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View Full Version : Maria Sharapova...when will she return?


Roookie
Sep 9th, 2008, 04:47 AM
Is she going to play this fall at all?...Anyone knows?

Danči Dementia
Sep 9th, 2008, 05:02 AM
no she is not going to play....she´ll play until next year

I´m not sure though :o

LudwigDvorak
Sep 9th, 2008, 05:06 AM
She signed up for Zurich, but I heard she withdrew. Someone told me she hasn't.

If she does play Zurich and is fine, she will probably play YEC. If neither of these happen, she returns to Melbourne in '09.

That's what I know. If anyone can clarify on this, I'd appreciate it.

ElusiveChanteuse
Sep 9th, 2008, 05:09 AM
Moscow? YEC probably since she came back to play YEC after she lost early with her 'shoulder injury' in USO and took a break.:shrug:

goldenlox
Sep 9th, 2008, 11:31 AM
Eisenbud said she won't play again this year.
Maria has been in NY the last few days -

Sharapova and Cole Haan Hit the Court
JENNIFER ERNST (javascript:showEmailForm();)
Sept. 9, 2008

NEW YORK — Cole Haan has paired with tennis star Maria Sharapova for some doubles.

Cole Haan, a subsidiary of Portland, Ore.-based Nike Inc., has signed Sharapova as the lead collaborator and face of Cole Haan Sporting, a collection of men’s and women’s sport-inspired fashion footwear and accessories that will launch for spring ’09.

The inaugural collection will include day and night looks that will draw inspiration from boating, tennis, track and golf. Women’s footwear styles will include wedges, flats and sandals, with boat shoes and laceups available for men.

The footwear, which will be priced from $115 to $200, will incorporate Nike technologies including Nike Air and the Flywire construction that debuted in Beijing for the Olympic Games. The collection will be available at Cole Haan boutiques globally, as well as top-tier department store accounts and at www.Colehaan.com.

"Maria Sharapova embodies the blend of fashion and sport that makes Cole Haan Sporting unique," CEO James Seuss said in a statement. "We created this collection as the foundation to a dynamic lifestyle — weaving Cole Haan's history of craftsmanship with Nike's tradition of high-performance innovation."

Sharapova, a triple Grand Slam winner, will begin as a collaborator on the project for fall ’09.

"Cole Haan Sporting proves that fashion and technology can work together to change the way women think about and wear sport-inspired product," Sharapova said in the statement. “I look forward to working with Cole Haan to bring new innovations to this leading fashion brand with such a rich history.”

frenchie
Sep 9th, 2008, 11:33 AM
The later the better!

starred06
Sep 9th, 2008, 11:43 AM
She has said that she will not play until 2009.

mapaliey
Sep 9th, 2008, 12:23 PM
it means radwanska will play YEC...hahahahaha

frontier
Sep 9th, 2008, 02:06 PM
so after the YEC she will be out of the top ten and might draw Serena in the THIRD rd at AO09...

goldenlox
Sep 9th, 2008, 02:15 PM
Maria is getting ready for her next career in the fashion industry

http://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p222/kasia1992/kasia1992x/82721041.jpg

http://i171.photobucket.com/albums/u304/joxy_bucket/2008-09-08_213145.jpg

VictorP
Sep 9th, 2008, 02:21 PM
My freinds said it depends on how well her injury goes. If she completely healed by this season. She would go to Doha.

Dan23
Sep 9th, 2008, 02:39 PM
YEC at the earliest....but that seems unlikely.

so after the YEC she will be out of the top ten and might draw Serena in the THIRD rd at AO09...Dont get too excited....I doubt she'd drop out of the Top 10 while still holding the AO title.

LudwigDvorak
Sep 9th, 2008, 02:47 PM
YEC at the earliest....but that seems unlikely.

Dont get too excited....I doubt she'd drop out of the Top 10 while still holding the AO title.

She has 3041 pts. She's losing 525 after Madrid, aka 2516. Hmmmm. Wow, Maria probably won't even leave the top eight, unless Sveta/Venus/Vera/Anna/Aga get their shit together.

She can not play/play like shit for months and still manage to be ranked so high. Loves it.

VictorP
Sep 9th, 2008, 02:50 PM
I believe Maria will go to Doha too. She needs to stay in top 8 to avoid facing those girls in the quarters of Australian Open.

goldenlox
Sep 9th, 2008, 03:04 PM
I don't think her ranking is an issue. She has to get healthy, then start training again.
Maria won the AO without being in a close match, and everyone was there.
But now, she's not even practicing, just rehabbing

dany.p
Sep 9th, 2008, 03:04 PM
I believe Maria will go to Doha too. She needs to stay in top 8 to avoid facing those girls in the quarters of Australian Open.

Better for her to face those girls early in the Australian open, then to come back early and risk causing further damage to what is a already a serious injury

goldenlox
Sep 9th, 2008, 03:11 PM
She's very far from a match. And there's no reason to rush.

MarieC
Sep 9th, 2008, 05:14 PM
I say we wont see her before Australia

dany.p
Sep 9th, 2008, 05:16 PM
There seems to be confusion over when she'll return. I thought she said she couldn't come back till next year. Has maria actually said when, or is it all unsure?

goldenlox
Sep 9th, 2008, 05:30 PM
By Douglas Robson (http://www.usatoday.com/community/tags/reporter.aspx?id=179), Special to USA TODAY
NEW YORK — Maria Sharapova is unlikely to return to the Sony Ericsson WTA Tour this year, her longtime agent, Max Eisenbud, said Wednesday. The reigning Australian Open champion pulled out of the Beijing Olympics and the U.S. Open after an MRI exam in Montreal this month revealed two small tears in her right shoulder.
The 21-year-old Russian — who appeared in New York for opening ceremonies at the year's final major — first injured the shoulder in a fourth-round match at the 2006 U.S. Open and reinjured it in a first round win at Montreal earlier in August, according to Eisenbud.
Sharapova has occasionally had bouts of serving difficulties. Eisenbud said this was likely due to her subconscious effort to move her ball toss and avoid the pain.
The three-time major winner is under doctor's orders not to hit a ball the next four weeks and will spend most of the fall in a hotel in Scottsdale, Ariz., rehabbing her shoulder with Brett Fischer. Fischer is a prominent physical therapist who has worked with many professional baseball players, among them Chicago Cubs' pitcher Kerry Wood.

Tamus
Sep 9th, 2008, 06:17 PM
so after the YEC she will be out of the top ten and might draw Serena in the THIRD rd at AO09...

What are you talking about? She would have to drop as low as 25th to draw Serena in the 3rd round of a major. She also wouldn't face Serena before the quarters unless she falls as low as 13th (not going to happen).

As for the injury, I highly doubt she'll be back this year. I also pray to God that she is getting sound medical advice. I don't want to see her eventually needing surgery when the problem could have been solved now. :(

améliemomo
Sep 9th, 2008, 07:25 PM
it means radwanska will play YEC...hahahahaha

good news for her!:D

DOUBLEFIST
Sep 9th, 2008, 07:38 PM
In all likely-hood, unless Maria is truly willing to sit out as long as her agent and others have said, she would definitely need shoulder surgery.

I've been saying this for a while, but I think it's true. She will, probably, eventually, need the surgery anyway. As I understand, it's a partial tear in the rotator cuff. If that's the case, it's going to plague her for the rest of her career, as it would a Major league pitcher or an NFL quarterback.

My point is, resting may DELAY surgery but, if she wants to continue to have an big, upper echelon serve, she going to eventually have to have it repaired. So either get used to these periods of rest in Maria's career or get used to he idea of her having surgery or get used to the idea of an early retirement. Pick your poison.

W2RZeroEight
Sep 9th, 2008, 07:47 PM
In all likely-hood, unless Maria is truly willing to sit out as long as her agent and others have said, she would definitely need shoulder surgery.

I've been saying this for a while, but I think it's true. She will, probably, eventually, need the surgery anyway. As I understand, it's a partial tear in the rotator cuff. If that's the case, it's going to plague her for the rest of her career, as it would a Major league pitcher or an NFL quarterback.

My point is, resting may DELAY surgery but, if she wants to continue to have an big, upper echelon serve, she going to eventually have to have it repaired. So either get used to these periods of rest in Maria's career or get used to he idea of her having surgery or get used to the idea of an early retirement. Pick your poison.

i read somewhere that those tears when healed will form a scar that is much thicker than the original tissue thus making it stronger. but really needs time for it to heal on its own. so i guess thats the reason for all the rehab and at the same time waiting for it to heal on its own.

saniapower
Sep 9th, 2008, 07:56 PM
Maria Sharapova like Roger Federer is world's best and so thay dont care about ranking or their opponents. I feel her career will be complete if she can win the fo and after that she retires and let others taste success. same with Federer.

mashamaniac
Sep 9th, 2008, 08:02 PM
I doubt she'd be back this year again unless she'd decide to play YEC like she did last year... but the longer she rest the better for her shoulder! Hopefully she'll be back even stronger than 2008 AO.

Mikey B
Sep 9th, 2008, 10:58 PM
hope she can play doha, she's undefeated there, surely that gives someone more confidence when they're returning to tour.. she's going to have to work really hard to keep a decent ranking, i know it doesnt matter, she proved that at this year's aussie open, but with a finalist result at the YEC, then championship points at the aussie open, its all there for maria to lose! :( hope she can defend something! or at least play gold coast before the aussie open to beef up her points a little...

DOUBLEFIST
Sep 10th, 2008, 07:02 AM
Just some facts. Interpret as you will.




Surgical and Nonsurgical Options

Treatment options include:

* Nonsurgical (conservative) treatment
* Surgical treatment (rotator cuff repair)
o Open repair
o Mini-open repair
o All-arthroscopic repair

Top of page
Nonsurgical Treatment: Benefits and Limits

Nonsurgical treatment typically involves activity modification (avoidance of activities that cause symptoms). Nonsurgical management of a rotator cuff tear can provide relief in approximately 50% of patients.
Hawkins & Dunlop8 Hawkins RH, Dunlop R: Non-operative treatment of rotator cuff tears. Clin Orthop Relat Res 1995;321:178-188. 7497666 Itoi & Tabata9 Itoi E, Tabata S: Conservative treatment of rotator cuff tears. Clin Orthop Relat Res 1992;275:165-173. 1735208 Bokor et al.10 Bokor DJ, Hawkins RJ, Huckell GH, Angelo RL, Schickendantz MS: Results of non-operative management of full-thickness tears of the rotator cuff. Clin Orthop Relat Res 1993;294:103-110. 8358901 Bartolozzi et al.11 Bartolozzi A, Andreychik D, Ahmad S: Determinants of outcome in rotator cuff disease. Clin Orthop Relat Res 1994;308:90-99. 7955708
Patients who were satisfied 54% 82% 56% 25%
Patients with pain relief 45% 55% 77% Not reported

These studies show that approximately 50% of patients have decreased pain and improved motion and are satisfied with the outcome of nonsurgical treatment. Surgeons may recommend nonsurgical treatment for patients who are most bothered by pain, rather than weakness, because strength does not tend to improve without surgery.

There are a few predictors of poor outcome from nonsurgical treatment:

* Long duration of symptoms (more than 6 to 12 months)
* Large tears (more than 3 centimeters)

Nonsurgical treatment has both advantages and disadvantages.

Advantages:

* Patient avoids surgery and its inherent risks:
o a. Infection
o b. Permanent stiffness
o c. Anesthesia complications
* Patient has no "down time"

Disadvantages:

* Strength does not improve
* Tears may increase in size over time
* Patient may need to decrease activity level

Source: http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic=A00406

Dan23
Sep 10th, 2008, 08:23 AM
The above is probably assuming it is a serious rotator cuff tear.....that isnt the case here. I dont know if its best for Maria (or anyone for that matter) to be having surgery that isnt entirely necessary.

Kipling
Sep 10th, 2008, 09:04 AM
She will, probably, eventually, need the surgery anyway. As I understand, it's a partial tear in the rotator cuff. If that's the case, it's going to plague her for the rest of her career, as it would a Major league pitcher or an NFL quarterback.


You have no idea what you are talking about.

Having been through it myself, having talked to many doctors about it, I can say that.

All "tears" of the shoulder tendons are not equal. A severe rotator cuff tear would result in someone not being able to lift their arm. Maria obviously had flexibility and movement in flexion, extension, internal and external rotation when she was treated by the trainer in Montreal. That was obvious from the testing being done courtside.

That doesn't mean that Sharapova does not have a painful injury.

Tendons are "torn" and heal themselves all the time. That is how muscles are strengthened. When you exercise, you develop small micro-tears in your tendons. If there are no impingements in the surrounding joints, the tears heal naturally on their own. OTOH, if you continue exercising a muscle that has a tear in it, you can create bigger tears. And if you throw in multiple cortisone shots, which substantially weaken muscle tissue, then you have a liklihood of causing further tears. This is most likely what happened to Maria.

Her diagnosis was "two small tears" in the rotator cuff. If the doctor in her case recommended rest and therapy for that, then I am sure that is the best course of action for her injury.

This isn't something that goes away in a few weeks, as I have repeatedly tried to convey here. I had a year of therapy AND surgery and still have pain. I have full use of my shoulder, and the pain is decreasing with time, but it is still there. My doctors told me that the only way to be pain free is to strengthen the rotator cuff so that it stabilizes the shoulder joint. That is the purpose of therapy.

Maria should not be rushed back, irregardless of whether people are impatient for her return.

maki30
Sep 10th, 2008, 09:36 AM
puf, i dont like this predictions

DOUBLEFIST
Sep 10th, 2008, 09:55 AM
You have no idea what you are talking about..., blah, blah, blah

:lol: I completely know what I'm talking about, as I have a torn rotator cuff even as I type this. I'm getting it looked at at Kerlan-Jobe medical center in LA by the same doctor that operated on my achilles- the same guys that do the Lakers. And I'm willing to bet you I've spent more years in and out of sports medicine facilities than you have been alive!

Of course not all tears are created equal, but the difficulty in recovery (and the likely-hood of recurrence) goes UP by the demands of the activity placed on the shoulder subsequently. So even "two small tears" can be difficult to ever completely recover from if the SUBSEQUENT activity is extremely demanding. Maria, being a tennis player, places a HIGH demand on her shoulder.

Btw, you can argue with me all you want, and "shoot the messenger," but go to site I provided the link to, and get the REAL facts so you won't be blinded by all your WISHFUL THINKING. :lol:


btw... "Tendons" aren't "Muscles," a fact which you seem to have no grasp of as illustrated below.

Tendons are "torn" and heal themselves all the time. That is how muscles are strengthened. When you exercise, you develop small micro-tears in your tendons. If there are no impingements in the surrounding joints, the tears heal naturally on their own. OTOH, if you continue exercising a muscle that has a tear in it, you can create bigger tears. And if you throw in multiple cortisone shots, which substantially weaken muscle tissue, then you have a liklihood of causing further tears.

But, hey, believe what you want to believe. :shrug:

SOA_MC
Sep 10th, 2008, 12:40 PM
What are you talking about? She would have to drop as low as 25th to draw Serena in the 3rd round of a major. She also wouldn't face Serena before the quarters unless she falls as low as 13th (not going to happen).

As for the injury, I highly doubt she'll be back this year. I also pray to God that she is getting sound medical advice. I don't want to see her eventually needing surgery when the problem could have been solved now. :(

We might finally get our Sharapova V Vaidisova match at the AO:devil:

Kipling
Sep 10th, 2008, 03:53 PM
btw... "Tendons" aren't "Muscles," a fact which you seem to have no grasp of as illustrated below.

Tendons are the ends of muscles, the portion that connects the muscle to bone. They are made from the same fibers, and obviously, then, they heal and strengthen in the same fashion. Don't be so deliberately obtuse.

The only "wishful thinking" being done around here is by those thinking that Sharapova is going to be back before next year at the absolute minimum earliest. And it would be far longer than that if she'd had surgical intervention.

faboozadoo15
Sep 10th, 2008, 03:53 PM
In all likely-hood, unless Maria is truly willing to sit out as long as her agent and others have said, she would definitely need shoulder surgery.

I've been saying this for a while, but I think it's true. She will, probably, eventually, need the surgery anyway. As I understand, it's a partial tear in the rotator cuff. If that's the case, it's going to plague her for the rest of her career, as it would a Major league pitcher or an NFL quarterback.

My point is, resting may DELAY surgery but, if she wants to continue to have an big, upper echelon serve, she going to eventually have to have it repaired. So either get used to these periods of rest in Maria's career or get used to he idea of her having surgery or get used to the idea of an early retirement. Pick your poison.
:weirdo: Thanks for your medical opinion.
Rotator cuff rarely needs surgery. The partial tear, if not let to heal will be a chronic issue, however.

DOUBLEFIST
Sep 10th, 2008, 11:26 PM
...they heal and strengthen in the same fashion.


Yes, they do. And MOST who know sports medicine know that even if, say, a muscle is torn and it heals and is rehabbed, there is still a higher degree of probability that- IF CONTINUING THE SAME LEVEL OF STRESS ON THE MUSCLE- re-injury will occur. In that fashion, tendons are very much like muscles. Unfortunately, they don't heal as efficiently or as thoroughly as muscles, which is why you hear about more surgeries to repair tendons then you do muscles.

...The partial tear, if not let to heal will be a chronic issue, however.
Actually, the partial tear, EVEN IF "let to heal,", MIGHT be chronic- especially if indulging in the same activity that caused the orginal injury.

Not opinion. Just fact.

Cakeisgood
Sep 10th, 2008, 11:45 PM
Yes, they do. And MOST who know sports medicine know that even if, say, a muscle is torn and it heals and is rehabbed, there is still a higher degree of probability that- IF CONTINUING THE SAME LEVEL OF STRESS ON THE MUSCLE- re-injury will occur. In that fashion, tendons are very much like muscles. Unfortunately, they don't heal as efficiently or as thoroughly as muscles, which is why you hear about more surgeries to repair tendons then you do muscles.


Actually, the partial tear, EVEN IF "let to heal,", MIGHT be chronic- especially if indulging in the same activity that caused the orginal injury.

Not opinion. Just fact.

I am not discounting your knowledge or the truth of your injury, so please do not be offended at what I am about to say.

You, as far as I know, are not one of the world's best shoulder specialists. The people that Maria has seen are. Thus, if we are to take what Maria states to be the truth, she does not need surgery. If these experts have said that surgery is not necessary, then we can only agree as we do not have the capabilities or the knowledge to dispute this claim.

Again, I am not doubting your knowledge. However, the truth remains that we simply do not qualify to doubt what these experts have to say. If these specialists say that Maria does not need surgery, then she does not need surgery. And that is what we need to trust.

Dawn Marie
Sep 11th, 2008, 12:11 AM
Could it be that she may need surgery but wished to try the healing method first?? I'm sayin just because the doctors are allowing it to heal instead of surgery still doesn't mean 100% percent for certain that surgery is not an option. Many people would rather not be cut into.

We don't know really one way or the other for sure what is going on with that shoulder. Yet we do have to look at what her doctors are saying more so then not because we haven't heard anything regarding healing vrs surgery through Masha.

DOUBLEFIST
Sep 11th, 2008, 12:26 AM
I am not discounting your knowledge or the truth of your injury, so please do not be offended at what I am about to say.

You, as far as I know, are not one of the world's best shoulder specialists. The people that Maria has seen are. Thus, if we are to take what Maria states to be the truth, she does not need surgery. If these experts have said that surgery is not necessary, then we can only agree as we do not have the capabilities or the knowledge to dispute this claim.

Again, I am not doubting your knowledge. However, the truth remains that we simply do not qualify to doubt what these experts have to say. If these specialists say that Maria does not need surgery, then she does not need surgery. And that is what we need to trust.

This has been the most reasonable response I've heard to my thoughts. Thank you!

I think you're absolutely right. It could very well be that she doesn't need surgery. All I'm saying is I think they're being very (maybe even overly) optimistic about taking non-invasive action and the results it could bring. This, of course, is understandable. No one wants to go "under the knife." I just have a feeling that this will continue as a chronic injury and that more aggressive, if not invasive, treatments will be required.

But you're right. I'm certainly not one of the worlds experts and I could very well be wrong, but I said long time ago- when this ailment first popped up- that I believe it will be chronic, and here we are two years later dealing with the same thing. :shrug:

But, thanks for the reasonable post! :yeah:

Megan1224
Sep 11th, 2008, 12:41 AM
Hopefully she now has the right people around her that will be the most beneficial to her (ie. not missing a diagnosis of a tendon tear on an MRI). I have trust that the doctors she is working with know what the right treatment is. We can sit here and speculate all day, but none of us knows the circumstances. I'm gonna guess that this was caused over time and was not the result of an acute injury. When you have a chronic problem like that, it's usually caused by lack of strength in that area. It could possibly be that Maria has never had the proper strength training in her rotator cuff tendons and because of the amount of pressure she puts on those muscles and tendons it wore down over time. It just got progressively worse by not having the proper time to heal and not having enough strength in it which caused it to tear. Again all of this is speculative... If she was able to give it time to heal and put the proper work in to make it strong she could probably get by with no surgery and it might not ever cause problems for her again. However if she ever lets it get weak she'll be back in the same boat she's in now.

faboozadoo15
Sep 11th, 2008, 03:12 AM
I can't really imagine why Sharapova would decide to take this much time off if she and her team didn't believe that this is the best option-- rest and rehabilitation.
If surgery were necessary to get a good repair on the shoulder, I'd bet she would have decided to do it since resting alone meant she was out for the rest of 2008.

sammy01
Sep 11th, 2008, 03:33 AM
shoulders are the worst injury to have. i dont expect to see her before the oz open, but she may turn up there and do as she did in montreal, reinjure it if shes not careful.

LeRoy.
Sep 11th, 2008, 04:01 AM
Regardless of when she comes back and whether or not she decides to get the surgery, i think she will have a very short tennis career. :shrug:

Malva
Sep 11th, 2008, 04:15 AM
She may not return at all. She is now into commercials. Pay more, and very little stress.

Optima
Sep 11th, 2008, 04:16 AM
:weirdo: Thanks for your medical opinion.
Rotator cuff rarely needs surgery. The partial tear, if not let to heal will be a chronic issue, however.

I'm no doctor, but my dad tore BOTH of his and absolutely had to have surgery (on both) after waiting a 7 months + to see if they would heal. I seriously think this will be a chronic issue.

Dan23
Sep 11th, 2008, 05:50 AM
Can the shoulder "experts" here please explain how surgery will cause a simple muscle tear to heal and repair itself any better than by just allowing it to heal by rest and rehabilitation??

DOUBLEFIST
Sep 11th, 2008, 07:59 AM
...If surgery were necessary to get a good repair on the shoulder, I'd bet she would have decided to do it since resting alone meant she was out for the rest of 2008.

Not necessarily. With Surgery, she risks a slight possibility that she'd NEVER regain full mobility in her shoulder. That's why trying to see if it will heal on its own first is a preferable option.

DOUBLEFIST
Sep 11th, 2008, 08:04 AM
Can the shoulder "experts" here please explain how surgery will cause a simple muscle tear to heal and repair itself any better than by just allowing it to heal by rest and rehabilitation??

It's not a muscle tear it's a tendon. They do heal differently.

And to your question, surgery MAY NOT help it heal any faster, which, I suppose is why they're waiting. HOWEVER, surgery is the generally accepted next step if it DOESN'T fully heal or at least become more manageable.

Dan23
Sep 11th, 2008, 09:03 AM
...but again, how does surgery guarantee it will heal any better or stronger? Im no surgeon but generally speaking would surgery in this case involve removing any useless tissue and attempting to 'rejoin' the torn muscle/tendon? Initially the muscle/tendon damage done would become greater which would still require even more natural healing? In the end the muscle/tendon needs to repair by itself.

youizahoe
Sep 11th, 2008, 11:15 AM
She is only gonna play the YEC if she got qualified of course. But I highly doubt she'll be playing another match this year :fiery:

DOUBLEFIST
Sep 11th, 2008, 11:19 AM
...but again, how does surgery guarantee it will heal any better or stronger? Im no surgeon but generally speaking would surgery in this case involve removing any useless tissue and attempting to 'rejoin' the torn muscle/tendon? Initially the muscle/tendon damage done would become greater which would still require even more natural healing? In the end the muscle/tendon needs to repair by itself.

Look, there are no guarantees and I'm no expert on the miracles of surgery, but I do have some anecdotal examples, but first, I suggest that you check out the link that I posted in my first post in the thread. It's from a medical website and explains pretty authoritatively the ins and outs of the whole matter. But to think that surgery isn't ever the best option and that all tendon damage can and will heal by itself is simply to deny years and years of medical evidence to contrary.

Anecdotally(sp), when I tore my achilles tendon, the doctor flat out said that it required surgery to repair it to any kind of athletic functionality, and even then it would lose some range of motion. He said it ABSOLUTELY wouldn't heal properly by itself. While my case certainly isn't Maria's case, it does go to show that sometimes surgery is absolutely necessary.

Tissue sometimes need to be positioned properly to heal properly. Often times that can only be accomplished through surgery. Surgery can- in many circumstances- help something heal BETTER, STRONGER. Presently, my surgically repaired achillies is STRONGER than my other- non surgically repaired achilles. :shrug: