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gouci
Jun 24th, 2009, 05:26 PM
This thread is to provide and accumulate explanations of various NCAA rules.

gouci
Jun 24th, 2009, 05:33 PM
Tennisace explains transferring


...
There are three scenarios of transferring:
1) The home coach grants the transfer the ability to immediately play without the loss of eligibility,
2) The home coach does not grant the transfer the ability to immediately play but the transfer does, resulting in a loss of one year of eligbility,
3) The home coach does not grant the transfer the ability to immediately play and the transfer sits out a year, without the loss of eligibility.

An example of 1) is Cohen and Borsanyi.
An example of 2) is Suzi Fodor (she transferred out of Mississippi St. her freshman year and was only eligibile to play two years at Cal)
An example of 3) is Amanda Craddock (who sat out a year/played on the tour).

johnnytennis
Jun 24th, 2009, 10:38 PM
Tennisace explains transferring

Can you also explain what happens to their scholarships? From what I understand, if a person is granted permission to leave or not granted permission to leave, you will lose your scholarship if you transfer to another college in your conference. Is that correct?

gouci
Jun 26th, 2009, 08:26 PM
9th grade

* Understand the academic requirements for the type of school you plan to attend. For example, the NCAA recently increased the number of required core courses needed to qualify. The list of approved core courses for your school are listed at the NCAA Eligibility Center. In addition to governing body standards, individual schools have standards as well.
* Start keeping track of your complete player record and significant wins.
* It is a good idea to take advantage of reputable free services - like those provided at TennisRecruiting.net and USTA.com. If you decide to use such a service, keep your profile updated and current.

10th grade

* Stay on track with your coursework and monitor the approved core courses. (See above.)
* Continue updating your player record.
* Start researching schools that you have heard of in the past and may want to consider.
* You are allowed to take unofficial visits to schools.
* Coaches may not initiate contact with players.
* You may initiate a call to the coach - but the coach may not call you.
* You may receive camp brochures and questionnaires.

11 grade

* Register with the NCAA Eligibility Center and take a look at the amateurism questionnaire. if you have interest in NCAA Division I or II schools. Registration - which includes several questions about your sports history - can be done over the Internet.
* Try to take the SAT and/or ACT during your junior year. Request test scores to be sent to the Eligibility Center (the code is "9999").
* Understand the GPA and board scores necessary for admission. Minimum NCAA standards are shown here, but your school may have more stringent standards.
* You are allowed to take unofficial visits to schools.
* You can receive approved recruiting materials starting September 1.
* You may initiate contact with coaches.

Summer after 11th grade

* Make sure that you are registered with the NCAA Eligibility Center.
* Test scores must be reported directly to the NCAA Eligibility Center from either the SAT or ACT (the code is "9999"). You may also want to consider updating this information at TennisRecruiting.net.
* Coaches may contact you in the summer after your junior year:
o Division I - after July 1 (once per week)
o Division II - after June 15
o Division III - immediately after you complete your junior year.
o NAIA - no limit
o NJCAA - no limit
* Have your high school guidance counselor send a copy of your transcript to the Eligibility Center. This applies to all high schools attended.
* You are allowed to take unofficial visits to schools.

12th grade

* If you have not already done so, you MUST register with the NCAA Eligibility Center if you have interest in NCAA Division I or II schools.
* Can take official visits beginning the first day of school your senior year.
* Only one official visit per college - maximum of five visits are allowed.
* Can take unofficial visits to schools of interest.
* Coaches are permitted 3 in-person, off-campus contacts per prospect (this includes relatives or legal guardians) starting on the above listed summer dates.
* Do not sign National Letter of Intent (NLI) prior to 7:00 am on the first dates listed or after the final signing date:
o November - early signing period. (Nov 12-19, 2008 for this year)
o April - late signing period. (April 8 - August 1, 2009 for this year.)

One other note is that Division III schools are not subject to the majority of these restrictions. Division III schools can send you written materials at any time, there is no limit on the number of phone calls or when they can be made, and there is no limit to the number of official visits you can take (but only one per school).

gouci
Jun 26th, 2009, 08:46 PM
There are a number of terms that are used in college recruiting. Here is a quick list of terms you should understand.

Contact

Any off-campus, face to face meeting with you or your parents - that consists of more than a "hello".

College Visit

Official Visit - You and your parents visit a college campus paid for by the college (including transportation, room and meals).
Unofficial Visit - You and your parents visit a college campus at your own expense.

Contact Period

1. Coaches may have 3 in-person contacts on or off campus with you or your parents. Visitation by you to a college campus is allowed.
2. A visit by a coach to your school or an event is allowed. They may also phone (once a week) or write during this time.
3. At tournaments, coaches may not talk to you once you have registered for the event until you are completely out of the entire event.

Dead Period

The coach may not have any in-person contact with you or your parents at any time. They may call or write you or your parents during this time.
Division I Dates: Monday through Thursday of the week that includes the fall or spring signing of the National Letter of Intent -> Nov 10-13, 2008 and April 6-9, 2009.
Division II Dates: During the 48 hours prior to 7am on the initial date for the fall or spring signing of the National Letter of Intent -> Nov 10-12, 2008 and April 6-8, 2009.

National Letter Signing

55 Conferences and over 500 schools use this binding contract. Do not sign prior to 7:00 am (local time) on the following dates or after the final signing date: Nov 12-19, 2008 and April 8 through August 1, 2009.



Other Information

You should also take a look at the official resources put out by the collegiate governing bodies and the NCAA Eligibility Center. There is a great wealth of information here, but it may take some time to sort through it all:

* NCAA Recruiting Guidelines
* NJCAA Guidelines
* NAIA Guidelines
* NCAA Eligibility Center

gouci
Jul 17th, 2009, 02:39 PM
Matriculation Eligibility Rules. NCAA rules that allow players to retain their amateur status while playing professional events and not accepting prize money.

The NCAA rule states that the student-athlete is expected to complete high school according to the "prescribed educational path in his or her country". The student-athlete then has one additional year in which he or she must enroll to retain four seasons of eligibility.

In other words, in this country, once you start high school, you are expected to finish in four years and enroll in college within a year after that - period. A student who does not enroll at a collegiate institution after that one year period will lose a season of intercollegiate tennis eligibility. And, after that one-year period, if the student-athlete has engaged in organized tennis (e.g., tournament tennis), the student-athlete must attend school for a year before being eligible to compete.

gouci
Jul 17th, 2009, 02:46 PM
Home schooling has firmly positioned itself as a legitimate educational option. There are an estimated 1.5 million home schooled students in the U.S. Given the travel time required to obtain a high USTA national or ITF ranking, it is no surprise that many junior tennis players and their families make the decision to follow this route.

Travel translates to school days missed. Independent study, flexible scheduling, and online classes - the hallmarks of home schooling - can make tennis travel more manageable.

However, when it comes time for college recruiting, I frequently see home-schooled junior tennis players who are both surprised and disappointed to discover that their academic records are insufficient or incomplete.

Home-schooled student-athletes typically don't have access to the traditional sources of college guidance available at public and private schools, and that lack of guidance can lead to future eligibility issues. This unpleasant scenario can and should be avoided by exercising careful advance planning, obtaining accurate information about academic requirements and NCAA rules, and consulting with a college counseling professional or a college athletic consultant.

Start with the NCAA Eligibility Center - the NCAA department that certifies student-athletes who want to participate in Division I and II athletics. The Eligibility Center has specific guidelines for home-schooled students. Anyone interested in home schooling or other nontraditional high school programs (e.g., online, correspondence, private tutoring, etc.) should familiarize themselves with this information very early on in the process.

And, if you're aiming for the top academic schools like the Ivies, keep in mind that the minimum NCAA academic requirements will not be sufficient. Premier institutions will expect your academic credentials to be very close to those of the regular applicants. Home-schooled applicants without a conventional high school transcript may find that their standardized test scores (SAT I, SAT II, and AP exams) take on more meaning than they might be for other applicants.

Home schooling and other forms of independent study are attractive options for junior tennis players. But if you're interested in playing college tennis, make sure to plan ahead and understand the academic guidelines!

gouci
Jul 17th, 2009, 02:58 PM
From the ITA website

ITA Announces Division I Regional Realignment

SKILLMAN, N.J. – The ITA announced that effective in August 2009, the ITA membership will be aligned into 12 new Regions for all NCAA Division I men’s and women’s tennis programs.

For almost 40 years, the Division I membership of the ITA has been divided into eight regions, based previously upon regional alignments created by the NCAA for the purpose of selection into NCAA championship events.

The discussion about this expansion plan first began last fall with the ITA Realignment Task Force presenting its Regional Realignment Proposal during the ITA Coaches Convention in December. After extensive discussions and careful review, the ITA Operating Committee agreed to endorse this expansion.

The goal of the realignment is to benefit the student-athlete well being and experience while being sensitive to the economic environment. The three main components considered with the expansion were: 1) Geographic location, 2) Increasing participation and recognition opportunities for student-athletes, and 3) Creating competitive balance with consideration to conference affiliation.

The ITA Regional Championships Program is one of the premier ITA programs, and participation in these events is a highlight for thousands of Division I varsity student-athletes. By increasing the number of Regions and further minimizing the area per Region, a larger percentage of institutions will be able to drive to these Regional Championship events, thus helping to reduce travel costs. And at the same time, since a fewer number of schools will comprise each Region, student-athletes from those participating programs will have more opportunities to participate in these prestigious events.

gouci
Aug 28th, 2009, 03:18 AM
Form explains 4 general rules.


Admission and transfer requirements vary wildly from school to school.

Four general rules:

a) Must make NCAA minimum on courses taken in HS and you must achieve a minimum GPA vs SAT score.... but many schools require more than that... (Example: Stud Linebacker from Centennial signed with USC football but now going to Arizona State because he couldn't get admitted to USC but he could get admitted at ASU).

b) Transfer: NCAA rules require departing athlete must be academically eligible at the school they are leaving; whatever that schools eligibility requirement is. If on probation, no eligibility if you transfer.

c) Eligiblity: NCAA rules require athlete advances 20% toward degree in their 'major' ... so by end of soph year you must be at least 40% of requirements toward you declared major. 60% after junior year, 80% for red shirt 5th year students.. If not, or if you switch majors and thus are not that far along, then you are ineligble until you catch up.

d) Transfer: 99.9% of conferences have internal rule that does not permit transfer within conference. If you do, you are ineliglbe for one year. (So someone couldn't go from St Mary's to Pepp after freshman year as an example).

Everything else is fluid.

Examples I know of:

CSU's and UC's require a high TOEFL (English test for ESL kids) while Clemson does not require the test at all. Thus Clemson is very easy for Euro kids to get into. TOEFL requirement varies by school system or even by university.

For int'l students, many schools (incl. all but one in the Big West) have special international fee waivers that makes the fees in state level. LB requires a 3.6 gpa or tea/parents has to cover the differnece.. while CSUN only requires NCAA eligibility (mid 2.5) to qualify so their intl's are pretty cheap.... so that makes budgets and recruiting widely different. And in sports like baseball or men's volleyball, that is an even bigger deal since most are on partial scholarships and the parents make up the difference. The difference can be $12K per year. So CSUN should be kickn a** more than they are, as an example.

Other than a, b, c and d... it is all over the place....

gouci
Nov 1st, 2009, 05:28 AM
Selection Process (NEW):
The ITA Operating Committee updated the automatic selections due to the expansion from 8 to 12 Regionas at the convention meetings in December 2008. Only the Regional Champions (singles and doubles) will receive automatic entry into the tournament. Also, last year's Intercollegiate Indooor Champions will NOT receive an automatic entry.

A singles player who reaches the semifinals at the ITA All-American will receive an automatic berth. For doubles, an automatic berth will be given to the team that wins the ITA All-American Championship.

The single and doubles Super Bowl Champions from the ITA National Small College Championships will receive an automatic berth as well.

Singles: (32 draw)
- 12 regional champions
- 4 All-American semi-finalists
- 1 super bowl champion
- 2 host wildcards
- 12 at-large bids
- 1 ITA wildcard

Doubles: (16 draw)
- 12 regional champions
- 1 All-American champion
- 1 Super bowl champion
- 1 host wild card
- 1 at-large


Wildcards (NEW):
The Host School receives a wild card into each draw. As decided by the Operating Committee in December 2008, the host school is guaranteed 2 players in Main Draw Singles. If one player qualifies and only one wildcard is needed, the 2nd host wildcard will become an at-large selection. If the host site qualifies 2 players, they will still receive on wildcard and the 2nd wildcard will become an at-large selection.

An ITA wild card in singles can be given for any reason. The selection committee can also decide not to use the ITA wild card, in which case an "at-large" candidate would fill the spot.

Seedings:
Seeding for the event will be based on Pre-Season ITA Rankings and fall results.

At-Large Selections:
To be considered for an at-large selection in singles, a player must have reached at least the quarterfinals of an ITA Regional Championship. From this pool, the ITA National Tournament Committee will select singles players in order of preseason ITA national ranking (once the ranking lists has been exhausted, the committee will make the selction based on fall results/performance.) Wild card selections do not have to necessarily meet this criteria.

For doubles, the selections will be made from the pool of teams that have reached at least the Quarterfinals at an ITA Regional Championship (but not necessarily in order of ranking).

gouci
Dec 28th, 2009, 11:48 PM
Form explains a new transfer rule.



PASSED: This is the last year a mid year transfer in January is allowed in tennis. Next year, none of these January moves after having started fall at another school.

gouci
Dec 28th, 2009, 11:49 PM
Form explains a proposed new rule.



PROPOSED: Change tennis rule to require first enrollment within 6 months of high school graduation. So, if you grad in Spring 2010... you have to start no later than January 2011. You get one extra semester (to decide or clean up academic shortfalls). If you delay longer, you lose a year of eligibility and have to sit a year in residency.

This is designed to cut down the:

• the int'l kids (and a growing number of US kids) trying a year of pro tennis and then doubling back to college

or the

• "I didn't get the offer Top 20 offer I wanted so I'm gonna try the pro's while I wait for a better offer" gambit

DefyingGravity
Dec 30th, 2009, 06:22 PM
Can you explain club tennis rules, and especially in terms of accepting any money from a USTA tournament?

USTennisfan
Dec 30th, 2009, 10:41 PM
In regards to accepting money from either a USTA tournament, WTA or international ITF professional event, a prospective junior player may retain amatuer status, by not delaring professional status, and completing a NCAA/ITA form in which the tournament director signs off on that itemizes the expenses of the player only, and then may accept the prize money as a form of expense reimbursement. The payment can not exceed the amount of the itemized expenses to play in the event. The NCAA needs the forms as proof. So if the prize money was $1,580, but the itemized expenses only totaled $800, then all you can collect is $800. It's easy for the NCAA to see the amounts, since the WTA player pages shows each tournaments prize money by individual player, so you have to have the proof that you didn't report the money as expenses.

gouci
Jan 17th, 2010, 08:54 AM
I explain the difference between the ITF women's circuit and the WTA women's tour.



The International Tennis Federation (ITF) women's circuit is like the minor leagues of tennis.

The ITF events have 5 levels. $10,000, 25k, 50k, 75k and 100k tournaments.

Finalists of the 25k tournaments get entry into the qualifying draw of a lower WTA Tier 4 or 3 event.

Finalists of the 50k or higher tournaments get a wild card into the main draw of a lower WTA Tier 4 or 3 event.



The Women's Tennis Association (WTA) tour events have 5 levels in rising order. Tier 4, Tier 3, Tier 2, Tier 1 and Grand Slam events.

So 5 tiers for the minor leagues, ITF women's circuit, and 5 tiers for the major leagues, the WTA women's tour!

2nd_serve
Jan 18th, 2010, 11:45 PM
Quote"
So next year's 2011 seniors can only wait one semester before starting college... must start by January 2012 or not play any competiton anywhere after Dec 31 until they start school the following year; penalty then becomes sit year in school and lose a year of eligiblity. This effects US kids or int'l kids trying to pro tour OR trying to wait for a better offer the following year (like Brynn Boren waiting one year before starting at Tennessee next year OR Danielle Lao who 'had' planned to wait for a spot a year later until USC booted Niculescu and they freed up a spot this year). So it's not just going to impact int'l recruits. It will likely take a few years before the int'l kids figure this new time frame out."

Is this likely to make next year's recruiting class crowded with talent, as the 19 year old, 20 year old, and (gasp.) 21 year old Freshman all try to get in on the last dance.

Embittered
Jan 19th, 2010, 07:29 PM
Does funding from third parties (such as, ooh, I dunno, a national tennis federation (http://www.lta.org.uk/News/All-news-items/2009-12-14/Team-AEGON-players-announced/);)) compromise a player's amateur standing at all?

2nd_serve
Feb 3rd, 2010, 05:51 PM
The rule shrinking the one year grace period from HS to college down to just 6 months in tennis passed this week. All sports (no more 26 year old freshman Quarterbacks at Boston College). For tennis it is effective August 2011 so the word has time to spread world wide.

So next year's 2011 seniors can only wait one semester before starting college... must start by January 2012 or not play any competiton anywhere after Dec 31 until they start school the following year; penalty then becomes sit year in school and lose a year of eligiblity. This effects US kids or int'l kids trying to pro tour OR trying to wait for a better offer the following year (like Brynn Boren waiting one year before starting at Tennessee next year OR Danielle Lao who 'had' planned to wait for a spot a year later until USC booted Niculescu and they freed up a spot this year). So it's not just going to impact int'l recruits. It will likely take a few years before the int'l kids figure this new time frame out.

One thing this will do is eliminate 21 year old freshman. 20 would be possible in some cases but 21 would be almost impossible. Cal-Berkeley's average age is about to drop by about 3 years.

.

Is it correct that the new rule just applies to starting college as a freshman. As in it would be acceptable under the rule to go to college for a year, and if the player is beating up on the competition, try out as a pro. And if being a pro isn't successful enough, return to college.

gouci
Feb 25th, 2010, 05:57 PM
Tenniswish explains rules on scouting. :worship:


The NCAA does prohibit schools from paying any expenses for a coach to scout upcoming opponents.

In basketball, football and women's volleyball, off-campus, in-person scouting is strictly prohibited except at tournaments where a team is participating and then coaches can watch other games.

In sports other than those three, coaches wouldn't be able to receive any money to cover expenses. Furthermore, if a coach is traveling as part of the team or on a recruiting trip, then the coach is not allowed to scout during that trip. See NCAA Bylaw 11.6.2.

I guess if a coach wanted to drive across town and watch a match, he/she could, but this rule really protects the coaches from themselves since not being able to pay for scouting trips keeps heads coaches from sending their assistant coaches all over the place to scout opponents.

gouci
Mar 23rd, 2010, 12:02 AM
Form explains the tie-breakers for the Big West Conference tournament seedings.



Funny, there are a couple of tie scenarios but not sure how they break

1. I 'believe' first is head to head

2. I 'believe' a few years ago the coaches decided to then go to 'highest national ranking' as first option to break a three way tie.

3. Then they go back to head to head.

I THINK... that's what I remember being told.

gouci
Apr 1st, 2010, 07:10 PM
Here is NCAA bylaw 14.2.3.2.2


14.2.3.2.2 Tennis.

In tennis, a student-athlete who does not enroll in a collegiate institution as a full-time student in a regular academic term within six months (or the first opportunity to enroll after six months have elapsed) after his or her high school graduation date or the graduation date of his or her class (as determined by the first year of high school enrollment or the international equivalent as specified in the NCAA Guide to International Academic Standards for Athletics Eligibility and based on the prescribed educational path in the student-athlete’s country), whichever occurs earlier, shall be subject to the following:

(a) The student-athlete shall be charged with a season of intercollegiate eligibility for each calendar year after the six-month period has elapsed (or the next opportunity to enroll) and prior to full-time collegiate enrollment during which the student-athlete has participated in organized competition per Bylaw 14.02.9.

(b) After the six-month period, if the student-athlete has engaged in organized competition per Bylaw 14.02.9, on matriculation at the certifying institution, the student-athlete must fulfill an academic year in residence for each calendar year after the six-month period has elapsed (or the next opportunity to enroll) and prior to full-time collegiate enrollment during which the student-athlete has participated in such competition before being eligible to represent the institution in intercollegiate competition.

14.2.3.2.2.1 Matriculation After 20th Birthday — Tennis.

In tennis, a student who is eligible under Bylaw 14.2.3.2.2, but who participates in organized tennis events after his or her 20th birthday and before full-time enrollment at the certifying institution shall be subject to the following:

(a) The student will be charged with one season of intercollegiate tennis competition for each calendar year after his or her 20th birthday and prior to full-time enrollment at the certifying institution during which the student-athlete has participated in organized tennis eventscompetition per Bylaw 14.2.3.5.3 14.02.9. [Note: This includes participation in intercollegiate tennis while enrolled full time in another two-year or four-year institution; however, this provision replaces the season of competition counted in Bylaw 14.2 (only one season is used in any one year).]

(b) Upon matriculation at the certifying institution, the student-athlete must fulfill an academic year in residence before being eligible to represent the institution in intercollegiate tennis, unless the student transfers to the certifying institution with a minimum of 24 semester hours (or equivalent) of transferable degree credit. (Note: All other NCAA transfer and academic eligibility requirements apply.)

tennisismylife1
Apr 7th, 2010, 08:12 PM
Dear All Readers,

The information Gouci has stated regarding the rule change applying to student athletes participating in professional competition 6 months to 1 year after their scheduled high school graduation is NOT accurate. The proposed rule change was NOT accepted as it did NOT have the required 2/3rds vote.

Next week, April 12-13th the Legislative Council will review its action because their was 61 override votes. However, as it stands now the bylaws effective Aug 2010 will remain as 1 year post graduation to play before the athlete must enroll in order to not lose eligibility

Here are the proposed changes, and the history of it is at the bottom.

https://web1.ncaa.org/LSDBi/exec/propSearch

Please be careful what you post on your forums as it could very well effect the lives of many potential student athletes.

2nd_serve
Apr 7th, 2010, 09:22 PM
Dear All Readers,

The information Gouci has stated regarding the rule change applying to student athletes participating in professional competition 6 months to 1 year after their scheduled high school graduation is NOT accurate. The proposed rule change was NOT accepted as it did NOT have the required 2/3rds vote.

Next week, April 12-13th the Legislative Council will review its action because their was 61 override votes. However, as it stands now the bylaws effective Aug 2010 will remain as 1 year post graduation to play before the athlete must enroll in order to not lose eligibility

Here are the proposed changes, and the history of it is at the bottom.

https://web1.ncaa.org/LSDBi/exec/propSearch

Please be careful what you post on your forums as it could very well effect the lives of many potential student athletes.



Your link does not go to any information, just a search page.

Here is a link that may shed light

http://www.ncaa.org/wps/wcm/connect/ncaa/NCAA/NCAA+News/NCAA+News+Online/2010/Division+I/Attempts+to+suspend+two+DI+legislative+proposals+f ail_03_23_10_NCAA_News?pageDesign=Printer+Friendly +NCAA+News+And+Updates

gouci
Apr 7th, 2010, 10:07 PM
tennisismylife1 welcome to the board! :wavey:

1. Thanks for providing a link. But you failed to realize that others can't view the linked page without knowing your "username" and "password." :o :lol:

2. You're a little late to the debate as this topic was cleared up on another thread. But here's a summary of what we concluded.

Here was my conclusion.

- gouci's finding (http://www.tennisforum.com/showpost.php?p=17519327&postcount=264).


"2nd serve" reached the same conclusion.

- 2nd serve's interpretation (http://www.tennisforum.com/showpost.php?p=17519331&postcount=265)

- 2nd serve explains the next step. (http://www.tennisforum.com/showpost.php?p=17520200&postcount=267)

tennisbuddy12
Apr 7th, 2010, 10:54 PM
So its still one year, for now??? Lord, all of these posts and articles is confusing me. I feel for these 2010 seniors...

tennisismylife1
Apr 7th, 2010, 10:56 PM
You don't need a username or password. I believe you can just refresh.

But you really shouldn't conclude on a different thread. People search and find your information, it is not really feasible to then search elsewhere to find that you made a mistake.

2nd_serve
Apr 7th, 2010, 11:18 PM
You don't need a username or password. I believe you can just refresh.

But you really shouldn't conclude on a different thread. People search and find your information, it is not really feasible to then search elsewhere to find that you made a mistake.


Your link just brings up the search page. A reader might want to know the search terms of 2009-22 in the proposal number search box. (use the hyphen) The title of the proposal is.
AMATEURISM AND ELIGIBILITY -- INVOLVEMENT WITH PROFESSIONAL TEAMS -- EXCEPTION -- PRIOR TO INITIAL FULL-TIME COLLEGIATE ENROLLMENT -- DELAYED ENROLLMENT -- SEASONS OF COMPETITION -- SPORTS OTHER THAN MEN'S ICE HOCKEY AND SKIING

Also, you should scroll down to the bottom of the page, and read the paragraph about effective dates. To make it easier, I will quote it here.

Effective Date: For all provisions other than section E, as it relates to tennis: August 1, 2010; applicable to student-athletes who initially enroll full time in a collegiate institution on or after August 1, 2010. For section E as it applies to tennis: August 1, 2011, applicable to student-athletes who initially enroll full time in a collegiate institution on or after August 1, 2011. (emphasis supplied.)

gouci
Apr 8th, 2010, 12:42 AM
But you really shouldn't conclude on a different thread. People search and find your information, it is not really feasible to then search elsewhere to find that you made a mistake.I did not make a mistake. The posts made above mine consistently state the new 6 month grace period rule begins August 2011 for tennis. I just posted the specific language stating the new rule. In my post I didn't mention a start date for the new rule because a final decision won't be made until the April meetings.

The mistake was made by the tennisrecruiting.net article, which thousands of tennis players/coaches/fans probably read, about the new rule incorrectly applying to the tennis HS recruiting class of 2010.

2nd_serve
Apr 13th, 2010, 08:14 PM
OK, when or does this rule take effect?

Looks like the start school after high school rule is changing again. Now it looks that the effective date for most sports is pushed back to August 2011, and that tennis is pushed back to 2012.

link (http://ncaa.org/wps/portal/ncaahome?WCM_GLOBAL_CONTEXT=/ncaa/ncaa/ncaa+news/ncaa+news+online/2010/division+i/legislative+council+modifies+organized+competition +rule+ncaa+news+03-13-10)

quote
The delayed-enrollment/organized-competition portion will not take effect until August 1, 2011 (August 1, 2012 for tennis student-athletes). The Amateurism Cabinet recommended the change, and the Legislative Council agreed that allowing extra time will help with education efforts.

But warning, this may not be the final rule, stay tune to the NCAA.org website if this might effect you.

gouci
Apr 29th, 2010, 09:06 PM
Form talks about how to spot a walk-on.



Walk on's cannot sign LOI's

So either the girl has verballed but didn't sign (likely) or she has signed an LOI as a 2 star...

Also, schools can only 'announce' actually signed, scholarship LOI athletes. So if UCSB never 'announces' her she is then assumed a walk on.

gouci
May 4th, 2010, 09:19 PM
At Harvard, for example, you pay nothing if you earn less than 100k per year, and then 10% of your income if you earn between 100k and 250k. They do not count your assets. Over that and you pay in full (unless you have lots of kids or special circumstances). All financial aid is in grants, not loans. Princeton is pretty similar. The other schools are somewhat less generous, but still offer tons of aid. It is pretty standard to expect no parental contribution if your family makes less than 60k or 80k per year.

Then again, at Duke, which offers comparable financial aid, the average student's parents make over 350k per year...yeah don't even get me started about how pissed off it makes me...(overall something like 90% of Ivy League students come from the top quintile of earners, as I remember from sociology class...)
mboyle talks about Harvard scholarships.

gouci
May 13th, 2010, 08:29 PM
The NCAA Eligibility Center (formerly the NCAA Initial Eligibility Clearinghouse) is a branch of the NCAA that determines a student's initial eligibility for athletics participation in his or her first year of college enrollment. Students who want to participate in college sports during their first year of enrollment in college must register with the Eligibility Center. Located in Indianapolis, Indians, the Eligibility Center staff follows NCAA legislation in analyzing and processing a student's high school academic records, ACT or SAT scores, and key information about amateurism participation, to determine the student's initial eligibility.


What Does A Prospective Student-Athlete Need to Do Before He/She Can Make an Official Visit?

1. Register with the Eligibility Center by completing the online Student Release Form.

2. Pay the registration fee.

3. Make sure the prospective student-athlete has taken the ACT, SAT or PSAT test.

4. Make sure all test scores and high school transcripts are sent directly to the Eligibility Center and the college the prospect is interested in visiting immediately after the student's junior year of high school.

gouci
May 28th, 2010, 07:09 AM
T2000 talks about NCAA individual draw seedings.


Seeding thoughts, Friend at Court explains it this way.

Placing is prohibited. Placing occurs, for example, when the Com-
mittee in a 16-draw tournament seeds four and “places” four. The
practice of placing is an attempt to hide the fact that in reality eight players have been seeded instead of the permissible maximum of four. The rule of “one in three” was established to provide some matches between strong players in the first round, to increase the variety of a player’s opponents, and to get away from the “strong weak-strong-weak” pattern in the draw, thereby giving players who
are usually first-round losers an occasional opportunity to meet each other and advance to the second or third round.

gouci
Jun 8th, 2010, 07:45 PM
Amalgamate, a top 25 nationally ranked junior tennis player, offers some insight to official visits.



Bottom line: I do not think official visits should be allowed during junior year. I appreciate that they are regulated to senior year only. I don't believe that student-athletes should engage in the college process any earlier than other students. A lot happens maturity wise throughout high school. And let's be honest, official visits consist of coaches and players doing their best to woo the recruit. I.e. The players try to "show the recruit a good time." Parties, alcohol, (as much trouble as they could get into, I've never known a girl to take an official visit and not be taken to a party of some sort and be offered alcohol.) free stuff etc. I'd much rather have a senior -- who I believe has a better sense of who they are as a person, are less impressionable, and has a better idea of what they want out of college in terms of academics and socially -- take these visits than juniors. They have had more time to ruminate over these decisions and I think they have a better head on their shoulders. I see no reason to rush the recruiting process (other than coaches trying to secure players as early as possible).

gouci
Nov 30th, 2010, 06:45 AM
Moving from WAC to Mountain West

Boise St. - in 2011-12

Fresno St. - in 2012-13

Nevada - in 2012-13

Hawaii - football only in 2012-13 (in works not official yet)

Hawaii - all other Hawaii sports moving from WAC to Big West in 2012-13

new Mountain West for 2012-13

1. Air Force
2. Colorado St.
3. New Mexico
4. San Diego St.
5. UNLV
6. Wyoming

7. Boise St.
8. Fresno St.
9. Nevada
10. Hawaii (football only)


old Mountain West for 2010-11

7. BYU - football independent & WCC 2011-12
8. Utah - Pac 10 2011-12
9. TCU - Big East 2012-13

gouci
Nov 30th, 2010, 07:00 AM
Moving to WAC in 2012-13

Texas San Antonio - leaving Southland Conference

Texas St. - leaving Southland Conference

Denver - non football member, leaving Sun Belt Conference

new WAC for 2012-13

1. Idaho
2. Louisiana Tech
3. New Mexico St.
4. San Jose St.
5. Utah St.

6. Texas San Antonio
7. Texas St.
8. Denver (non football)


old WAC for 2010-11

6. Boise St. - to MWC 2011-12
7. Fresno St. - to MWC 2012-13
8. Nevada - to MWC 2012-13
9. Hawaii - to MWC football & Big West 2012-13

gouci
Nov 30th, 2010, 07:00 AM
Moving to Pac 12

Utah - in 2011-12, leaving Mountain West

Colorado - in 2012-13, leaving Big 12


Pac 12 for 2012-13

South Division
1. UCLA
2. USC
3. Arizona
4. Arizona St.
5. Utah
6. Colorado

North Division
1. Stanford
2. Cal
3. Washington
4. Washington St.
5. Oregon
6. Oregon St.

Ex. In football UCLA & USC will play all South division teams plus Stanford & Cal every year. UCLA & USC will alternate playing the Washington & Oregon schools every other year.

The Pac-12 will only have divisions in football. Every other sport will simply use one big division, with different setups for how the conference schedule will shake out.

gouci
Nov 30th, 2010, 07:55 AM
Others transferring conferences

Nebraska - to Big Ten 2011-12, leaving Big 12

BYU - football independent & WCC 2011-12, leaving MWC

TCU - to Big East 2012-13, leaving MWC

Seattle - to Great West Conf. for w. tennis 2010-11, was independent


Utah Valley St. - supposed to start W. tennis 2010-11 but change of plans

gouci
Dec 16th, 2010, 03:13 AM
Update: Learned today that changes in the state of CA system now requires as many as FOUR years to change your residency status as in state.

So the UC's and CSU's in California bringing in out of state kids must pay DOUBLE tuition cost for out of state kids their entire four years.

Probably explains why the UCLA football team is now all CA kids rather than recruiting from around the country... though obviously the UCLA tennis team does not have that same issue.
Form gives an update on CA residency rules.

gouci
Mar 21st, 2011, 12:30 AM
The NCAA has lifted the ban on moving up in Divisions effective June 1, 2011. However a schools move up must be sponsored by a conference. Schools can no longer jump to Division 1 as an independent but will have to be accepted by a Division 1 conference 1st.


Transferring Conferences

Southern Utah - to Big Sky 2012-13, leaving Summit League


Jumping to Division 1

Nebraska Omaha - to Summit League 2011-12, moving up from Division 2

UNO plans to move to Div. 1 (http://www.cass-news.com/articles/2011/03/17/sports/college/doc4d7e72a5da232508159412.txt)

UC San Diego - petitioning to join the Big West Conference and move up from Division 2

UCSD request upgrade to Div. 1 (http://www.fox5sandiego.com/news/kswb-ucsd-athletics,0,1398005.story)
UCSD May compete in Div. 1 by 2013 (http://www.ucsdguardian.org/sports/ucsd-may-compete-in-division-i-sports-by-2013/)

gouci
Apr 8th, 2011, 12:15 AM
Form talks about the number of allowed match dates.

8 fall tournies (if you play more than four players in the tourney than the tourney counts as one team match date but each tourney entered counts as one of the 25 max individual dates per player for the participating players)

plus

24 spring dual match dates


Teams are allowed 25 dates (dual matches or tournies with more than 4 entries).
Players are allowed 25 dates (dual matches or tournies they played)

So it appears most of the team was already scheduled to play 28-29 match dates?

No player can play more than 25 'dates' no matter the combo. So you schedule 28-29 per player? This rule has been around for more than 20 years.

WOW... that (Arizona coach) is about as bad a schedule management as I've ever seen in any sport anywhere. Who bumped their head?

gouci
Jun 15th, 2011, 06:48 AM
Moving to WAC in 2012-13

Texas San Antonio - leaving Southland Conference

Texas St. - leaving Southland Conference

Denver - non football member, leaving Sun Belt Conference

Seattle - non football member, was an Independent

new WAC for 2012-13

1. Idaho
2. Louisiana Tech
3. New Mexico St.
4. San Jose St.
5. Utah St.

6. Texas San Antonio
7. Texas St.
8. Denver (non football)
9. Seattle (non football)


old WAC for 2010-11

6. Boise St. - to MWC 2011-12
7. Fresno St. - to MWC 2012-13
8. Nevada - to MWC 2012-13
9. Hawaii - to MWC football & Big West 2012-13


Seattle moving to the WAC (http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/seattleuniversity/2015316570_seattleu15.html) beginning 2012-13.

gouci
Aug 13th, 2011, 11:22 AM
Increase in academic cutline approved

By Dana O'Neil
Associated Press

University presidents and athletic administrators promised swift and serious action after their two-day NCAA retreat.

On Thursday, they delivered their first hammer.

Following up on the retreat's mandate to toughen academic standards, the NCAA Board of Directors voted to ban Division I teams with a four-year academic progress rate (APR) below 930 from participating in the postseason, including all NCAA tournaments and football bowl games.

It's a significant change from the APR structure now in place. Currently, teams with a four-year APR of 925 or below face penalties like loss of scholarships. Only if a team falls below a 900 and is therefore considered a chronic under-performer will it face "historical penalties" including postseason bans.

Now the NCAA will do away with the 900 cutoff, forcing all teams to raise their academic standards or sit on the sidelines in the postseason. Under the new standards, 12 teams would not have qualified for this year's NCAA tournament, including Ohio State and Syracuse.

"A 930 equates to a 50 percent graduation rate and that is the stake in the ground that the presidents wish to put in as an overall goal for every team in Division I," said Dr. Walt Harrison, president of the University of Hartford who serves as the chair of the Division I committee on academic performance. "It's a clear marker. We believe a 50 percent graduation rate is a reasonable goal for all teams."

The final kinks still need to be worked out, but NCAA president Mark Emmert said he expects a formalized plan to be in place by October. Between now and then Harrison and his committee will look at the particulars, including a timetable for implementing the new structure. Because it is a considerable leap, Harrison said there likely will be a three- to five-year phase-in period, allowing schools to "ratchet up" their academics.

Also under discussion is just when the new numbers would be released. Currently, the NCAA releases its annual APR report in May -- a month after the NCAA tournament ends.

Connecticut, with an APR of 930 in May 2010, was eligible to compete and win a national championship. But as of May 2011, the Huskies' APR dropped to 893. If the new mandate was in place, UConn would not be able to defend its title.

But Harrison said that the different academic calendars -- some schools use quarters while others go by semesters -- would make it difficult to have more than one report released.

"As things currently stand, (the spring scores) would determine the next year's postseason eligibility," Harrison said.

One thing that does seem likely to change is the appeal process.

As in there won't be one.

Currently, teams that fall below a 900 can receive a waiver rather than postseason ban in extenuating circumstances -- if, for example, the school has shown marked improvement or the president has shown active involvement in improving his struggling team's academic performance.

"I don't think there will be too much leverage there," Harrison said. "If there is any appeal, I think it will be pretty tightly defined and there might not be any."

U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan had previously called for the NCAA to ban basketball teams with graduation rates below 40 percent from competing in the NCAA tournament. He issued a statement approving of the changes.

"I applaud the NCAA's decision and encourage them to proceed with due speed," Duncan said. "When we joined this conversation two years ago, many experts were skeptical that the NCAA would ever move to deal with the the problem of low graduation rates among a small minority of tournament teams. But they were wrong. College presidents have acted courageously and are leading the way."

NCAA statistics show athletes graduate at a higher rate that non-athletes and academic performance has steadily improved among all sports The most recent numbers, released in May, showed the overall average score for athletes jumped three points to 970. Two of the lower scoring sports -- baseball (959) and men's basketball (945) -- had a five-point jump over the previous year. Another low-scoring sport, football (946), had a two-point jump.

The rule change will likely go down like a dose of castor oil in college hoops circles. Since it was implemented, the APR long has been a sticking point among college basketball coaches who argue it punishes teams unfairly when players leave early for the NBA.

Two years ago, Syracuse lost two scholarships after Eric Devendorf, Jonny Flynn and Paul Harris opted to leave for the NBA without completing their spring coursework.

"It's flawed," Jim Boeheim said at the time about the APR system. "There is absolutely nothing a coach can do if a kid wants to leave and train for the NBA. If he was leaving and walking the streets, I'd understand. When those kids left, they were eligible. They opted not to finish."

But academic administrators and NCAA officials don't want to hear it. They counter that the APR allows for a student to leave early provided he or she leaves in good academic standing.

And more, they believe that the APR goes to the core of what the NCAA is about.

"This is about making sure student-athletes are students," Emmert said. "There is an expectation that they behave accordingly."

The list of penalized teams has skewed disproportionately toward historically black colleges and universities.

This year, the NCAA graded 340 schools. Twenty-four, or about 7 percent, were HBCUs. Yet of the 58 harshest penalties handed out, half went to teams in the two conferences, the Southwestern Athletic and the Mid-Eastern Athletic, comprised entirely of HBCUs. Four teams in those leagues were banned from NCAA tourneys because of their poor academic performance, and football teams at Southern and Jackson State were even banned from playing in the SWAC title game.

If the new rules were in place last year, Alcorn State would have been the only school in the SWAC eligible for the postseason.

Now, everybody is expected to hit an even higher mark to remain eligible for postseason tourneys.

"From a SWAC standpoint, we have to look at what we're doing and definitely get our house in order. But I think our chancellors are working hard to get that done," commissioner Duer Sharp said. "The NCAA realizes not everyone has the same resources and they've been receptive to our challenges."

Some coaches think it's the right move, though.

"I think it's everybody's responsibility to go to school and get an education," Alabama football coach Nick Saban said. "That's part of our program here. I don't really see it being a big issue that players are held accountable relative to what their responsibility is to get an education."

In other action Thursday, the board:

• Agreed to do away with the single-year APR scores and will only use the four-year rolling average to determine postseason eligibility.

• Agreed to continue providing funding for low-resource schools to help the academic performance of athletes and look at new ways to help those schools.

• Decided to take another look at improving the standards for incoming freshmen and junior college transfers in October.

• Agreed to consider including family members among the definition of third-party influences, a definition that also includes agents.

gouci
Oct 28th, 2011, 02:20 PM
The NCAA made the new APR requirement official and provided the implementation timeline.


Under the new standard, teams will have to qualify for the postseason with a four-year average Academic Progress Rate score of 930 or better, which equates to graduating about half the players on a given roster.

Implementation will start in 2012-13, when teams must achieve a 900 multiyear score or average 930 for the most recent two years. In 2014-15, teams must reach 930 or average 940 for the previous two years.

After that, the 930 mark is fully implemented, and NCAA officials warned that it will be waived only in extraordinary circumstances.

In addition, the new, tougher entrance requirements could force some incoming freshmen to spend their first year in college as an "academic redshirt," under scholarship and practicing with their teams but not allowed to compete.

gouci
Oct 28th, 2011, 02:24 PM
The NCAA board adopted a much-anticipated proposal that will allow universities to boost their athletic scholarships by as much as $2,000 to cover the full cost of attendance.

Proponents of the scholarship increase see it as a way to help student-athletes, many of whom are asked to train year-round and cannot work to pay for miscellaneous expenses or even food once their season ends and they no longer get training table meals.

Each conference will be free to vote on whether to adopt the proposal. Critics argue that any increase in spending favors larger, wealthier conferences and exacerbates the so-called arms race.

"The NCAA, apparently, is not concerned about that," said Robert Kustra, president of Boise State.

form
Oct 28th, 2011, 06:41 PM
The NCAA board adopted a much-anticipated proposal that will allow universities to boost their athletic scholarships by as much as $2,000 to cover the full cost of attendance.

Proponents of the scholarship increase see it as a way to help student-athletes, many of whom are asked to train year-round and cannot work to pay for miscellaneous expenses or even food once their season ends and they no longer get training table meals.

Each conference will be free to vote on whether to adopt the proposal. Critics argue that any increase in spending favors larger, wealthier conferences and exacerbates the so-called arms race.

"The NCAA, apparently, is not concerned about that," said Robert Kustra, president of Boise State.


Boise president just summed it up. Non-football schools just got left at the gate and we all know where tennis fits in most atletic depts when budgets are tight. :help:

gouci
Nov 21st, 2011, 08:17 PM
Hal Incandenza talks about colleges able to pay for pro tournaments in the Fall.

It is actually allowed and other top schools do this as well. It's a way to sign/keep that player that is on the bubble of going pro or playing in college. The pro events count as any other fall event and the school can pay, just like any other fall event, as long as a coach from the school takes them. If they go alone, the school can't pay.

gouci
Dec 11th, 2011, 08:03 PM
Form talks about the difference between head count and equivalency sports.

Here are the D-1 college sports that give either full scholarships or none!

Men
Football
Basketball

Women
Basketball
Gymnastics
Tennis
Volleyball

This list is correct. it's known as HEAD COUNT sports meaning they count the number of athletes receiving support. In these sports it is very difficult to compete unless you offer FULL scholarships because other schools will offer full scholarships. It's sort of an all or nothing in most cases for good players.

All other sports (20+ sports) are EQUIVALENCY sports where you get a pot of money equivalent to a number (baseball is 11.7, men's tennis is 4.5 I believe)... and that money is spread amongst unlimited number. Basically you are like a General Manager trying to attract players within a salary cap. Some fulls, some partials of varying sizes, some walk ons.

There is a big CULTURE difference between the two in each sport. In HEAD COUNT SPORTS, the student and their parents basically expect a full scholarship (except for a few elite academic schools). Otherwise they move on to the next best offer.

In EQUIVALENCY SPORTS, the goal is as much supports as possible COMBINED with a calculation as to how much mom/dad/loans will have to come up with to cover the difference.

The student athletes literally grow up with different mental expectations depending on the situation.

gouci
Jan 1st, 2012, 06:46 AM
Transferring Conferences

Belmont - from Atlantic Sun to Ohio Valley for 2012-13

North Dakota - from Great West to Big Sky for 2012-13

Northern Kentucky - from Div. 2 to Div. 1 Atlantic Sun for 2012-13

Texas Arlington - from Southland to WAC for 2012-13


To SEC for 2012-13

Missouri - from Big 12
Texas A&M - from Big 12


To Big 12 for 2012-13

TCU - from Mountain West
West Virginia - from Big East


To Big East for 2013-14

Central Florida - from Conference USA
Houston - from Conference USA
SMU - from Conference USA
Boise State - from Mountain West (football only)
San Diego State - from Mountain West (football only)

Boise State - from Mountain West to WAC (Olympic sports) for 2013-14

San Diego State - from Mountain West to Big West (Olympic sports) for 2013-14


To Southland

Oral Roberts - from Summit League to Southland for 2012-13
Houston Baptist - from Great West to Southland for 2013-14


To ACC for 2014-15?

Syracuse - from Big East (date TBD)
Pittsburgh - from Big East (date TBD)
.

gouci
Mar 27th, 2012, 02:55 AM
To Atlantic 10 for 2013-14

Butler - from Horizon League
George Mason - from Colonial Athletic Association
VCU - from Colonial Athletic Association


To Big East for 2013-14

Temple - from Atlantic 10


To Sun Belt for 2013-14

Charlotte - from Atlantic 10


according to CBSSports.com (http://www.cbssports.com/collegefootball/blog/brett-mcmurphy/18045227/vcu-george-mason-butler-in-discussions-to-join-atlantic-10)


To WCC for 2013-14

Pacific - from Big West

gouci
Apr 6th, 2012, 08:09 PM
10sE does a great job of explaining below the formula for ranking teams and individuals.



The ranking value is the result of a fraction:

Wins (and their value, which depends on your opponents' rank) is the numerator, and countable matches plus losses as the denominator. If a team were undefeated, however many wins are being counted at the current ranking date is the denominator. This number increases as the season goes on and caps off at a certain number. Every time a team loses, there is a figure added to the denominator (the worse the ranking, the higher the number added), thereby decreasing the total value. This explains why a team's ranking drops suddenly after a "bad" loss, especially early after the computer takes over and not as many wins are being "counted".

So it's X (points for countable wins) over Y (number of countable wins) plus Z (losses)

The exact formula is "secret" but you one tell by movement in rankings that a loss against a top-10 team hardly adds any value to the denominator while an unranked loss affects a team a great deal. Also it is clear that less wins/losses are counted early in the season because big wins/bad losses affect a team's ranking # more dramatically (not actual rank, but the integer next to the team, which is the result of the calculation).



To make it more clear, and I know this is not exactly correct but just for the sake of clarifying, say there are 320 D1 teams, a win over the #1 team would get you 320 points and a win over the #320 team would get you 1 pt.

A loss against the #1 team would add 1 to your denominator while a loss against the worst team would add 320.

Judging by the final ranking value the figures above are clearly not correct, but the principle (benefit/detriment of a win/loss directly proportional to opponent's rank) is.

Someone with a math background could probably figure it out.

gouci
Apr 14th, 2012, 04:17 PM
Form talks about seeding for the NCAA team tournament.



Actually found it in the 2011 handbook as I cannot yet find the 2012 book.
http://fs.ncaa.org/Docs/champ_handbooks/tennis/2011/11_1_mw_tennis.pdf

Page 22

SeedingTeam championship. The Division I Tennis Committee will seed teams using the
selection criteria, excluding the “wins versus teams already selected” criterion. The
selection criteria includes a review of team results obtained beginning January 1
through May 1, 2011.

The committee will seed teams 1-16 in order. Nos. 17-32 will be banded in order.
Nos. 33-48 will be banded alphabetically as a group of 16. Nos. 49-64 will be banded
alphabetically as a group of 16. Teams will not be re-seeded after the first and second rounds.

ats_tennis
May 8th, 2012, 06:24 PM
Gouci, I think I read in this thread that transfers in-conference would result in a player having to lose a year of eligibility? So say if someone was transferring from Duke to UNC or vice versa (ACC to ACC) they would lose a year of eligibility, correct?

tennisbuddy12
May 8th, 2012, 07:03 PM
Gouci, I think I read in this thread that transfers in-conference would result in a player having to lose a year of eligibility? So say if someone was transferring from Duke to UNC or vice versa (ACC to ACC) they would lose a year of eligibility, correct?

Yes, also if a coach doesn't allow a transfer to be made, the player has to sit out a year

form
May 8th, 2012, 08:55 PM
Yes, also if a coach doesn't allow a transfer to be made, the player has to sit out a year

You have to sit a year.

You don't technically lose one of your four competition years ... but you do lose 1 of the 5 years you have to complete 4 years if you transfer within conference or without departing uni granting approval.

Personally, I wish they'd mirror the Basketball/Football rule... if you transfer you must sit a year.. period. Then kids might think a bit harder about their choice or jumping ship. Likewise, it would make it more difficult for coaches (UVA, Baylor in the past) to continuously cut kids as they SHOP each year for better and better.

Would make both sides of the argument a bit more responsible.

ats_tennis
May 9th, 2012, 12:17 AM
You have to sit a year.

You don't technically lose one of your four competition years ... but you do lose 1 of the 5 years you have to complete 4 years if you transfer within conference or without departing uni granting approval.

Personally, I wish they'd mirror the Basketball/Football rule... if you transfer you must sit a year.. period. Then kids might think a bit harder about their choice or jumping ship. Likewise, it would make it more difficult for coaches (UVA, Baylor in the past) to continuously cut kids as they SHOP each year for better and better.

Would make both sides of the argument a bit more responsible.

Thanks form! Last question: what about de-committnig from a verbal commitment? Are there any rules that punish players for de-committing from a verbal?

gullytwin
May 9th, 2012, 12:20 AM
Thanks form! Last question: what about de-committnig from a verbal commitment? Are there any rules that punish players for de-committing from a verbal?I'm pretty sure the answer is "no"--a verbal means, essentially, nothing, and either the coach/team or the player can renege without any penalty. Until the discussion of Virginia on this board, though, I hadn't heard of teams reneging on offers, only players changing their minds.

form
May 9th, 2012, 04:09 PM
gullytwin is correct... a verbal is like a promise ring.... you can walk away from it. The person who got the promise ring was all excited but ultimately only got scre****. hehehehehe

Actually the verbal is also a two way street... until that paperwork is signed and returned, the coach can pull back even if they have received a verbal also.

It's just a promise that can be broken.

I know of a Pac school who once pulled back on a verbal... but to be honest they were smart. The girl had verballed and then pretty much stopped playing so you could see that mess coming fast. And it did, she washed out of another school back east in two years of poor play also.