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Mina Vagante
Apr 15th, 2009, 06:11 PM
On a visit to Spain, I relaised how un-european we are.

We met a Spanish family , so I put my hand out to shake their hand and they siad 'No, a kiss'

It took us all by surprise !

There were so many different people there from all other Europe and they all seemed to have their little European things they do. It just felt really strange and my friends were saying we felt like we weren't from Europe - more like Americans.

The ' European Kiss ' thing wasnt too bad. I met this really hot guy so :p

Anyways so... We felt really different from everyone else. Just a very strange vibe.

The end:)

Joe Keane
Apr 15th, 2009, 06:13 PM
No, WW3....thats the only time i'll set foot in europe

Tom1990
Apr 15th, 2009, 06:15 PM
I know what you mean. I think us Brits are kind of in the middle. Americans think we're European and European's think we're Americans. LOL.

Personally living in London i feel more European but that's me.

Did that answer your question. :D

Adal
Apr 15th, 2009, 06:16 PM
Hey Ross

Dodoboy.
Apr 15th, 2009, 06:20 PM
Oooo, who's this guy :speakles:

Yeah, i am not european.

Mina Vagante
Apr 15th, 2009, 06:20 PM
I know what you mean. I think us Brits are kind of in the middle. Americans think we're European and European's think we're Americans. LOL.

Personally living in London i feel more European but that's me.

Did that answer your question. :D

Well you would as there are so many different people in London.

But sure, We definately live a more American way of life.

And its strange, Like someone mentioned that I was European and I had to think about it. I had just never fully thought that I was European.

Mina Vagante
Apr 15th, 2009, 06:21 PM
Hey Ross

:lol: Heyyyyy !!!! :wavey:

Mina Vagante
Apr 15th, 2009, 06:22 PM
Oooo, who's this guy :speakles:

Yeah, i am not european.

I'm Ross and I'm European :rolls:

I know you're not :) ... You're African ;)

Tom1990
Apr 15th, 2009, 06:24 PM
Well you would as there are so many different people in London.

But sure, We definately live a more American way of life.

And its strange, Like someone mentioned that I was European and I had to think about it. I had just never fully thought that I was European.


I think because we speak English we feel more closely linked to American people.

I like referring to myself as European though. The EU probably makes me feel more like that. When I went to America 2 years ago I thought they had their own weird things, they're much more religious than we are, I think, lol.

spiceboy
Apr 15th, 2009, 06:28 PM
I know what you mean. I think us Brits are kind of in the middle. Americans think we're European and European's think we're Americans.

Excuse me? Only retarded people would think so :weirdo:

Mina Vagante
Apr 15th, 2009, 06:30 PM
Excuse me? Only retarded people would think so :weirdo:

I know what he means though. I think Europeans see British people as very ' Americany ' and not steriotypically ' European '

Or am I wrong ?

Kart
Apr 15th, 2009, 06:31 PM
I struggle to feel British, let alone European.

Craig.
Apr 15th, 2009, 06:38 PM
Ross :hearts:

Tom1990
Apr 15th, 2009, 06:40 PM
I know what he means though. I think Europeans see British people as very ' Americany ' and not steriotypically ' European '

Or am I wrong ?


Yes LOL that's exactly what i mean, Thank you for clarifying my point Ross :D

But as a Brit, I don't feel particularly "Americany"

Mina Vagante
Apr 15th, 2009, 06:40 PM
Ross :hearts:

Craig ! :inlove:

Craig.
Apr 15th, 2009, 06:42 PM
Craig ! :inlove:

Where the hell have you been? :(

My thread just died without you. :sobbing:

Mina Vagante
Apr 15th, 2009, 06:44 PM
Where the hell have you been? :(

My thread just died without you. :sobbing:

No more hot talk between us :sad:

Sorry, I was in Spain for two weeks.

Here I am though ! :D

spiceboy
Apr 15th, 2009, 06:45 PM
I know what he means though. I think Europeans see British people as very ' Americany ' and not steriotypically ' European '


I'm sorry to be a pain but the whole concept sounds pretty stupid. What's an stereotypically European? What does a Spaniard have in common with a Polish? And a Finnish with a French? An Italian with a Czech? I think it is a very simplistic approach to catalogue Europeans as a whole. You Brits are not THAT special :p

Craig.
Apr 15th, 2009, 06:45 PM
No more hot talk between us :sad:

Sorry, I was in Spain for two weeks.

Here I am though ! :D

Spain, huh? :hehehe:

Let's go talk in my thread. :cool:

Tom1990
Apr 15th, 2009, 06:47 PM
I'm sorry to be a pain but the whole concept sounds pretty stupid. What's an stereotypically European? What does a Spaniard have in common with a Polish? And a Finnish with a French? An Italian with a Czech? I think it is a very simplistic approach to catalogue Europeans as a whole. You Brits are not THAT special :p

haha point well made. I think us brits like to think we're special ;)

Rui.
Apr 15th, 2009, 06:59 PM
What's an "european kiss"?

Well in Portugal, atleast in the region where i live, no boy/man kisses another boy/man, normally.

Mina Vagante
Apr 15th, 2009, 07:32 PM
haha point well made. I think us brits like to think we're special ;)

We are ! We're the leaders of Europe :secret:

Mina Vagante
Apr 15th, 2009, 07:34 PM
What's an "european kiss"?

Well in Portugal, atleast in the region where i live, no boy/man kisses another boy/man, normally.

I named it that :lol:

The whole kiss on each cheek thing. We do it a bit here, not much though.

In Spain everyone was doing it !

Italians especially :scratch:

Rui.
Apr 15th, 2009, 07:47 PM
I named it that :lol:

The whole kiss on each cheek thing. We do it a bit here, not much though.

In Spain everyone was doing it !

Italians especially :scratch:

In my region we don't do it :lol:

veryborednow
Apr 15th, 2009, 09:06 PM
Ignore the flag, I'm as British as you can get. I see myself as European over being British mainly cos I hate my country's little islander stuck up image of itself. I'd love for the country to pull its head out of its collective arse and join in a bit more.

And having studied abroad for a year amongst Europeans and Americans, I saw how European my mentality was (socially, economically, in social situations etc eetc) even though it doesn't always match up exactly with other Europeans (they're a diverse bunch) and how different it was from the Americans - even though they're the Americans who managed to make it out of their own country who are different from those who don't.

I guess I don't count kissing on the cheek the defining attribute of 'European-ness', and yes it invades the personal space more than a 'hi', soon got used to it.

Conor
Apr 15th, 2009, 09:26 PM
Yes I feel Ireland is somewhat adrift of the rest of Europe too. I like to blame the Eurovision song contest for that though.

Apoleb
Apr 15th, 2009, 09:29 PM
The "kiss on the cheek" thing is probably more Mediterranean than European. I'm not sure it's a regular habit in say, Germany or Scandinavia.

veryborednow
Apr 15th, 2009, 09:43 PM
Yes I feel Ireland is somewhat adrift of the rest of Europe too. I like to blame the Eurovision song contest for that though.
Heh. How?! Before the voting change you and your rubbish gaelic lullaby crap always used to win...

QuicKyMonSter
Apr 15th, 2009, 09:46 PM
European kiss? :unsure:
As someone said before, it's rather a mediterranean thing with the Frenchies being the leaders.

In Spain it's normal between girl- girl and girl-guy but never guy-guy unless they're in your family. Even when you meet someone for the first time. Guy shaking a girl's hand => WTF?!

In France it's mainly the same thing as in Spain...only you do shake hands the first time you meet somebody but it's more normal to see two guys kissing on the cheek.

I suppose it's more similar to Spain in Italy and Portugal. Have no idea about the slavic mediterraneans...can't remember in Greece.

But no, it's not particularely European to kiss someone on the cheek the first time you meet them so don't feel un-european.

And to answer the other question. I don't think Brits are similar to Americans. Not.at.all. :)

Conor
Apr 15th, 2009, 09:49 PM
Heh. How?! Before the voting change you and your rubbish gaelic lullaby crap always used to win...

Joking much? ;)

Svetlana.
Apr 15th, 2009, 11:11 PM
I'm sorry to be a pain but the whole concept sounds pretty stupid. What's an stereotypically European? What does a Spaniard have in common with a Polish? And a Finnish with a French? An Italian with a Czech? I think it is a very simplistic approach to catalogue Europeans as a whole. You Brits are not THAT special :p

I've never been to England, but believe me when you live in the States and then travel to France, Italy or any other EU country you feel the difference. You can travel from one to another country in Europe and feel that special vibe like no where else.

veryborednow
Apr 15th, 2009, 11:21 PM
Joking much? ;)
How long have I been online, and I still can't recognise sarcasm.... stunning.

The Daviator
Apr 15th, 2009, 11:28 PM
On a visit to Spain, I relaised how un-european we are.

We met a Spanish family , so I put my hand out to shake their hand and they siad 'No, a kiss'

It took us all by surprise !

There were so many different people there from all other Europe and they all seemed to have their little European things they do. It just felt really strange and my friends were saying we felt like we weren't from Europe - more like Americans.

The ' European Kiss ' thing wasnt too bad. I met this really hot guy so :p

Anyways so... We felt really different from everyone else. Just a very strange vibe.

The end:)

Maybe you don't feel very 'Spanishy'? :p

Go to Spain and and go to Finland, and I'm sure you'll have two very different experiences, Europe is very diverse, I'm Irish and I feel European probably cos I love most of Europe/Europeans :p

Expat
Apr 15th, 2009, 11:41 PM
I haven't seen 2 unrelated guys kissing on the cheeks at all in Spain. Never been to Italy or the Balkans. Unless it is some modern role play by gay guys taking on the traditional role of women in such a situation I am not sure this happens in Spain outside of the immediate family. It was quite common in Dubai though amongst the native Arab population. I didn't observe it amongst expats in Dubai. They also had some nose rubbing ritual amongst the Arabs there.

Geoffry
Apr 16th, 2009, 12:19 AM
The kiss on the cheek isn't just in the Mediterranean countries. We, Belgians, also prefer to kiss than shake hands. ;) Three kisses, actually. :p

M2k
Apr 16th, 2009, 01:42 AM
Don't kill me! :o


now that I think about it... I never think of British people as "European", I mean I know they are, but it just seems odd to think of them as European. * blame Hollywood for making me think that way though :p *

gentenaire
Apr 16th, 2009, 05:56 AM
The kiss on the cheek isn't just in the Mediterranean countries. We, Belgians, also prefer to kiss than shake hands. ;) Three kisses, actually. :p

But men don't kiss. It's only girl-girl, girl-boy, never boy-boy. And we generally don't kiss when meeting for the first time. (could be different in Wallonia though).

We either give one or three kisses, in France it's two or four. So in practice, this means that whenever I meet a French person we end up kissing 4 times. I intend to give just one kiss, French person always gives 2, but it's never 2 here so I go for the 3rd, then French person goes for a 4th :lol:

~Cherry*Blossom~
Apr 16th, 2009, 06:05 AM
I feel British but don't feel English for some reason. I know that's really odd but I never see myself as being English even though I was born here and always lived here. So if I don't feel English I think it is pretty much out of the question for me to feel European.

I don't understand why though.

^bibi^
Apr 16th, 2009, 06:33 AM
But men don't kiss. It's only girl-girl, girl-boy, never boy-boy. And we generally don't kiss when meeting for the first time. (could be different in Wallonia though).

We either give one or three kisses, in France it's two or four. So in practice, this means that whenever I meet a French person we end up kissing 4 times. I intend to give just one kiss, French person always gives 2, but it's never 2 here so I go for the 3rd, then French person goes for a 4th :lol:

Yeah it IS different.. Which is really weird coz If I meet a french speaking guy I tend to kiss him, if he's flemish I tend to shake hands, unlesshe's gayin which case i'm still allowed to kiss :haha: that's the real prolem in Belgium if you ask me :haha:

I usually only give one kiss, except to my french buddies who get 2 (unless I forget and they're just waiting in vain for the second one :lol: )

About the first subject of the thread.. as someone pointed out, I feel that London is somewhat more european than the rest of UK... When I lived there, I didn't feel outside of Europe at all :shrug: But yeah, every country's different and there's a lot of different culture interacting... to me, that would be what defines "Europe-ness"

Halardfan
Apr 16th, 2009, 07:47 AM
We are not part of continental Europe, and that physical seperation has lead to a defensive attitude when it comes to the rest of Europe. But we are European, and I feel positive about that. I hate the little Englander, Daily Mail attitude, while at the same time I feel sad when some countries sneer at “Anglo-saxons” (Ironics considering the continental origins of the Angles and the Saxons!)

The situation is mirrored in Japan, again because they are seperate from mainland Asia, many Japanese feel more removed from Asia. Being an island people has interesting effects, good and bad.

I feel in the English speaking world, Britain has more in common with Canada, Australia and New Zealand than America.

jimbo mack
Apr 16th, 2009, 08:32 AM
i'm a guy, in the uk if i meet a girl i shake their hand, i would never kiss them on cheek. i consider it rude to invade people's personal space :shrug:

jimbo mack
Apr 16th, 2009, 08:34 AM
We are not part of continental Europe, and that physical seperation has lead to a defensive attitude when it comes to the rest of Europe. But we are European, and I feel positive about that. I hate the little Englander, Daily Mail attitude, while at the same time I feel sad when some countries sneer at “Anglo-saxons” (Ironics considering the continental origins of the Angles and the Saxons!)

The situation is mirrored in Japan, again because they are seperate from mainland Asia, many Japanese feel more removed from Asia. Being an island people has interesting effects, good and bad.

I feel in the English speaking world, Britain has more in common with Canada, Australia and New Zealand than America.

having been to Australia and NZ i can assure we are not

Us Brits are completely unique, no country can be compared to us

fifiricci
Apr 16th, 2009, 08:49 AM
I think because we speak English we feel more closely linked to American people.

I like referring to myself as European though. The EU probably makes me feel more like that. When I went to America 2 years ago I thought they had their own weird things, they're much more religious than we are, I think, lol.

When it comes to the UK and the USA, George Bernard Shaw's famous quote still stands, methinks. We may have a common language, but in so many other respects our attitudes are miles apart. And why should they be similar? Brits and Americans have a completely different genesis. The use of a common language gives us a false sense of similarity with each other.(ditto the Brits and Australians).

I'm British and I feel, well, British!! But what does "British" mean exactly? British Welsh, British English, British Scottish, British Northern Irish? And God only knows what "European" is supposed to mean. I've got some Italian blood (in my veins, that is - I haven't sucked the blood out of a passing Italian in a vampire like frenzy or stolen some from an Italian blood bank), so does that make me more Italian European than, say, French European, even though I've spent over a year of my life in France and only six months in Italy?

Do we have to have a specific national label? Can't I just be me without being badged with a nationality every day? If not, today I think I'll be an Italian European. Tanti baci carissimo! :kiss:

FORZA SARITA
Apr 16th, 2009, 08:56 AM
i'm a guy, in the uk if i meet a girl i shake their hand, i would never kiss them on cheek. i consider it rude to invade people's personal space :shrug:

:lol: here it's normal :kiss: a girl ;)

Mina Vagante
Apr 16th, 2009, 12:26 PM
:lol: here it's normal :kiss: a girl ;)

We met some Italian boys and they were all kissing each other goodbye !

So, I felt obliged to do it do :kiss: Man, I miss them !

Another thing I realised is that Spanairds and Italians are really touchy people ! I seriously thought one of them was feeling me up ! :lol:

only_one_maria
Apr 16th, 2009, 01:19 PM
I think the best way to resolve this is to ask how would aliens from outer space observing the human race define the British? Rather like most of Europe, Britain is a post-reformation/post-enlightenment christian country. Someone once said to me the biggest difference between Britain and the continent was that we hadn't properly experienced the French Revolution. I don't know enough about histroy to say whther that is true or not but it's obvious when your are (geographically) on the fringes of a continent - and an Island at that - you will be less exposed to the cultural/political changes that take place. Perhaps rather like other countries on the fringes - Ireland, Russia, Ukraine - Britain will always be a bit semi-detached.

As for the leaning towards US or Europe debate, I always find that a hard one to answer. We are definitely more susceptible to American culture than most European countries, in part I guess because of language, but also remember that modern America was largely founded by Brits. Whatever the answer, I'd say we're more similar to the Australians/New Zealanders/Canadians/Irish.

Polikarpov
Apr 16th, 2009, 01:36 PM
I'm Asian, but really found this thread interesting -- especially about the kissing as a form of greeting part. I've always thought that it was normal, and is being done by majority of Europeans.

My family and I were watching gymnastics in the Olympics last year, and we're surprised when Nastia Liukin kissed his father on the lips. We were even more surprised during the men's competition when they showed the coach of the Russian team kissing his gymnasts. Is this something exclusive to Russia, or are there other countries that practice such?

lolas
Apr 16th, 2009, 02:24 PM
In Germany people shake hands most of the time although the kisses on the cheeks are used especially by teenage girls with a underclass background (I guess)

fifiricci
Apr 16th, 2009, 02:55 PM
Do British posters feel European? I don't think we need look any further for the answer:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j0R7NLk4W0s
:worship:

Just Do It
Apr 16th, 2009, 04:17 PM
I dont feel European either.

AdeyC
Apr 17th, 2009, 11:19 AM
Heh. How?! Before the voting change you and your rubbish gaelic lullaby crap always used to win...

Probably because it's now full of countries from the east who'd vote for each other even if they were reading from the telephone book.

Although gotta say Luminita should have won in 2005 - that was pure class.

Dodoboy.
Apr 17th, 2009, 11:36 AM
Eastern Europe is very different i guess :shrug:

Europe rocks
Apr 17th, 2009, 09:11 PM
I think that most people who come from an island nation feel slightly more detached from the continent that they belong to, but it just depends on what you classify as British and European

Monica_Rules
Apr 17th, 2009, 09:20 PM
Yes and no.

I feel like i am a european as we do have certain things in common with mainland europe but the UK is almost like a bridge between the USA and europe.

I do feel embarassed when i go to spain or wherever and i can't speak the language, its just disrespectful but its part of the british culture to go to another country and expect them to speak english and it grates on me. I suppose i notice this more as i see english people move into wales for their retirement and have respect of the language and the culture of the area they move to.

I did learn a few spanish words out of respect such as please, thank you and hello.

I can get by ok with french but its not great.

talie
Apr 17th, 2009, 09:42 PM
Yes and no.

I feel like i am a european as we do have certain things in common with mainland europe but the UK is almost like a bridge between the USA and europe.

I do feel embarassed when i go to spain or wherever and i can't speak the language, its just disrespectful but its part of the british culture to go to another country and expect them to speak english and it grates on me. I suppose i notice this more as i see english people move into wales for their retirement and have respect of the language and the culture of the area they move to.

I did learn a few spanish words out of respect such as please, thank you and hello.

I can get by ok with french but its not great.Or you can do what most of us do when abroad and just speak very loudly in English but with the accent that is appropriate to that country with lots of pointing and gesticulating :lol:

LeonHart
Apr 17th, 2009, 11:52 PM
I'm Asian, but really found this thread interesting -- especially about the kissing as a form of greeting part. I've always thought that it was normal, and is being done by majority of Europeans.

My family and I were watching gymnastics in the Olympics last year, and we're surprised when Nastia Liukin kissed his father on the lips. We were even more surprised during the men's competition when they showed the coach of the Russian team kissing his gymnasts. Is this something exclusive to Russia, or are there other countries that practice such?


I know what you mean. In Asia (or at least in Taiwan where I lived) childen and parents never kiss on the lips, only on the cheeks. When I moved to U.S. I know alot of children kiss their parents on the lips though. So it's not just a Russian thing.

Shvedbarilescu
Apr 18th, 2009, 12:20 AM
I'm English and I was born here in London but I grew up mostly in New York. I have lived the vast majority of my life in these two big and wonderful cities, New York and London. That said, I don't feel particularly English at all and don't feel any real attachment to Great Britain. Neither do I feel any great attachment to the USA. I do however regard myself as a Londoner and I love this city. I also consider myself a New Yorker and likewise I love NYC. But I don't really feel London is that much like the rest of GB or that NY is that much like the rest of the USA. Both cities are great big melting pots of lots of different cultures. That is what I like about both and what makes me comfortable in both theses cities.

And finally to answer the question, yes, I do feel very European as well. I love visiting continental Europe, I love the people and I actually feel more comfortable with non-English Europeans than I do with English folks. I should add that there are obviously a lot of English people I like very much too but if London's population was all English I'd go mad and quickly find a way out and move somewhere like Prague or Barcelona.

Destiny
Apr 18th, 2009, 12:51 AM
Noi do not in the slightest bit

Crazy Canuck
Apr 18th, 2009, 10:35 AM
having been to Australia and NZ i can assure we are not

Us Brits are completely unique, no country can be compared to us

Sure. You're unique and special, just like everybody else.

raffles
Apr 18th, 2009, 10:56 AM
I know what you mean. In Asia (or at least in Taiwan where I lived) childen and parents never kiss on the lips, only on the cheeks. When I moved to U.S. I know alot of children kiss their parents on the lips though. So it's not just a Russian thing.

Well I was slightly surprised by the amount of people walking aroung holding hand in the street in China, the girl/girl and boy/girl. I also spotted a good few guys walking around with their arms around each other shoulders. It seemed to have way more public affection than in Britain, Lonely Planet lied to me about that. :lol:

Crazy Canuck
Apr 18th, 2009, 11:12 AM
Well I was slightly surprised by the amount of people walking aroung holding hand in the street in China, the girl/girl and boy/girl. I also spotted a good few guys walking around with their arms around each other shoulders. It seemed to have way more public affection than in Britain, Lonely Planet lied to me about that. :lol:
My male students (in Korea) would regularly hold hands and sit in each other's laps, even when they were what is generally considered way too old to be "horsing around". Of course, most of them grow up to be massive homophobes anyways. I point out the hilarity of this to them as often as possible.

azza
Apr 19th, 2009, 12:23 AM
i wish was was european :( im only half maltese

frenchie
Apr 19th, 2009, 12:46 AM
When I was in Canada (french speaking part of Canada) people felt more European than Canadian or American

vadin124
Apr 19th, 2009, 01:31 AM
i would never consider myself European...

the only other european nation i like is Greece...all the rest i don't really care about...

Britain has nothing in common with Europe...we're just our own little island on our own!

Pengwin
Apr 19th, 2009, 01:55 AM
No.

Inktrailer
Apr 19th, 2009, 08:44 AM
I don't feel European, no. But do, say, French people think of themselves as European or as French? People say the British are up their own arse but we're no more so than a lot of other countries, people tend to be proud of their nationality but in Britain we give ourselves stick for that and we HATE it when our media beefs us up. But anyway, we're not like the Americans either, just the language means we have a closer relationship to their output/entertainment. Speaking of language, I disagree that it's ignorant or disrespectful that we go abroad and don't learn the language. The fact is that other European countries are much more focused on second languages and English is the language most learned by non-English speakers around the world. Learning English is much more useful in general, but I would like to see our schools teaching a second language from an earlier age as it's a useful skill to have. Personally I plan on attempting to learn another language - probably German, which would still make me look ignorant if I were to travel to Spain, France, Italy, Russia, Portugal, wherever. Other countries in Europe start learning at age 6, we start at 11 and can choose to drop it a couple of years later, having reached the stage of saying crap like "My monkey is having a drink in the cafe. His name is Maurice. He is sitting in a blue chair".

Bartosh
Apr 19th, 2009, 10:52 AM
Eastern Europe is very different i guess :shrug:

I don't think so :shrug: we assimilate manners from Western Europeans ;) shake hands is now more common than kisses :)

gentenaire
Apr 19th, 2009, 11:23 AM
Other countries in Europe start learning at age 6, we start at 11 and can choose to drop it a couple of years later, having reached the stage of saying crap like "My monkey is having a drink in the cafe. His name is Maurice. He is sitting in a blue chair".

Been watching Eddie Izzard, have you? ;)

(and we didn't start learning French until age 10 either, English at 13, German at 14)

Inktrailer
Apr 19th, 2009, 01:24 PM
I consider myself as much European, as British.

But that leads to another question; do British posters feel British? I've no problems about being called British but I'm English, and a lot of Scots and Welsh people consider themselves Scottish or Welsh rather than British.

gentenaire
Apr 19th, 2009, 01:30 PM
But that leads to another question; do British posters feel British? I've no problems about being called British but I'm English, and a lot of Scots and Welsh people consider themselves Scottish or Welsh rather than British.

It doesn't have to be an 'or' thing. You can feel English and British and European.

I consider myself Flemish and Belgian and European.

Inktrailer
Apr 19th, 2009, 01:35 PM
It doesn't have to be an 'or' thing. You can feel English and British and European.

I consider myself Flemish and Belgian and European.

No, but usually one means more to a person than the other. If asked, I say I'm English; I know I'm also British and being European means nothing to me.

In general though I don't consider any of it to be a big deal. People are people first and foremost, not a nationality.

frenchie
Apr 19th, 2009, 08:35 PM
I don't feel European, no. But do, say, French people think of themselves as European or as French? People say the British are up their own arse but we're no more so than a lot of other countries, people tend to be proud of their nationality but in Britain we give ourselves stick for that and we HATE it when our media beefs us up. But anyway, we're not like the Americans either, just the language means we have a closer relationship to their output/entertainment. Speaking of language, I disagree that it's ignorant or disrespectful that we go abroad and don't learn the language. The fact is that other European countries are much more focused on second languages and English is the language most learned by non-English speakers around the world. Learning English is much more useful in general, but I would like to see our schools teaching a second language from an earlier age as it's a useful skill to have. Personally I plan on attempting to learn another language - probably German, which would still make me look ignorant if I were to travel to Spain, France, Italy, Russia, Portugal, wherever. Other countries in Europe start learning at age 6, we start at 11 and can choose to drop it a couple of years later, having reached the stage of saying crap like "My monkey is having a drink in the cafe. His name is Maurice. He is sitting in a blue chair".

First I feel french, then I feel european;)

Serval
Apr 19th, 2009, 08:38 PM
I don't feel European.

Halardfan
Apr 19th, 2009, 08:54 PM
But that leads to another question; do British posters feel British? I've no problems about being called British but I'm English, and a lot of Scots and Welsh people consider themselves Scottish or Welsh rather than British.

Im English before British...though that feeling has grown stronger with the generally perfectlly reasonable wishes of the rest of Britain to be increasingly independent.

The other bits of Britain rightly feel comfortable and proud of their identities...I just want England to fashion its own identity that is distinct from Britain. Not a Little Englander thing, which I hate, but a positive modern, outward looking Englishness.

Im European, my family background involves English, French, Polish, and Belarussian threads.

only_one_maria
Apr 20th, 2009, 12:35 PM
It's very difficult for the English to fashion an identity that is distinct from British - after all you are 80 or 85% of the population of this island. What is seen as British will be overwhelming English. I suppose first and foremost you have your language, the language of the world, a huge number of words and that of Chaucer, Shakespeare and Milton. Not that I claim to be an expert on any of them.

NoChokes
Apr 22nd, 2009, 09:43 AM
I'm not that picky as to who I feel.