PDA

View Full Version : Anne Keothavong: "Is Agassi's story really that surprising?"


Noctis
Oct 29th, 2009, 10:15 PM
:tape::haha:

Anne becareful what you say on twitter.
its on some famous news site:kiss:

hdfb
Oct 29th, 2009, 10:16 PM
:lol: Good one!

RenaSlam.
Oct 29th, 2009, 10:24 PM
Agassi's story > your life, Anne.

auntie janie
Oct 29th, 2009, 10:26 PM
She probably got suspicious when Andre came in and eagerly offered to scrub and wax the floors, walls, benches, lockers, and ceiling of the women's lockerroom. ;)

goldenlox
Oct 29th, 2009, 10:56 PM
Cocaine was supposed to be big on the ATP tour when he was coming up.

There has been plenty of drug use by tennis players that's been swept under the rug.
Where is Agassi's rug nowadays? Is Trump wearing it?

Lulu.
Oct 29th, 2009, 11:05 PM
She probably got suspicious when Andre came in and eagerly offered to scrub and wax the floors, walls, benches, lockers, and ceiling of the women's lockerroom. ;)

:lol:

Golovinjured.
Oct 29th, 2009, 11:10 PM
Agassi's story > your life, Anne.

:spit:

BlameSerena
Oct 29th, 2009, 11:13 PM
Martina N. is shocked and I was, too, to be honest.

Article (http://www.tennis.com/news/news.aspx?id=190366)
________________


Navratilova shocked; compares Agassi to Clemens

MIAMI (AP)—Martina Navratilova drew a parallel Thursday between Andre Agassi and Roger Clemens, saying she’s shocked the eight-time Grand Slam champion lied about drug use.

Agassi’s upcoming autobiography contains an admission he used crystal meth in 1997 and failed a drug test - a result he says was thrown out after he lied by saying he “unwittingly” took the substance.

“Shocking,” Navratilova said Thursday from Sarasota, Fla., in a phone interview. “Not as much shock that he did it as shock he lied about it and didn’t own up to it. He’s up there with Roger Clemens, as far as I’m concerned. He owned up to it (in the book), but it doesn’t help now.”

Clemens, a seven-time Cy Young Award winner, repeatedly has denied using performance-enchancing drugs. His former personal trainer, Brian McNamee, claimed in the Mitchell Report that he injected Clemens with steroids and human growth hormone at least 16 times in 1998, 2000 and 2001.

According to an excerpt of Agassi’s autobiography “Open” published Wednesday in The Times of London, he blamed the positive drug test on accidentally drinking a soda spiked with meth. Agassi wrote that the ATP accepted his explanation and threw out the case.

“Andre lied and got away with it,” Navratilova said. “You can’t correct that now. Do you take away a title he wouldn’t have won if he had been suspended? He beat some people when he should have been suspended.”

Navratilova won a record 167 singles titles, including 18 in Grand Slam tournaments. She retired from singles in 1994 and played her last doubles match in 2006.

She said she found Agassi’s decision to come out with the story now peculiar.

“How is it going to play out for him? I don’t know,” she said. “I don’t know why he would come out now.”

Agassi retired in 2006. His autobiography will go on sale Nov. 9.

Mrs. Peel
Oct 29th, 2009, 11:23 PM
She probably got suspicious when Andre came in and eagerly offered to scrub and wax the floors, walls, benches, lockers, and ceiling of the women's lockerroom. ;)

Brill :lol:

laurie
Oct 29th, 2009, 11:30 PM
I'm suprised so many players are "shocked".

As Goldenlox said, cocaine was big in the 1970s and 1980s among Tennis players. They were not tested because Tennis didn't have testing until 1988 when it became an Olympic sport.

Pat Cash in his autobiography said Yannick Noah introduced him to the idea of taking marijuana the night before a match to help the nerves and get a good nights sleep in 1978, they were both juniors at that stage. Cash started taking coaciane in 1989 introduced to him by his 2nd wife. He went on to become an addict and contemplated suicide in 1997 after the death of Michael Hutchence (a friend of his).

Mats Wilander and another Swedish player (can't remember the name), tested positive for cocaine in 1995 and both were banned.

From what I understand there is a lot more things Agassi might have gotten away with not just the crystal meth.

I really think people like Federer, Nadal, Navratilova etc shouldn't bother to make statements and pronouncements about this - it smacks of them trying to look good in the public eye because they know things go on behind the secenes.

bandabou
Oct 29th, 2009, 11:32 PM
Martina N makes a good point...Andre did get away with it. Just like Clemens got away with it while people are/were crucifying Barry Bonds.

It's good though.

LightWarrior
Oct 29th, 2009, 11:38 PM
He may have gotten away with it at the time but he acknowledes it in his book.

Ferg
Oct 29th, 2009, 11:59 PM
I prefer what Serena had to say :lol:

youizahoe
Oct 30th, 2009, 12:04 AM
Navratilova just stfu.

Valanga
Oct 30th, 2009, 12:07 AM
OMG Andre :eek:
would there be any follow-up?

jefrilibra
Oct 30th, 2009, 12:12 AM
I wonder if Brad Gilbert knew anything about this or that he did and just kept his mouth shut and let his bank account grow.

Anyway I think he took more than just crystal meth. When you're an addict, you take just about everything you can get hold of.

PLP
Oct 30th, 2009, 12:37 AM
I wonder if Brad Gilbert knew anything about this or that he did and just kept his mouth shut and let his bank account grow.

Anyway I think he took more than just crystal meth. When you're an addict, you take just about everything you can get hold of.

Hmm...Just because he did it once, does not automatically make him an addict.

I think it's great that Andre admits it in his book. It's his life and prerogative. Not to mention...NOT a performance enhancing drug.

DimaDinosaur
Oct 30th, 2009, 12:47 AM
Andre Agassi is a douchebag, even Steffi Graf is better than him, he makes me sick every day

pascal77
Oct 30th, 2009, 12:48 AM
Hmm...Just because he did it once, does not automatically make him an addict.

I think it's great that Andre admits it in his book. It's his life and prerogative. Not to mention...NOT a performance enhancing drug.

The bottom line is a celebrity wont admit something that means a disgrace to his/er reputation. So the only explanation is he has to do that or more serious consequence will be coming to him. Maybe he is being blackmailed by someone who knows his whole dirty secrets.:o

LeonHart
Oct 30th, 2009, 12:48 AM
So why wasn't Agassi banned from tennis for 2 yrs I'm wondering?

pascal77
Oct 30th, 2009, 12:59 AM
So why wasn't Agassi banned from tennis for 2 yrs I'm wondering?

He made it clear in his confession. He made up a story like Gas did to convince ATP that he was innocent. Atp just bought it and covered his direty secret up. shame on him and ATP.

KournikovaFan91
Oct 30th, 2009, 01:13 AM
I agree with Anne :lol: I wasn't shocked.

drake3781
Oct 30th, 2009, 03:41 AM
I am not shocked. Drug use was much more a part of the culture even 10 years ago, but surely 20, than it is now.

Doesn't mean Martina is wrong. Her point is not shock that he used the drug so much as anger that he was caught, should have been suspended but lied and got away with it, which affected other players. Thus tarnishes his record for getting titles/money when he should have not had them, and somebody else should have had them. Valid point.

darrinbaker00
Oct 30th, 2009, 04:29 AM
I am not shocked. Drug use was much more a part of the culture even 10 years ago, but surely 20, than it is now.

Doesn't mean Martina is wrong. Her point is not shock that he used the drug so much as anger that he was caught, should have been suspended but lied and got away with it, which affected other players. Thus tarnishes his record for getting titles/money when he should have not had them, and somebody else should have had them. Valid point.
You know, you're absolutely right. Andre Agassi should DEFINITELY be stripped of that Burbank Challenger title he won in 1997 while he was on crystal meth. He cheated poor Sargis Sargsian out of 21 ranking points AND $2,960!

LDVTennis
Oct 30th, 2009, 04:48 AM
Martina N makes a good point...Andre did get away with it. Just like Clemens got away with it while people are/were crucifying Barry Bonds.

It's good though.

Barry Bonds lied to US federal investigators.

Andre Agassi lied to the ATP. There's a BIG difference. Get a brain!

Roookie
Oct 30th, 2009, 04:54 AM
Navratilova acts like she so pure all the time. :rolleyes:

darrinbaker00
Oct 30th, 2009, 05:16 AM
Barry Bonds lied to US federal investigators.

Andre Agassi lied to the ATP. There's a BIG difference. Get a brain!
Note to self: don't, repeat, DON'T reply with, "You first!" Too corny. Appropriate, but corny.

faboozadoo15
Oct 30th, 2009, 06:11 AM
Barry Bonds lied to US federal investigators.

Andre Agassi lied to the ATP. There's a BIG difference. Get a brain!

Isn't a lie a lie? We're talking about someone's integrity, not what's a worse "crime."

Navratilova acts like she so pure all the time. :rolleyes:

I can empathize with her. She's had people breathing down her neck her whole career alleging that she used illegal means to achieve her physique. She never did, and she thinks anyone telling lies to avoid a punishment is unacceptable in a sport she loves.

LDVTennis
Oct 30th, 2009, 06:43 AM
Isn't a lie a lie? We're talking about someone's integrity, not what's a worse "crime."



I can empathize with her. She's had people breathing down her neck her whole career alleging that she used illegal means to achieve her physique. She never did, and she thinks anyone telling lies to avoid a punishment is unacceptable in a sport she loves.

If it's just a question of integrity, then you tell me what is worse: Bond's lying about taking steriods and not ever coming clean, even in front of a grand jury. Or, Andre's lying about taking meth and admitting it years later.

As for Martina, how do you know she didn't take any PED's?

CooCooCachoo
Oct 30th, 2009, 10:20 AM
Agassi's story > your life, Anne.

Entirely irrelevant comment.

Slutiana
Oct 30th, 2009, 10:25 AM
Anne. :bowdown:

In The Zone
Oct 30th, 2009, 11:25 AM
How does Crystal Meth affect your play? Agassi just used it for recreational use? How can you compare Agassi and Clemens when Clemens used drugs for an unfair advantage?

markdelaney
Oct 30th, 2009, 11:53 AM
isn't it just a huge publicity stunt to promote his book ?

TheAllan
Oct 30th, 2009, 12:34 PM
"Agassi retired in 2006. His autobiography will go on sale Nov. 9"

This is all you need to know. It's a common marketing ploy to sell a celeb autobiography with a scandal that will get widespread media coverage. How many would know he had a book coming out without this story? It's the kind of PR that no money can buy. It's purely speculation to drive up sales. If he was genuine about coming clean about his drug use, he wouldn't try to profit from the admission.

When it's a drug confession the celeb will usually only admit having used it for a limited period and will offer plenty of redeeming circumstances for the usage. The sports star will also stay clear of admitting to any hardcore performance-enhancing drugs that would seriously undermine his legacy - steroids, EPO etc. I'm not saying he used those, but that's the kind of drugs he would never admit to using. With a recreational drug he expects to get a slap at the wrist at most. There will be enough controversy to keep the media interested until the book launch, but he doesn't expect any long-term damage to his reputation.

Dave B
Oct 30th, 2009, 12:55 PM
I wonder if Brad Gilbert knew anything about this or that he did and just kept his mouth shut and let his bank account grow.

Anyway I think he took more than just crystal meth. When you're an addict, you take just about everything you can get hold of.

First of all, given that Agassi used it a few times, he was unlikely an addict.

Secondly, when someone is an addict, they are addicted to a particular substance. Some addicts might also use other things, but many do not. Many alcoholics, for example, only drink. The idea that meth would suddenly make Agassi run and do other substances is completely ridiculous. The physical addiction of meth makes you want to do more meth.

Now there are people that have problems dealing with life being sober and will do anything to avoid it. This would be called a substance abuse problem, and often times does not involve the abuser being addicted to any substance at all. In fact, substance abusers often like to live in denial, and switching substances effectively lets them avoid addiction. This avoidance helps them rationalize their problems away.

So, back to the topic, the proper argument would be that in his depressive state, Agassi likely used meth as a part of a broader substance abuse problem because his reality was too depressing. He also likely got drunk a lot and used other substances. The key is, however, none of these actions were driven by addiction, which can harm an otherwise psychologically healthy person.

Max565
Oct 30th, 2009, 01:07 PM
Why is everyone so shocked at this?! I'm certainly not. Maybe it's because I've heard so many stories of players in the 80s and 90s taking recreational drugs casually and getting away with it... I just sort of 'expected' it.

Good for Andre for confessing this now... It'll help him sell a few extra copies of his book. It's all over the news. I really didn't expect this revelation to be such a big shock to everyone.

What's really disconcerting is how the authorities (maybe the ATP or WADA or whatever you call the drug testing organization) so easily gave him the benefit of doubt... No lie-detector tests, no concrete evidence needed. They just bought into their main star's bogus story. Well, I guess he wasn't their main star back then since he was out of the top 100. But it just makes me angrier at how they treated Hingis. :o

It's funny how he's now saying that he hated playing tennis. I was reading Kathy Griffin's autobiography and as she used to be friends with Brooke Shields (Agassi's then wife) she devotes a few pages to Agassi. She recounts a moment when he said to her that he's sick of tennis and if it was up to him, he'd just be playing golf all day. :lol: But Kathy's response was, "Ummm... Why don't you just stick to something you're good at?" ;) She also describes him as a 'kind of a pill'. :p

sammy01
Oct 30th, 2009, 01:08 PM
Entirely irrelevant comment.

thats sums up 99% of renaslam's posts.

anyway, it isn't shocking, though it does seem shocking how esily the atp accept these 'stories'. for me theres only 1 way recreational drugs get into the body and it aint through kissing or drinking soda.

Lucemferre
Oct 30th, 2009, 01:13 PM
Hmm...Just because he did it once, does not automatically make him an addict.

I think it's great that Andre admits it in his book. It's his life and prerogative. Not to mention...NOT a performance enhancing drug.

Oh yes lets celebrate this brave effort by golden boy Agassi :weirdo: Perfromance enhancing or not it's a banned substance and there is a punishment for it. Plus he lied to ATP. Yea it's great :weirdo::weirdo::weirdo:

Dawson.
Oct 30th, 2009, 01:17 PM
Agassi's story > your life, Anne.

And what exactly does that say about your life? :tape:

Donny
Oct 30th, 2009, 01:17 PM
Barry Bonds lied to US federal investigators.

Andre Agassi lied to the ATP. There's a BIG difference. Get a brain!

I'll respond to this the same way I respond to comments about Clinton lying under oath about Lewinsky:

It was none of the government's god damn business to begin with. Senators think that an anti trust agreement gives them some sort of duty to police the MLB. It's nonsense.

Donny
Oct 30th, 2009, 01:18 PM
I do find it humorous how the US media has to pretend to give a shit about drug use now that they went after Bonds.

LoveFifteen
Oct 30th, 2009, 02:47 PM
So why wasn't Agassi banned from tennis for 2 yrs I'm wondering?

Agassi would have only been banned for 3 months if he had been punished. Recreational drugs only gave you a 3 month suspension at that point in the game. The two year suspension for recreational drugs came several years later.

As for Navratilova, all I can say is go f*ck yourself! There is absolutely no comparison with Roger Clemens. Firstly, meth is not a performance enhancing drug. Second, he would have been suspended for three months at a point in his career where he did not win a single title, not even at Mickey Mouse tournaments. His rank plummeted to ... I don't remember ... 150? 200? He was a total joke in 1997 and the first months of 1998. He didn't win any titles at that time. He was a complete mess in 1997.

She just wants to cast aspersions on other people because so many greats from her era were doing recreational drugs with high frequency, and nowadays you get caught with 42 parts per billion of a metabolite in your system, and you're banned for 2 years.

(I'm sure at some point, some dumbass will come in here claiming that meth can enhance performance somehow, completely disregarding the fact that for Agassi, it caused him to be unable to play well at all and plummet out of the top 100. Never lets facts get in the way of your feelings!)

darrinbaker00
Oct 30th, 2009, 02:58 PM
I'll respond to this the same way I respond to comments about Clinton lying under oath about Lewinsky:

It was none of the government's god damn business to begin with. Senators think that an anti trust agreement gives them some sort of duty to police the MLB. It's nonsense.
A government employee has sex with a subordinate government employee on government property, and it's none of the government's business? Sorry, Donny, but you're wrong on that one. Also, since the government granted Major League Baseball an exemption that other businesses don't have, it has an obligation to make sure that MLB conducts itself in a manner worthy of said exemption. You're wrong on both counts.

Donny
Oct 30th, 2009, 03:09 PM
A government employee has sex with a subordinate government employee on government property,

The first lady is a subordinate government employee to the POTUS as well. Should we investigate whenever the President and his wife have sex as well?



and it's none of the government's business? Sorry, Donny, but you're wrong on that one. Also, since the government granted Major League Baseball an exemption that other businesses don't have, it has an obligation to make sure that MLB conducts itself in a manner worthy of said exemption. You're wrong on both counts.

Anti trust exemptions aren't based on ethics. It's based on whether the monopoly in question is unavoidable and whether anti trust measures would be effective or beneficial to the market.

What they did re steroids would be like going after them about the offensive nature of the Redskins logo. Completely bogus.

Wimbledon9
Oct 30th, 2009, 03:17 PM
Martina has it right it is the lying that shows that Agassi has no character he used recreational drugs but why should he not have used performance enhancing drugs? Why is it that the ATP lets the boys get away with so many things. At the US Open when we had the incident with Serena Williams Martina N. said that the ladies get bigger punishments and she also referred to Martina Hingis with the coke incident. It was very little of coke found in her blood and the hairtest was negative she could not bring herself to defend and was suspended for two years. What a difference to Gasquet so Martina N is pissed of about the lying and she has every right. If Martina N.had used PED her whole career she would not be healthy or alive because she had a very long career, she worked very hard in the gym.

Patrick345
Oct 30th, 2009, 03:26 PM
How you peeps know she is talking about the drugs? Might be wig partners in crime. :hug:

Rocketta
Oct 30th, 2009, 03:28 PM
I find it weird that there are some people upset when a celeb actually tells a negative about themselves in a biography considering they usually lie or just tell about a bunch of fluff? :confused:

As far as Martina N. I saw her special on the tennis channel and she didn't strike me as a person who would ever admit anything negative about her life, you learned very little in that special... it you went by her everybody just got along great. :tape:

Marcell
Oct 30th, 2009, 10:59 PM
The ATP And Doping



Seven top male tennis players who tested positive for nandrolone were exonerated by the ATP on "clearly unsustainable grounds", the World Anti-Doping Agency said on Friday.

WADA said in a statement that more positives had come to light despite the ruling body of men's tennis (ATP) withdrawing contaminated electrolyte supplements which it believed were the source of the banned anabolic steroid.

Testing of the suspect electrolytes failed to show up traces of nandrolone-related products, WADA said.

"Now it is clearly established that the source of contamination is not the electrolyte, the legal analysis behind the seven cases ... is not sustainable," WADA said.

"The consequence and the problem arising from this situation is that there are now seven cases where exonerations were granted on what are now clearly unsustainable grounds and the exonerations may not be able to be revisited.

"The ATP has informed WADA that this (analytical) fingerprint continues to be found in samples collected from male tennis players," said WADA.

The ATP announced last July that players might have taken banned substances in supplements handed out by ATP trainers. It asked WADA to set up an investigation of the seven positive dope tests involving players between August 2002 and May 2003.

In its report WADA was scornful of the ATP's inconsistent disciplinary process covering the seven cases.

The allegation that an ATP-supplied electrolyte might be responsible for the positive test was made by just one of the players, the fifth charged, WADA said.

An ATP investigation "found through questioning ... that most of the 43 players with positive or elevated tests claimed (in retrospect) that they had used the electrolyte replacement product provided by trainers," WADA said.

WADA said the independent tribunals which exonerated the players made an "extraordinary series of findings" founded on two principles - shifting the onus of proof to the ATP to show it was not the source of the positive tests, and precluding the ATP from sanctioning players based on positive tests because it might have been responsible for those positives.

The name of only one of the seven players, Bohdan Ulihrach of the Czech Republic, was made public. He was banned for two years by the ATP but exonerated at a second hearing.

Under WADA's anti-doping code, which the ATP has not fully signed up to*, athletes are responsible for any substance in their bodies under the "strict liability" principle.

Briton Greg Rusedski was cleared of doping offences in March after an ATP-appointed tribunal found the ATP could have been responsible for his positive nandrolone test.

Rusedski admitted in January he had tested positive in a test taken in July 2003. The WADA review did not cover his case.

Emphasis mine.

This is what I'm talking about, people.

If the ATP wasn't responsible for the failed tests then what was? Why was only one name made public? Did anybody in the tennis media press for the other names? If not, why not? How convenient that "unsustainable grounds" would be enough cause to keep the exonerations of the other six players from being revisited?

Earlier in 2004, Marcelo Rios had this to say (translated from an article in a Chilean paper):


Rios thinks that the ATP protects Agassi of doping "I know that if nandrolona were found on Agassi, they would not disclose it. He is a very prominent, very popular player and if he were to fall, the world of tennis would fall with him. The ATP would not say it. They are such a large dependent organization that it would be a problem if Agassi or Sampras tested positive", attacked the Chilean, ex- Nº1 of the world. The Marcelo Chilean Rios, ex- Nº1 of the world, accused the organization of the ATP of never openly disclosing certified drug tests on Andre Agassi. When commenting on the situation of dopajes of the Argentinean Mariano Puerta and, specifically, of the Englishman Greg Rusedski, whom respectively tested positive of clenbuterol and nandrolona, the Chilean not only lamented the incidents but accused the ATP of favortism. In his third radial commentary since the 2 of January on the microphones of Chilean Radio, Rios directly blamed the Association of Professional Tennis players (ATP) of not wanting to surface similar cases of doping of the more famous players, focusing instead on the "lesser" players of the tour. "[We]the South Americans have discussed it repeatedly. It is a complicated subject. I do not have problem in saying it: we always said (we asked ourselves) who publicly certifies the doping tests of Agassi or Sampras ?". The Chilean left-handed person remembered a case in Australia 2002 "where there was a control and Agassi disappeared, saying that they were going to kidnap his son..."

"I would love to be able to see and certify Agassi's doping tests because now I currently have no idea who is doing the test, and who decides who gets it and who doesn't."

"I know that if they were to find nandrolona on Agassi, they wouldnt say it to anybody. It would taint his reputation and bring tennis down dramatically. ATP would not say it. It is such a large organization that it would be a problem if Agassi tested positive," he charged.

Sure, Rios could simply have been a disgruntled player jealous of Agassi's and Sampras' popularity and success and/or bitter about the back injury that would prematurely end his career at the age of 27 a few months later. But Rios doesn't actually accuse either star of doping. He simply alleges that the ATP would cover it up if either was. Now, one might think that a former No. 1 would know the ATP better than most onlookers, but I suppose his allegations against the ATP are spurious because he can't prove it.

I wonder what Guillermo Cañas is thinking right about now.

spice_of_life
Oct 31st, 2009, 03:50 PM
http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5j_kixcrUNSIvdyF6Zys3s7JU-AowD9BLLVD81

NEW YORK — Andre Agassi used crystal meth periodically for "a year or so," the eight-time Grand Slam champion revealed in an interview with People magazine

spice_of_life
Oct 31st, 2009, 03:55 PM
I find it weird that there are some people upset when a celeb actually tells a negative about themselves in a biography considering they usually lie or just tell about a bunch of fluff? :confused:

As far as Martina N. I saw her special on the tennis channel and she didn't strike me as a person who would ever admit anything negative about her life, you learned very little in that special... it you went by her everybody just got along great. :tape:I don't think anyone is suggesting Agassi shoud lie. But no one forced him to write a book. I'm just curious why he chose to do a book. Did he have some inner deamons that he needed to get on paper? What he's revealing doesn't make him OR the tour look good. Especially his comment about hating tennis. Were all the kisses and bows to the crowd just an act? :confused:

Rocketta
Oct 31st, 2009, 04:11 PM
I don't think anyone is suggesting Agassi shoud lie. But no one forced him to write a book. I'm just curious why he chose to do a book. Did he have some inner deamons that he needed to get on paper? What he's revealing doesn't make him OR the tour look good. Especially his comment about hating tennis. Were all the kisses and bows to the crowd just an act? :confused:

Is is really unusual for someone to say at some point in their long career they hated their job? :scratch:

Also, when is the appropriate time to tell that you took drugs and lied in your career? :confused:

It's good that when he decided to write the book he decided to be honest and not waste all our time and money telling us crap we all already knew, don't you think?

laurie
Oct 31st, 2009, 06:31 PM
Is is really unusual for someone to say at some point in their long career they hated their job? :scratch:

Also, when is the appropriate time to tell that you took drugs and lied in your career? :confused:

It's good that when he decided to write the book he decided to be honest and not waste all our time and money telling us crap we all already knew, don't you think?

Is the book out yet?

I would venture that there would be other things Agassi has done that would have been left out of this book, things that could potentially damage his reputation further.

I wonder if "Slim" was paid off to keep quiet all these years or indeed if his reputation is damaged whatever field he is working in now. I wonder if "Slim" was contacted before the book was written.

Also, how were the ATP able to keep this quiet from WADA? Tennis has been an Olympic sport since 1988 and testing is mandatory and informing WADA I thought was mandatory.

The ATP have let themselves down again.

And consider this, what about Richard Gasquet's story - could that be a made up one as well and he got away with it?

Bayo
Oct 31st, 2009, 06:38 PM
Martina Navratilova is bitterness personified.

moby
Oct 31st, 2009, 06:46 PM
Nav has a point though, although not so much the bit about "beating people when he should have been suspended".

There are several reasons players are suspended for drug use:
1) It gives them an unfair advantage
2) The athlete is not a good role model
3) It is unhealthy

So while I think recreational drug use is not cheating, I think there are legitimate reasons (2 and 3) why a short suspension is not ridiculous.

Granted that this happened 10 years ago, where rules for recreational drug use was markedly more lax (as IMO, it should be). But what disturbs me more is the discrepancy between what goes on on the ATP and the WTA. But just think: Agassi (ab)used crystal meth for a year, tested positive, writes a letter with a lame explanation and is completely excused? Gasquet comes up with a similarly lame excuse and receives an extremely short suspension, compared to Hingis who had but a trace of cocaine in her bloodstream, which would in the worst case, come from one lone use of drugs.

I don't have an encyclopedic knowledge of all the cases of drug use in tennis, but Rios has got to have a point that the high-profile (male) players are sheltered for publicity reasons. Which makes a lot of economic sense from the side of the tour of course. But it creates a very uneven playing field.

AnnaK_4ever
Oct 31st, 2009, 06:47 PM
It's freaking hilarious when the likes of Navratilova and Nadal are whining about other players using drugs :haha:

young_gunner913
Oct 31st, 2009, 06:51 PM
:spit: well she's right, he does look like someone whose done it. :shrug:

Ferg
Oct 31st, 2009, 06:54 PM
It's freaking hilarious when the likes of Navratilova and Nadal are whining about other players using drugs :haha:

Fabrice hinted pretty heavily recently that a lot of players on tour suspect Nadal of using steroids.

moby
Oct 31st, 2009, 07:04 PM
Fabrice hinted pretty heavily recently that a lot of players on tour suspect Nadal of using steroids.On what do they base their suspicions?

jj74
Oct 31st, 2009, 09:16 PM
I'm quite surprised by the Nadal coments. He was really eager to forgive and forget all the Gasquet incident, so i don't understand his double standards

JadeFox
Oct 31st, 2009, 09:37 PM
I'm surprised the Anne isn't more surprised.

I for one was shocked when I first heard. I mean seriously, who would've guessed? I knew I didn't.

Oh wait, you guys are talking about the crystal meth use and not the wig bombshell? Never mind. :angel:

Nico_E
Nov 1st, 2009, 01:02 AM
surprising?

the only surprising thing to me is that Anne Keothavong's twitter has readers

drake3781
Nov 1st, 2009, 03:15 AM
.....

anyway, it isn't shocking, though it does seem shocking how esily the atp accept these 'stories'. for me theres only 1 way recreational drugs get into the body and it aint through kissing or drinking soda.



Yeah, right, I cannot believe they go for this kissing business. Ridiculous. :rolleyes:

tonybotz
Nov 1st, 2009, 04:40 AM
this shit would never fly on the SEWTA....

LudwigDvorak
Nov 1st, 2009, 04:57 AM
I don't really care. I don't think any less of him for it. :shrug:

He made a mistake. I, and many others, would have done the same.

Donny
Nov 1st, 2009, 05:07 AM
I don't really care. I don't think any less of him for it. :shrug:

He made a mistake. I, and many others, would have done the same.

Basically.

I think of it this way: If I happened to smoke weed on one of my off days, and my job did a random drug test, I'd lie to save my job too. It's none of my job's business what I do when I'm not working.

Volcana
Nov 1st, 2009, 05:13 AM
I really think people like Federer, Nadal, Navratilova etc shouldn't bother to make statements and pronouncements about this - it smacks of them trying to look good in the public eye because they know things go on behind the secenes.And what would repeatedly answering questions with 'no comment' look like?

Renalicious
Nov 1st, 2009, 05:23 AM
Serena's quote is the best. :worship:

Marcell
Nov 1st, 2009, 01:32 PM
New Andre Agassi drug revelations

The World Anti-Doping Agency have been left angry and exasperated at Andre Agassi's revelation that his father Mike Agassi asked him to take the drug speed before a tournament – and that he took it.

By Mark Hodgkinson

The tennis player has said that his father used to give him drugs to take before matches, including pills that were high in caffeine, and possibly even the illegal amphetamine speed.

The suggestion that Agassi may have taken the drug, which has not been made public in this country until now, will further damage his image after his disclosure last week that he took crystal meth and then lied to avoid a ban.


Though Wada has an eight-year statute of limitations, and it is highly unlikely that they could punish the former Wimbledon champion, Howman indicated that he did not consider "this to be a dead issue", and hoped that the ATP and the International Tennis Federation would act "responsibly".

In an extract of Agassi's autobiography Open, which was serialised in the German newspaper Bild last week, the Las Vegan recalled that his brother Phil warned him that the pills their father Mike was handing him before matches were speed, an illegal drug.

Agassi had believed they were Excedrin, a pill high in caffeine. Howman said on Saturday night that a high level of caffeine was on the banned list until 2004, and that it remains on their monitoring list.

Agassi writes: "One night, Philly asked me to promise him something: 'Don't ever let Paps give you any pills to take.' 'Pills?' 'Next time you go to the nationals and Paps gives you pills, don't take them.'

'He always gives me Exedrin [sic], Philly. He gives me Exedrin before every match, because there's a load of caffeine in each one.'

'Yeah, I know. But the pills I'm talking about are something else. They are really tiny, white and round. Don't swallow them, no matter what happens.'

'Okay, but what kind of pills are they, Philly?' 'Speed'.

"And yet, when Agassi's father gave him a "tiny, white, round" pill, he says he swallowed it. Agassi writes: "As predicted by Philly, my father gives me a pill at the national tournament in Chicago. 'Hold out your hand,' he said.

'This will help you. Swallow it.' He puts a pill in my hand. Tiny. White. Round. I swallow it and I feel good. Not much different. A bit more alert."

Howman said Wada "take it extremely seriously if anyone has taken anything on the banned list, whether it is believed to be performance-enhancing or not".

Howman said that he would be writing to the ATP and the ITF asking them to investigate whether the Las Vegan "lied on oath" after he tested positive for crystal meth.

"Our position is simple. We believe that the tennis authorities should investigate a possible breach of the law by Agassi, if he lied on oath about this, and also a possible breach of the law by his lawyers.

"If his lawyers knew at the time that Agassi was lying, that is extremely serious, and we believe that the tennis authorities should act responsibly over this. There are limitations over what we can do, but we don't believe that this is a dead issue," Howman told Telegraph Sport.

"We believe that the tennis authorities should be investigating the possibility of perjury, and also looking at Agassi's entourage. Letters will be going out to the tennis authorities next week."

Both the ATP and the ITF declined to comment on the latest Agassi revelations.



http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/tennis/atptour/6475361/New-Andre-Agassi-drug-revelations.html

moby
Nov 1st, 2009, 01:40 PM
Whoa. Things just got a lot more serious.
We're not talking about recreational drugs any more, are we?

Rocketta
Nov 1st, 2009, 03:28 PM
that report sounds like they are talking about a time when he was a minor? :confused: Are they really going to investigate something 25 years ago? :scratch:

Marcell
Nov 1st, 2009, 03:52 PM
that report sounds like they are talking about a time when he was a minor? :confused: Are they really going to investigate something 25 years ago? :scratch:



Cash said there had long been suspicion among tour players that Agassi may have used performance-enhancing drugs to help build his renowned fitness and strength. ''There were some dubious circumstances, none more than his early-morning withdrawal from the defence of his title at the 2002 Australian Open, citing a wrist injury,'' Cash wrote in his column in London's Sunday Times

Rocketta
Nov 1st, 2009, 03:57 PM
Cash said there had long been suspicion among tour players that Agassi may have used performance-enhancing drugs to help build his renowned fitness and strength. ''There were some dubious circumstances, none more than his early-morning withdrawal from the defence of his title at the 2002 Australian Open, citing a wrist injury,'' Cash wrote in his column in London's Sunday Times

but he wasn't with his father in 2002 was he? :scratch:

as far as Cash, I guess it takes a druggie to know a druggie. :)

kiwifan
Nov 1st, 2009, 04:01 PM
Fabrice hinted pretty heavily recently that a lot of players on tour suspect Nadal of using steroids. Plenty of people suspected Navrat of being on steriods in her prime, no one had those bulging veins before - ha ha...

...big picture, speed, roids, whatever...you still have to play the points to win; your brain makes you an all time great tennis player, more than any other factor.

:shrug:

terjw
Nov 1st, 2009, 04:23 PM
I'm the same as Anne. I'm not surprised at the Agassi story and would have been surprised if he was not taking any recretational drugs. I'm more surprised at Serena coming from Compton and saying she doesn't know what Crystal Meth is.

Donny
Nov 1st, 2009, 04:27 PM
I'm the same as Anne. I'm not surprised at the Agassi story and would have been surprised if he was not taking any recretational drugs. I'm more surprised at Serena coming from Compton and saying she doesn't know what Crystal Meth is.

Crystal isn't very common in inner city neighborhoods relative to crack or heroin. And it definitely wasn't when she was living there.

wayitis
Nov 1st, 2009, 05:17 PM
Nav has a point though, although not so much the bit about "beating people when he should have been suspended".

There are several reasons players are suspended for drug use:
1) It gives them an unfair advantage
2) The athlete is not a good role model
3) It is unhealthy

So while I think recreational drug use is not cheating, I think there are legitimate reasons (2 and 3) why a short suspension is not ridiculous.

Granted that this happened 10 years ago, where rules for recreational drug use was markedly more lax (as IMO, it should be). But what disturbs me more is the discrepancy between what goes on on the ATP and the WTA. But just think: Agassi (ab)used crystal meth for a year, tested positive, writes a letter with a lame explanation and is completely excused? Gasquet comes up with a similarly lame excuse and receives an extremely short suspension, compared to Hingis who had but a trace of cocaine in her bloodstream, which would in the worst case, come from one lone use of drugs.

I don't have an encyclopedic knowledge of all the cases of drug use in tennis, but Rios has got to have a point that the high-profile (male) players are sheltered for publicity reasons. Which makes a lot of economic sense from the side of the tour of course. But it creates a very uneven playing field.

you are being naive if you think the WTA hasn't as many skeletons in the closet as the ATP does... Agassi's name has been surrounded by suspicions and silent accusations for years, most insiders and experts are not that surprised by the fact that the ATP was/is hiding positive results out from the public. The same goes with the WTA, by the way, with a string of stars that have the same kind of suspicions clouding over, and with a history of supposed 6-month "injury breaks" that read more like suspensions. The WTA sided up with Sesil before her London hearing and had prepared and acutally recommended Sesil on her pregnancy line of defense. The only reason why we heard of Sesil's positive was because L'Equipe blew the whistle and it then became impossible to deny or keep the information out of the public's eyes. Otherwise, Sesil would heve been diagnosed with a "back ache" that would impede her to compete for, say it, 6 months, and things would be normal and dainty as usual. If the WTA was willing to do that for a 15 year old, imagine what they have already done for their more established stars...

moby
Nov 1st, 2009, 05:46 PM
you are being naive if you think the WTA hasn't as many skeletons in the closet as the ATP does... Agassi's name has been surrounded by suspicions and silent accusations for years, most insiders and experts are not that surprised by the fact that the ATP was/is hiding positive results out from the public. The same goes with the WTA, by the way, with a string of stars that have the same kind of suspicions clouding over, and with a history of supposed 6-month "injury breaks" that read more like suspensions. The WTA sided up with Sesil before her London hearing and had prepared and acutally recommended Sesil on her pregnancy line of defense. The only reason why we heard of Sesil's positive was because L'Equipe blew the whistle and it then became impossible to deny or keep the information out of the public's eyes. Otherwise, Sesil would heve been diagnosed with a "back ache" that would impede her to compete for, say it, 6 months, and things would be normal and dainty as usual. If the WTA was willing to do that for a 15 year old, imagine what they have already done for their more established stars...This is very interesting to me. I didn't know that they did that. How much control does the WTA have in handling the results, and if so, why did they throw Hingis - one of the biggest stars in women's tennis - under the bus with a 2-year suspension?

I don't doubt that cheating goes on in women's tennis. But whether they are routinely caught is a different manner. For me, it's difficult to imagine that the top women are sheltered as much as the top men just from the Hingis vs Gasquet incident, which is why I included "male" in parantheses in my original post. There's also the Kuznetsova cough medicine business from a while back, which was at that time a leakage. Why do similar leakages not occur on the men's tour?