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View Full Version : A match with many foot-faults called (at least 5 in a match)...


ElusiveChanteuse
Oct 27th, 2009, 04:59 PM
This Venus vs Lena definitely is one of them I suppose.:scratch:
I once thought the linesjudge from the USO was there.:unsure: :lol:

Any other matches with many foot-faults by players in a match?

ZODIAC
Oct 27th, 2009, 05:06 PM
they are targeting Vee too much,its a plan to disrupt the game and the bad calls keep on happening.Its not the locals that are making the bad calls its the blonde women at the two ends of the court.

Ferg
Oct 27th, 2009, 05:09 PM
they are targeting Vee too much,its a plan to disrupt the game and the bad calls keep on happening.Its not the locals that are making the bad calls its the blonde women at the two ends of the court.

You really think they planned to call lots of FFs to put Vee off? :cuckoo:

pov
Oct 27th, 2009, 05:12 PM
You really think they planned to call lots of FFs to put Vee off? :cuckoo:
Unfortunately, they probably really do. The fact that they mentioned it being "the blonde women" sums up the mentality.

Slutiana
Oct 27th, 2009, 05:13 PM
It's "The Serena Effect" :lol: :p

Olórin
Oct 27th, 2009, 05:16 PM
Unfortunately, they probably really do. The fact that they mentioned it being "the blonde women" sums up the mentality.

They? Who are you talking about altogether? They is a plural pronoun.

Apoleb
Oct 27th, 2009, 05:23 PM
Unfortunately, they probably really do. The fact that they mentioned it being "the blonde women" sums up the mentality.

:spit:

pov
Oct 27th, 2009, 05:24 PM
They? Who are you talking about altogether? They is a plural pronoun.
"They" isn't always used as a plural. It can be used in a singular context as was done here.

Olórin
Oct 27th, 2009, 05:30 PM
"They" isn't always used as a plural. It can be used in a singular context as was done here.

Strictly, grammatically it should never be used as a singular. Unless that's an american bastardisation of the English language of which I am unaware; as may be the case I suppose.

I only highlighted it in any case as I wasn't sure if you actually were referring to anyone else, obviously not...

pov
Oct 27th, 2009, 05:35 PM
Strictly, grammatically it should never be used as a singular. Unless that's an american bastardisation of the English language of which I am unaware; as may be the case I suppose.

You're completely wrong. On two counts. It is grammatically correct in that usage and it is a usage far more common in British English.

And BTW It's "bastardization"

RenaSlam.
Oct 27th, 2009, 05:36 PM
This is ridiculous.

pov
Oct 27th, 2009, 05:39 PM
This is ridiculous.
Okay. You're excused.

Olórin
Oct 27th, 2009, 05:44 PM
You're completely wrong. On two counts. It is grammatically correct in that usage and it is a usage far more common in British English.

No.

They can be used as an definite singular antecedent in place of he/she. That is its one and only use as a plural and it is still rejected by many as ungrammatical, despite its use in some literature and in casual conversation.

As an American I am not sure how famililar you are with British-English (clearly not very) but I defy you to find me a definitive source that shows this one and only usage is more common in Britain than America.

davidmario
Oct 27th, 2009, 05:46 PM
they really are champions in calling foot faults! There were like 10 footsfaults already! But also like 10 wrongproved linecalls at the baseline! They really should start shifting their focus on calls during a rally and not at the start of it.

Olórin
Oct 27th, 2009, 05:46 PM
And BTW It's "bastardization"

In American-English yes, you ignoramus. Point proved. :lol:

pov
Oct 27th, 2009, 05:49 PM
No.

They can be used as an definite singular antecedent in place of he/she. That is its one and only use and it is still rejected by many as ungrammatical despite its use in some literature and in casual conversation.

As an american I am not sure how famililar you are with British-English (clearly not very) but I defy you to find me a definitive source that shows this one and only usage is more common in Britain than America.
lol. For someone who doesn't even spell correctly you are committed to embarrassing yourself. First you say no then you give an example of such a usage.

I'll leave you to do your own research as I'm certain about what I've stated. And I'd say I'm a lot more familiar with British English than you are. Don't make so many assumptions.

Ziggy Starduck
Oct 27th, 2009, 06:06 PM
Add another one to the evergrowing list.