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Wigglytuff
Mar 19th, 2009, 12:37 AM
hello,

i am excited, i will be allowed pets up to 30lbs.

i have spent a year studying and learning about Golden Retrievers and being around them so i fell in love with the breed. but they are much to big and we dont have a large yard or a place for the long walks i would need to make.

so
i want a small dog less then 30lb,
must be ok with short daily walks (very small grounds of the condo)
friendly and very loving, good with other dogs (there will be a shih-tzu)

right now i am leaning toward a miniature poodle but i want to be open to all options.

:bounce: :bounce: :bounce: :bounce: :bounce:

update
i am not going to buy a dog i am going to go through a breed rescue with a breed rescue is similar to a pound or shelter but the get dogs from shelters mostly and owners. most dogs are ones that shelters could not adopt or were faced with over crowding.

this is are the top picks right now:
based on things i put in (smaller, very loving, light exercise but playful and fun, easy with dogs and people this is what the experts at discovery channel have recommended for me.


bichon frise
http://animal.discovery.com/guides/dogs/selector/gallery/1440b.jpg

Temperament
Perky, bouncy and playful, the bichon frise's happy-go-lucky outlook endears it to all. It is friendly toward strangers and other dogs and pets, and it is very good with children. It is sensitive, responsive and affectionate, as eager to cuddle as it is to play. It can bark a lot.

Upkeep
Although small, the bichon is an active dog and needs daily exercise. Its needs can be met with a vigorous indoor game or, better, a romp in the yard or a short walk on leash. The white powder-puff coat needs brushing and combing every other day, plus scissoring and trimming every two months. It doesn't shed, but the loose hairs become entangled in the coat and can mat. It may be difficult to keep white in some areas. This is not a dog that should live outdoors.

miniature schnauzer
http://animal.discovery.com/guides/dogs/selector/gallery/2010b.jpg

Temperament
The miniature schnauzer deserves its place as one of the most popular terrier pets. It is playful, inquisitive, alert, spunky and companionable. It is a well-mannered house dog that also enjoys being in the middle of activities. It is less domineering than the larger schnauzers and less dog-aggressive than most terriers. It is also better with other animals than most terriers, although it will gladly give chase. It is clever and can be stubborn, but it is generally biddable. It enjoys children. Some may bark a lot.

Upkeep
This energetic breed can have its exercise requirements met with a moderate walk on leash or a good game in the yard. Even though it can physically survive living outdoors in warm to temperate climates, it emotionally needs to share its life with its family inside the home. Its wire coat needs combing once or twice weekly, plus scissoring and shaping (clipping for pets and stripping for show dogs) every couple of months.


miniature poodle
http://animal.discovery.com/guides/dogs/selector/gallery/1550b.jpg

The miniature poodle is lively, amiable, playful, eager to please, responsive, smart and obedient — small wonder that it has remained one of the most popular varieties of dog for so long. It is sensitive, tending to be devoted to one person, and initially reserved with strangers. It is good with children, other pets and dogs. Some tend to bark a lot.

Upkeep
All poodles need a lot of interaction with people. They also need mental and physical exercise. A brief but challenging obedience or play session, combined with a walk, should be part of every poodle's day. Standard poodles will need more exercise and may especially enjoy swimming. No poodle should live outdoors. The show poodle should preferably be brushed every day or weekly for shorter coats. Poodle hair, when shed, does not fall out but becomes caught in the surrounding hair, which can cause matting if not removed. The pet clips are easier to maintain and can be done every four to six weeks.


toy poodle
http://animal.discovery.com/guides/dogs/selector/gallery/2280b.jpg

The pert and peppy toy poodle is one of the brightest and easiest breeds to train. It is alert, responsive, playful, lively, sensitive and eager to please. It is devoted to its family. Some can be reserved with strangers; others may bark a lot.

Upkeep
Poodles need a lot of interaction with people. They also need mental and physical exercise. The toy poodle's exercise needs can be met with a short walk or even indoor games. This is not a breed that should ever live outside, although it enjoys access to a yard. Its coat should be brushed every day or two. Poodle hair, when shed, does not fall out but becomes caught in the surrounding hair, which can cause matting if not removed. Clipping should be done at least four times a year, with the face and feet clipped monthly. Although most poodles are professionally groomed, owners can learn to groom their own dog.

papillon
http://animal.discovery.com/guides/dogs/selector/gallery/2250b.jpg

Temperament
One of the most obedient and responsive of the toy breeds, the vivacious papillon is also gentle, amiable and playful. It is friendly toward strangers, other dogs and pets and is very good with children. Some can be timid.

Upkeep
The lively papillon thrives on mental stimulation, and it enjoys a daily walk on leash as well as challenging games indoors or out. This is not a breed that can live outdoors. Its coat needs brushing twice weekly.


Havanese
http://animal.discovery.com/guides/dogs/selector/gallery/2190b.jpg

Temperament
This is a busy, curious dog; it is happiest when it is the center of attention. It loves to play and clown and is affectionate with its family, children, strangers, other dogs and pets — basically everyone! The Havanese is willing to please and learn easily, but it tends to be vocal.

Upkeep
Although energetic, the Havanese can have its exercise needs met with a short walk or a good play session. It is not a dog that can live outside. Coat care entails brushing two to four times a week. This is a nonshedding dog, which means that loose hairs are caught in the outer hairs, tending to tangle, unless they are combed out.

Miss Atomic Bomb
Mar 19th, 2009, 12:45 AM
How about a beagle? They are really nice, they dont shed and they are quite sturdy.

Frode
Mar 19th, 2009, 12:49 AM
How about a beagle? They are really nice, they dont shed and they are quite sturdy.

:hearts::hearts:
Beagles are :cool:
But I think they need a bit more just short daily walks? (Like most hunting breeds)

Miss Atomic Bomb
Mar 19th, 2009, 12:51 AM
:hearts::hearts:
Beagles are :cool:
But I think they need a bit more just short daily walks? (Like most hunting breeds)

Yea, being blood hounds they need a daily run , but they are the best :hearts: If I didn't have 7 big birds, I would get one :(

Miss Atomic Bomb
Mar 19th, 2009, 12:53 AM
Also look for Yorkshire terriers, westies and king charles spaniels. All are medium sized dogs and do well without too much exercise like the hounds.

Infiniti2001
Mar 19th, 2009, 01:01 AM
Get a border collie :hearts: They are sweet and very smart.I can't keep mine out of the darn pool though :fiery:

Wigglytuff
Mar 19th, 2009, 01:17 AM
Get a border collie :hearts: They are sweet and very smart.I can't keep mine out of the darn pool though :fiery:

i thought borders need a lot of walks?

Also look for Yorkshire terriers, westies and king charles spaniels. All are medium sized dogs and do well without too much exercise like the hounds.

no yorkies, i have seem to many in my day in nyc and just cant do it

now i love westies but are they affectionate? dont they need long walks.

are king spaniels bity at all?

Yea, being blood hounds they need a daily run , but they are the best :hearts: If I didn't have 7 big birds, I would get one :(

but i would not be able to give a dog a run :( really it is a very small space for walks.

Miss Atomic Bomb
Mar 19th, 2009, 01:23 AM
Westies are fine with just daily walks, as long as you take them out everyday.

King Charles arent nippy, but the species is sometimes prone to heart diseases (usually around the age of 6-7 years)

Wigglytuff
Mar 19th, 2009, 01:29 AM
Westies are fine with just daily walks, as long as you take them out everyday.

King Charles arent nippy, but the species is sometimes prone to heart diseases (usually around the age of 6-7 years)

ok that is good to know because i like the spunk of the westies and had ruled them out because i thought they would need really long walks.

Hurricane Lily
Mar 19th, 2009, 01:43 AM
<---- my baby... leo the beagle! :D

get a puggle :hearts:

Frode
Mar 19th, 2009, 02:00 AM
<---- my baby... leo the beagle! :D

get a puggle :hearts:

Or a French Bulldog maybe?:)

Wigglytuff
Mar 19th, 2009, 02:05 AM
<---- my baby... leo the beagle! :D

get a puggle :hearts:

moon says no pugs or puggles!! :fiery: :fiery:

Hurricane Lily
Mar 19th, 2009, 03:00 AM
:eek: what? how can moon say no to puggles? just look at those cuties... :awww:

http://www.legacy-kennels.com/1aPuggleCute%20024.jpg
http://legacy-kennels.com/darling26.jpg

drake3781
Mar 19th, 2009, 03:24 AM
Sheltie. Gorgeous.

http://www.321dogs.com/pictures/shetland_sheepdog_11.jpg



http://www.esssc.org/3shelties.jpg

skanky~skanketta
Mar 19th, 2009, 03:36 AM
Or a French Bulldog maybe?:)
OMG they are amazing AND good with kids, other dogs...

mariahdg
Mar 19th, 2009, 04:15 AM
chihuahua
eat less, poo less, pee less, shed less.

brown miniature poodle

Bichon Frise

woosey
Mar 19th, 2009, 04:40 AM
beagles can be barky.

bulldogs have health issues, plus they snore and drool...

Dandy_Warhol
Mar 19th, 2009, 07:52 AM
:eek: what? how can moon say no to puggles? just look at those cuties... :awww:

http://www.legacy-kennels.com/1aPuggleCute%20024.jpg
http://legacy-kennels.com/darling26.jpg

:sobbing::awww::awww::awww::awww:
they're so cute!

i agree that Shelties are gorgeous and well-behaved dogs but they need a lot of exercise right?

Ksenia.
Mar 19th, 2009, 08:55 AM
I have an English cocker spaniel, he's very lovely and "sociable" if this can be applied to a dog :)

Wigglytuff
Mar 19th, 2009, 10:51 AM
:eek: what? how can moon say no to puggles? just look at those cuties... :awww:

http://www.legacy-kennels.com/1aPuggleCute%20024.jpg
http://legacy-kennels.com/darling26.jpg

:sad: :sad: i know, but those are the breaks, no pugs or puggles :( :sad:

:sobbing::awww::awww::awww::awww:
they're so cute!

i agree that Shelties are gorgeous and well-behaved dogs but they need a lot of exercise right?

yeah as far as i know they need a lot of exercise, they are herding and working dogs after all.

Wigglytuff
Mar 19th, 2009, 10:54 AM
chihuahua
eat less, poo less, pee less, shed less.

brown miniature poodle

Bichon Frise

no chihuahuas they are nasty little bastards with too much attitude and bitiness

but miniature poodles and bichon frise are at the top of the list!!!

Dandy_Warhol
Mar 19th, 2009, 11:07 AM
yeah as far as i know they need a lot of exercise, they are herding and working dogs after all.

for what it's worth, i have a Golden Retriever and i live in an apartment (check out my location) but she has become accustomed to the environment. they're really lovely to be with because they're very intelligent, sensitive and they're eager to please you. it takes a lot of walking around the block (or more) and going to Central Park though. i wish you can manage something out because having a Golden is really great :)

mariahdg
Mar 19th, 2009, 11:20 AM
chow chow. :lol: they don't like walk
http://www.ce.cn/xwzx/shgj/gdxw/200509/05/W020050905256602987773.jpg

Dandy_Warhol
Mar 19th, 2009, 11:25 AM
chow chow. :lol: they don't like walk
http://www.ce.cn/xwzx/shgj/gdxw/200509/05/W020050905256602987773.jpg

omg the other one looks like a panda!!

Wigglytuff
Mar 19th, 2009, 11:26 AM
for what it's worth, i have a Golden Retriever and i live in an apartment (check out my location) but she has become accustomed to the environment. they're really lovely to be with because they're very intelligent, sensitive and they're eager to please you. it takes a lot of walking around the block (or more) and going to Central Park though. i wish you can manage something out because having a Golden is really great :)

dont tell me anymore it will make me cry :sad:

see this is the situation: the condo agreement limits dogs to under 30lbs. plus there is not alot of room to excrises and run free. so if i were to get the agreement changed (it would take months anyway) then i would still need to overcome the space limitations :( but yes goldens are amazing.

so i think to keep myself from being to sad and crazy about the whole thing, getting another, smaller breed, would be best. but i love all the things you mentioned, the general love of life, smarts, train-ability, and eagerness to please are my favorite things, plus they are so damn cute!!

ce
Mar 19th, 2009, 11:26 AM
chow chow :hearts:

mariahdg
Mar 19th, 2009, 11:28 AM
no chihuahuas they are nasty little bastards with too much attitude and bitiness

but miniature poodles and bichon frise are at the top of the list!!!

chihuahua like you touch them, hold them, if you pay bit attention to other dogs, they will be jealous to death:devil: right, selfish bitches

Miniature Pinscher

Wigglytuff
Mar 19th, 2009, 11:35 AM
chihuahua like you touch them, hold them, if you pay bit attention to other dogs, they will be jealous to death:devil: right, selfish bitches

Miniature Pinscher

well there will be another dog in the house so jealous breeds are a no no.

Dandy_Warhol
Mar 19th, 2009, 11:38 AM
how about a Dachshund or a Jack Russel? :D

Wigglytuff
Mar 19th, 2009, 11:42 AM
how about a Dachshund or a Jack Russel? :D

omg, both are so cute!!! i need to do more research

mariahdg
Mar 19th, 2009, 11:51 AM
Dachshund has heavy odor :o

Frode
Mar 19th, 2009, 04:39 PM
How about a (Standard) Schnauzer?:)

They are fun and smart dogs:)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standard_schnauzer

Kuilli
Mar 19th, 2009, 05:09 PM
:sad: :sad: i know, but those are the breaks, no pugs or puggles :( :sad:
I think you should show moon those pics again. How can she say 'no' after seeing such a cute pics?! ;)

http://www.legacy-kennels.com/1aPuggleCute%20024.jpg
http://legacy-kennels.com/darling26.jpg

Wigglytuff
Mar 19th, 2009, 05:42 PM
How about a (Standard) Schnauzer?:)

They are fun and smart dogs:)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standard_schnauzer

i love schnauzers but would they be too big?

mandy7
Mar 19th, 2009, 05:53 PM
okay, people who suggested dogs under 20lbs... THEY ARE NOT DOGS!!! THEY ARE RATS!!
if you want a 'smaller' dog,
http://users.telenet.be/dehond/images/Hondenrassen/FCI%202%20molossers%20pinchers/grote%20zwitserse.jpg

they do need lots of walking though, but so do most real dogs

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Entlebucher_Mountain_Dog
smallest of the sennen dogs, who are way cute, and so nice

Wigglytuff
Mar 19th, 2009, 06:02 PM
woot more research update!!!

i found the discovery channel breed selector!!

based on things i put in (smaller, very loving, light exercise but playful and fun, easy with dogs and people this is what the experts at discovery channel have recommended for me.


bichon frise
http://animal.discovery.com/guides/dogs/selector/gallery/1440b.jpg

Temperament
Perky, bouncy and playful, the bichon frise's happy-go-lucky outlook endears it to all. It is friendly toward strangers and other dogs and pets, and it is very good with children. It is sensitive, responsive and affectionate, as eager to cuddle as it is to play. It can bark a lot.

Upkeep
Although small, the bichon is an active dog and needs daily exercise. Its needs can be met with a vigorous indoor game or, better, a romp in the yard or a short walk on leash. The white powder-puff coat needs brushing and combing every other day, plus scissoring and trimming every two months. It doesn't shed, but the loose hairs become entangled in the coat and can mat. It may be difficult to keep white in some areas. This is not a dog that should live outdoors.

miniature schnauzer
http://animal.discovery.com/guides/dogs/selector/gallery/2010b.jpg

Temperament
The miniature schnauzer deserves its place as one of the most popular terrier pets. It is playful, inquisitive, alert, spunky and companionable. It is a well-mannered house dog that also enjoys being in the middle of activities. It is less domineering than the larger schnauzers and less dog-aggressive than most terriers. It is also better with other animals than most terriers, although it will gladly give chase. It is clever and can be stubborn, but it is generally biddable. It enjoys children. Some may bark a lot.

Upkeep
This energetic breed can have its exercise requirements met with a moderate walk on leash or a good game in the yard. Even though it can physically survive living outdoors in warm to temperate climates, it emotionally needs to share its life with its family inside the home. Its wire coat needs combing once or twice weekly, plus scissoring and shaping (clipping for pets and stripping for show dogs) every couple of months.


miniature poodle
http://animal.discovery.com/guides/dogs/selector/gallery/1550b.jpg

The miniature poodle is lively, amiable, playful, eager to please, responsive, smart and obedient — small wonder that it has remained one of the most popular varieties of dog for so long. It is sensitive, tending to be devoted to one person, and initially reserved with strangers. It is good with children, other pets and dogs. Some tend to bark a lot.

Upkeep
All poodles need a lot of interaction with people. They also need mental and physical exercise. A brief but challenging obedience or play session, combined with a walk, should be part of every poodle's day. Standard poodles will need more exercise and may especially enjoy swimming. No poodle should live outdoors. The show poodle should preferably be brushed every day or weekly for shorter coats. Poodle hair, when shed, does not fall out but becomes caught in the surrounding hair, which can cause matting if not removed. The pet clips are easier to maintain and can be done every four to six weeks.


toy poodle
http://animal.discovery.com/guides/dogs/selector/gallery/2280b.jpg

The pert and peppy toy poodle is one of the brightest and easiest breeds to train. It is alert, responsive, playful, lively, sensitive and eager to please. It is devoted to its family. Some can be reserved with strangers; others may bark a lot.

Upkeep
Poodles need a lot of interaction with people. They also need mental and physical exercise. The toy poodle's exercise needs can be met with a short walk or even indoor games. This is not a breed that should ever live outside, although it enjoys access to a yard. Its coat should be brushed every day or two. Poodle hair, when shed, does not fall out but becomes caught in the surrounding hair, which can cause matting if not removed. Clipping should be done at least four times a year, with the face and feet clipped monthly. Although most poodles are professionally groomed, owners can learn to groom their own dog.

papillon
http://animal.discovery.com/guides/dogs/selector/gallery/2250b.jpg

Temperament
One of the most obedient and responsive of the toy breeds, the vivacious papillon is also gentle, amiable and playful. It is friendly toward strangers, other dogs and pets and is very good with children. Some can be timid.

Upkeep
The lively papillon thrives on mental stimulation, and it enjoys a daily walk on leash as well as challenging games indoors or out. This is not a breed that can live outdoors. Its coat needs brushing twice weekly.


Havanese
http://animal.discovery.com/guides/dogs/selector/gallery/2190b.jpg

Temperament
This is a busy, curious dog; it is happiest when it is the center of attention. It loves to play and clown and is affectionate with its family, children, strangers, other dogs and pets — basically everyone! The Havanese is willing to please and learn easily, but it tends to be vocal.

Upkeep
Although energetic, the Havanese can have its exercise needs met with a short walk or a good play session. It is not a dog that can live outside. Coat care entails brushing two to four times a week. This is a nonshedding dog, which means that loose hairs are caught in the outer hairs, tending to tangle, unless they are combed out.

Kuilli
Mar 19th, 2009, 06:06 PM
woot more research update!!!
You can't be serious!! Those are not real dogs. :p

Frode
Mar 19th, 2009, 06:11 PM
i love schnauzers but would they be too big?

There are three different sizes;)

mandy7
Mar 19th, 2009, 06:34 PM
bichon frise
http://animal.discovery.com/guides/dogs/selector/gallery/1440b.jpg

rat
miniature schnauzer
http://animal.discovery.com/guides/dogs/selector/gallery/2010b.jpg

rat

miniature poodle
http://animal.discovery.com/guides/dogs/selector/gallery/1550b.jpg

rat
toy poodle
http://animal.discovery.com/guides/dogs/selector/gallery/2280b.jpg

rat
papillon
http://animal.discovery.com/guides/dogs/selector/gallery/2250b.jpg

rat
Havanese
http://animal.discovery.com/guides/dogs/selector/gallery/2190b.jpg

rat

mandy7
Mar 19th, 2009, 06:45 PM
Or a French Bulldog maybe?:)
we got one living in our building; for a small dog, it's a pretty cool dog
Sheltie. Gorgeous.

http://www.321dogs.com/pictures/shetland_sheepdog_11.jpg



http://www.esssc.org/3shelties.jpg
we got one of those in our building as wel, his name is bailey and he is my puppies best friend :D
he is 7 months old and already perfectly trained, knows all the basics, but can also do twists and twirls and stuff; it's pretty funny,
it's a real nice dog, but has a shitload of HAIR

anyhow, gonna walk my puppy know
(blonde labrador, but you knew that i reckon)

Wigglytuff
Mar 19th, 2009, 06:54 PM
okay, people who suggested dogs under 20lbs... THEY ARE NOT DOGS!!! THEY ARE RATS!!
if you want a 'smaller' dog,
http://users.telenet.be/dehond/images/Hondenrassen/FCI%202%20molossers%20pinchers/grote%20zwitserse.jpg

they do need lots of walking though, but so do most real dogs

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Entlebucher_Mountain_Dog
smallest of the sennen dogs, who are way cute, and so nice

i am glad that you think so but as i said the condo board is VERY clear nothing over 30lbs and anything with the word "mountain" in its name is going to be big. plus its ok if they are rats, fancy rats are great pets :ras:

Ashtony Sanders is sitting on her bed, talking on the phone and typing on her laptop when a large rat crawls onto her leg. She picks it up and gives it a kiss.

His name is Deuro (Latin for "nip"), and he's not the only pet rat in the family. There's also Yuki ("snow" in Japanese). In fact, 17-year-old Ashtony has had rats around since kindergarten.

Buy This Photo

Ashtony Sanders, 17, says fancy rats are very affectionate.
Ashtony Sanders, 17, says fancy rats are very affectionate. "They're not all that different from other pets." (By James A. Parcell -- The Washington Post)

"She volunteered to take care of the class pet, which happened to be a large white rat, for the entire summer," said her mother, Carla. "I'll admit that in the beginning I was a little nervous about it."

But in no time the whole family had fallen for the little critter. It's not that surprising: Domestic rats, known as "fancy rats," have been kept as pets since the mid-1800s. Upper-class English girls liked white ones, in particular, and kept them in gold-covered cages.

After Ashtony returned her summer guest, her family decided to get a rat of its own -- make that two rats. "We did a little research and decided to get two because they love company," said Carla Sanders. "When we got them, they were just a few weeks old and the size of a small hamster, but they quickly tripled in size."

Deuro and Yuki live in a large ferret cage that has ladders, toys and hammocks. Rats are intelligent and need to keep busy.

Before moving to Lanham, the Sanders family lived in Minnesota. "We had a big lawn there, and we'd set up obstacle courses and train them to go through them," said Ashtony. "And it's really easy to teach them their name and have them come when you call them."

Fancy rats cost $3 to $8. Unlike most pets, they don't need shots or other expensive care. They eat pellets and enjoy chew treats and fresh fruit; also, they need their water changed daily.

Ashtony, called "Mom" by her family because she spends so much time caring for her rats, plays with them at least an hour each day. "They're very affectionate," she said. "You know, they're not all that different from other pets."

Fittingly, the family bought two small harnesses to take the rats on walks. But, being torpedo-shaped, they always seem to squirm free.

"They're designed to wiggle in and out of tight spaces," said Carla Sanders. "Besides, they prefer to ride on your shoulder to see what's going on. They're very curious."

Even more curious are the people who learn that Ashtony and her sister, Cherie, have pet rats. "They always say 'ewww' at first," said Cherie, 14. "But it doesn't take much convincing. They're pretty lovable pets."

While some people do suffer from a fear of rats (called murophobia), Ashtony said most negative reactions are because people think of rats as wild rodents living in city sewers.

"Those are gross, I'll admit," she said. "But fancy rats are as different from wild ones as dogs are from wolves."

There is one member of the Sanders family who wouldn't mind a rat-free house: Oreo the cat. "The rats are large enough to fend for themselves," said Carla Sanders, so Oreo "pretends to ignore them."

-------

i have met a number a fancy rats and even though i was like EWWWW at first they are very smart and curious and won me over in no time.

rats are smart and even have dreams about their days and nights

http://discovermagazine.com/2001/oct/featrat
Rat Dreams
Oh great—now we'll have rat psychologists
by Bruce McCall, Illustrations and Case Histories by Bruce McCall

Several months ago, Matthew Wilson, a neuroscientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, announced that he had figured out what the rats in his lab dream about. Wilson and his graduate assistant Kenway Louie had implanted tiny electrodes directly into the rats' hippocampi, the region responsible for memory and learning. Then they trained the rats to scurry around a circular track and stop periodically for food rewards. As the rats ran, the electrodes monitored the firing of a dozen or so neurons in each rat's brain. Wilson found that the neurons fired in a distinctive pattern that varied from rat to rat but remained the same for each individual animal.

Later, when the rats experienced rapid eye movement sleep, those neurons began to fire again. "The patterns are not exactly the same," Wilson says, "but we can definitely say that they are derived from those generated during the rats' awake experience on the track." Apparently the rats' nocturnal visions are constructed from the mundane events of their daily lives, replayed in detail. In some cases, Wilson and Louie could even tell where on the track the animal dreamed it was.

Humans, of course, dream about events long past as well as about more recent ones, and Wilson speculates that some rat dreams may be just as convoluted as ours. His rats led a sheltered, uneventful existence before they were introduced to the track and an equally boring life after, which he suspects left them with simple dreams. "You have a past to dream about," he says. "The task we engage them in and their normal behavior in their cage are the only experiences they ever have, so that's what they replay."

Researchers have long known that animals experience dreamlike states, but Wilson's experiment breaks new ground, offering a clue to why humans dream. Wilson suspects his rats relive their wanderings as they dream to consolidate events into their long-term memory— in short, to learn. In his next experiments, he will test how teaching rats a variety of tasks influences their dreams.

Discover's editors found Wilson's research fascinating but also noted that there is something inherently funny— and humbling— in the idea that rats dream at all. Freud turned human dreams into sacred texts and created an industry out of their interpretation. That so furtive and repellent a creature experiences dream states just as we do confirms what many of us have long feared— that rats share far more with us than we want to admit. So we wondered: Just how rich might a rat dream be? We asked humorist and illustrator Bruce McCall to imagine a new scientific discipline: psychorodentology. Here, for your amusement, a look into that horrific future.
— Reporting by Kathy A. Svitil

Wigglytuff
Mar 19th, 2009, 06:55 PM
rat

rat


rat

rat
[COLOR=red][COLOR=#000000]
rat

rat
you're a rat!!! :ras: and not a fancy pet rat either :ras:

Hurricane Lily
Mar 19th, 2009, 07:08 PM
wiggly, how about Cavalier King Charles Spaniel?

http://caninecoalition.com/img/Cavalier-King-Charles-Spaniel--0.jpg

Wigglytuff
Mar 19th, 2009, 07:26 PM
wiggly, how about Cavalier King Charles Spaniel?

http://caninecoalition.com/img/Cavalier-King-Charles-Spaniel--0.jpg

i dont know much about them but i will do some looking up.

ok this i what i have so far
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Most dogs of the breed are playful, extremely patient and eager to please. As such, dogs of the breed are usually good with children and other dogs. A well-socialized Cavalier will not be shy about socializing with much larger dogs. (However, on occasion, this tendency can be dangerous, as many cavaliers will presume all other dogs to be equally friendly, and may attempt to greet and play with aggressive dogs.) Cavaliers will adapt quickly to almost any environment, family, and location. Their ability to bond with larger and smaller dogs make them ideal in houses with more than one breed of dog. Cavaliers are great with people of all ages, from children to seniors, making them a very versatile dog.

[edit] Personality

The extremely social nature of the Cavalier KC Spaniel means that they require almost constant companionship from humans or other dogs, and are not suited to spending long periods of time on their own. This breed is one of the friendliest of the toy group. It is important for Cavaliers to have a hand-reared puppyhood to ensure security and friendliness. When they greet somebody they tend to lick them on the hand. They connect with their owners almost immediately, but are a little delayed with strangers.

Some Cavaliers have been known to exhibit traits in common with cats, such as perching in high places (the tops of couches, the highest pillow, etc), cleaning their own paws and can also show some birding qualities. Cavaliers have been seen to catch small birds in mid-flight that are flying too close to the ground. Such behavior is a result of their earlier use as a hunting dog, and as such, they can develop habits that predispose them to chase small animals such as chipmunks, squirrels, rabbits, birds etc. Because of this, it is recommended that care should be taken when walking a Cavalier off-leash, as they can single-mindedly chase a butterfly or rabbit onto a busy road or other dangerous situation without regard for their own safety if not properly trained.They are very playful.

Temperament
The cavalier in many ways fits the bill as an ideal house pet. It is sweet, gentle, playful, willing to please, affectionate and quiet. It is amiable toward other dogs, pets and strangers. Outdoors, its spaniel heritage kicks in, and it loves to explore, sniff and chase.

Upkeep
The cavalier needs a fair amount of exercise every day, either in the form of a moderate walk on leash or a romp in a safe area. This is not a breed that should live outdoors. Its long coat needs brushing every other day

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they are REALLY cute but i worry about the exercise needs... is this accurate that they need lots of exercise?

Hurricane Lily
Mar 19th, 2009, 07:34 PM
http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/cavalierkingcharlesspaniel.htm

Wigglytuff
Mar 19th, 2009, 09:22 PM
http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/cavalierkingcharlesspaniel.htm

cool thank you!!!

drake3781
Mar 19th, 2009, 10:10 PM
Is going to the pound and finding one that best suits you completely out of the question? :shrug:

pepaw
Mar 19th, 2009, 10:47 PM
yeah a dog shelter could be a good option, you could get a fully grown and probably trained dog. and you'd know that you saved a dog from a pretty bad fate.

Wigglytuff
Mar 19th, 2009, 10:55 PM
Is going to the pound and finding one that best suits you completely out of the question? :shrug:

i am going to pick out a breed, and then go to a breed rescue. but you have to know what breed you want and why you want one, a breed rescue is going to want to be sure that the dog is going to a good home and so on.

a breed rescue is similar to a pound or shelter but the get dogs from shelters mostly and owners. most dogs are ones that shelters could not adopt or were faced with over crowding.

Wigglytuff
Mar 19th, 2009, 10:59 PM
:eek: what? how can moon say no to puggles? just look at those cuties... :awww:

http://www.legacy-kennels.com/1aPuggleCute%20024.jpg
http://legacy-kennels.com/darling26.jpg

moon is a pain in my side, NOW after i show her the picks she says that a puggle is ok, and that she never said no pugs just no puggles. :rolleyes:

so the puggle is back on the list!!

drake3781
Mar 19th, 2009, 11:09 PM
i am going to pick out a breed, and then go to a breed rescue. but you have to know what breed you want and why you want one, a breed rescue is going to want to be sure that the dog is going to a good home and so on.

a breed rescue is similar to a pound or shelter but the get dogs from shelters mostly and owners. most dogs are ones that shelters could not adopt or were faced with over crowding.


Sounds good, you can check out several of them and see the dogs. In other words, don't lock yourself into something unnecessarily.

Hurricane Lily
Mar 19th, 2009, 11:14 PM
moon is a pain in my side, NOW after i show her the picks she says that a puggle is ok, and that she never said no pugs just no puggles. :rolleyes:

so the puggle is back on the list!!
:lol: oh moon... but, yay! :bounce:

Wigglytuff
Mar 19th, 2009, 11:28 PM
Sounds good, you can check out several of them and see the dogs. In other words, don't lock yourself into something unnecessarily.

yep. i think i will choose 3-5 breeds and go to the different rescues. right now, i am in love with the idea of a poodle. every poodle i have ever met has been amazing and sweet and friend and smart. i taught one to roll over in 5 minutes!! (i have neve had a dog before) so i am excited about that.

Dandy_Warhol
Mar 20th, 2009, 03:43 AM
i am going to pick out a breed, and then go to a breed rescue. but you have to know what breed you want and why you want one, a breed rescue is going to want to be sure that the dog is going to a good home and so on.

a breed rescue is similar to a pound or shelter but the get dogs from shelters mostly and owners. most dogs are ones that shelters could not adopt or were faced with over crowding.

that's good to hear. you're also not contributing to the money making puppy farms out there :mad:

woosey
Mar 20th, 2009, 09:04 PM
yep. i think i will choose 3-5 breeds and go to the different rescues. right now, i am in love with the idea of a poodle. every poodle i have ever met has been amazing and sweet and friend and smart. i taught one to roll over in 5 minutes!! (i have neve had a dog before) so i am excited about that.

poodles are considered to be one of the smartest dogs.

shame they insist on shaving that like that. i think it turns people off, including me. i hear it's also supposed to be a good watchdog and is kinda good for people with allergies.

Dandy_Warhol
Mar 20th, 2009, 11:11 PM
hey, if you want a poodle and a golden, there's a "designer breed" called Golden Poodles, it was one of the Obama kids's choice because they're apparently hypo-allergenic ;)

Martian KC
Mar 20th, 2009, 11:14 PM
chow chow. :lol: they don't like walk
http://www.ce.cn/xwzx/shgj/gdxw/200509/05/W020050905256602987773.jpg

ZOMG! So cute! My dog is half chowchow and she'sthe cutest thing ever. Love the panda looking one.

Anyways, if ou want a smaller sporty dog, jack russells are the way to go.

Wigglytuff
Mar 20th, 2009, 11:51 PM
poodles are considered to be one of the smartest dogs.

shame they insist on shaving that like that. i think it turns people off, including me. i hear it's also supposed to be a good watchdog and is kinda good for people with allergies.

i dont let others tell me how to clip my (future) dogs. :wavey:

Wigglytuff
Mar 21st, 2009, 12:21 AM
hey, if you want a poodle and a golden, there's a "designer breed" called Golden Poodles, it was one of the Obama kids's choice because they're apparently hypo-allergenic ;)

now this is also something to consider, but i am worried because those kinds of designer dogs dont show up in shelters and i would most likely have to buy said puppy. and buying a puppy when there are so many in shelters seems .... uncouth.

Ciarán
Mar 21st, 2009, 12:28 AM
My mom has a miniature yorkshire terrier. He is hilarious, so much character. Crap is small, doesn't walk long distances and is easy to look after. The only down side is because he is so small he is easily stood on and doesn't like children or being handled much. I also love Pugs, I don't know anyone who has one but they are adorable. I am also not sure whether they fit into the 30lb bracket either because they are quite heavy :lol:

Ciarán
Mar 21st, 2009, 12:40 AM
Sorry just read 'No Yorkies'. I love these dogs called Samoyeds. They can be quite expensive though and obviously due to the type of hair need quite a bit of grooming :lol:
http://www.dognews.com/pedigreegallery/2003/working/images/Samoyed.jpg
http://www.british-samoyed-club.co.uk/images/group.jpg
Their faces scream 'Buy me' :tears:

Dandy_Warhol
Mar 21st, 2009, 01:46 AM
now this is also something to consider, but i am worried because those kinds of designer dogs dont show up in shelters and i would most likely have to buy said puppy. and buying a puppy when there are so many in shelters seems .... uncouth.

true. it depends on where you live though. there are dogs like these that can be found in shelters here in the US.

mandy7
Mar 23rd, 2009, 03:56 PM
picked a rat yet?

Wigglytuff
Mar 24th, 2009, 02:09 PM
i think right now the top choice is miniature or toy poodle. they are common enough to be able to be easily found in a shelter so i dont have to face the option of going to a breeder. but as always i am open to new options.

this is picture of someone else's 10 year old toy poodle. HOW CAN YOU SAY NO?!!!

http://cdn-www.dailypuppy.com/media/dogs/anonymous/17341/20090113212967_IMG_5236.jpg_w450.jpg
http://cdn-www.dailypuppy.com/media/dogs/anonymous/17341/20090113212964_IMG_3627.jpg_w450.jpg

Wigglytuff
Mar 24th, 2009, 02:13 PM
Sorry just read 'No Yorkies'. I love these dogs called Samoyeds. They can be quite expensive though and obviously due to the type of hair need quite a bit of grooming :lol:
http://www.dognews.com/pedigreegallery/2003/working/images/Samoyed.jpg
http://www.british-samoyed-club.co.uk/images/group.jpg
Their faces scream 'Buy me' :tears:

they are really cute but at an average of plus 40 pounds it is too big. :(

Dandy_Warhol
Mar 24th, 2009, 02:25 PM
i think right now the top choice is miniature or toy poodle. they are common enough to be able to be easily found in a shelter so i dont have to face the option of going to a breeder. but as always i am open to new options.

this is picture of someone else's 10 year old toy poodle. HOW CAN YOU SAY NO?!!!

http://cdn-www.dailypuppy.com/media/dogs/anonymous/17341/20090113212967_IMG_5236.jpg_w450.jpg
http://cdn-www.dailypuppy.com/media/dogs/anonymous/17341/20090113212964_IMG_3627.jpg_w450.jpg

so cute :awww:
poodles are also considered to be one of the most intelligent breeds! :D

Wigglytuff
Mar 24th, 2009, 02:30 PM
so cute :awww:
poodles are also considered to be one of the most intelligent breeds! :D

i know!! i really want a dog that is ok with short walks but longer training sections of tricks and obedience.

Dandy_Warhol
Mar 24th, 2009, 02:33 PM
i know!! i really want a dog that is ok with short walks but longer training sections of tricks and obedience.

good! then you'll have a fun with a poodle because they're just as what you described! :)

Barrie_Dude
Mar 24th, 2009, 03:47 PM
hello,

i am excited, i will be allowed pets up to 30lbs.

i have spent a year studying and learning about Golden Retrievers and being around them so i fell in love with the breed. but they are much to big and we dont have a large yard or a place for the long walks i would need to make.

so
i want a small dog less then 30lb,
must be ok with short daily walks (very small grounds of the condo)
friendly and very loving, good with other dogs (there will be a shih-tzu)

right now i am leaning toward a miniature poodle but i want to be open to all options.

:bounce: :bounce: :bounce: :bounce:



miniature schnauzer
http://animal.discovery.com/guides/dogs/selector/gallery/2010b.jpg

Temperament
The miniature schnauzer deserves its place as one of the most popular terrier pets. It is playful, inquisitive, alert, spunky and companionable. It is a well-mannered house dog that also enjoys being in the middle of activities. It is less domineering than the larger schnauzers and less dog-aggressive than most terriers. It is also better with other animals than most terriers, although it will gladly give chase. It is clever and can be stubborn, but it is generally biddable. It enjoys children. Some may bark a lot.

Upkeep
This energetic breed can have its exercise requirements met with a moderate walk on leash or a good game in the yard. Even though it can physically survive living outdoors in warm to temperate climates, it emotionally needs to share its life with its family inside the home. Its wire coat needs combing once or twice weekly, plus scissoring and shaping (clipping for pets and stripping for show dogs) every couple of months.







\

My Fave. Have had them. Great dog

Cam'ron Giles
Mar 24th, 2009, 04:16 PM
Wiggly, you met my babies...

Wigglytuff
Mar 24th, 2009, 05:05 PM
Wiggly, you met my babies...

oh YES!!!! I REMEMBER THEM!!!! they were so cute and so smart!!! that i just want i want!!!