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View Full Version : This is why I think WTA events in Doha and such locations are great


pov
Oct 28th, 2009, 02:47 PM
http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/javaImages/9c/cd/0,,12781~7523740,00.jpg

http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/javaImages/98/cd/0,,12781~7523736,00.jpg

http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/javaImages/e8/d3/0,,12781~7525352,00.jpg

Vanity Bonfire
Oct 28th, 2009, 02:52 PM
Your kidding about the last picture, right? For a pro-women's rights organisation, to stage such a prestigious event in a country where there are practically no women's rights is a joke.

delicatecutter
Oct 28th, 2009, 03:01 PM
I'm surprised they didn't make Caro put the veil over her head. :tape:

shirgan
Oct 28th, 2009, 03:04 PM
The last picture is really sad

RND
Oct 28th, 2009, 03:07 PM
Why sad? It's their belief and proud culture. Why be sad?

shirgan
Oct 28th, 2009, 03:10 PM
Why sad? It's their belief and proud culture. Why be sad?
who's belief? these women are forced to wear this whether they want to or not.

V's a star
Oct 28th, 2009, 03:21 PM
I actually luv Doha. The place and the stadium are great. I wish to go there some day if i hit the lottery

fufuqifuqishahah
Oct 28th, 2009, 03:24 PM
Your kidding about the last picture, right? For a pro-women's rights organisation, to stage such a prestigious event in a country where there are practically no women's rights is a joke.

That's specifically why its such a great place to stage an event :smash:

Placing an event such as this in a USA doesn't nearly have as much effect for women's rights.

Keegan
Oct 28th, 2009, 03:30 PM
Don't feel sorry for them. I believe the dress code is in the Qur'an. I don't feel sorry for Jewish people having to eat Kosher, it's in the Torah, it's their religious law.

shirgan
Oct 28th, 2009, 03:34 PM
Don't feel sorry for them. I believe the dress code is in the Qur'an. I don't feel sorry for Jewish people having to eat Kosher, it's in the Torah, it's their religious law.
this is beyond one's personal religious belief. If they don't obey the dress code they are endangering their life.
people are forcing them to wear it, not god.
It's NOT A CHOICE for them

pov
Oct 28th, 2009, 03:34 PM
Your kidding about the last picture, right? For a pro-women's rights organisation, to stage such a prestigious event in a country where there are practically no women's rights is a joke.
Not kidding at all. For one thing I appreciate traditional cultures and seeing a Western woman sitting with, and getting tips from, a Arabic carpet weaver rocks. On what you call "rights" (because women there have many rights, they're just different from the ones you like) cross-cultural interaction will only help.

pov
Oct 28th, 2009, 03:35 PM
That's specifically why its such a great place to stage an event :smash:

Placing an event such as this in a USA doesn't nearly have as much effect for women's rights.

:yeah: Thanks for that.

pov
Oct 28th, 2009, 03:40 PM
The last picture is really sad
Sad? ??? NIMO. It's her tradition and her beliefs which are as valid as yours, mine or anyone else.

Langers
Oct 28th, 2009, 03:44 PM
Yeah, awesome pics..... :rolleyes:

Matt01
Oct 28th, 2009, 03:45 PM
WTA Tour Tournaments (and especially the big and important ones) should not held where women's rights are trampled under foot.

Keegan
Oct 28th, 2009, 03:46 PM
this is beyond one's personal religious belief. If they don't obey the dress code they are endangering their life.
people are forcing them to wear it, not god.
It's NOT A CHOICE for them

You're actually just assuming that they hate dressing like that. If they really hated it, we'd be hearing about women being massacred in Arab states because they showed a leg in protest, but we're not. Some Islamic women feel sorry for Western women because of the way they dress. A lot of them are quite alright dressing in such a way because it saves their beauty for their husband; the person who deserves to see their beauty over everyone else in the world.
Anyway, I'm not here to start an argument and this is completely off topic.

I think WTA events in the Middle East are great because not only do they show an intergration of Western and Middle Eastern culture, but the Arab states are becoming amazingly diverse because of the growing business opportunities in the Middle East, so it shows an intergration of a huge variety of cultures.

Matt01
Oct 28th, 2009, 03:57 PM
You're actually just assuming that they hate dressing like that. If they really hated it, we'd be hearing about women being massacred in Arab states because they showed a leg in protest, but we're not. Some Islamic women feel sorry for Western women because of the way they dress. A lot of them are quite alright dressing in such a way because it saves their beauty for their husband; the person who deserves to see their beauty over everyone else in the world.
Anyway, I'm not here to start an argument and this is completely off topic.



:spit:

And of course the men don't need to do such things like "saving their beauty"?

BuTtErFrEnA
Oct 28th, 2009, 03:57 PM
:weirdo: they have a choice, and they CHOOSE to dress that way...muslims here in the caribbean where it's hot as hell sometimes, dress with EVERYWHERE covered (yes even their eyes) and don't complain...their religious choice is theirs not yours...you observe the sabbath as a jew (if you are really a jew) and you don't eat pork as far as i remember, and you have to eat kosher at some times...and you do it all by choice

bjurra
Oct 28th, 2009, 03:58 PM
Why sad? It's their belief and proud culture. Why be sad?

As if they have any choice whatsoever.

pov
Oct 28th, 2009, 04:17 PM
:spit:

And of course the men don't need to do such things like "saving their beauty"?
Do you dress like most Western women? I ask because - although it isn't officially sanctioned - there are strong conventions about how men and women are expected to dress in the Western world. There's more flexibility and things are rapidly becoming even more open but even on this board you can still see women who choose to dress outside those conventions disparaged in subtle ways.

The point still is that events like WTA tennis convey an image that works towards the very things you'd like to see in Qatar.

Convoluted
Oct 28th, 2009, 04:19 PM
I do think these events can have an influence. I hope with this, more women in arabic countries will stop seeing themselves as wallflowers, and realise they can have succesful carreers as well. Before you flame me, I do realise that many arabic women have succesful carreers as well, but I don't think there's enough of them. I do wish we could see arabic women become a more integral part not only of sports, but of the international scene in general. Hosting events such as this one is a tiny step in that direction...

bjurra
Oct 28th, 2009, 04:59 PM
:weirdo: they have a choice, and they CHOOSE to dress that way...muslims here in the caribbean where it's hot as hell sometimes, dress with EVERYWHERE covered (yes even their eyes) and don't complain...their religious choice is theirs not yours...

You are a complete idiot!

bjurra
Oct 28th, 2009, 05:02 PM
I do think these events can have an influence. I hope with this, more women in arabic countries will stop seeing themselves as wallflowers, and realise they can have succesful carreers as well. Before you flame me, I do realise that many arabic women have succesful carreers as well, but I don't think there's enough of them. I do wish we could see arabic women become a more integral part not only of sports, but of the international scene in general. Hosting events such as this one is a tiny step in that direction...

I agree.

I visited the Doha tournament in February 2008 and I could not help wondering what those burqua dressed women were thinking when they were watching those quite sexily dressed female players run around on court. I hope they were thinking something like "I hope my daughter might be able to that one day."

Dini.
Oct 28th, 2009, 05:03 PM
who's belief? these women are forced to wear this whether they want to or not.

That's the most ignorant answer I've seen in a long while. That's not true. Some of them believe in wearing veils. If they're happy with it then who the hell are we to complain?!

Assumptions, generalisations, stereotypes are freaking pathetic.

KournikovaFan91
Oct 28th, 2009, 05:06 PM
The pic with Caro is a major LOL pic, she is showing her legs and everything something that definatly would not be tolerated. :lol:

Women should have the option to wear the burkha however in some cases were it is optional husbands force their wives to wear them. Aren't they actually banned in Turkey.

Apoleb
Oct 28th, 2009, 05:11 PM
Both pics are great, especially the second one.

Yes, women's rights need to improve in the Gulf area and in lot of places in the world, but Western arrogance on this issue is not warranted. Most of the improvements happened in the last 40/50 years, so get over yourselves. :yawn:

KournikovaFan91
Oct 28th, 2009, 05:13 PM
Wrong, an Egyptian woman said she never saw a woman in a burkah before 1975. They have become more conservative recently.

Young 8
Oct 28th, 2009, 05:16 PM
Don't feel sorry for them. I believe the dress code is in the Qur'an. I don't feel sorry for Jewish people having to eat Kosher, it's in the Torah, it's their religious law.


lol

we are in 2009

- Earth is not flat
- Lightnings are not expressions of God's fury

JadeFox
Oct 28th, 2009, 05:16 PM
I do think these events can have an influence. I hope with this, more women in arabic countries will stop seeing themselves as wallflowers, and realise they can have succesful carreers as well. Before you flame me, I do realise that many arabic women have succesful carreers as well, but I don't think there's enough of them. I do wish we could see arabic women become a more integral part not only of sports, but of the international scene in general. Hosting events such as this one is a tiny step in that direction...

I could go into a long discussion about our stereotypes about Arabs and how in many ways our Western culture isn't any better, but that's would be too OT. I will say this: From what I've read about Qatar laws there's no actual laws on book saying that women must completely cover themselves.

And really, if the government was so dead against women's rights and Western influence they wouldn't even bother lobbying for the YEC to be played there to begin with.

Apoleb
Oct 28th, 2009, 05:16 PM
Wrong, an Egyptian woman said she never saw a woman in a burkah before 1975. They have become more conservative recently.

What are you talking about, cause you clearly misread my post. *shocker*

"They"? :lol: Egypt and the Gulf are vastly different despite your stereotypes about "Arabs." The Burka is a traditional dress there.

Young 8
Oct 28th, 2009, 05:18 PM
Sad? ??? NIMO. It's her tradition and her beliefs which are as valid as yours, mine or anyone else.


no, they're not


Religions should not affect people lifes

Keegan
Oct 28th, 2009, 05:18 PM
lol

we are in 2009

- Earth is not flat
- Lightnings are not expressions of God's fury

No shit sherlock. What is wrong with people having different beliefs to you? Just because you have beliefs like that doesn't mean they're right.

pov
Oct 28th, 2009, 05:20 PM
Qatar Women's Dress

When women are outside the home, or present with non-male relatives, their hair will normally be covered, obeying Mohammed's command to cover your shameful parts. The interpretation of what is shameful is very broad. Some of the more liberal Qataris have started to wear hijab far back on their heads, others allow a fringe to peep through; some cover their hair completely, while others cover their whole face. Even here there is variation; eyes may be open (and heavily decorated with makeup), or closed with sunglasses, or even with thin, see-through cloth. There is debate in the Muslim world over whether covering your face is allowed under Islam, and certainly when women perform the Haj: a pilgrimage that forms one of the five pillars of Islam it is forbidden to cover the face.

Young 8
Oct 28th, 2009, 05:20 PM
No shit sherlock. What is wrong with people having different beliefs to you? Just because you have beliefs like that doesn't mean they're right.

And exactly, putting a veil on your face for some religious voodo crap written 1500 years ago......what kind of belief is that ??

Beat
Oct 28th, 2009, 05:21 PM
i'm not quite sure what those 3 pictures are supposed to prove.

Keegan
Oct 28th, 2009, 05:25 PM
And exactly, putting a veil on your face for some religious voodo crap written 1500 years ago......what kind of belief is that ??

They might not be right to me or you, but they mean something to them. I might not think your beliefs are right, but they mean something to you. You can't say every belief that isn't yours is wrong, or "voodoo crap" as you put it.

Donny
Oct 28th, 2009, 05:25 PM
no, they're not


Religions should not affect people lifes

No, what you really meant is that it shouldn't affect your life in ways you don't like.

Why do people wear clothes at all in hot climates? Out of some notion about the breasts, buttocks, and genitals being 'shameful' parts. The notion of certain areas of the body being off limits to others is almost completely religious in nature. But because they wear more than what YOU deem acceptable, you take issue.

pov
Oct 28th, 2009, 05:26 PM
lol

we are in 2009

- Earth is not flat
- Lightnings are not expressions of God's fury

2009 you say? Really and now that you figured that out .what? Can anyone prove that lightning isn't an expression of God? No, they can't. We know the mechanics of what constitutes the electrical charge and release but that doesn't disprove a more primary cause.

The point is that people have their beliefs and they have as much validity in their context as your beliefs do in yours. Yes, even in the year you view as 2009, which is the year 5770 for some people.

Young 8
Oct 28th, 2009, 05:26 PM
They might not be right to me or you, but they mean something to them.


really ??

ask to those women

Young 8
Oct 28th, 2009, 05:27 PM
Why do people wear clothes at all in hot climates?

forced by nobody

Young 8
Oct 28th, 2009, 05:28 PM
The point is that people have their beliefs and they have as much validity in their context as your beliefs do in yours. Yes, even in the year you view as 2009, which is the year 5770 for some people.

that's the major problem of our society

Convoluted
Oct 28th, 2009, 05:31 PM
I could go into a long discussion about our stereotypes about Arabs and how in many ways our Western culture isn't any better, but that's would be too OT. I will say this: From what I've read about Qatar laws there's no actual laws on book saying that women must completely cover themselves.

And really, if the government was so dead against women's rights and Western influence they wouldn't even bother lobbying for the YEC to be played there to begin with.

I agree Qatar seems to be quite moderate in its "islamitic" laws. But I see this not as a chance to influence Qatari women, moreso the women in the surrounding arrabic states. Women's rights are doing ok in Qatar and most of the emirates I think, but there are nearby countries where the situation is appalling. By generating an interest in the region for women's sports, we might get a wee bit more emancipation...

Keegan
Oct 28th, 2009, 05:32 PM
that's the major problem of our society

That we have diversity?

Joana
Oct 28th, 2009, 05:37 PM
Not kidding at all. For one thing I appreciate traditional cultures and seeing a Western woman sitting with, and getting tips from, a Arabic carpet weaver rocks. On what you call "rights" (because women there have many rights, they're just different from the ones you like) cross-cultural interaction will only help.

Here's the most likely scenario: 5 minutes after this picture was taken, Caroline has already forgotten she ever saw the woman. The woman probably had no real idea what was happening.
All that will have left is a picture.

tobe
Oct 28th, 2009, 05:38 PM
:weirdo: they have a choice, and they CHOOSE to dress that way...muslims here in the caribbean where it's hot as hell sometimes, dress with EVERYWHERE covered (yes even their eyes) and don't complain...their religious choice is theirs not yours...you observe the sabbath as a jew (if you are really a jew) and you don't eat pork as far as i remember, and you have to eat kosher at some times...and you do it all by choice


wow...who brainwashed you?

quentinak
Oct 28th, 2009, 05:38 PM
Re: Wearing the veil is their culture, therefore, we should respect it.

True. If EVERY woman in these fundamentalist Muslim countries want to be fully covered, we should totally respect that. But the fact is, there are many women in these countries who don't want to go to that extreme. There are moderate Muslim women FORCED by law or by religious establishment to be fully covered. That is a violation of their basic human rights to choose to how they wish to adhere to their religion or what they wish to put on their own bodies. Unfortunately, there are Muslim nations who are extremists and are oppressive to women.

To think that EVERY SINGLE woman in these countries want to be fully covered is ridiculous. Women who don't wish to be fully covered might be in the minority. So does that mean that the minority should be oppressed?

Joana
Oct 28th, 2009, 05:39 PM
To think that EVERY SINGLE woman in these countries want to be fully covered is ridiculous. Women who don't wish to be fully covered might be in the minority. So does that mean that the minority should be oppressed?

Yes. It's their tradition!!!1

bjurra
Oct 28th, 2009, 05:40 PM
That's the most ignorant answer I've seen in a long while. That's not true. Some of them believe in wearing veils. If they're happy with it then who the hell are we to complain?!

Assumptions, generalisations, stereotypes are freaking pathetic.

You are saying they do have a choice because "some of them believe in wearing veils"???

Great logic, mate!!

pov
Oct 28th, 2009, 05:41 PM
You are saying they do have a choice because "some of them believe in wearing veils"???

Great logic, mate!!
They definitely do have choice.

tobe
Oct 28th, 2009, 05:42 PM
That we have diversity?

diversity as in "some can believe in whatever they want and some are told what to believe"

pov
Oct 28th, 2009, 05:42 PM
Re: Wearing the veil is their culture, therefore, we should respect it.


They don't have to wear a veil, in fact few do.

bjurra
Oct 28th, 2009, 05:43 PM
Yes. It's their tradition!!!1

Tradition uber alles!!!

As a Swede, I should stick to our traditions and go to England and rape and ravish.

Donny
Oct 28th, 2009, 05:45 PM
Re: Wearing the veil is their culture, therefore, we should respect it.

True. If EVERY woman in these fundamentalist Muslim countries want to be fully covered, we should totally respect that. But the fact is, there are many women in these countries who don't want to go to that extreme. There are moderate Muslim women FORCED by law or by religious establishment to be fully covered. That is a violation of their basic human rights to choose to how they wish to adhere to their religion or what they wish to put on their own bodies. Unfortunately, there are Muslim nations who are extremists and are oppressive to women.

To think that EVERY SINGLE woman in these countries want to be fully covered is ridiculous. Women who don't wish to be fully covered might be in the minority. So does that mean that the minority should be oppressed?

In the summer, I'm sure some people want to walk around with no clothes on at all. There's not a country on earth that would allow this, yet Westerners accept that.

In Doha, women aren't even FORCED to wear veils, and people accused them of backwardness. It makes no sense.

quentinak
Oct 28th, 2009, 05:47 PM
Tradition uber alles!!!

As a Swede, I should stick to our traditions and go to England and rape and ravish.

haha yes, please respect my tradition and culture of teh Crusades, raping and pillaging in the name of God to get the Holy Land back from teh Heathens. :silly::weirdo:

pov
Oct 28th, 2009, 05:51 PM
Tradition uber alles!!!

As a Swede, I should stick to our traditions and go to England and rape and ravish.
Dang. At least come with something either intelligent or witty. That's not a tradition. That's a set of events. Anyway, nowadays Swedes would get their arses kicked!

JadeFox
Oct 28th, 2009, 05:51 PM
I agree Qatar seems to be quite moderate in its "islamitic" laws. But I see this not as a chance to influence Qatari women, moreso the women in the surrounding arrabic states. Women's rights are doing ok in Qatar and most of the emirates I think, but there are nearby countries where the situation is appalling. By generating an interest in the region for women's sports, we might get a wee bit more emancipation...

Good point. Qatar and the UAE are the most liberal of the Islamic states in the Middle East. While things are hardly perfect in Qatar and UAE, the countries around them are infinitely worse. It would be great if women were in the Middle East were totally free to be their own people and wear whatever they like but I think us Westerners have to remember to not force our own beliefs down on anyone. We're not perfect either.

And there are human rights activists both male and female in these regions doing what they can to change things. Here's hoping they succeed.:hug:

Apoleb
Oct 28th, 2009, 05:53 PM
Good point. Qatar and the UAE are the most liberal of the Islamic states in the Middle East. While things are hardly perfect in Qatar and UAE, the countries around them are infinitely worse. It would be great if women were in the Middle East were totally free to be their own people and wear whatever they like but I think us Westerners have to remember to not force our own beliefs down on anyone. We're not perfect either.

And there are human rights activists both male and female in these regions doing what they can to change things. Here's hoping they succeed.:hug:

No? :shrug:

The Middle East is not the Gulf. Syria, Lebanon, Jordan are infinitely more liberal.

Dini.
Oct 28th, 2009, 05:54 PM
A lot of them really do have a choice. It's so easy for Europeans to stereotype and make your own assumptions but you don't live there and you don't know the whole story.

This coming from a Lebanese person and I do know a fair bit about the Middle East.

duhcity
Oct 28th, 2009, 05:56 PM
I read it's not law to be fully veiled in Qatar. It was the woman's choice

pov
Oct 28th, 2009, 05:59 PM
An example of the much vaunted Western freedoms:

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20091028/ap_on_bi_ge/us_god_button_home_depot

A former cashier for The Home Depot who has been wearing a "One nation under God" button on his work apron for more than a year has been fired, he says because of the religious reference. The company claims that expressing such personal beliefs is simply not allowed.

JadeFox
Oct 28th, 2009, 05:59 PM
No? :shrug:

The Middle East is not the Gulf. Syria, Lebanon, Jordan are infinitely more liberal.

Sorry about that. I was thinking about the gulf.

Dini.
Oct 28th, 2009, 06:02 PM
Sorry about that. I was thinking about the gulf.

Gulf countries are a part of the Middle East. :shrug:

bjurra
Oct 28th, 2009, 06:04 PM
Dang. At least come with something either intelligent or witty. That's not a tradition. That's a set of events. Anyway, nowadays Swedes would get their arses kicked!

The vikings travelled and conquered for several hundred years. That certainly makes it a tradition.

Aaric
Oct 28th, 2009, 06:06 PM
Your kidding about the last picture, right? For a pro-women's rights organisation, to stage such a prestigious event in a country where there are practically no women's rights is a joke.

THIS

quentinak
Oct 28th, 2009, 06:09 PM
In the summer, I'm sure some people want to walk around with no clothes on at all. There's not a country on earth that would allow this, yet Westerners accept that.

In Doha, women aren't even FORCED to wear veils, and people accused them of backwardness. It makes no sense.

I agree that it is offense and inappropriate to call them backward for wearing veils.

I don't know about Doha or Qatar, whether there are the "religious decency policewomen" who are out in the streets putting veils onto women if they fail to have one on. There are several Islamic countries that does this. But my point isn't targeted at Doha. So, no disrespect to Qatar and Doha.

Countries like Saudi Arabia are among the worse offenders there women have no choice to be different.

In the US, there can at least be nudist areas. Other countries have nude beaches. No such refuges in Saudi Arabia and the like. And their punishments for violations are severe.

There are plenty of more moderate Muslim countries who are good examples to follow. And I find nothing wrong with calling human rights violation like it is, especially in the case of Saudi Arabia.

bjurra
Oct 28th, 2009, 06:13 PM
The question "do they have a choice?" is a very wide one. Choice and freedom are on a very broad scale, ranging from:

1. The woman has to wear a veil and her freedom of movement is extremely limited. Her only chance would be to escape the country but she is illerate, doesnt have money, doesnt speak other languages and she would risk severe punishment.

2. The woman has to wear a veil but she is allowed to move around freely and speak to other women. She knows how to read and can gather information from other countries. However, she would still not cope her own and her options are extremely limited.

3. The woman is not legally obliged to wear a veil but there is strong social pressure, maybe also pressure from religious police. Women who dont wear veils risk harassement.

4. The woman is not legally obliged to wear a veil and does not risk any physical harm. However, she is financially and socially dependent on her surrounding and feels strong social pressure.

5. The woman lives in Holland, Sweden or similar country. She could manage on her own but she would risk social exclusion from family and friends if she didnt follow Arabic traditions. She might also receive threats.

But conditions can also vary a lot withina country. In Istanbul, there are many modern Muslim women who enjoy a large degree of freedom. In Eastern Turkey, womens freedom is a lot more limited.

Dini.
Oct 28th, 2009, 06:17 PM
There are no laws in Qatar that says a woman HAS TO wear a veil. In fact there are no laws in Qatar that says a woman has to wear a hijab even. :shrug:

Therefore they have a choice.

bjurra
Oct 28th, 2009, 06:20 PM
There are no laws in Qatar that says a woman HAS TO wear a veil. In fact there are no laws in Qatar that says a woman has to wear a hijab even. :shrug:

Therefore they have a choice.

I am sure there are no laws in Qatar saying that the wife has to do the cooking at home. Do you think a Qatar woman can tell her husband: "I dont feel like cooking, you do the cooking!"

Liberty is not the sum of all laws in a country.

Dini.
Oct 28th, 2009, 06:23 PM
^^ That's just stereotyping and you know it.

quentinak
Oct 28th, 2009, 06:26 PM
If this

Originally Posted by bjurra
3. The woman is not legally obliged to wear a veil but there is strong social pressure, maybe also pressure from religious police. Women who dont wear veils risk harassement.

4. The woman is not legally obliged to wear a veil and does not risk any physical harm. However, she is financially and socially dependent on her surrounding and feels strong social pressure.

then this
There are no laws in Qatar that says a woman HAS TO wear a veil. In fact there are no laws in Qatar that says a woman has to wear a hijab even.

Therefore they have a choice.

is false

Donny
Oct 28th, 2009, 06:27 PM
I am sure there are no laws in Qatar saying that the wife has to do the cooking at home. Do you think a Qatar woman can tell her husband: "I dont feel like cooking, you do the cooking!"

Liberty is not the sum of all laws in a country.

You could say the same thing about areas in Western countries.

JadeFox
Oct 28th, 2009, 06:27 PM
Gulf countries are a part of the Middle East. :shrug:

I know. I meant I was only thinking about that region, that specific part of the Middle East.

quentinak
Oct 28th, 2009, 06:31 PM
An example of the much vaunted Western freedoms:

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20091028/ap_on_bi_ge/us_god_button_home_depot

A former cashier for The Home Depot who has been wearing a "One nation under God" button on his work apron for more than a year has been fired, he says because of the religious reference. The company claims that expressing such personal beliefs is simply not allowed.

Now you're catching on! Let's all call out on human rights violations in the US, Middle East, or wherever else we see them!

RenaSlam.
Oct 28th, 2009, 06:31 PM
What a joke this thread is. :help:

bjurra
Oct 28th, 2009, 07:40 PM
You could say the same thing about areas in Western countries.

That is true. But it is hardly comparable.

Matt01
Oct 28th, 2009, 09:09 PM
There are no laws in Qatar that says a woman HAS TO wear a veil. In fact there are no laws in Qatar that says a woman has to wear a hijab even. :shrug:

Therefore they have a choice.


There is even a law in Qatar that states that women should not be discriminated. Is that law put into practice? As far as I know, it's not.

pov
Oct 28th, 2009, 09:26 PM
The vikings travelled and conquered for several hundred years. That certainly makes it a tradition.
Uhh no . . it doesn't. Sorry. As I said intelligent or witty. Surely you can do one or the other? If not then at least go for accurate. And BTW . you and the current Swedes aren't Vikings.