually use the recovery time,” Williams says. “I’m so active trying to produce television shows now, writing and playing tennis—and on top of that, winning Grand Slams—that it’s good for me to just have some time off. At first I dreaded it, but I’m sleeping a lot, which is good, and I’m being babied.”

Confident that she’ll be fully recovered by the fall, Williams, 28, has used this respite to establish a time frame for all the things she wants to accomplish off the court. “A year from now, I see myself trying to compete and win Grand Slams, but maybe not playing such a full schedule so I can focus on the other things in my life, like doing more in show business,” she says.

Williams is already becoming an old hand in the entertainment business: She has guest-starred on ER and Law & Order and done voice-over work for several animated series. Last year she starred in a hilariously irreverent commercial for Tampax, in which she argues with Mother Nature about the “bad blood” between them. The spoof allowed Serena’s fans to finally see something she hadn’t been able to showcase on the tennis court—her sense of humor.

“Everyone who knows me knows I’m always the life of the party and the joker,” Williams says. “It was fun to do the Tampax ad because people got to see that side of me. When I’m on the court, people don’t get to see that I’m not one of the most serious people in the world.” (Her sense of humor about being the first active pro female athlete to appear in a feminine hygiene ad is completely spot-on: “Tampons, I love them. They’re the world’s best invention.”)

Williams isn’t afraid to turn her deep, throaty laugh around on herself, especially when she looks back at some of the more outrageous decisions she’s made outfit-wise both on and off the court. “I like to look back at everything and be like, ‘Damn, I wore that and I don’t regret it.’ I’m the first person to make fun of myself and say, ‘What I wore was hideous; what was I thinking?’ One day I can tell my kids, ‘Mom was a hot mess!’”

That said, her next project will be behind the camera. Williams, who was raised a Jehovah’s Witness, believes there’s a lack of morals and positivity on television these days—a hole she’s hoping to fill as a producer of several reality television programs with an affirmative bent. “I just want to promote some good things and stay positive,” says the three-time US Open champ.

That ideal extends into charity work as well, including a school-building project in Matooni, Kenya, a three-hour drive outside the capital, Nairobi. She has already built two schools in the impoverished area that has no running water and a desperate need for other basic services. She hopes to build another one within the next year. “It was the best thing I’ve ever done,” says Williams. “I always said winning all those Grand Slams was a dream, but when I opened my school in Kenya, that was the best feeling in the world because I was helping people who had almost nothing.”

Her most recent school contains special services for children who are hearing-impaired, a segment of the population that’s routinely ignored and abused in Africa. “We gave them computers donated by Hewlett-Packard, and one of the kids came up to me crying and said, ‘Now I can finally tell everyone what’s on my mind,’” Williams remembers.

The little boy, who has probably never watched a tennis match in his life, looked up to Williams the way millions of young girls around the world do—as a role model, a position she accepts with the utmost responsibility. “I feel like my job, more than anything, is to be a good Christian,” she says. “I’ve been known to make mistakes and because I do live in the public eye, it can be hard, but I’m living my life as best I can.”

doni1212
Aug 25th, 2010, 01:37 PM
Show business again?! :o
I understand not doing a full schedule but for SHOW BUSINESS?!!!

BlameSerena
Aug 26th, 2010, 12:39 AM
:lol:

:lol:

nadlinds
Aug 26th, 2010, 09:25 PM
How Power Has Transformed Women’s Tennis

ON THE DAY BEFORE Wimbledon started, when the club grounds had not yet opened to the public, Justine Henin, the diminutive Belgian tennis great, stepped onto practice court No. 3, then still an emerald patch of unspoiled grass. The sun had just come out after several cloudy days, and all around, players, their coaches and families, yammering in various languages, exchanged greetings like veteran bunkmates on the first day at summer camp. Not Henin. Having unretired last year as suddenly as she quit 16 months earlier — saying she had got all she wanted from the sport — she remained absorbed with her coach, Carlos Rodriguez, in their warm-up routine.

She began exchanging ground strokes, forehands and backhands, slowly then harder, with a hitting partner, one of the men that the top women hire to practice with, a tall, powerful young Briton, Scott Sears, who missed a few shots, apologized and began to sweat. Henin missed nothing, ever. Most eyes now turned toward her, drawn by the silence of the practice, which was interrupted only when Rodriguez, to whom Henin kept turning for assurance, issued a gentle “marche” every once in a while.

In Henin, the line between an expression of vulnerability and a devouring stare of slightly sour competitiveness can be fuzzy. Venus and Serena Williams, the game’s longtime dominant sisters, tend to look more abstracted, in a world closed onto themselves. Until they’re threatened. Then the array of weapons — the fist pumps, the drive to win, the sheer, overwhelming athleticism — emerge. Henin, “the sister of no mercy,” as she is called, is a more elegant player but no less unrelentingly obsessed with crushing her opponents.

Finished, she gathered up her belongings, leaving Sears in a pool of sweat, then walked off, head down so as not to catch anyone’s eye, trying to preserve, it seemed, like breath on glass, the focus she had on court. Even practicing, she made an argument for promoters who claim that women’s tennis has never been better off.

Women have certainly never hit harder and not just on account of improved equipment. They’re stronger, bigger, faster, better trained and pushed above all by the example of the Williams sisters. Serena, glorious and musclebound, and Venus, long-limbed and tall, have redefined the sport around power. Years ago, tennis writers used to call Martina Navratilova, listed at 5-foot-8 and lean, a giantess with popping veins because other women seemed weaklings by comparison. Now most tour players would dwarf her. In large part what makes Henin, at 5-foot-5, such an exception on the tour and such fun to watch is that she’s nearly always David against the rising tide of Goliaths.

“When I started, all the top players thought the Grand Slams began in the quarterfinals, because the early rounds were so easy and we only had to give 50 percent to get through them,” Kim Clijsters, Belgium’s other tennis superstar, told me when we sat down to talk one day at Wimbledon. “Now I have to be at least 85 to 90 percent at my best from the beginning of a tournament. Venus and Serena raised the bar for everyone. We all had to go back to the gym. Younger players saw that, and now they’re hitting harder and harder.”

This is a basic truth about the Williamses, held among professional watchers of the sport as well as players. Venus says it herself: “Serena and I did change the game, and it’s interesting to see people on court now trying to do all our moves. To be that person, the one who changed the game, wow, that’s too good to be true.”

Lately, it has been Serena, the top-ranked woman, who has dominated the field, but a foot injury forced her to withdraw from the United States Open, the last major tournament of the year. Pretenders have come and gone in recent years, capitalizing on the sisters’ irregular schedules, as well as on Henin’s absence, before succumbing to injury or nerves or simply retiring. When, for a while, both Henin and Clijsters, who quit in 2007 to have a baby, were gone, the game looked bereft of its only serious challengers.

Clijsters is now back, defending her United States Open title in New York beginning this week. That, so shortly after coming out of retirement, she could have won at all last year (Serena crashed out in their semifinal over a foot-fault call she profanely protested) signaled to some skeptics how thin on the ground are the women capable of actually winning majors. With Henin suffering a partial ligament fracture to her right elbow in a match against Clijsters at Wimbledon and now out of commission for the rest of the year, one of those few women is missing, again.

But back, too, from shoulder trouble, is Maria Sharapova, the Russian champion and tennis’s commercial gold mine, the quintessential baseline basher with razor-sharp ball-striking abilities. She won her last Grand Slam in 2008 and reached the final against Clijsters earlier this month in Cincinnati, where she injured her heel but looked as if she had nearly returned to form. At Wimbledon, after beating Anastasia Pivovarova, another towering Russian, 6-1, 6-0, in the first round, she could be seen marching back to the locker room, all business, cellphone clapped to one ear, her white satin bolero sparkling in the afternoon glare as the crowds, like filings drawn to a magnet, swiveled to watch her pass, whispering “Sharapova” in her wake as if she were an apparition.

At the same time, Caroline Wozniacki, a young Dane, has fought her way close to the top, joining Vera Zvonareva, Victoria Azarenka and veterans like Elena Dementieva, Svetlana Kuznetsova, Jelena Jankovic and Samantha Stosur. The feel-good match of the year, at the French Open in June, pitted Stosur, 26, against Francesca Schiavone, 29, a wry, extroverted Italian, both favorites on tour with all-around games, rarities among the women these days, and both sharing the unusual condition of not being one or the other of the Williams sisters in a Grand Slam final. Schiavone wept after winning. Even Stosur conceded the contest was special.

Yet the very exceptional quality of that match — its variety and unpredictability — served to reinforce skeptics’ views that women’s tennis, based on grinding power, is for better and worse all about the greatness and influence of the Williams sisters.

Which is to say that it’s not common these days to find women with their range: with the defensive skills to neutralize the big serves, or an accomplished net game or a good second serve. Many women’s matches get bogged down with baseline exchanges — a criticism that might be leveled at the men’s matches except that, as Federer put it after losing to Andy Murray in the final of the Rogers Cup in Toronto earlier this month, the men, in general, are more evenly matched. They “don’t have the margins like maybe exist in women’s tennis,” whereby players like the Williamses “can just come out and maybe dominate an opponent every single time,” Federer said. “That doesn’t happen in the men’s game.”

It doesn’t. More than that, off court as well as on, and here the criticism becomes more intangible, the two best male players of the era, Federer and Rafael Nadal, have made a point of praising competitors and showing how much they love the sport and how devoted to it they are. Playing against each other, they’ve also mustered some of the most brilliant matches in tennis history. Contests between Venus and Serena, though improved in recent years, were for a long time understandable but notorious duds, anticlimaxes to major championships in which fans didn’t know whom to root for. Venus has been the player representative for the tour behind the scenes, but the sisters can sometimes give the impression, publicly, that they really aren’t all that interested in the game. At Wimbledon, they sent reporters back to earlier interviews rather than answer questions they didn’t want to answer, talking about soccer, outfits, meeting the queen, anything but tennis. And after Serena snapped at that foot-fault call, even insiders who sympathized said the incident conjured up a time when John McEnroe and Jimmy Connors made the men’s game seem nasty. If you couldn’t blame her, she still made it hard to take her side.

Does that matter? “When Chrissie and Martina were winning 36 majors,” Billie Jean King, the tennis legend, talking pure performance, not personality, recalled of the Chris Evert versus Martina Navratilova rivalry of the late ’70s and early ’80s, “everyone was complaining about only two good players, no depth. Now, that was supposedly the golden age, and there’s no depth and only the Williams sisters today? Give me a break. My lord, what I would give to hit one ball like them.”

It’s true, there is more depth now, meaning more women beyond the top 10 or 20 or even top 100 who can smack a given forehand or backhand harder than King ever dreamed of doing, although consistency is another question. Ana Ivanovic, who looked to be the next Maria Sharapova after she won the French Open in 2008 and rose to No. 1, is beautiful, charming and talkative. She was called the future of tennis until she slumped, her serve and forehand betrayed by nerves. This month in Cincinnati, she lost in a semifinal to Clijsters, withdrawing in tears after hurting her foot. She wrestled in the first round at Wimbledon with her service toss against Shahar Peer, from Israel. Tennis is a game; but it can be heartbreaking to watch sometimes. One set down, scrambling to stay alive in the second, Ivanovic slammed her racquet in frustration. She kept making mistakes, defeating herself. Her talent escaped her. Afterward, snatching up her belongings, she hurried through the crowd toward the locker room, struggling not to break down in public.

It’s a sign of both the game’s depth and inconsistency that Schiavone and Stosur, like Ivanovic, also lost first-round matches at Wimbledon. Playing Vera Dushevina, another tough, tall Russian right-hander, then ranked No. 56, Schiavone grabbed the first set but soon fell behind in the second, beseeching her coach in the stands, loudly complaining about herself in Italian, urging Dushevina’s lobs to sail out, gesticulating like a taxi driver stuck in traffic and grunting on some shots as if a chicken had lodged in her throat. It was hugely entertaining but sloppy tennis. At one point, Schiavone hit a miraculous backhand winner and spread her arms like Goya’s defiant hero in “The Third of May.” The crowd roared.

But to no avail. Across the grounds, Stosur, exhausted after Paris, was falling in straight sets against Kaia Kanepi, a 5-foot-11 Estonian who had to qualify to get into the tournament. Wimbledon had barely started, and the tour’s latest stars had both bitten the dust.

“I THINK IT’S sort of cyclical,” said Bud Collins, the legendary tennis commentator, when I asked him about the ups and downs of the women’s tour over the years. But, he added, “when they talk about depth today, I snicker.”

Depth means more talent, more players who can knock the bejesus out of a ball. But there’s a difference between more good tennis players and more great ones. Stacey Allaster, chairwoman and chief executive of the Women’s Tennis Association, says that there are more great ones. One morning, she delivered the tour’s basic message. “Our underlying mission and values remain as strong as they were in 1973,” she said, “plus we have greater responsibility now in going to places like China and the Middle East, showing the world that women are strong and deserve to be treated equally.” Feminist missionary work aside, tour executives see global outreach as critical to the bottom line, especially as fewer top players are from the United States, traditionally the sport’s biggest market.

The top 100 women players now come from 33 countries, most of the best from Eastern Europe — countries like Russia, Serbia, Poland and the Czech Republic, nations hungry to nurture the sport. America’s problem, if there is one, may be a lack of urgency and the fierce competition from other sports. At Wimbledon, I found Nick Bollettieri, whose Florida academy has churned out droves of tour players over the years. He was watching an academy product, Michelle Larcher de Brito, a gifted Portuguese player with an ear-shattering grunt, giving Serena Williams a brief scare on Center Court, walloping backhands to the corners before Williams aced her way out of trouble.

“You hear all sorts of theories — it’s probably just a passing phase,” Bollettieri shrugged about the American situation, then finally decided for the theory that “the best American girls are not going into tennis.”

One positive result has been that tennis has developed a larger, increasingly global audience. Western media outlets took notice when Andy Murray reached the semifinals at Wimbledon and 10 million Britons tuned in on television. But when one of China’s top female players, Zheng Jie, played at Wimbledon last year, as Allaster pointed out to me, 100 million Chinese watched on CCTV.

So the tour is banking on China. For its part, China has only recently begun to bank on the tour. Li Na, who is 28 and her country’s leading player, with a perch now in the Top 10, in person conveys the polite world-weariness of someone who has grown up navigating a vast government bureaucracy. “My life has been like this,” she said, making a wave motion with one hand. “It is step by step in China.”

By this Li meant that only after she won a W.T.A. tournament, in 2004, the first Chinese woman to do so, did Chinese officials begin to take the sport seriously. “It had all been about Ping-Pong and diving. When I started, the Chinese tennis federation chose my coach and told me which tournaments I could play in, and nobody was really pushing me, so at one point I said, ‘Enough.’ But then I got back into it, and after the Olympics” — in Beijing in 2008, where she reached the semifinals, beating Venus Williams and Kuznetsova along the way — “I was finally given a choice: to stay with the federation and the national team and have everything paid for, or, like players from other countries, choose my own coach and tournaments.

“Change comes slowly there,” she said, “and developing top players in China will depend on Chinese players winning.” Of course winning depends on having already developed those players, the eternal paradox.

“I have no doubt that there will be a Chinese No. 1,” says David Shoemaker, president of the W.T.A., who oversees the association’s efforts in that country. “People say the Chinese don’t know how to develop players, that they’re too rigid, but they’re wrong,” he says. “Part of the beauty of the game is how unpredictable it has always been. What we’ve got today is in fact what everyone always said they wanted. There are eight different Grand Slam champions playing at Wimbledon, and a bunch more who have been No. 1.”

I found one of those players at Wimbledon, Jelena Jankovic, a former No. 1, now ranked third, from Serbia, a tough customer with a big smile and sunny profile. She was dressed in a pink warm-up suit, her jewelry jangling. “In the last couple of years, as women’s tennis has become more popular, some of the girls on tour have also been trying to look nicer, more feminine, and, face it, there are fans who like to look at girls in nice tennis dresses,” she told me. “It has become very competitive in this sense, but the level of tennis is very high. It all depends on how you want to develop your brand. Some players want to be known as great tennis players, others for something else. I smile a lot, I show my emotions, and maybe that’s what I’m known for.”

Then she confirmed what many people say about developing top players: “Coming from a poor country, I learned to work for my own sake to become somebody — to earn success through hard work.”

Success can mean millions in prize money and endorsements. When the women’s tour started in the early 1970s, the total annual prize money was $300,000. Today it’s $86 million, counting the Grand Slams, which (and this remains one of the most contested topics behind the scenes) pay men and women equally. Wimbledon and the French Open lagged behind until Venus Williams wrote an article for The Times of London a few years ago claiming she felt like a second-class citizen. Tournament officials got the message.

King, whose straight-set victory over Bobby Riggs in the so-called Battle of the Sexes in 1973 attracted some 50 million television viewers around the world and gave the tour its initial publicity boost, reflected the other day on how players back then “were activists, ours was totally a political movement, and today the tour is so much more important than most of the young players realize. They forget that a woman could not get a credit card on her own.”

King earned $1,800 for winning Wimbledon in the late 1960s, Navratilova, $18,000 in the ’70s. Now the winner takes home $1.6 million. In the tour’s early days, women had to barnstorm the globe to make a decent living, and the best players aimed to be ranked No. 1 when the season ended. Grand Slam trophies figured less in their calculations. Today stars construct their careers around the slams, picking and choosing among other tour events, which vie for their participation, creating a delicate and complicated ecosystem. The system demands a broad cast of supporting players, a bit like the expendable crew members on the old “Star Trek” series.

More of these supporting players struggle to make a living than the public probably imagines, considering all the money on tour. Shenay Perry, an American and a longtime player, now ranked No. 116, was laboring one afternoon at Wimbledon against Maria Kirilenko, a steady Russian with clean strokes, in a second-round match on Court 5, where the fans ebbed and flowed between games like rush-hour commuters. Julie Ditty, 30, a friend of Perry’s and fellow tour player who, with Renata Voracova, a Czech, had just lost in a first-round doubles match against the Williams sisters, watched from the bleachers, seated behind her father, Jack Ditty, a dermatologist from Kentucky. Powerfully built and a live wire, Jack volunteered that he played tennis in college and, like many tennis parents, he seemed at least as competitive and driven as the touring pros. “If you’re not in the top 100,” Jack told me, “you’re lucky to have any money at the end of any year.”

That’s because costs are high. At Grand Slams like Wimbledon and the U.S. Open, top players may pay to take along a coach, a trainer, a practice partner and an assistant. A single slam can set a star back between $30,000 and $50,000, according to Carlos Fleming, an agent for I.M.G., the management firm with the largest stable of tennis players. A year on tour, Fleming estimated, can require an outlay of hundreds of thousands or more in travel expenses. For journeywomen, flying economy and sharing trainers and coaches, a Grand Slam can still cost $10,000, and annual costs can run as high as $150,000. Unlike players on a professional baseball team, whose contracts basically guarantee their salaries, pros on the tennis circuit must earn that money back by winning. And when their skills decline, so do their nest eggs, if they ever had them. Players end up playing to please themselves; it’s a privilege, or a lark, to be on tour if you’re not highly ranked, but rarely a gold mine.

“Julie could have made more doing other things,” Jack Ditty said as Perry succumbed to Kirilenko, “but this is what she wanted, and you can’t ask more as a parent. We’ve helped Julie with expenses over the years. To see your daughter ace Venus and Serena back to back at Wimbledon, well, you can’t ask for more,” he added, referring to the high point in his daughter’s doubles loss. “I filmed it. Now Julie will always have done that. If I hadn’t been here,” he took the trouble to emphasize, “nobody would know.”

ALLASTER LIKES TO call touring pros “independent contractors,” because they work for themselves. And this has consequences aside from having to earn a living with each game. Since 2001, the Williams sisters have boycotted the tournament at Indian Wells, in California, one of the tour’s biggest events. Venus withdrew from the semifinals that year, and Serena was roundly booed afterward. Richard Williams, their father, claimed that he heard racist slurs. Despite being cajoled, fined, penalized and begged, they haven’t returned. They’re young, rich, profoundly gifted African-American women who operate as they wish, in a tennis world that’s still overwhelmingly white, conformist and reluctant to acknowledge that race is even an issue. The Indian Wells boycott, a matter of principle or a show of power or both, underscores the tour’s impotence. “The business is ultimately not sustainable on the backs of two players,” Allaster acknowledged at one point, finessing what Bud Collins later put more bluntly. The W.T.A., he said, is dependent on the Williams sisters even as it’s hopeful that new champions will come along to supplant them.

So where are they? The top-ranked women today are, conspicuously, not getting any younger. Serena is about to turn 29; Venus is 30. The women’s tour used to turn out a steady stream of teen idols. But new strength training and equipment have made it harder for teenagers to compete against grown women, and the tour is now wary of encouraging them to try. In 1979, Tracy Austin won the U.S. Open at age 16, reached No. 1 the next year, but fell out of the Top 10 by 22. A shoulder injury in 1985 did in Andrea Jaeger, who reached No. 2, also while a teenager. During the late ’90s, Martina Hingis won five Grand Slams in her teens, then retired in 2003 at 22, returning to the tour three years later only to be expelled after testing positive for cocaine. And this summer, Jennifer Capriati, who reached the Top 10 at 14, in 1990, landed in a Florida hospital after an overdose of prescription drugs.

While there are young talents on tour, like Wozniacki and Melanie Oudin, the 18-year-old American right-hander, ranked No. 44, they’re few. The casualty list prompted W.T.A. officials some years ago (the Williams sisters, who began playing as teenagers in the mid-1990s, were already around) to impose restrictions on whether and how much teenagers could play. “I will listen to doctors more than to agents,” is how Allaster puts it. Most insiders endorse the policy.

Others, like Mary Joe Fernandez, a retired American player, now a television commentator, contend that by protecting the many, the tour may be holding back that rare precocious player — the next rival to the Williams sisters, perhaps — who, like Hingis and Capriati, may happen to peak as a teenager. “I understand the age rule, but I turned pro at 14 — I missed my prom and graduation because I played the French Open — and while not everybody is ready then, some are,” Fernandez says. “At the same time I don’t entirely buy the argument about power, since the same thing was said years ago, whether it was that Navratilova hit harder than anyone, or Monica Seles or Capriati or now Serena. The game needs young stars. And it may be that some women develop younger.”

This view is seconded by Tom Perrotta, editor at large at Tennis magazine. “Why does it matter if you start your career at 16 and end it at 25?” he asked. “Skeptics on the development side of the game will tell you that the women’s tour has become more monotonous, that there’s a missing generation. Some blame parents, some blame the academies turning out robot players, some the age rule. Maybe it’s just that the Williams sisters have set the bar too high or that all the money spoils players’ appetites for getting to the very top. I don’t know. But I do know that while you have a bigger pool of good players from more countries, having many more good players doesn’t substitute for having a few more icons.”

During Wimbledon’s last weekend, Yulia Putintseva, a short, pony-tailed blond teenager from Russia, played Kristyna Pliskova, a tall, blonder teenager from the Czech Republic, also pony-tailed, in the semifinals of the girls’ championship, where future Henins, Clijsterses and Williamses are supposed to emerge. Putintseva was the sort of player who threw herself into every serve, coiling, pouncing, grunting, too often double-faulting, avoiding the net as if it were the precipice of a cliff, bashing her racquet on the court in disgust.

Pliskova, a lanky, slightly gawky lefty, ambled and loped around the court, smacking heavy first serves and angled backhands. Rallies often dragged on from the baseline until someone committed an error, mostly Putintseva. Pliskova went up 4-0 in the first set. From the bleachers, Jan Bedan, Pliskova’s coach, kept one eye on the game, the other on his mobile telephone, typing in her statistics.

“She looks good,” I said to him.

“Easy first set, then complications,” Bedan replied.

“Always?” I asked.

“Always,” he said, still typing.

I left for a press conference and returned to find Pliskova up a set and, after a few serves, up 5-3 in the second set, on the verge of victory. Bedan remained absorbed in his telephone.

“It’s not like 20 years ago,” he offered, without looking up. “Everything is so fast now, you can’t play serve and volley. It’s impossible. Not even Federer can do it. It’s necessary to play from the baseline. Everyone is working harder, the competition is stronger, with more girls on the same level. So this is just where the game is.”

Contrary to his prediction, Pliskova won easily.

I tried Bedan’s explanation for the state of the women’s game on Geoff Macdonald, who coaches women’s tennis at Vanderbilt University. “The challenge is that an all-around game — learning not just to hit aggressive ground strokes but to serve and volley and have the whole package — takes longer to develop, and lots of people on tour calculate that it doesn’t pay to spend an extra three or four years grooming a player when she is already winning and maybe already being marketed by the tour.” But he added, “I’m sure someone will come along, the way Federer did on the men’s side, who’s faster, plays an all-around game, who knows how to play defensively and not just rip at every ball.”

Maybe she’s out there now, some 10-year-old girl preparing to raise the women’s game another notch and prove the skeptics wrong. Meanwhile there’s Serena to carry the sport on her broad shoulders. Only Zvonareva stood between her and the Wimbledon title everyone had expected her to win from the beginning. Heavy ground strokes nipping the lines kept the Russian in the fight for a while. At 3-3 in the first set, the crowd cheering, it looked as if it might be a contest. Then Williams found another gear, moving inside the baseline to receive even Zvonareva’s first serves, pushing the Russian onto her heels, wearing her down. Zvonareva played well. But she was totally outgunned.

“Come back!” one fan called out.

“All is forgiven,” joked another. Then someone yelled, “Come on, Serena,” and Bud Collins, in the seat next to mine, shook his head.

“Sadist,” he said.

At the end, Williams never even faced a break point. Zvonareva thanked her surgeon during the postmatch ceremony. Williams teased King, watching from the stands, because with the victory she passed King’s total of 12 Grand Slam singles titles.

People worrying about the game today will probably be the same ones, years from now, who boast about having seen Serena in her prime, along with Henin and Venus and Sharapova and Clijsters.

There’s nothing like it, they’ll say. Those were the days.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/29/magazine/29Tennis-t.html?_r=1

Miss Atomic Bomb
Aug 26th, 2010, 09:27 PM
Henin 'sister of no mercy' ? my ass.

nadlinds
Aug 30th, 2010, 03:11 PM
Serena planning another Kenyan school

Tennis ace Serena Williams is stepping up her charitable efforts in Kenya - she is planning to build a third school for underprivileged children.

The 28 year old tennis champion became involved in a school-building mission in Matooni, a three-hour drive from the capital of Nairobi, after she rose to fame - and now she calls the project "the best thing" she's ever done.

She has already built two schools in the area - where civilians don't have access to running water - and Williams has vowed to build another learning establishment by next year.

She tells America's Hamptons magazine, "It was the best thing I've ever done. I always said winning all those Grand Slams was a dream, but when I opened my school in Kenya, that was the best feeling in the world because I was helping people who had almost nothing."

http://www.torontosun.com/sports/othersports/2010/08/29/15180561.html

Tech1
Aug 30th, 2010, 07:04 PM
http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/tennis/news/story?id=5512443

Updated: August 30, 2010, 2:52 PM ET

Source: Serena Williams return delayed

ESPN.com news services

Women's world No. 1 Serena Williams (http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/tennis/players/profile?playerId=394) is unlikely to make her return to tennis at the WTA Pan Pacific Open in Tokyo, a source with knowledge of the situation tells ESPN.

Williams, who's not playing in the U.S. Open due to a cut on her right foot that required surgery, has had a protective boot removed. She has said she was targeting the Pan Pacific Open, which begins Sept. 26, for her return to action.

Williams hasn't played competitively since winning Wimbledon. She was reportedly hurt by a broken glass at a restaurant while she was in Munich in July. She had surgery on July 15.

Williams said doctors advised her not to play the U.S. Open so that her foot can heal, and she called missing the tournament "one of the most devastating moments of my career." The top-ranked Williams has won three titles at Flushing Meadows, part of her 13 Grand Slam singles championships.

Information from The Associated Press was used in this report.

doni1212
Aug 30th, 2010, 07:05 PM
FUCK!!!!! I do NOT want that Pusher as Number 1!!! :fiery:

Gdsimmons
Aug 30th, 2010, 07:12 PM
DAmnit!! Sigh well whats the next event, Beijing??

doni1212
Aug 30th, 2010, 07:19 PM
I'm hopeful for Beijing b/c that's where Venus said she MIGHT play doubles with Serena again (if not there, then Australia).

Tech1
Aug 31st, 2010, 01:29 PM
Clijsters: I saw Serena's foot injury

NEW YORK (AP) -- Kim Clijsters said she saw Serena Williams' foot lacerations and "it's not something that she's making up or that it's a small cut or anything."

Williams, the world's top-ranked player, withdrew from the U.S. Open after surgery on her right foot. The WTA Tour has said she cut it on broken glass at a restaurant. Williams hasn't had much to say other than releasing a few statements, leading to plenty of speculation.

After she was hurt, Williams played in an exhibition match against Clijsters that drew a tennis-record crowd of 35,681 in Brussels on July 8.

Clijsters said Monday that Williams actually had cuts on both feet, but she doesn't recall whether they were on the top or bottom.

It was against Clijsters in last year's Open semifinals that Williams went on a tirade against a line judge over a foot-fault call. That led to Williams losing the match and receiving a record fine.

Williams isn't back this year, but Clijsters is, defending a Grand Slam title for the first time. She won the U.S. Open in 2005 but missed the tournament the next year because of a wrist injury.

In her first match as the reigning champion Monday, the second-seeded Belgian beat Hungary's Greta Arn 6-0, 7-5.

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2010/tennis/08/30/clijsters.serena.ap/index.html?eref=si_tennis&utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+rss%2Fsi_tennis+%28SI.com+-+Tennis%29

Bijoux0021
Sep 2nd, 2010, 11:36 AM
http://www.usatoday.com/sports/columnist/brennan/2010-09-01-serena-williams-reveals_N.htm

For first time, Serena Williams reveals details of her foot injury

By Christine Brennan, USA TODAY

NEW YORK — In her first public comments about the mysterious injury and surgery that forced her to miss this year's U.S. Open, Serena Williams told USA TODAY on Wednesday evening that she had surgery to repair a lacerated tendon on the top of her right foot July 15 at the Kerlan-Jobe Orthopaedic Clinic in Los Angeles a week after receiving 12 stitches in one foot and six in another when she was cut by glass at a restaurant in Munich.
The torn tendon, known as the extensor hallucis longus, was causing her right big toe to "droop," Williams said in an exclusive telephone interview from Los Angeles, where she is receiving physical therapy and resuming training.

"I came back to the United States from Germany and knew something was not right," Williams said. "My big toe was drooping, and I thought, 'My toe shouldn't be hanging like this.' I saw a specialist in New York and had an MRI, and he said I had a tendon that was torn. He said I didn't necessarily have to fix it, but I'd have a droopy toe the rest of my life. I thought it over and decided it was better to have the surgical procedure, for my career and for my life."

Williams, 28, the world's top-ranked women's tennis player, said she does not know exactly how she was injured the evening of July 7 in Munich.

"We were walking out of the restaurant and, all of a sudden, I felt pain," she said. "The pain felt like kind of a stubbed foot, like 'Ow,' and I thought, 'Wow, I stubbed my foot.' Then in 20 seconds, or a minute, I started walking again. And it hurt some more. So we looked down and there was glass all over the floor. I was standing, recovering, thinking I got a little cut and telling my nephew, who was with us, to be careful. Then my practice partner put a cellphone down to the floor so we could see, and there was a huge puddle of blood. I said, 'OMG, I don't think this is good.' "

They went to an emergency room in Munich where Williams said she had X-rays and received 18 stitches: six inside the cut on her right foot and six on top of that foot, and six stitches on the bottom of her left foot. "That one really hurt," she said, "it was right in the arch area. I don't know how it happened. Honestly, I think someone may have dropped something, which is how I got cut on both feet.

"I was planning to wear really high boots that night, and instead wore sandals. I'm trying to figure it all out, but what happened was a one-in-a-trillion chance, and unfortunately, I was the one in a trillion."

Still, Williams traveled to Brussels to play an exhibition with Kim Clijsters the next day. "I had a lot of pain in Belgium and was getting nervous because that was when I noticed my toe was drooping," Williams said. "I got a shot and then played, and at the time, my left foot hurt way more, but I thought the pain and swelling would go away and that I'd probably be all right in a week."

Then she returned to the USA, and things did not get better, she said. After seeing the specialist in New York, she flew to Los Angeles to host a housewarming party at her new home July 12. She was photographed at the party wearing high heels with a small bandage on her right foot.

Asked how she could fit her swollen, painful feet into high heels three days before surgery, Williams said, "I was bummed about wearing the Band-Aid at my party, you know me, but there were six stitches under there, so I didn't want those to show. I love heels, I'm a sucker for heels, so if I have to get the (surgical) procedure anyway, at that point, the doctor told me I needed to do it, so I took the pictures with those shoes, then wore flats the rest of the night. I couldn't have worn heels the whole night."

That photo has led some members of the news media to wonder about the veracity of Williams' story. If this bothers Williams, she didn't let on.

"Honestly, I don't read the press," she said. "I don't know what they're saying. I just look at the pictures, the photo shoots. I heard just recently that there had been doubt, but at the end of the day, I have to answer to me. It's unfortunate I had to have surgery, but I'm not lying or denying, because it is what it is."

Williams said Kenneth Jung performed the surgery on her right foot at Kerlan-Jobe. She then wore a walking boot for several weeks. "I'm out of it now," she said. "I hated that boot. I plan to use it for target practice for my serves."

She said she plans to come to the Open on Friday to watch her sister Venus play. "It will be hard to be there watching and not playing," she said, "but this whole experience will make me stronger. I plan to come back better than ever."

JN
Sep 2nd, 2010, 01:15 PM
^^ A good read.

nadlinds
Sep 13th, 2010, 10:08 PM
Serena Williams back practicing after foot surgery

NEW YORK — Serena Williams is back practicing after foot surgery that kept her out of the U.S. Open.

The world's top-ranked women's player told The Associated Press on Monday that she hasn't decided when she'll return to competition, but she still plans to play for the United States in the Fed Cup final against Italy in November.

Williams cut her right foot on broken glass at a restaurant after winning Wimbledon.

She says she doesn't need to do anything special to protect the foot other than a little extra tape.

Williams attended a news conference Monday to announce the launch of a charitable foundation connected to Mission Skincare, a line of sunscreens and other products for athletes that she and a group of fellow sports stars founded.

http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5jj5jNUAtiFUvb3Gk0mt2g09_Yy5AD9I79M880

Miss Atomic Bomb
Sep 13th, 2010, 10:41 PM
:yeah:

Gdsimmons
Sep 13th, 2010, 11:07 PM
Time to get it in!!

shoryuken
Sep 14th, 2010, 04:40 PM
Good news!

nadlinds
Sep 15th, 2010, 10:04 PM
Serena Williams Walks the Runway

I have been spending a lot of time with Serena Williams these days, looking quite wonderful. At the U.S. Open, she wore a fabulous red dress from her collection Serena Williams Signature Statement to watch her sister Venus play in the quarterfinals. At the FNO Fashion Show at Lincoln Center, she showed up in an elegant ivory John Galliano dress with towering Christian Louboutins. On Fashion’s Night Out last Friday, we crawled through the throngs of people outside Prada on Fifth Avenue. Williams, wearing the house’s brown-plaid silk and radzimir dress—the Prada dress of the season—and Judy-Garland-ruby-red YSL platforms, had never been to the store and was amazed at the circular glass elevator. The Tennis Channel showed up to film us, and between takes, Williams tried on a black recycled-goatskin coat, picked up a great red bag for her agent, Jill Smoller, and ordered another plaid dress, this one also brown with white ruffles.

Over the weekend, while covering the chiffon trenches, I had a divine-inspiration moment: Serena should walk in LaQuan Smith’s show! I vetted the idea with the designer, whose first diffusion line last season was inspired by the Williams sisters’ style on the courts. “I love Serena,” he said, “and I love her body.” So, she makes her Fashion Week runway debut tomorrow at LaQuan’s show, at the Peninsula Hotel at 1 p.m.

http://www.vogue.com/vogue-daily/article/serena-williams-walks-the-runway/

Tech1
Sep 17th, 2010, 05:07 PM
Williams Sisters Fed Cup Commitment Under Scrutiny

Published by Paula Vergara on Sep 16, 2010

Venus and Serena Williams have committed to represent the U.S. in the Fed Cup final vs. Italy in November. Will they show up and play? How does this impact their eligibility to compete in the Olympics in 2012? OTB’s Paula Vergara takes a closer look.


The U.S.A. will play host to Italy in the Fed Cup final at the San Diego Sports Arena on November 6-7. This marks the first Fed Cup final played in the U.S. in 10 years, and the second consecutive year that the U.S. has faced Italy in the Fed Cup final.

They’ll be looking to avenge their 4-0 loss to Italy in last year’s final with a home court advantage, and playing on hard courts. The U.S. currently holds a 9-1 leads over Italy in their head-to-head race. Liezel Huber (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/player/liezel-huber_2257889_3447), Melanie Oudin (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/player/melanie-oudin_2257889_13174), Bethanie Mattek-Sands (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/player/bethanie-mattek-sands_2257889_5667) will once again be part of the U.S. Fed Cup lineup for the final, and they will be joined by Venus (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/player/venus-williams_2257889_9027) and Serena Williams (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/player/serena-williams_2257889_9044).

Mary Joe Fernandez, who took over as U.S. Fed Cup captain in 2009 and has been granted a two-year extension by the USTA, is hoping to lead the U.S. to its first Fed Cup title since 2000.

Both Venus and Serena have said they’ve committed to play in the Fed Cup final in San Diego, but there is legitimate reason for doubt, given their history of backing out of Fed Cup ties at the last minute, as well as their apparent lack of interest. This year is different. The Olympics are now in clear view.

Venus elaborated on her commitment to playing in the Fed Cup final after her semifinal loss to Kim Clijsters at the U.S. Open. She insists that this year is different from her 2009 wait-and-see-commitment to playing in the Fed Cup final, and then backing out at the last minute due to injury. “Last year, I didn’t commit. I couldn’t go. This year is different. I’ve already said I’d be there,” said Venus. It is worth noting that Venus and Serena Williams have not made themselves available to play Fed Cup since 2007.

When it comes to competing in the Summer Olympics, eligibility hinges on a Fed Cup commitment. According to Olympic rules, a player must make herself available for Fed Cup play twice during a four year Olympic cycle to be eligible to play in the Olympics. For the 2012 summer Olympics, that cycle is 2009, 2010, 2011, and 2012. One of those availabilities must take place the year before or the year of the Olympics (2011 or 2012).

Upon closer examination, the rules for qualifying for the 2012 Olympics with a Fed Cup commitment are not without caveats.

Caveat #1: If Venus or Serena are on the Fed Cup team roster and are not chosen by Mary Joe Fernandez to play either singles or doubles in the final, that counts as having fulfilled their commitment to play Fed Cup for that year.

Caveat #2: If Venus or Serena are injured just prior to the Fed Cup final after they have committed to play, they would have to be physically present at the location where the tie is taking place in order to fulfill their commitment to play Fed Cup for that year.

What does this mean for the Williams sisters? If either of them follow through on their commitment to play in this year’s Fed Cup final in San Diego, they will need to play again in 2011 and 2012 if they want to remain eligible for the 2012 Summer Olympics, held in London. According to Tim Curry, spokesperson for the USTA, if the U.S. team makes the Fed Cup final in 2012, that tie won’t take place until after the Olympics. That could pose a potential problem for the Williams sisters.

Will either of them show up and play in November? We’ll just have to wait and see.

Paula Vergara is a freelance tennis journalist, covering the WTA and ATP tours. Paula’s publishing credits include On the Baseline Tennis News, Tennis.com, USTA New England Magazine, and Bob Larson’s Tennis News. Paula is also a member of the United States Tennis Writers’ Association. To view her work, visit www.paula-vergara.blogspot.com (http://www.paula-vergara.blogspot.com).

http://www.onthebaseline.com/2010/09/16/williams-sisters-fed-cup-commitment-under-scrutiny/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+OnTheBaseline+%28On+the+Basel ine%29

nadlinds
Sep 17th, 2010, 10:24 PM
Double Duty In Doha

DOHA, Qatar - It is hard enough to qualify for and be successful in the WTA Championships singles event, but to do so in doubles in the same year is a noteworthy feat. The wear and tear of the Tour season does not allow many of the top singles players to plays doubles very often, much less thrive in it. Nevertheless, there is a good chance both Williams sisters will qualify for both this year in Doha, just as they did last year. If so, they will be seeking to become the third players to win both events in the same year (Martina Navratilova did it five times and Martina Hingis once). So, how have those who competed in both events in the last 10 years fared?

Player Year Singles Result Doubles Result Partner
Julie Halard-Decugis 2000 R16 QF Ai Sugiyama
Martina Hingis 2000 Won Won Anna Kournikova
Anna Kournikova 2000 SF Won Martina Hingis
Nathalie Tauziat 2000 QF QF Alexandra Fusai
Amanda Coetzer 2001 R16 QF Lori McNeil
Nathalie Tauziat 2001 R16 SF Kimberly Po-Messerli
Sandrine Testud 2001 SF QF Roberta Vinci
Elena Dementieva 2002 R16 Won Janette Husarova
Kim Clijsters 2003 Won R-Up Ai Sugiyama
Ai Sugiyama 2003 Round Robin R-Up Kim Clijsters
Svetlana Kuznetsova 2004 Round Robin SF Elena Likhovtseva
Serena Williams 2009 Won SF Venus Williams
Venus Williams 2009 R-Up SF Serena Williams

http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/doublesnews/20100917/double-duty-in-doha_2256567_2157569

edificio
Sep 17th, 2010, 11:11 PM
Williams Sisters Fed Cup Commitment Under Scrutiny

Published by Paula Vergara on Sep 16, 2010

Venus and Serena Williams have committed to represent the U.S. in the Fed Cup final vs. Italy in November. Will they show up and play? How does this impact their eligibility to compete in the Olympics in 2012? OTB’s Paula Vergara takes a closer look.


The U.S.A. will play host to Italy in the Fed Cup final at the San Diego Sports Arena on November 6-7. This marks the first Fed Cup final played in the U.S. in 10 years, and the second consecutive year that the U.S. has faced Italy in the Fed Cup final.

They’ll be looking to avenge their 4-0 loss to Italy in last year’s final with a home court advantage, and playing on hard courts. The U.S. currently holds a 9-1 leads over Italy in their head-to-head race. Liezel Huber (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/player/liezel-huber_2257889_3447), Melanie Oudin (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/player/melanie-oudin_2257889_13174), Bethanie Mattek-Sands (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/player/bethanie-mattek-sands_2257889_5667) will once again be part of the U.S. Fed Cup lineup for the final, and they will be joined by Venus (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/player/venus-williams_2257889_9027) and Serena Williams (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/player/serena-williams_2257889_9044).

Mary Joe Fernandez, who took over as U.S. Fed Cup captain in 2009 and has been granted a two-year extension by the USTA, is hoping to lead the U.S. to its first Fed Cup title since 2000.

Both Venus and Serena have said they’ve committed to play in the Fed Cup final in San Diego, but there is legitimate reason for doubt, given their history of backing out of Fed Cup ties at the last minute, as well as their apparent lack of interest. This year is different. The Olympics are now in clear view.

Venus elaborated on her commitment to playing in the Fed Cup final after her semifinal loss to Kim Clijsters at the U.S. Open. She insists that this year is different from her 2009 wait-and-see-commitment to playing in the Fed Cup final, and then backing out at the last minute due to injury. “Last year, I didn’t commit. I couldn’t go. This year is different. I’ve already said I’d be there,” said Venus. It is worth noting that Venus and Serena Williams have not made themselves available to play Fed Cup since 2007.

When it comes to competing in the Summer Olympics, eligibility hinges on a Fed Cup commitment. According to Olympic rules, a player must make herself available for Fed Cup play twice during a four year Olympic cycle to be eligible to play in the Olympics. For the 2012 summer Olympics, that cycle is 2009, 2010, 2011, and 2012. One of those availabilities must take place the year before or the year of the Olympics (2011 or 2012).

Upon closer examination, the rules for qualifying for the 2012 Olympics with a Fed Cup commitment are not without caveats.

Caveat #1: If Venus or Serena are on the Fed Cup team roster and are not chosen by Mary Joe Fernandez to play either singles or doubles in the final, that counts as having fulfilled their commitment to play Fed Cup for that year.

Caveat #2: If Venus or Serena are injured just prior to the Fed Cup final after they have committed to play, they would have to be physically present at the location where the tie is taking place in order to fulfill their commitment to play Fed Cup for that year.

What does this mean for the Williams sisters? If either of them follow through on their commitment to play in this year’s Fed Cup final in San Diego, they will need to play again in 2011 and 2012 if they want to remain eligible for the 2012 Summer Olympics, held in London. According to Tim Curry, spokesperson for the USTA, if the U.S. team makes the Fed Cup final in 2012, that tie won’t take place until after the Olympics. That could pose a potential problem for the Williams sisters.

Will either of them show up and play in November? We’ll just have to wait and see.

Paula Vergara is a freelance tennis journalist, covering the WTA and ATP tours. Paula’s publishing credits include On the Baseline Tennis News, Tennis.com, USTA New England Magazine, and Bob Larson’s Tennis News. Paula is also a member of the United States Tennis Writers’ Association. To view her work, visit www.paula-vergara.blogspot.com (http://www.paula-vergara.blogspot.com).

http://www.onthebaseline.com/2010/09/16/williams-sisters-fed-cup-commitment-under-scrutiny/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+OnTheBaseline+%28On+the+Basel ine%29

Stirring up shit kind of article. No surprise that it comes from a blogger.

sakya23
Sep 18th, 2010, 04:05 AM
is she in tokyo???

nadlinds
Sep 23rd, 2010, 07:47 PM
Injured Serena Williams pulls out of Pan Pacific Open

World number one Serena Williams has pulled out of next week's Pan Pacific Open in Tokyo as she continues her recovery from a foot injury.

The 28-year-old American has not played since her victory at Wimbledon after cutting her right foot on broken glass in a restaurant.

Williams described withdrawing from the US Open last month as "one of the most devastating moments of my career".

Tokyo will be the fifth tournament she has missed because of the injury.

Wimbledon runner-up Vera Zvonareva, French Open champion Francesca Schiavone, world number two Caroline Wozniacki and defending champion Maria Sharapova are among those scheduled to play in Tokyo.

Williams, who was in London this week to attend for a fashion show, underwent surgery in Los Angeles on 15 July.

Victories in this year's Australian Open and Wimbledon took her career record to 13 Grand Slam titles.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/tennis/9025807.stm

MrSerenaWilliams
Sep 23rd, 2010, 08:04 PM
SURPRISE SURPRISE :rolleyes:

nadlinds
Sep 25th, 2010, 06:49 PM
Injured Serena Williams pulls out of China Open

World number one Serena Williams has pulled out of October's China Open because she is still not fully recovered from a foot injury.

The 28-year-old American has not played since cutting her right foot on broken glass in a restaurant in July.

On Thursday, she withdrew from next week's Pan Pacific Open in Tokyo and has now decided not to play in Beijing.

"While I have continued to make progress in my recovery...I am still not ready to compete," she said.

"These are both fantastic events, with loyal fans, that I hope to be able to compete in next season.

"In the meantime, I am focused on my rehab programme and remain optimistic to return to competition this season."

Williams, who was in London this week to attend a fashion show, suffered the injury shortly after winning her fourth Wimbledon title and underwent surgery in Los Angeles on 15 July.

The two Far East tournaments are the fifth and sixth she has missed since then, a list which also includes the US Open.

She described having to miss the 2010 season's final Grand Slam event at Flushing Meadows as "one of the most devastating moments of my career".

Victories in this year's Australian Open and Wimbledon took her career record to 13 Grand Slam titles.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/tennis/9025807.stm