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heavensider
Sep 5th, 2008, 10:41 PM
Q. What were you going to get a degree in when you almost made a mistake by going back to university?

JELENA JANKOVIC: I don't know. I'm not really thinking about that at the moment, you know.

I didn't actually know what I wanted to study in the beginning. I'm only in the second year, and in the third year I would really choose what I want to study. But now I am focused on tennis. Little by little.


Q. Of course you are. What do you think it would have been?

JELENA JANKOVIC: I don't know. Off the court, I really love acting.


Q. You're pretty good at that.

JELENA JANKOVIC: Sure. I don't know. (laughter.)

I don't know. We'll see.


Q. In all your tries to get past the semifinal, what was the difference today?

JELENA JANKOVIC: You know, actually, to be honest, this has been the first set Grand Slam that I don't have any injuries, that I don't have any issues bothering me.

It really takes off ‑‑ it really took me ‑‑ you know, I wasn't thinking about, you know, tennis. I was thinking, Oh, my God, this is hurting. This is bothering me. So I was really struggling and really not playing my tennis and not thinking about my game.

And now, first time, you know, this year, Grand Slam, I'm healthy and, you know, I really want to do well. I'm really focused, I really believe in myself, and I'm really going one match at a time.

I'm really trying my best out there, and so I'm motivated. So I'm happy to be in the final for the first time.


Q. That was a battle of mental strength today and you won it.

JELENA JANKOVIC: Yeah, mentally, I feel I'm a lot stronger, because I really believe in myself. I really want to do this, and, you know, I think it's about time for me to make that step forward to break that barrier and go a long way.

I want to win a Grand Slam, and this is why I came here. Not having injuries, not having some problems, is giving me a good opportunity to be here, so I'm really thankful for that.


Q. In a strange way, have your physical problems helped you build mental strength in the sense that you know that you can battle through that so you could also battle through...

JELENA JANKOVIC: No, but throughout the year I had all these different kinds of injuries, because due to ‑‑ I didn't prepare well enough in the beginning of the year. Actually, in the preseason I didn't prepare.

So I started with a lot of injuries. It was like a chain, going from one injury to another. I had some kind of bacteria for like three or four months where I was blowing my nose the whole time and I couldn't breathe and all these problems.

So of course when you're having some things like that it's tough to be at the top of your level and really play your tennis. You're really struggling with many things.

And now, you know, to knock on wood, you know, it's a miracle, for me to be here and to be healthy and to enjoy my tennis.

As you could see, I'm really fighting out there. I'm really never giving up. I'm really there until the last point. No matter what, I'm going to really, until I ‑‑ until the last point I'm going to be there and I'm going to try my best.

This is what has helped me propel through this tournament and helped me until now to come into the final.


Q. Can you take us through the injuries from the very beginning?

JELENA JANKOVIC: It's a long story. It's going to be a long story.


Q. Abbreviated version.

JELENA JANKOVIC: Oh, my God. Actually, it all started in exhibition in Hopman Cup. I injured my glut muscle. I don't know how you call that.


Q. Back side.

JELENA JANKOVIC: Yeah, in the back. Yeah.

Then I had a back pain in Australian Open. Then I had ‑‑ I don't know what I played afterwards. Then I got sick in Indian Wells really bad and was sick for three or four months. I had some bacteria that they couldn't ‑‑ they didn't know how to get rid of it, and so my nose was running the whole time. It was really bad in my throat and it was hard for me to breathe.

Then French Open I had problem with my arm, you know. My arm was like swollen, and since the second round of the tournament I was struggling.

In Wimbledon, I made some movement and I had a tear in my meniscus where they told me I went to have surgery and I'm not going to play for a while. I recovered in three weeks, but it really took me a long time, you know, to come back.

It was amazing how my knee got weaker. Through Olympics and LA and Montreal I was really out of shape. I couldn't move. I was not fast enough. I was just ‑‑ it was hard for me.

And then finally now I'm really working hard, you know, with my coach, with my fitness coach, really, you know, taking care of every little detail. Even the food I'm eating, I'm really taking care of everything, because all these little things are going to make a big difference, especially for me.

So these things are starting to pay off, and I'm really being disciplined in the moment. I'm really listening to everything. I'm really eager, you know. I'm really motivated to do the right things and to win a Grand Slam.

I'm really happy to be in the final, and tomorrow is another day. Hopefully I can give my best in the last match with her.


Q. I'm sure you heard about the possibility of a lot of rain tomorrow. Would you rather have the extra day if you push it back to Sunday?

JELENA JANKOVIC: For me it doesn't matter. Just whenever I play, I'm going to play. I'm going to be there. I'm going to try my best, and that's all I care about, even if it's tomorrow or next day or in a week. I'm going to go out there and compete.


Q. If you play Serena Williams, how does your history against her where you've split six matches, you've split the two matches this year, all the...

JELENA JANKOVIC: This year we are 1‑1. I beat her at the Australian Open; she beat me in Miami in three sets. So it will be a tough match. She's a powerful player. She loves to play here at the Open, but so do I. I love being here. I love the atmosphere.

It's going to be an interesting match if she wins, but I don't know what is happening now with Safina. She's also in great form and doing really well the last couple of months. So whoever it will be, it will be a difficult opponent.

But I will go out there and do my best.


Q. What has been the difference when you've played Serena since you've split those matches? What has been the key when you've played against her?

JELENA JANKOVIC: What do you mean? When I have won?


Q. When you've won or when you've lost, what's been the difference?

JELENA JANKOVIC: Overall, she's, I think, the strongest player on the tour, together with her sister. Nobody has the power that they have.

We cannot compare. At least I cannot compare to any of them, you know, with their strength. They're great athletes, really. I'm a little athlete. They move really well. They hit the ball so hard.

So if you want to really win when they're in form, you really have to be on the top of your level and you really have to go for every shot and really have to run a lot.

So it will be difficult, but it's doable.


Q. Having spent so much time at Nick's, do you regard the United States as sort of a second country?

JELENA JANKOVIC: Yeah, I have a house here in America, and I love spending time here. You know, when the tournaments are in America I'm here, and when the tournaments are in Europe I go back home to Serbia. So it's like a second home.


Q. When Novak struggles with hostile crowds, and of course he had an issue with that last night, how important is it for you to be loved out there on court?

JELENA JANKOVIC: I don't know how important it is to be loved, but I'm being myself. You know, I say everything that I feel to say, and, you know, it comes out naturally.

So, you know, different players, you know, they have different personalities. People may like them; some people may not like them. Of course when you play a crowd favorite, when you play an American here at the Open, the majority of people will be against you, which is normal, which is understandable.

Because if I played in Serbia, of course, the crowd would be on my side. So when you play, for example like Djokovic played against Roddick, it was, you know, very ‑‑ you could understand that, you know, 90% of the crowd was for Roddick.

But, you know, then with the issue between them, you know, with the injuries and the things they had, you know, I cannot comment on that because it's not my thing.

I try to ‑‑ I can say what I do. I don't like to comment on other people's, you know, comments or whatever they had.


Q. Did you see the on‑court interview?

JELENA JANKOVIC: I did, and I saw that ‑‑ you know, it was ‑‑ they booed him. They didn't really appreciate what he said.

But, you know, from my opinion, he just defended himself, because, you know, when Roddick said that he was ‑‑ you know, he took all these timeouts and all these injuries ‑‑ you know, in a way I didn't think it was nice to say all of these things, even though maybe he had injuries.

Whatever he had, I don't think it's nice to say, because you don't know for a fact what this guy has, what kind of issues. But at the end of the day, from my opinion, most important this is to win. This is what counts, and this is the one who goes forward.

The one who went into the semifinal was Djokovic. All these things that he has done or didn't do, that doesn't matter. It's the winner that counts.


Q. What were those guys in the balcony shouting? They were for you. I mean, it was sort of like a cheering squad.

JELENA JANKOVIC: Oh, the one from upstairs?


Q. Yeah, upstairs.

JELENA JANKOVIC: They kept saying, Jelena, we love you, and all these things, cheering, you know, in kind of a ‑‑ I don't know, like a poem, you know, rhyming.


Q. When she pushed at you today, you responded well, no nerves. You played offense when you had to. Defense, you got past this stage. Grand Slam final you've never experienced, so just talk about how you think you're going to hold up.

JELENA JANKOVIC: Yeah, it will be just like another match. I didn't make ‑‑ for me, at least, doesn't make a difference, semifinal or final.

I want to go out there the same like I've been doing the last, you know, couple of matches. I want to go out there and really, from the first point, be there and really be focused.

You know, come out with a game plan and know what I have to do to win and just fight. You know, I have to believe in myself. I know that I can do it, and that is what matters.


Q. If you play Serena, the winner will be No. 1 in the world as far as I understand. If you play Safina, even if you lose, you are going to be No. 1 in the world. Does it make a difference? And also, you lost to Safina three times out of four, and you are even with Serena.

JELENA JANKOVIC: I lost to her the last two times.


Q. Yes.

JELENA JANKOVIC: I didn't lose last three.


Q. Three out of four. Three out of five.

JELENA JANKOVIC: Since when? Since when I've lost to her so many times? I don't...


Q. Anyway, doesn't matter. Not so important. Would you prefer to play to Serena because you're on even...

JELENA JANKOVIC: I don't know. It doesn't matter, because I'm improving. I lost to Safina when I was just coming back from an injury. I was really ‑‑ if you could watch the matches that I played in Olympics or Montreal, it was really hard for me, you know, to move, to go from one side to another.

I had no reaction. I had no ‑‑ I was really, my game was kind of falling apart. I was really struggling. When you're not, you know, there, it's ‑‑ and I lost in three sets in those circumstances.

Now that I feel much stronger, I'm still, you know, very, very far from my limit for my full potential, but I feel that I'm getting better. I feel that I'm moving faster. I feel I'm a little bit stronger. I feel I can hold my ground.

When I played against Safina, for example in the Olympics, every time she hit hard I was falling back. I couldn't stand my ground. She was overpowering me.

And now I feel that, you know, I can stand there, and I can, you know, hit back to back with whoever it is on the other side. So that is something that is giving me a lot more confidence and a lot more belief when I go into my next match.

So I hope that, you know, I can do and give really 100%, and hopefully I can do it. I don't know. We'll see.


Q. When you were at Bollettieri's, you were a little kid.

JELENA JANKOVIC: I'm still a little kid. (laughter.)


Q. Okay, kid.

JELENA JANKOVIC: For you. (laughter.) I didn't say anything in a bad way.


Q. When you're having those battles on the back locals with Sharapova and all those people, did you ever think, I can't do this. It's just too tough.

JELENA JANKOVIC: Tennis, you mean?


Q. Yeah, yeah.

JELENA JANKOVIC: I don't know. Tennis, in the beginning I never really took it too seriously. Tennis was, for me, I really loved the sport, I really loved to play and compete, but as a young girl I never knew that I was going to make it.

I never knew that, you know, this is something I really want to do, that I'm going to become a professional. Because how many people, especially coming from Serbia, we didn't have a tradition in tennis.

Not many people ‑‑ nobody made it from that country, so I didn't have anybody to look up to. I didn't know, you know, how far I can go, what is my potential, what is my limit and all this.

People were telling me I'm talented, you know, I'm going to about be this and that, but you never know. So in the beginning, for me it was most important to go to school but then, you know, to play tennis.

Then when I became No. 1 junior in the world and won Australian Open juniors, that's when I started thinking I'm going professional and really maybe trying my best. When I finished high school I started to train a little bit more, and that's when I wanted to make that transition into the professional level. You know, here I am. I came a long way.


Q. You just said you were just a little kid, and obviously you love still to joke and have fun. So many players on the circuit start as teenagers. They're happy, they're bubbly, but slowly they get more serious.

JELENA JANKOVIC: That's not the case with me.


Q. How important is it for you for you to have...

JELENA JANKOVIC: It's important to be yourself and to really have fun out there. Our life is not easy, and traveling everywhere, traveling around the world, and really being away from your country, being away from the family, from the people you love and from your friends, it's hard, you know, sometimes, to take everything.

If you don't enjoy yourself, you don't enjoy competing, you know, of course, we have a lot of pressure, we go out there, we really try our best, we really compete at our hardest. But when we step off the court, we're real people and we're human beings. We try to ‑‑ at least I try to enjoy myself. I try to laugh. I try to have a good time.

I'm young, so why not? When am I going to have fun? When I'm ‑‑ now is the time. For example, the driver, when he was driving me back home he told me, You know, you made my day. You laugh a lot. All these players, you know, they complain about traffic all the time.

And I said, you know, I don't complain about traffic. All I want is to get home. I'm really tired. We started making some jokes. He said, Thank you for making my day. You really lighten up, you know, even this car.

And I said, You know, I don't know what it is. I'm just laughing. I have a good time. And he said, Is this because you're No. 1 or No. 2 in the world?

And I said, No, I was laughing when I was 1,000 in the world, but maybe a little bit more now that I'm No. 1 or No. 2.


Q. Do you think it's too bad that Novak has stopped pretty much doing these imitations which brought so much fun to so many people?

JELENA JANKOVIC: I don't know. That's his thing to do, you know. He loves imitating. I don't know why he stopped it. Maybe some of the players were complaining they didn't like, you know, his imitations. They didn't like him, you know, maybe making fun of some other people.

In his own individual way, in a positive way, you know, it's not ‑‑ when you're imitating something it's just for fun. I don't think people could get offended by that. But, you know, that's his thing. I can ask him, you know, to keep doing it. Why you stopping? The people like it.


Q. Were you ever concerned today when she started the match quite aggressively?

JELENA JANKOVIC: Yeah, I mean, the match is not over until it's over. Until the end you are out there competing. You're playing every point. So until it's finished, you never know what's going to happen.


Q. What about the weather conditions? Did they affect your game at all today?

JELENA JANKOVIC: It was hard for both of us, especially from one side the wind was very strong. So you keep hitting as hard as you can and the ball doesn't go anywhere. From the other side, you hit a little bit and the ball flies. It was difficult, but it was the same condition for both players.


Q. Are you concerned that it's the same conditions for tomorrow or the day after?

JELENA JANKOVIC: It's okay, you know. We're getting used to it, because the whole two weeks the weather has been like this. You have to really try your best. The most important thing is to move your feet and be on every ball.

heavensider
Sep 5th, 2008, 10:47 PM
Jelena is so nice to help Novak for defending the critis.

mure
Sep 5th, 2008, 10:56 PM
so everytime she loses it's because of her (imaginary) injuries not because of her opponent's superiority

what a loser!

Beny
Sep 5th, 2008, 11:00 PM
After she's talked about all the injuries, the journalist asks her to take us through the injuries again :weirdo: :help: :tape:

дalex
Sep 5th, 2008, 11:05 PM
so everytime she loses it's because of her (imaginary) injuries not because of her opponent's superiority


Yes! JJ is obviously the most talented player that's ever played this game. You should know that by now.

Great interview! She's never been this confident in her press conferences. Since Wozniacki match she really sounds like she wants this title badly and will give her all to win it. Go JJ!

améliemomo
Sep 5th, 2008, 11:05 PM
She lost me after her talking about her injury free and all the blabla:rolleyes:
what will she say if she lose the finale?

Bosco123
Sep 5th, 2008, 11:09 PM
so everytime she loses it's because of her (imaginary) injuries not because of her opponent's superiority

what a loser!

oh, the report asked her what was different today compared to her other semi final performances, so she replied that this is the first time that she feels completely healthy and i believe her. being healthy and without distractions caused by pain would probably make you play more loosen up and freely and she did have injuries in Australia, RG and Wimbledon, that is the truth.

Bosco123
Sep 5th, 2008, 11:18 PM
She lost me after her talking about her injury free and all the blabla:rolleyes:
what will she say if she lose the finale?

You should know her better and give her more credit cause she is a really honest person. Last year she was healthy and she lost GS semi finals last year too and she didn't blame it on an injury simply because she knows how to loose in a sporty way unlike Sharpoava Shoulderova, or SerenaIALwaysPlayShitWhenILose and that's the true, this year she has injuries in all the GS accept the U.S and that is a fact.

Imperfect Angel
Sep 5th, 2008, 11:18 PM
Jelena Robotactresskovic!:hearts:

brent-o
Sep 5th, 2008, 11:19 PM
I'm glad she finally realizes that getting healthy yields better results.

Ty-Ty
Sep 5th, 2008, 11:23 PM
"Not many people ‑‑ nobody made it from that country, so I didn't have anybody to look up to. "

Wasn't there that one girl who made all that noise when she hit that ball? ;)

Zweli
Sep 5th, 2008, 11:29 PM
She lost me after her talking about her injury free and all the blabla:rolleyes:
what will she say if she lose the finale?


She will say she was injured:lol::lol:


I feel she is over-confident.She might get disappointed.

Slutati
Sep 5th, 2008, 11:31 PM
JJ :hearts:
Please win the title now, you vulgar bitch :kiss:

The Kaz
Sep 5th, 2008, 11:32 PM
Wasn't there that one girl who made all that noise when she hit that ball? ;)

She defected though, hardly someone to feel much nationalistic pride in, turned her back on her own country :shrug:

Marshmallow
Sep 6th, 2008, 12:07 AM
Then I had a back pain in Australian Open. Then I had ‑‑ I don't know what I played afterwards. Then I got sick in Indian Wells really bad and was sick for three or four months. I had some bacteria that they couldn't ‑‑ they didn't know how to get rid of it, and so my nose was running the whole time. It was really bad in my throat and it was hard for me to breathe.

Then French Open I had problem with my arm, you know. My arm was like swollen, and since the second round of the tournament I was struggling.

In Wimbledon, I made some movement and I had a tear in my meniscus where they told me I went to have surgery and I'm not going to play for a while. I recovered in three weeks, but it really took me a long time, you know, to come back.

It was amazing how my knee got weaker. Through Olympics and LA and Montreal I was really out of shape. I couldn't move. I was not fast enough. I was just ‑‑ it was hard for me.

Wow! I'm surprised she didn't pencil in an excuse for her loss in Dubai. Didn't she have a fractured nail? A strained hair strand?

Overall, she's, I think, the strongest player on the tour, together with her sister. Nobody has the power that they have.

We cannot compare. At least I cannot compare to any of them, you know, with their strength. They're great athletes, really. I'm a little athlete. They move really well. They hit the ball so hard.


I can't help but :rolleyes: everytime she says stuff like this. Guess it could be worse she could call them manly like she did Ana after the LA match.

duhcity
Sep 6th, 2008, 12:27 AM
Yes Jelena and Novak know each, both are from Serbia, and enjoy each other.

but Jelena is not joined at the hip with Novak. Is she the expert on what he said and did and his antics on and off court? Really. Unless they ask every other freaking player the question, I truly don't see how that was relevant

terjw
Sep 6th, 2008, 12:28 AM
Wow! I'm surprised she didn't pencil in an excuse for her loss in Dubai. Didn't she have a fractured nail? A strained hair strand? .

Jeez - I wonder at your intelligence when I see a post like that.. She was asked a question to take them through her injuries this year and she answered factually. This is not an "excuse". She's doing her bit as a professional answering questions. :rolleyes:

Contrast this: Jelena was asked a question and gave a factual answer. You were not asked to post - but decide to post a load of tripe anyway.

Marshmallow
Sep 6th, 2008, 12:42 AM
Jeez - I wonder at your intelligence when I see a post like that.. She was asked a question to take them through her injuries this year and she answered factually. This is not an "excuse". She's doing her bit as a professional answering questions. :rolleyes:

Contrast this: Jelena was asked a question and gave a factual answer. You were not asked to post - but decide to post a load of tripe anyway.

:tape:

Q. In all your tries to get past the semifinal, what was the difference today?

JELENA JANKOVIC: You know, actually, to be honest, this has been the first set Grand Slam that I don't have any injuries, that I don't have any issues bothering me.

She was injured then at the USO in 2006 and the FO 2007 [they stand out]. Maybe you're just niave but there's an excuse making undertone throughout the transcript.

Q. If you play Serena Williams, how does your history against her where you've split six matches, you've split the two matches this year, all the...

JELENA JANKOVIC: This year we are 1‑1. I beat her at the Australian Open; she beat me in Miami in three sets.

Has to mention it took Serena 3 sets, though all of us who saw that match know Serena choked the second set away.

I had no reaction. I had no ‑‑ I was really, my game was kind of falling apart. I was really struggling. When you're not, you know, there, it's ‑‑ and I lost in three sets in those circumstances.


Here has to point out that even while on her death bed, it took Safina 3 sets.

It's all about viewing herself in the best possible light - but to you I suppose nothing more than factual. Even though combined with her abiltiy to lose concentration getting into arguments while leading, and constantly trying to please the crowd and gazing at herself relentlessly on the big screen - it all paints a pretty consistent picture.

For the record you can question my intellect all you like, I assure you I won't lost sleep over it. :D

CanIGetAWhat
Sep 6th, 2008, 12:44 AM
Serena Williams (http://www.usopen.org/en_US/bios/overview/wta230234.html)
Friday, September 5, 2008
http://www.usopen.org/images/players/wta230234.jpg (http://www.usopen.org/en_US/bios/overview/wta230234.html)

Transcribed Interview

Q. What's the difference between the Serena Williams who sort of came out of the blue, won the Australian Open in 2007 and the Serena Williams who's played a lot more consistently in the last little while?
SERENA WILLIAMS: I think it's just it. I've been way more consistent. I was playing a lot more, having more consistent results, and just putting in the effort.

Q. What does that mean, putting in the effort?
SERENA WILLIAMS: Well, just putting in the effort both on the court and off the court. Paying the price, basically. Doubles helped, too. Playing a lot of doubles is always fun.

Q. Was this match as easy as the scores indicate?
SERENA WILLIAMS: It was so windy out there, so it's kind of hard to say. Yeah, it was ‑‑ you know, I think she played well and did some things that really worked, and it was just me trying to find my rhythm.

Q. Can you describe the way you were when you won your first Grand Slam here in '99? How long ago does that feel compared to where you are now, mentally, physically?
SERENA WILLIAMS: Yeah, it feels like a long time ago. Doesn't really ‑‑ actually doesn't feel like that long ago, but when I look ‑‑ it's almost been 10 years. That's kind of weird.

But it's good, you know. I just am excited to obviously still be here, and 10 years later still putting up a major fight. Well, nine years later.

Q. What's different about the way you approach the points, the way you approach your game now?
SERENA WILLIAMS: When I was that young, you know, when you're that young you really have nothing to lose. Every person you go against is probably, especially back then I wasn't ranked that high, they were expected to win.

At the same time, I still had the confidence. I really felt like I was going to win that year. You know, I think that confidence has been able to stay with me throughout my career.

Q. What about 2002?
SERENA WILLIAMS: That seems even longer. I really don't eve remember that one. I don't remember anything about that.

Q. Do you feel expected to win tomorrow?
SERENA WILLIAMS: I don't feel expected to win. I feel expected to show up and, you know, do the best that I can do, and I feel like I have nothing to lose. I'm going against, you know, someone that's ranked higher than me.

She has a lot of pressure to win her first Grand Slam, and I'm just enjoying every moment, so yeah.

Q. Did you ever doubt that you would get back to this point?
SERENA WILLIAMS: Absolutely not. You know, I've always felt like my game is suited to withstand a long time and play for years and years. I feel like ‑‑ I've been saying I feel like I just started again, like I just feel so excited to be out there for every match.

Q. It was awfully windy out there today, but how cleanly do you feel you're hitting the ball right now?
SERENA WILLIAMS: I can't really tell today. It was just so windy out there. It was really windy out there.

Q. Did you get your rhythm in today's match, or...
SERENA WILLIAMS: I guess I got more of a rhythm as the match ‑‑ obviously I got more of a rhythm, so I was excited to get that.

Q. Can you talk about that point where you struck Safina with that drive?
SERENA WILLIAMS: Oh, my God, yeah. It was crazy, you know. I didn't even see the ball. I was just ‑‑ pretty much just running and hitting my shot. I'm so used to playing shots in doubles, and it was like, you know, you just make any shot that you can make. I was, you know, nearly mortified that I hit her. Yeah.

Q. Are you concerned about weather conditions for the match tomorrow, if it's going to be tomorrow?
SERENA WILLIAMS: Yeah, I don't know if we'll play tomorrow, but I'm ready to play tomorrow. Hopefully we can. If not, I'll be ready for Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, doesn't matter.

Q. Would you say a quarterfinal match was a lot harder than the semifinals?
SERENA WILLIAMS: Obviously. Absolutely. I feel that Venus is my toughest opponent ever. You know, nothing against Dinara. I think she's been playing really incredible. I think she played even well today.

But I just ‑‑ I just think Venus is just an amazing player. Maybe I have a little too much respect for her.

Q. You mentioned this after you played her, that if you're going to eliminate her from the tournament, you really want to go on and win it to make it worthwhile. Is that pretty much the case?
SERENA WILLIAMS: Yeah, I feel like Venus was playing the best in this tournament. I felt like she had a chance to win, and maybe she even would have won.

Obviously I would like to do what I think she would have done. But at the same time, I don't want to put too much pressure on myself.

I just want to go out there and do the best that I can do. You know, getting to the final of a Grand Slam is awesome in any way. I just ‑‑ obviously I want to go another one.

Q. If you become No. 1, it will have been five years since you were No. 1. No other woman has come back and done that after such a long time. What kind of statement do you think that makes about your career?
SERENA WILLIAMS: Well, I mean, I'm here to stay. Like I said, I've really been enjoying my time on the court and playing a lot. You know, I think ‑‑ No. 1 is not my goal right now.

I know I'll get that eventually if I continue to play the tournaments. I just want to be able to win the Grand Slams, and, you know, play and stay healthy. And I think the ranking will definitely come.

Q. Did you warm up with Venus this morning, and did she give you any advice for this match?
SERENA WILLIAMS: She gave me a lot of advice for this match. I didn't warm up with her, but she gave me a lot of advice in what to do and how to play.

Q. Talk a little bit more specifically about what you mean by just putting in the effort. I mean, are you talking about practicing more or working out more?
SERENA WILLIAMS: Yea, I mean, just I think more than anything playing more tournaments. I've been working hard for years, you know. It's like ‑‑ I think my results are finally showing.

You know, if I don't practice, then it's like my mind goes nuts. It's like I should have been on the court today.
I'm just paying the price, so to say, whatever that means. It is what it is, you know.

Q. Can you talk a little bit about the advice that Venus gave you? It was about Dinara?
SERENA WILLIAMS: Yeah, it was about Dinara. Venus is a really smart player. She's an extremely smart player. She knows how to read people very well, so...

Q. Any particular reads on Dinara that she gave?
SERENA WILLIAMS: Yeah, she gave me some advice on what to do and how to play and what to expect.

Q. The last time you and Jelena played in Miami, her tenacity really kept her in that match. Is that her biggest weapon, just being able to hang in there in rallies and hang in there and hang in there?
SERENA WILLIAMS: Yeah, absolutely. I don't know too many people on the tour that can hang in there as much as she can, and it's definitely ‑‑ she's playing well, and she's just going for glory here, so, yeah.

Q. Can you describe your will on the court in big matches, big points, big tournaments like this one?
SERENA WILLIAMS: My what?

Q. Your will.
SERENA WILLIAMS: My will?
Yeah, I have amazing will. I don't want to ‑‑ I love to win, and more than anything, I just ‑‑ I love to win, so I think that wills me to do the best I can.

Q. Mary Carrillo was on the air talking about how the people closest to you in your life, your family, have really encouraged you to take advantage of this prime of your career and really go for it now as opposed to maybe doing other things in life. Can you talk about that a little bit? Is there someone close to you or in your family who's really kind of encouraged you right now?
SERENA WILLIAMS: Yeah. You know, she knows my family really well. Yeah. (laughter.)

So I guess maybe she had a conversation with them. My family has always supported me since Day One.

Q. What was that like to be part of that HBO documentary with that experience with all those amazing people from all walks of life?
SERENA WILLIAMS: It was an honor, and I think that sums it up. I felt honored that they wanted me to speak on it and to be a part of it.

I was so excited to do it. And then to see people like Colin Powell and everyone else that was on the program, as well, really was ‑‑ made me feel so proud to be black and African‑American and be a part of that program.

Q. Do you want to catch Steffi Graf? Do you think that's at all possible? I know you're a little bit far behind as far as 22 Grand Slams.
SERENA WILLIAMS: Well, only way I can catch her is for singles and doubles, because, you know, my goal has never been to have the most. My goal has always been to have the best time and do the best I can do.

Yeah, that's a pretty unbelievable goal. She was one of my favorite players growing up.

Q. You said the other day you really wanted to play Safina. Is that because she was kind of the hottest player this summer and you wanted to match up against her?
SERENA WILLIAMS: Yeah, she's been playing so well this summer. She beat me in Berlin, and I really just was not very happy about that.

So I felt that I could play better. It was kind of hard to do today with the conditions, but I just definitely, you know, wanted to just go up against, you know, I think the best player this summer.

Q. Following up on the documentary, have you seen it? And if you have, was there one person's story that you were struck by that you just maybe didn't know about?
SERENA WILLIAMS: Yeah, I was struck by ‑‑ that's why I mentioned Colin Powell. I was really struck by his story and everything he was saying. I saw pretty much everyone on the documentary, but I didn't see me. It's like everyone came up but me. I was waiting and waiting. I must have missed it.

Q. I guess you know your story, so...
SERENA WILLIAMS: Yeah. Thank you.

FastScripts by ASAP Sports
Win your 9th slam tomorrow.

fufuqifuqishahah
Sep 6th, 2008, 02:54 AM
Q. When you've won or when you've lost, what's been the difference?

JELENA JANKOVIC: Overall, she's, I think, the strongest player on the tour, together with her sister. Nobody has the power that they have.

We cannot compare. At least I cannot compare to any of them, you know, with their strength. They're great athletes, really. I'm a little athlete. They move really well. They hit the ball so hard.

So if you want to really win when they're in form, you really have to be on the top of your level and you really have to go for every shot and really have to run a lot.

So it will be difficult, but it's doable.



:yeah:

sammy01
Sep 6th, 2008, 03:10 AM
:tape:



She was injured then at the USO in 2006 and the FO 2007 [they stand out]. Maybe you're just niave but there's an excuse making undertone throughout the transcript.



Has to mention it took Serena 3 sets, though all of us who saw that match know Serena choked the second set away.



Here has to point out that even while on her death bed, it took Safina 3 sets.

It's all about viewing herself in the best possible light - but to you I suppose nothing more than factual. Even though combined with her abiltiy to lose concentration getting into arguments while leading, and constantly trying to please the crowd and gazing at herself relentlessly on the big screen - it all paints a pretty consistent picture.

For the record you can question my intellect all you like, I assure you I won't lost sleep over it. :D


i agree with you, but shes not as bad as serena at putting herself in the best possible light. serena said diara played well and did some things that worked today, when safina was shit. when she loses she says she played bad and its was all her fault and gives no credit. this is serena just trying to paint herself in the best light as possible, its all about her and her tennis.

Renalicious
Sep 6th, 2008, 03:11 AM
Jelena is so inspirational. Really, everyone keeps talking about Ana's story being found by a Swiss player but I think the story that hasn't been heard enough is Jelena's - when she almost quit.

Jelena is such a unique player...one that is not afraid to laugh and Im so happy that she's finally healthy and ready to compete.

pov
Sep 6th, 2008, 03:20 AM
After she's talked about all the injuries, the journalist asks her to take us through the injuries again :weirdo: :help: :tape:
Yeah and at first I was also thinking wtf? Then I thought that it was a slick move. If she was faking all those injuries she'd have a hard time remembering them accurately. So, although I thought she was faking, it seems that she really did have those injuries

OrdinaryfoolisNJ
Sep 6th, 2008, 04:32 AM
Thanks for that great interview. I remember the Hopman Cup when Jelena and Novak still played the final, even though neither was in great shape (against Serena and Mardy Fish as I recall). The Serbs stayed in the match, and laughed until the end. As a fan, I appreciated that.

JJ has been injured during nearly every important tournament this year. I've been frustrated, and even wondered if her over playing from last year and the year before effected her going into this season.

As Jimmy Connors used to say, the past is the past, and JJ seems to be very much into the moment and feeling good.

It leaves me in a real pickle, as they say, because I love both JJ and Serena. I wanted Serena to end the year as number one, but I also want JJ to win her first GS. Who to root for?! I almost don't want to watch the match, because I don't know if I can stand to see either girl lose.

But someone must lose, and I believe that Serena will in the end be the winner. However, I'll be rooting for JJ for the upset. I would love to see a lot of people forced to shut up when JJ not only wins a GS, but EARNS number 1. But, if Serena does it instead, there will be a lot of people shutting up too!

I guess as a fan of both, its win-win and lose-lose. I can't wait to see which one of these deserving ladies takes the US Open GS AND number 1. Either will deserve it!

justine schnyder
Sep 6th, 2008, 05:42 AM
Jelena :hearts:

rockstar
Sep 6th, 2008, 06:31 AM
:lol: i found it amusing when she gave a long story about her injuries through out the year :hearts:

Junex
Sep 6th, 2008, 07:01 AM
Yeah and at first I was also thinking wtf? Then I thought that it was a slick move. If she was faking all those injuries she'd have a hard time remembering them accurately. So, although I thought she was faking, it seems that she really did have those injuries

at least she got it right, unlike a certain ATP player who can't seem to remmeber if its his right or left ankle that has got the pain for that dubious medical time-out!
and he got the nerve to lash out at someone who pointed out that obvious fakery!!!!!!!

dal
Sep 6th, 2008, 07:14 AM
Wow! I'm surprised she didn't pencil in an excuse for her loss in Dubai. Didn't she have a fractured nail? A strained hair strand?

nooo in dubai she was already the center of attention ... they celebrated her birthday after her first match there... :devil::lol:

Eddie
Sep 6th, 2008, 06:28 PM
"I never knew that, you know, this is something I really want to do, that I'm going to become a professional. Because how many people, especially coming from Serbia, we didn't have a tradition in tennis. Not many people ‑‑ nobody made it from that country, so I didn't have anybody to look up to":rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes:

I find this statement from Jelena very strange. Monica Seles grew up not to far from Belgrade and was a huge star in former Yugoslavia.

Delija
Sep 6th, 2008, 07:28 PM
"I never knew that, you know, this is something I really want to do, that I'm going to become a professional. Because how many people, especially coming from Serbia, we didn't have a tradition in tennis. Not many people ‑‑ nobody made it from that country, so I didn't have anybody to look up to":rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes:

I find this statement from Jelena very strange. Monica Seles grew up not to far from Belgrade and was a huge star in former Yugoslavia.




Well I suppose Jelena was 8 years old when Monica got stabbed by that idiot and wasn't yet focused on tennis :P

slamchamp
Sep 6th, 2008, 07:47 PM
You should know her better and give her more credit cause she is a really honest person. Last year she was healthy and she lost GS semi finals last year too and she didn't blame it on an injury simply because she knows how to loose in a sporty way unlike Sharpoava Shoulderova, or SerenaIALwaysPlayShitWhenILose and that's the true, this year she has injuries in all the GS accept the U.S and that is a fact.When has maria blamed a loss because of an injury?:rolleyes: she always gives credit to her oponents so shut up:o

#1SteffiGraf#1
Sep 6th, 2008, 07:56 PM
Why does she sounds so bitter when that reporter asked her about her going University? :confused:

I mean the only reason she thought about college was if tennis dont work out, which is smart, actually.

But um...I think tennis has worked for her. Time to forget college, JJ. :lol:

OrdinaryfoolisNJ
Sep 6th, 2008, 08:54 PM
"I never knew that, you know, this is something I really want to do, that I'm going to become a professional. Because how many people, especially coming from Serbia, we didn't have a tradition in tennis. Not many people ‑‑ nobody made it from that country, so I didn't have anybody to look up to":rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes:

I find this statement from Jelena very strange. Monica Seles grew up not to far from Belgrade and was a huge star in former Yugoslavia.

Monica wasn't a Serb. She was born in Yugoslavia to Hungarian parents, and became a US citizen.

No Name Face
Sep 6th, 2008, 09:03 PM
I kinda like Jelena after that interview....but Serena FTW.

Nicolás89
Sep 6th, 2008, 09:46 PM
Some people just can't understand context, don't they.
Anyway, Jelena knows she is playing a great opponent and she is really confident about it, she is not saying "I don't care who is my next opponent, if I'm playing good no one can beat me".........for example.