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Wigglytuff
Mar 20th, 2009, 03:33 AM
i dont understand this. is this some local slang i dont get? i dont mind it online but yesterday i had someone in REAL LIFE say it. and i blinked. i thought i had misheard, then i it happened again. three times in all each one clear as day "MATHS" with an "s"

is this a local slang or something? a verbal tick? some new and crazy way of being "unique"?

edit: some people in this thread took this simple question to a kind of extreme that is really stupid. it was a simple question with a simple answer:

maths is like a british thing i think, maybe only north americans say it singular
Maths = English
Math = American

In Australia we say maths too. As someone said previously it's short for mathematics so it's not grammatically wrong or anything.

Ellery
Mar 20th, 2009, 03:34 AM
That's how I say it :shrug:

Harvs
Mar 20th, 2009, 03:36 AM
ok.. everyone calls it "maths"... who cares.

Pasta-Na
Mar 20th, 2009, 03:37 AM
how about "fishes"? :o

wild.river
Mar 20th, 2009, 03:40 AM
maths is british english. and i think it makes more sense than math. maths = mathematicS

Lin Lin
Mar 20th, 2009, 03:41 AM
how about "fishes"? :o

for me,when we have different fishes,we use fishes
one kind of fish,it's singular:confused:

Lin Lin
Mar 20th, 2009, 03:43 AM
maths is british english. and i think it makes more sense than math. maths = mathematicS

:eek:that's exactly what I want to say:)

pepaw
Mar 20th, 2009, 03:44 AM
maths is like a british thing i think, maybe only north americans say it singular

Hayato
Mar 20th, 2009, 03:45 AM
mathematics

I say maths:p

ElusiveChanteuse
Mar 20th, 2009, 03:51 AM
fishes?:scratch:

Lin Lin
Mar 20th, 2009, 03:54 AM
fishes?:scratch:

Tuna and codfish are two different fishes:shrug:

Scotso
Mar 20th, 2009, 04:03 AM
i dont understand this. is this some local slang i dont get? i dont mind it online but yesterday i had someone in REAL LIFE say it. and i blinked. i thought i had misheard, then i it happened again. three times in all each one clear as day "MATHS" with an "s"

is this a local slang or something? a verbal tick? some new and crazy way of being "unique"?

maths is british english. and i think it makes more sense than math. maths = mathematicS

Indeed, it's just a different version of abbreviating it. Neither of them is a real word, so I don't understand the fuss.

Wigglytuff
Mar 20th, 2009, 04:05 AM
how about "fishes"? :o

fish is for one kind of fish. for example, there are 3 betta fish in this tank

fishes is used for different species of fish, for example there are fishes in the ocean.

Wigglytuff
Mar 20th, 2009, 04:15 AM
maths is like a british thing i think, maybe only north americans say it singular

ah ha!!! that makes sense as the person who said it was british. :lol: :lol:


but someone should add it here :lol: :lol:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_and_British_English_spelling_differences

Pasta-Na
Mar 20th, 2009, 04:15 AM
fish is for one kind of fish. for example, there are 3 betta fish in this tank

fishes is used for different species of fish, for example there are fishes in the ocean.

cool :p

Ellery
Mar 20th, 2009, 04:16 AM
Educational :drool:

Daniel K
Mar 20th, 2009, 05:14 AM
Maths = English
Math = American

In Australia we say maths too. As someone said previously it's short for mathematics so it's not grammatically wrong or anything.

Direwolf
Mar 20th, 2009, 09:35 AM
i use to say MATHS in

like elementary/primary
and then part of my
highschool/secondary..

but to tell you the truth

i love saying Maths...
it sounds sexier and easier
to the tongue!!

saying Maths completes the breath
because you kinda exhale after "S"
but when you say math...its like youre holding
that big lump of air in your chest...

and
Mathematics...
if you shortened it...
it would be just right enought if you keep the
"s" right...

Wigglytuff
Mar 20th, 2009, 09:57 AM
Maths = English
Math = American

In Australia we say maths too. As someone said previously it's short for mathematics so it's not grammatically wrong or anything.

ah ha!!! this is good to know as well!!

Conor
Mar 20th, 2009, 09:04 PM
LOL this thread has to be a joke? surely? Thats how we say it... math sounds weird. You dont say 'I have mathematic now' do you lol

égalité
Mar 20th, 2009, 09:07 PM
LOL this thread has to be a joke? surely? Thats how we say it... math sounds weird. You dont say 'I have mathematic now' do you lol

"Maths" sounds weird to Americans :p

But then again we spell things wrong and don't speak real English anyway :tears:

vadin124
Mar 20th, 2009, 09:27 PM
maths is the proper way to pronounce it, the Americans ruin most of our words with their interpretations...

Jose.
Mar 20th, 2009, 09:29 PM
:lol: I say Matematica :p

Libertango
Mar 20th, 2009, 09:58 PM
Yup, Maths is the British way to say Mathematics ... and therefore, right. :)

Wigglytuff
Mar 20th, 2009, 10:14 PM
Yup, Maths is the British way to say Mathematics ... and therefore, right. :)

:smash:

Wigglytuff
Mar 20th, 2009, 10:15 PM
maths is the proper way to pronounce it, the Americans ruin most of our words with their interpretations...

:lol: :lol: you sound like a cry baby "mom, he ruined my word" maybe you are not, but you sound like it.

Libertango
Mar 20th, 2009, 10:28 PM
:smash:
;) :p

Droolv
Mar 20th, 2009, 10:46 PM
I say maths :shrug:

KournikovaFan91
Mar 20th, 2009, 11:51 PM
yeah I assumed Americans said Math and other English speakers said Maths.

The only people I know who say Math are Americans or attended American-run International Schools.

Horizon
Mar 21st, 2009, 12:40 AM
:lol: :lol: you sound like a cry baby "mom, he ruined my word" maybe you are not, but you sound like it.
We British get very irritated when Americans ruin our language :p

Experimentee
Mar 21st, 2009, 06:18 AM
The word "mathematics" is plural, so the short form should also be plural.

Therefore "maths" is more correct.

mckyle.
Mar 21st, 2009, 06:24 AM
I never use either :p I always say the specific class I'm taking (but I prefer saying math)

Barrie_Dude
Mar 21st, 2009, 06:57 AM
fish is for one kind of fish. for example, there are 3 betta fish in this tank

fishes is used for different species of fish, for example there are fishes in the ocean.
Fish is a noun
Fishes is a verb
"There are fish in the ocean!" :rolleyes:
"A fisherman fishes"

Lin Lin
Mar 21st, 2009, 07:42 AM
The word "mathematics" is plural, so the short form should also be plural.

Therefore "maths" is more correct.

no,"mathematics" is singular;)

Lin Lin
Mar 21st, 2009, 07:47 AM
Fish is a noun
Fishes is a verb
"There are fish in the ocean!" :rolleyes:
"A fisherman fishes"

Did you really read the post you quoted?
Fish is a none,it is singular when it comes to one kind of fish,but it comes to fifferent species of fish,it's plural:):)

égalité
Mar 21st, 2009, 08:01 AM
The word "mathematics" is plural, so the short form should also be plural.

Therefore "maths" is more correct.

Um, actually it's singular. Just because it has an s on the end doesn't mean it's plural. :spit: Observe: Mathematics is hard, not mathematics are hard.

And typically you shorten a word by chopping off the end, not by cutting out the middle. So "math" makes sense.

lee station
Mar 21st, 2009, 08:08 AM
i had a maths teacher that used to say: espabila que falta te hace :D

fifiricci
Mar 21st, 2009, 08:13 AM
The "s" has nothing to do with singularity or plurality. Here's an explanation and from that you'll see that the difference, like so many other things, is the result of the divide between the UK and North America . If you rely on the contents of the article being correct, I would suggest that the Brits are more gramatically correct with their abbreviation ("maths") than the Yanks are with their "math" (which to a Brit sounds very odd and, franky, wrong!). :D

The word "mathematics" comes from the Greek (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ancient_Greek_language) μάθημα (máthēma), which means learning, study, science, and additionally came to have the narrower and more technical meaning "mathematical study", even in Classical times. Its adjective is μαθηματικός (mathēmatikós), related to learning, or studious, which likewise further came to mean mathematical. In particular, μαθηματικὴ τέχνη (mathēmatikḗ tékhnē), in Latin (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Latin) ars mathematica, meant the mathematical art.
The apparent plural form in English (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_language), like the French (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_language) plural form les mathématiques (and the less commonly used singular derivative la mathématique), goes back to the Latin neuter plural mathematica (Cicero (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cicero)), based on the Greek plural τα μαθηματικά (ta mathēmatiká), used by Aristotle (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aristotle), and meaning roughly "all things mathematical".[9] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mathematics#cite_note-8) In English, however, the noun mathematics takes singular verb forms. It is often shortened to math in English-speaking North America and maths elsewhere.

Halardfan
Mar 21st, 2009, 08:20 AM
I hate grammar! My girlfriend is Japanese, but her knowledge of the grammar terms and rules in English is vastly superior to mine.

muzzy
Mar 21st, 2009, 08:35 AM
In Australia or where I live it is maths,
short for mathematics, It doesnt matter that much

wally1
Mar 21st, 2009, 10:48 AM
To british ears (well mine at least) "math" instead of maths is one of the wierdest sounding americanisms there is.

Slutiana
Mar 21st, 2009, 11:06 AM
Maths is the right way to say it, but some dumb americans tried to change it to math. :(

rockstar
Mar 21st, 2009, 04:00 PM
yeah, i guess almost everyone pronounces it as maths except in america

Barrie_Dude
Mar 21st, 2009, 04:42 PM
Did you really read the post you quoted?
Fish is a none,it is singular when it comes to one kind of fish,but it comes to fifferent species of fish,it's plural:):)
Yes, fish is both singular and plural

Crazy Canuck
Mar 21st, 2009, 05:54 PM
fish is for one kind of fish. for example, there are 3 betta fish in this tank

fishes is used for different species of fish, for example there are fishes in the ocean.

And... if actually got worse. Somehow. She's clearly kidding. Or on a really awesome high.

égalité
Mar 21st, 2009, 06:30 PM
And... if actually got worse. Somehow. She's clearly kidding. Or on a really awesome high.

That's actually correct.

Apoleb
Mar 21st, 2009, 06:33 PM
In French, it's also "maths". It's a short for a plural word and not a singular one (mathematics).

In any ways, it all ends up being a matter of convention. So both are "correct." And math is easier to pronounce than maths.

égalité
Mar 21st, 2009, 06:56 PM
In French, it's also "maths". It's a short for a plural word and not a singular one (mathematics).

In any ways, it all ends up being a matter of convention. So both are "correct." And math is easier to pronounce than maths.

True :lol:

But omg mathematics is singular. It takes singular verb forms. You would never say "mathematics are my favorite subject." And there's no such this as a mathematic. :tape:

Olórin
Mar 21st, 2009, 07:06 PM
i dont understand this. is this some local slang i dont get? i dont mind it online but yesterday i had someone in REAL LIFE say it. and i blinked. i thought i had misheard, then i it happened again. three times in all each one clear as day "MATHS" with an "s"

is this a local slang or something? a verbal tick? some new and crazy way of being "unique"?

Maths is a shortened, even slang if you will, form of Mathematics.

Either shortening is acceptable, but neither is as correct as Mathematics.

Apoleb
Mar 21st, 2009, 07:07 PM
True :lol:

But omg mathematics is singular. It takes singular verb forms. You would never say "mathematics are my favorite subject." And there's no such this as a mathematic. :tape:

Grammatically it is used as a singular noun in English, but that's also a matter of convention. In French, it is not (les mathematiques sont). The reason why mathematics takes an "s" has very much to do with plurality, because like fiffirici said "meaning roughly "all things mathematical". It's sort of in muddy water, and really ends up being totally a matter of convention. So yeah technically it is used as a singular noun in English, but conceptually it is sort of a plural concept which is why it takes an "s" at the end and why in other languages it is treated completely as a plural noun.

Olórin
Mar 21st, 2009, 07:10 PM
^^^^

Thats interesting, I was just thinking about the possible former plurality of maths.

Wigglytuff
Mar 21st, 2009, 09:09 PM
Fish is a noun
Fishes is a verb
"There are fish in the ocean!" :rolleyes:
"A fisherman fishes"

when correcting someone it is important to be RIGHT. in this case, i was right as per The Oxford University Press Dictionary:

fish noun, verb noun (pl.fish or fishes)Fish is the usual plural form. The older form, fishes, can be used to refer to different kinds of fish.1 [C] a creature that lives in water, breathes through gills, and uses fins and a tail for swimming: They caught several fish.tropical / marine / freshwater fish shoals (= groups)of fish a fish tank / pond There are about 30 000 species of fish in the world.The list of endangered species includes nearly 600 fishes.Fish stocks in the Baltic are in decline.In the pool she could see little silvery fish darting around.—see also coarse fish, flatfish, sea fish, shellfish, wet fish
2 [u] the flesh of fish eaten as food: frozen / smoked / fresh fish fish pie The chef’s fish dishes are his speciality.Fish forms the main part of their diet.

tennisbear7
Mar 21st, 2009, 10:50 PM
What a petty argument. :o

frenchie
Mar 21st, 2009, 10:54 PM
mathématiques = maths = plural in french

comfortably.numb
Mar 21st, 2009, 10:59 PM
What a petty argument. :o
Dead. Agreed.

SvetaPleaseWin.
Mar 21st, 2009, 11:06 PM
math sounds dumb ergo british folk use the word maths

Wigglytuff
Mar 22nd, 2009, 12:23 AM
What a petty argument. :o

if you read the thread (difficult i know) you would see that there is no argument i had a question that was answered quite fully in the first or second page.

égalité
Mar 22nd, 2009, 01:48 AM
math sounds dumb ergo british folk use the word maths

And "maths" sounds like what a lolcat calls "math." :tape:

Bayo
Mar 22nd, 2009, 01:51 AM
LOL @ several people in this thread.

Anti-colonial snobbery is SO 18th century. :kiss:

mckyle.
Mar 22nd, 2009, 03:28 AM
LOL @ several people in this thread.

Anti-colonial snobbery is SO 18th century. :kiss:

:worship:

Mikey.
Mar 22nd, 2009, 09:46 AM
To british ears (well mine at least) "math" instead of maths is one of the wierdest sounding americanisms there is.

Agreed :sobbing:

fufuqifuqishahah
Mar 23rd, 2009, 02:58 AM
The "s" has nothing to do with singularity or plurality. Here's an explanation and from that you'll see that the difference, like so many other things, is the result of the divide between the UK and North America . If you rely on the contents of the article being correct, I would suggest that the Brits are more gramatically correct with their abbreviation ("maths") than the Yanks are with their "math" (which to a Brit sounds very odd and, franky, wrong!). :D

The word "mathematics" comes from the Greek (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ancient_Greek_language) μάθημα (máthēma), which means learning, study, science, and additionally came to have the narrower and more technical meaning "mathematical study", even in Classical times. Its adjective is μαθηματικός (mathēmatikós), related to learning, or studious, which likewise further came to mean mathematical. In particular, μαθηματικὴ τέχνη (mathēmatikḗ tékhnē), in Latin (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Latin) ars mathematica, meant the mathematical art.
The apparent plural form in English (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_language), like the French (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_language) plural form les mathématiques (and the less commonly used singular derivative la mathématique), goes back to the Latin neuter plural mathematica (Cicero (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cicero)), based on the Greek plural τα μαθηματικά (ta mathēmatiká), used by Aristotle (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aristotle), and meaning roughly "all things mathematical".[9] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mathematics#cite_note-8) In English, however, the noun mathematics takes singular verb forms. It is often shortened to math in English-speaking North America and maths elsewhere.

:worship::worship:

i bet only 10% of the people responding in this thread after this post even read this :rolleyes:

mckyle.
Mar 23rd, 2009, 04:25 AM
And "maths" sounds like what a lolcat calls "math." :tape:

:sobbing:

Wigglytuff
Mar 23rd, 2009, 05:27 AM
The "s" has nothing to do with singularity or plurality. Here's an explanation and from that you'll see that the difference, like so many other things, is the result of the divide between the UK and North America . If you rely on the contents of the article being correct, I would suggest that the Brits are more gramatically correct with their abbreviation ("maths") than the Yanks are with their "math" (which to a Brit sounds very odd and, franky, wrong!). :D

The word "mathematics" comes from the Greek (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ancient_Greek_language) μάθημα (máthēma), which means learning, study, science, and additionally came to have the narrower and more technical meaning "mathematical study", even in Classical times. Its adjective is μαθηματικός (mathēmatikós), related to learning, or studious, which likewise further came to mean mathematical. In particular, μαθηματικὴ τέχνη (mathēmatikḗ tékhnē), in Latin (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Latin) ars mathematica, meant the mathematical art.
The apparent plural form in English (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_language), like the French (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_language) plural form les mathématiques (and the less commonly used singular derivative la mathématique), goes back to the Latin neuter plural mathematica (Cicero (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cicero)), based on the Greek plural τα μαθηματικά (ta mathēmatiká), used by Aristotle (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aristotle), and meaning roughly "all things mathematical".[9] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mathematics#cite_note-8) In English, however, the noun mathematics takes singular verb forms. It is often shortened to math in English-speaking North America and maths elsewhere.
fair enough!!!