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~Kiera~
Sep 29th, 2008, 10:33 AM
http://msn.foxsports.com/tennis/story/8620252/China-Open-title-could-put-Jankovic-back-at-No.-1

China Open title could put Jankovic back at No. 1
by Matt Cronin, Special to FOXSports.com

On Sunday, world No. 2 Jelena Jankovic won her second 2008 title at the China Open, racing past Svetlana Kuznetsova 6-3, 6-2 in the final. Jankovic is now within a few points of regaining the top spot from Serena Williams, who hasn't played since out-toughing the Serbian in the last round of America's Grand Slam.

Jankovic has had a good but not great year and must be given credit for her consistency and how frequently she straps on her tennis shoes. But the 23-year-old is by no means a legend and is probably not even a legend in the making. Her ascent to No. 1 in early August without reaching a Grand Slam final was a sorry Open-era record, but that would have been quickly forgotten had she managed to claw her way to a three-set victory over Serena.

That she might ascend to No. 1 next week says something more profound: Too many great women's champions are retiring early and leaving some of the tour's biggest honors to those who should have needed more time to achieve them.

Had Belgian and seven-time grand Slam champion Justine Henin not unexpectedly retired in May at the relatively young age of 26, this topic might not be ripe for discussion. But with Henin joining other former Slam champs under the age of 29 like Martina Hingis, Kim Clijsters and Anastasia Myskina in early retirement, it's worth noting.

"That's the face of tennis today, with a player who is reaching No.1 without winning a Grand Slam," Henin's coach Carlos Rodriguez told FOXsports.com of Jankovic, who was 0-9 against Henin. "It's a sign. She's a good player, but when you see Maria Sharapova and the Williams sisters, they not only win Grand Slams, but they have the charisma. They give something extra, not only hitting balls. There's more behind them."

An intense and thoughtful man who took Henin out the juniors to tennis fame, Rodriguez and Henin just opened a branch of their 6th Sense Tennis Academy at the Mission Inn Resort & Club in Howey-in-the-Hills, Fla. They both see an opportunity in the U.S., where many parents of juniors are looking for intelligent coaches with proven track records who understand that teaching children to be champions is more than just about stroke production.

Rodriguez says that one of the reasons that Henin is retired is that she's looking to prove to herself that she can do more than just "hitting the ball" and will only likely consider a comeback once she has taken a very necessary mental break.

But what Henin left after she retired from her most dominant season ever in 2007 is a tour with three legitimate Hall of Fame players and a bunch of developing competitors who really couldn't hold her worn out pair of socks.

"I have a lot of respect for the other players, but outside of the Willamses and Sharapova, the rest are still really poor," Rodriguez said.

It's not like the Argentine doesn't like the potential of some of the kids — it's just that they are so wildly inconsistent. Take Roland Garros champion Ana Ivanovic, who is just 5-5 since winning her first Slam crown in Paris. Sven Groenefeld, whom Rodriguez considers the best coach on tour today, coaches the Serbian, but the 20-year-old is struggling mightily.

"I think Ana can do big things, but she needs more maturity," Rodriguez said. "It's very difficult for a player to learn what to do when she's in trouble. Ivanovic is not able to have a Plan B or C to solve the situations, and she loses complete control. The coach can help with this, but in the end, it's up to the player to find for herself what possibilities will work. The coach can only help you to a certain point."

Rodriguez spent a little time this past summer working with former world No. 4 Anna Chakvetadze but couldn't make it work with the Russian, who has spiraled downward to No. 12. On the outside, Chakvetadze appears to have all the ingredients that Rodriguez would like: foot speed, soft hands, the ability to take the ball on the rise and smarts. But he couldn't get through to the 21-year-old.

"Anna seems like she wants to work, but I told her, at the end of the day, deep inside of you, you don't want to try to go further and to push yourself more to succeed," he said. "I cannot help you if you don't have the will to do something, even if I'm the best or worst coach in the world. She has the talent. But she's really confused as to what she needs to do to succeed to do to become a No. 1 or No. 2 player in the world. She's not ready to make the sacrifices it takes to go to the top, there's not question about it. A champion is one inside and outside the court, and when you take Anna outside the court, she's really a disaster."

Somewhat incredibly, Rodriguez tabbed Nicole Vaidisova as the young player with the most potential. The Czech has the height, power and ball-striking capabilities to do major damage and has reached two Grand Slam semifinals, but the 19-year-old has had a depressing year, falling to No. 22 in the rankings. Vaidisova doesn't always play smart or look motivated.

"She's amazing," Rodriguez said. "It comes back to the entourage she has around her. It's so important. When you are talking mental, these girls are very strong, but when you are talking emotional, it's very hard. The emotional takes over the mental and she completely loses the way. It's a pity. I hope someone can take care of her because she's charismatic and is a really good player, but her emotional (state) and the intelligence is not that good."

Outside of the Williams sisters and Sharapova, there are no players on tour who can consistently win ugly when the chips are down, their bodies are aching and their foes are zoning on them. That's part of the make-up that Henin had, her innate ability to fight like an alley cat even when being attacked by every mangy dog in the alley.

"You can't teach that," Rodriguez said. "You can learn a lot of things, but you cannot change the natural personality of a player. With Serena, Venus, Justine and Jennifer Capriati, they have the personality that even when they weren't enjoying it, they could go through. There's no question that Maria, Serena and Venus are far and away from the other players. Their quality is too good."

Henin put a hurt on all of those players, who also got back at the Belgian in some of the finest matches the tour has seen this century. They may not miss losing to her, but Serena and Sharapova have admitted to missing the thrill of the battle against Henin, trying to figure out which strategy would work against the cagey all-courter's high-variety game.

But Henin isn't coming back anytime soon, if at all, so now it's up one of three other elite players to see if they can dominate like the Belgian did in 2007.

Sharapova just shut down her season due to her inability to recover a tear in her right rotator cuff, and when she returns to defend her Australian Open title in January, she will have more than likely have fallen out of the top 10 and will have missed the vast majority of the second part of the season. Whether the three-time Grand Slam champion can ever truly dominate is an open question.

"She showed that she's able to dominate, but it's not a question of once in a while, it's a question of regularity and the only way she can do it is to concentrate 100 percent on her tennis," Rodriguez said. "If Maria doesn't do that, she's never going to find the consistency throughout the year. In tennis, to be a champion, you have to choose to do everything you have to succeed in your sport. I think today Maria is unable to do so."

Crossover celebrity Sharapova has always stressed that her tennis comes first, and it's hard to argue with her resume. But it's also clear that carrying a $26-million off-court portfolio every year can be demanding. Rodriguez doesn't think that it's only her injuries that are holding her back.

"She has to concentrate, practice and live for her tennis — no endorsements, publicity and wasting time outside of the court with other things that distract you from No. 1," he said. "Once and for all, in front of the mirror, she has to ask herself, 'What do I want to achieve in my career?' I have all the possibilities to be No. 1 and stay there for a long time, but this is the price I have to pay."

Then there's Serena, she of nine Grand Slam titles and with the ambition to go well into the double digits. Now 27-years-old, Serena appears to be on a one Grand Slam per year pace. She's capable of doing better, but time is running short, and there's little room for the party circuit if she's ever going to dominate again.

She, Venus and Jankovic will tee it up in Stuttgart this week. If Serena wants to stay at No. 1, she's going to have to keep her mind focused on the next six weeks — not an easy task after a hard year and when the offseason beckons.

"Serena has the quality, and everything she needs mentally and physically to do it she has," Rodriguez said. "But is she going take care of herself and prepare to go into action? If she does that, I think Serena has another two or three great years left."

~Kiera~
Sep 29th, 2008, 10:42 AM
http://66.102.9.104/translate_c?hl=en&sl=zh-CN&tl=en&u=http://sports.sina.com.cn/t/2008-09-29/10353980854.shtml&usg=ALkJrhi4O0xTGI8ApH_icHru6-4nVD2hpQ

Branch network in five years, Yang Sword pretty dress is not only a player is a woman

Mao Yu correspondent reported, "Well, the final wish her good luck." September 27, and Zheng Jie in the fight to win, Kuznetsova in the final the following day about this, so this year because of self-confidence with the two Jankovic She is in the final against the winner. But in the end, on September 28 in the match, Jankovic has more than 6 to 3, 6 2 of the score gap, the easier end of the fighting, five in a row to participate in the network, finally get ahead of the tournament champion. And Kuznetsova, the continuation of the five finals this year, lost five of the History champion insulation.

Since the invasion of cold air over the weekend, Beijing's temperature plummeted. It's also wearing short shorts from all of a sudden, became a Canadian long-sleeved jacket. September 28 of the women's singles final is no exception. Love has always been pretty Jankovic in the bright yellow tennis dress, put on a stylish black to play Diku; Kuznetsova is not only wore trousers, also after two games, only off Under a thick coat. As Jankovic earlier adapted to the cold weather in Beijing, race, the one seed, and earlier access to the state. In contrast, Kuznetsova in the final performance, and the day before the semi-finals of the Panruoliangren not only many mistakes in the initiative, winning points pitifully small. 3 to 6, almost defenseless, Kuznetsova lost the first set. The second set of matches, it is almost a replica of the first set. Xingyunliushui Jankovic in the attack, only Kuznetsova struggling hard to cope with, and occasionally get the opportunity to attack, often because of lack of preparation and failure to come to an end. 2 to 6, Kuznetsova in the final game of the poor lost the second set.

"Today's game, I do not have the level of play. After all, is different from other final matches are held, I regret that I have in this year's five finalists, only won the runner-up." Face of the five finalists, none out of the Champions Problem is the very expression of Cold Kuznetsova. Because the day before the conference, she talked about her in the Fed Cup finals, and the state of mind have been the subject of non-small upgrade. However, only a day after the so-called improvement on the ending, even Kuznetsova had "halted" and described his condition suddenly disappeared without a trace.

Jankovic's victory was a great feeling. She not only before the award ceremony, has long been out ready to take up a good lip gloss its own; conference after the match, Jankovic was walking gold high heels, wearing a black stage of the pretty, Even a hair comb are meticulous. "Yes, I am not just a tennis player, I was a girl. Than it has been praised play good tennis, I prefer being praised as a good girl." Dress up as a really bright, Fu Yi arise in the field Jankovic, received a reporter at the scene all the warm applause, and she is shy, some covered in the face.

"We are pleased that this year's race, I got further than last year's champion. To me, this is a special reward. I like China to participate in the competition, my mother is the same." Big smile, Jan Covey Qi in the conference is very easy because the game was a victory, she was most worried about financial problems, and finally resolved. "My mother in this week, always kept in shopping around. Fortunately, I won the championship, the reward should be able to make up much of my mother's shopping deficit."

Lighter after Jankovic was asked if the world number one on the other. In the net, Serena Williams and she points to narrow the gap between the median 2. The next week, two of them will appear in the race in Stuttgart, where the race results will directly determine whether the world will be changed again. "The competition is this year's top competition has always been the case, went through the net of justice in the United States of the net several times frustrated, I could have easily asked on the subject --- compared with the world number one, playing for the next Is the game I have to face. Because as long as this, the world's natural to be able to pocket income, I can be worthy of that position. "

Shy? Who is she kidding :lol:

~Kiera~
Sep 29th, 2008, 10:44 AM
http://66.102.9.104/translate_c?hl=en&sl=zh-CN&tl=en&u=http://sports.sina.com.cn/t/2008-09-29/11183980938.shtml&usg=ALkJrhhD-t1DVafmWd-HeVKUkl9asc_HPw

Jan Branch sweet revenge for NO.1 eventual champion as the story unfolds into a white-hot stage

Ben Beijing Zhang correspondents reported fighting

In the more than 2 hours spent in the semi-finals 3 Ziwo Na beat Zvonareva, Jankovic has pledged to the finals to face Kuziniesuo her to seek revenge. When the good reporter used the phrase in the other semi-final in the Kuziniesuo Zheng Jie out of her confirmation when Jankovic holds 4 wins 2 losses of a large Russian girl eyebrows respond: "What can I say? Would wish her good luck chant!"

Jankovic was really him good luck this year in Dubai last week and the Tokyo Station on two occasions in the 3 to beat rivals, she finally won a 6 to 3 and 6 to 2 easy victory. It is interesting to note that this took place against the three in Asia. Jankovic said after the match excitedly: "Svetlana beat me twice this year, in order to be able to beat the way of revenge, I am very satisfied." Jankovic to victory narrowed further in the Serena championship and the gap between, as both plan to attend this week's Stuttgart station, they will also be the envy of the world's first to Europe.

Kuziniesuo For her, this is already the fifth time this season she was in the final defeat, after she apparently do not want to talk about the subject, but said "the situation in each of the final are from each other." Jankovic was revealed large scars opponent: "She's finals record is not good, and perhaps in this case, her psychological problems; if it is in the semi-finals or 1 / 4 finals of the meet, her performance Much better than today. "Kuziniesuo baby has to admit that, compared to a week before the first stop in Tokyo after a loss of the two 7-to-5 reverse Jankovic's game, her game The performance of the frequent mistakes, very bad. In the last 11 finals, Kuziniesuo lost one of her 10; in this to win the championship, Jankovic in the last 7 games in the finals only to win just two.

Jankovic in Beijing sweet revenge, of course, in addition to revenge against him, there is another layer of meaning. Last year's net in the women's singles final, Jankovic and a first victory in the second set at 5 to 1 board ahead of time, Hungary was the ultimate girl zaouia reversed the 2007 season, bringing several of the greatest reversal One of the show. This game, Jankovic in the second set, although there have been a short game of the slack, but she said after the match: "I did not think last year's finals, this year is a different year, I tend to think more positive . "

Kuziniesuo her press conference after the end of half an hour, before Jankovic came Shanshan Press Office. Prior to that, the site hosts the explanation given her to do is stretch the muscles in order to relax the body. A mere 74 minutes of the game, she should not have much of the body's response; when Jankovic arrived at the scene, told reporters she came to realize that during this period of time really done - she put on Of a beautiful small black dress and makeup on the face of apparently Xinhua-off; her into the news conference hall, the reporters could not help but cheer up and applaud, not only for her win, but also for her beauty.

Women's singles top seed Jankovic won the women's singles crown, the popularity of men's singles Roddick won the men's singles champion Wang; Zheng Jie combined with the outstanding performance in singles, women's doubles final is also the local players in this network can Said to be a satisfactory outcome. Over the past five years in the network, which will enter into a new stage; next year's crown, as well as ATP500-level women's tournament season, will be looking forward to it.

She must love it over there. Every article refers to her beauty :lol:

schorsch
Sep 29th, 2008, 11:24 AM
rodriguez proving once again why i hate his guts :worship:

thx kiera for proving us with so many articles :p

Brena
Sep 29th, 2008, 11:45 AM
rodriguez proving once again why i hate his guts :worship:

pffft! Unshaved, creepy moron. :o I used to dislike Henin only because of him. Serena couldn't even get to the third set against Henin, and JJ lost half of their matches just because she's slightly bonkers. BS.

thx kiera for proving us with so many articles :p

Sarah :kiss:

schorsch
Sep 29th, 2008, 11:48 AM
but this article is really gm worthy kiera :p

providing not proving hehe :p

~Kiera~
Sep 29th, 2008, 12:04 PM
but this article is really gm worthy kiera :p

You should post it then ;)

Optima
Sep 29th, 2008, 01:28 PM
Rodriguez = :help:

He doesn't know the definition of charisma. Put a sock in it.

schorsch
Sep 29th, 2008, 01:41 PM
ok did... this is gonna be ...erhh interesting.

Nina.
Sep 29th, 2008, 01:44 PM
Wow Rodriguez... :help: who does he think he is?


"I have a lot of respect for the other players, but outside of the Willamses and Sharapova, the rest are still really poor," Rodriguez said.

Really poor? Sure, everybody but Henin is probably por for him...

A champion is one inside and outside the court, and when you take Anna outside the court, she's really a disaster."

I find this really rude and I am not even a fan...you should not say sth like this and even not after you worked with somebody.

I don't see why he is saying these things :shrug:
Desperately seeking for some attention?

redsonja
Sep 29th, 2008, 01:49 PM
I love Justine, but Carlos needs to stop taking whatever crack he's on. Besides being inaccurate (naming Nikki V as the only one with any potential :help: ), it was totally rude. If you know Anna C is a mess... why in God's name would you go to the mass media and tell everyone she's a mess? Sure, that's gonna help. :rolleyes:

Moving on...
a large Russian girl eyebrows
I love China. :lol:

bluehaze
Sep 29th, 2008, 01:52 PM
That Carlos spews a lot of BS doesnt he? JJ has more charisma than the rest of the top 5 combined.

oleada
Sep 29th, 2008, 01:55 PM
Carlos need to shut up.
Besides, I don't know what charisma has to do with your ability to play tennis. And charisma is not an area JJ is lacking anyway. :devil:

Hashim.
Sep 29th, 2008, 02:09 PM
its not the first time JJ is being criticized nor it would be the last time:shrug: we just need to ignore:lol:
and no mention of Safina:shrug::unsure:

btw that was really rude to Anna...disaster on court:help:

redsonja
Sep 29th, 2008, 02:18 PM
and no mention of Safina:shrug::unsure:
I figure since she was the last person to beat Justine, Carlos prefers to pretend that Dinara doesn't exist. :p (But I found her omission totally odd, too.)

RFS
Sep 29th, 2008, 02:25 PM
I love Justine, but Carlos needs to stop taking whatever crack he's on. Besides being inaccurate (naming Nikki V as the only one with any potential :help: ), it was totally rude. If you know Anna C is a mess... why in God's name would you go to the mass media and tell everyone she's a mess? Sure, that's gonna help. :rolleyes:

Moving on...

I love China. :lol:

Sorry... Carlos Who-now?
I noticed the lack of Safina in his spray-painting of opinion... and ITA... Nicky V? Really? But I can't believe his comments about Anna... it's like... "I am the famous Carlos... i guided Justine... if it didn't work with anyone... it's THEIR fault... quelle disaster"...

Lorrrrd have mercy on his grubby unshaven soul....

Wayn77
Sep 29th, 2008, 02:36 PM
grrrrrrrrr.... taking medication and trying to stay calm..

Justine was a great player, of that there is no doubt.

Mr Rodriguez has decided to step out and start shouting.

The grubby, folickly-challenged, unshaven, base-ball cap wearing square, wouldn't know charisma if I printed the word on a bill-board sized plank of wood ... and smacked him over the head with it.

redsonja
Sep 29th, 2008, 02:42 PM
But I can't believe his comments about Anna... it's like... "I am the famous Carlos... i guided Justine... if it didn't work with anyone... it's THEIR fault... quelle disaster"...
I'm really bothered by it because I suspect that there are fairly good reasons why Anna's been an emotional mess all year. And whether she ever hears about the article or not, it's really rude and a little mean to accuse her of-- in that situation-- not being mentally focused enough on her tennis. Hel-lo! :mad:

(Jelena Jankovic has no charisma and... Dinara who?)

schorsch
Sep 29th, 2008, 02:54 PM
well somebody pointed out he also is looking for publicity for the tennis acedemies (recently opened one in usa) and for his other projects..

:eek: wasnt justines charisma and waste of time offcourt to be more popular / endearing / make more of a name for him and herself not enough :eek:

Brena
Sep 29th, 2008, 03:02 PM
I'm really bothered by it because I suspect that there are fairly good reasons why Anna's been an emotional mess all year. And whether she ever hears about the article or not, it's really rude and a little mean to accuse her of-- in that situation-- not being mentally focused enough on her tennis. Hel-lo! :mad:

(Jelena Jankovic has no charisma and... Dinara who?)

Yes, he can bash, praise and ignore whomever he wants, who cares, but to say publicly somethink like that about a young girl who's going through problems shows what a seriously derranged person he is. :shrug: I'm amazed he didn't write : ''And Hantuchova had an eating disorder - those girls are such a mess, they'll never do anything in their lives''. :weirdo:

redsonja
Sep 29th, 2008, 03:15 PM
Yes, he can bash, praise and ignore whomever he wants, who cares, but to say publicly somethink like that about a young girl who's going through problems shows what a seriously derranged person he is. :shrug: I'm amazed he didn't write : ''And Hantuchova had an eating disorder - those girls are such a mess, they'll never do anything in their lives''. :weirdo:

I can see it now: "That Daniela has no sense of nutrition! I kept telling her all her muscle was disintegrating and she just wouldn't listen! :mad:" :rolleyes:

("Being held up at gunpoint in your house because you're a tennis player is no excuse not to focus on your tennis!")

Brena
Sep 29th, 2008, 03:23 PM
I can see it now: "That Daniela has no sense of nutrition! I kept telling her all her muscle was disintegrating and she just wouldn't listen! :mad:" :rolleyes:

("Being held up at gunpoint in your house because you're a tennis player is no excuse not to focus on your tennis!")

Bunch of losers those kids! And those with injuries? - they should be killed off since they're obviously not tough enough and will never become the GOATs. They're so spoilt - they want to have boyfriends, friends, spend time with their families or even have hobbies! They just don't get what sport is all about'' etc. etc.

~Kiera~
Sep 29th, 2008, 03:46 PM
If he ever had any credibility, he lost it on the charisma part. Jelena has enough charisma for the entire tour. It's certainly not something she is lacking.

As for Nicole, I like the girl but there's clearly a reason why some reporters call her I-Robot.

redsonja
Sep 29th, 2008, 03:52 PM
As for Nicole, I like the girl but there's clearly a reason why some reporters call her I-Robot.

:lol: :tape:

Tashi
Sep 29th, 2008, 03:57 PM
JJ's pinky finger has more charisma than 99% of both tours. Grrr!

And leave Chakky alone. I mean, WTF?

Nikkie V?! Seriously?!

He may be a great coach but he's proving to be a crappy person. Carlos do me a big favor and shut the fuck up. :rolleyes:

Cat123
Sep 29th, 2008, 03:57 PM
That guy needs to shut the hell up and leave Anna alone. :(

schorsch
Sep 29th, 2008, 04:17 PM
thats sort of like rainer hoffmann's behaviour towards mirza and chakve -______-

he worked with them seperately (well the were training with patty) a lil'bit, but they didnt work very well together and they wasnt able to sort of improve through his coacing, so they told him they wouldn't want to work with him anymore.

so he was sitting in the final last year of them after patty had lost i think it was in stanford and he grinned at every ue / mistake, df they hit :bolt:

RFS
Sep 29th, 2008, 05:12 PM
Well I wonder whether he will ever find as good a money-ticket as Justine... and also ... if he couldn't afford a bloody razor when working with her... perhaps he's resigning himself to a life of looking like a grubby little wino...? :lol:

Edit: Oh apparantly he shaved and cut his hair? But still a grubby little guttersnipe!

~Kiera~
Sep 29th, 2008, 08:12 PM
http://tennisworld.typepad.com/tennisworld/2008/09/monday-net-po-2.html

WTA - Jelena Jankovic

The Tier II China Open had a draw that resembled a Tier I event, with eight of the Top 17 women in the world entered. The eventual champion turned out to be a name that we've grown accustomed to seeing at the end stages of big tournaments - Jelena Jankovic.

For all that Jankovic has accomplished in 2008, including a brief occupation of the No. 1 world ranking, she had won just one tournament - Tier I Rome, in May. Since then, Jankovic has reached three quarterfinals (including at the Olympics), two semifinals (including at Roland Garros), and one final - at the U.S. Open. But while these results mean plenty of big paychecks, it also means that Jankovic lost in every one of these events. And in a sport where winning hardware requires perfection, that's a cold reality to face. This week in Beijing, Jankovic won a trophy, but more importantly, acquired some confidence that she can win once she gets to the final matches of tournaments.

After navigating past qualifier Alexsandra Wozniak, Jankovic, like Tsonga, seemed to pick up steam as the week progressed. She beat No. 7 Daniela Hantuchova 7-5, 6-1, No. 5 Vera Zvonareva in three sets, and No. 4 Svetlana Kuznetsova in the final 6-3, 6-2. The title is the seventh of Jankovic's career, and it puts her just 21 ranking points behind world No. 1 Serena Williams.

After this year's French Open, we thought that Ana Ivanovic had asserted herself as the stronger of the two top Serbian women. Ivanovic reached the final of the Australian Open back in January, and won at Roland Garros. But since then, it's been Jankovic who's had more consistent results, and she's passed Ivanovic in the rankings. I felt that Ivanovic was due to breakthrough at a Grand Slam earlier this year, and I think it will be Jankovic's time soon - maybe even as soon as the 2009 Australian Open.

RFS
Sep 29th, 2008, 08:20 PM
^ Here's hoping... PS I always said that this would be JJ's "injury" year (I forgot about her miracle powers of healing :p) but I think big things are due for 2009!

terjw
Sep 29th, 2008, 08:23 PM
You know Carlos was always shooting his mouth off against Kim. The more Justine and Kim got along - he would come up with something to try to wedge them apart - some lie about Kim or something from 4 years ago.. He'd always spout on about demanding apologies and Justine wouldn't be playing Fed Cup again or until she got an apology.

Couple of weeks after pretty well every outburst he would grovel on her website he didn't really mean that. He was taken out of context blaa blaa, he was misquoted blaa blaa and that Justine would be playing.

I think the bit about Justine coming back is more what he hopes will happen than anything else. I think he was a great coach for Justine. But he got lucky. And he's not so good with anyone else not so good or dedicated.

What he publicly said about Anna is really disgraceful. That should be between coach and player. Totally unprofessinal and downright nasty.

terjw
Sep 29th, 2008, 08:33 PM
The Tier II China Open had a draw that resembled a Tier I event, with eight of the Top 17 women in the world entered. The eventual champion turned out to be a name that we've grown accustomed to seeing at the end stages of big tournaments - Jelena Jankovic.



So what does Stuttgart resemble. The field this week at Stuttgart is even tougher.

schorsch
Sep 29th, 2008, 08:45 PM
hmmmm lets say... super tier 1 then ?

louisa.
Sep 29th, 2008, 11:34 PM
oo he's a nasty piece of work isn't he? :o
i'd love to cram all his BS right back down his throat.
no charisma my ass. :rolls:

ahem, and moving right along..
i do hope 2009 is a continuation of the second half of this year :D really would like to see her grab that AO trophey!

~Kiera~
Sep 30th, 2008, 12:06 AM
http://www.tennisforum.com/showpost.php?p=14156814&postcount=115

From the author:

Allow me to weigh on a few things:

1: Carlos only responded to questions about the players I asked him about, hence the admission of Dementieva, Safina and Kim. I only had a certain amount of time and we also discussed coaching philosophy for a magazine piece I’m doing so I couldn’t fit those folks in.

2: What he essentially means by charisma is that “extra special something” that player takes on court, not charm, which JJ obviously has loads of. JJ still needs to prove that she’s a big time player and she knows that.

3: Chakvetadze publicly spoke about Carlos plenty during the summer, not it’s not out of hand for him to be discussing her. As much as I like her game and think she is smart, thoughtful person, she is struggling emotionally, hence her poor results.

4. I don’t agree with his comments about Maria, but he’s said much the same in the past about players who do a fair amount of modeling, photo shoots, etc.

5. He likes Ivanovic’s potential a lot, but said she’s needs to mature and I’m sure that AI would say much the same.

6. He does not want to coach Nicole and I was stunned as some of you that he thought that she still has such great potential and I told him so. He wants to coach juniors now, not pros.

7: He never said Justine was certain to come back.

7. He admits that he is a tough coach and says that only resilient players like Henin can put up with him.

Got to go but will be back on Tuesday if you want to discuss more...

Best

Matt

redsonja
Sep 30th, 2008, 01:31 AM
Flashcards oughta help sort out the difference between "admission" and "omission", Matt.

And I still think that what he said about Anna C was absolutely vile. There are plenty of ways to say that she's in trouble emotionally without insinuating that she's just not committed enough.

schorsch
Sep 30th, 2008, 02:50 AM
how can you be that is really Carlos Matt who posted that?

redsonja
Sep 30th, 2008, 03:47 AM
Well, I guess it's possible it's not, but I don't know why anyone would be chomping at the bit to post as Matt Cronin. :lol: And it reads like his writing.

~Kiera~
Sep 30th, 2008, 11:17 AM
Well, he once told me off for posting something from his site so I'm guessing that's really him :o

RFS
Sep 30th, 2008, 11:22 AM
Flashcards oughta help sort out the difference between "admission" and "omission", Matt.

And I still think that what he said about Anna C was absolutely vile. There are plenty of ways to say that she's in trouble emotionally without insinuating that she's just not committed enough.

Mu thoughts exactly - and in my pre-lunch state I was scratching my head for a while wondering what was the word I was looking for...
And I second that - what Anna went through, I would not wish on my worst enemy... one of those events that puts everything in its context...

Well, I guess it's possible it's not, but I don't know why anyone would be chomping at the bit to post as Matt Cronin. :lol: And it reads like his writing.

Yeah... over-officious (otherwise translated in this context as "up his own arse"...):devil:

Well, he once told me off for posting something from his site so I'm guessing that's really him :o
I think I actually remember that !

~Kiera~
Sep 30th, 2008, 03:05 PM
New blog

Letter from Stuttgart

Hello again,

This week it was all about tennis. As you can imagine, I am very happy to have left Beijing with my second title of the year and the seventh of my career. To be honest, I wasn't that excited about making the long trip back to Beijing after just having been there a few weeks ago but of course now I am happy to have gone. The people have really been very welcoming and I even started to like the food!

It took me a little while to get into the tournament, but with each match I grew in confidence and played better and better. The semi final against Vera was particularly tough but once I got through that three set match I had a lot of confidence going into the final. I knew that playing Svetlana wasn't going to be easy especially as she beat me the week before in Tokyo but I just went out there knowing what i need to do in order to win. I played a good match and I stuck to the game plan I had going into the match. Playing tennis at this level, small differences make a big difference and in the final I just felt as if everything clicked.

I then made the long journey back to Europe. I have arrived in Stuttgart where I will get a late start to play my first match on Thursday. I haven't even had the chance to look at the draw but I will just try and stay focused on my game and continue with my work. I have a couple of activities to do before I start including a media roundtable today. I may go to the player party this evening if I am not too tired and if I can figure out what to wear! I have to get rid of all my summer clothes and get the warm winter clothes because here in Europe is quiet cold.

I hope to get over the jet lag soon because being wide awake at 3am and dead tired at noon is not fun at all! As long as I don't fall asleep during my match I should be ok! Also I forgot to say that I am so excited to have both of my parents here with me at the tournament. My mom always travels with me as you all know and my dad arrived last night from America to see me...

That's all for now. Thanks for following along.

With Love

JJ

~Kiera~
Sep 30th, 2008, 03:07 PM
http://www.earthtimes.org/articles/show/234824,azarenko-and-qualifiers-win-at-porsche-gp--confident-jankovic.html

The American Williams has a slender 21-point lead over Jankovic atop the WTA rankings, and Jankovic hopes to regain the lead by the end of the season at the latest.

"I feel good and ready to play and am full of confidence. The number one is exciting. Most important to me is to finish the year as the number one," Jankovic told reporters on Tuesday after arriving from China the previous day.

Jankovic said she was finally injury-free after several ailments earlier in the year which hampered her performance. She lost the top spot to Williams after the American won the US Open.

"It is a relief (to be injury-free). If I had been healthy it would have made a huge difference," she said, looking at the race for number one.

~Kiera~
Sep 30th, 2008, 03:31 PM
http://www.porsche-tennis.de/prod/pag/tennis.nsf/web/english-tournament_pressreleases_T08_0059_en?OpenDocument&cont=news_topnews#pagetop

A Different Story this Year

Stuttgart. Jelena Jankovic, the world No. 2, sat down with the journalists to answer a variety of questions at the Porsche Tennis Grand Prix’s All Access Hour on Tuesday. The 23-year-old Serbian’s thoughts on...

...the No. 1 spot being on the line at the Porsche Tennis Grand Prix:

“I’m working really hard at the moment and am trying to progress. And the results are coming. This week will be really exciting especially as the No. 1 spot is on the line. Everything depends upon how Serena and I play this week. However it’s more important for me to finish the year as No. 1.”

...her current form:

“I’m feeling really fresh at the moment in contrast to last year when I was extremely exhausted coming into the Porsche Tennis Grand Prix. I want to finish the year in a good way. Even though I’ll need a couple of days to adjust to the different time zone and weather, I feel really good and am ready to play. It’s a different story to the one last year.”

...this year’s US Open:

“I’ve been in the semifinals at four or five Grand Slams but never broke the barrier. It was important for me to finally reach a Grand slam final. I felt as if I belonged there. I had so many chances to beat Serena but my inexperience showed at times especially when I hit some double faults at the wrong times. Then I lost concentration and I didn’t take my chances. If I’d have won the second set I might have taken the third as Serena looked very tired. Nevertheless getting to the final has given me confidence for the rest of the season.”

…recovering from injuries and sickness:

“It’s a relief to play without injuries. I had a bug in March and was constantly thinking of health issues. And then I got a cartilage injury later on. My fitness has been going backwards and forwards this year but I’m very fit at the moment and I’m enjoying my tennis.”

redsonja
Sep 30th, 2008, 03:34 PM
I may go to the player party this evening if I am not too tired and if I can figure out what to wear!
Excellent. :D I guess this means they don't all have to wear dirndls, though.

Ian Aberdon
Sep 30th, 2008, 06:06 PM
What?! :eek: She must have - what? - 1,973 dresses to choose from now as well as hundreds of pairs of Laboutin shoes??? :lol:

They do say never rush a lady on a night out...:lol:

redsonja
Sep 30th, 2008, 07:12 PM
Well, he once told me off for posting something from his site so I'm guessing that's really him :o

I missed this before. Did he really? :lol:

~Kiera~
Sep 30th, 2008, 08:37 PM
I missed this before. Did he really? :lol:

Yes, lucky me :lol:

I found one of his articles about Jelena over on Tennis One (http://www.tennisone.com/), so I posted it here. The article originally came from his subscription only newsletter, which he didn't like being reproduced elsewhere, so he asked that I refrain from posting such pieces in their entirety.

redsonja
Sep 30th, 2008, 09:33 PM
Well, Sarah, I hope you appreciate that you have been rebuked by greatness. :lol:

RFS
Sep 30th, 2008, 10:05 PM
who doesn't know his "omissions" from his "admissions"... but hey ho...! :rolls:

redsonja
Sep 30th, 2008, 10:16 PM
who doesn't know his "omissions" from his "admissions"... but hey ho...! :rolls:

The more I think about the Dinara, uh, "admission", the stranger it is. He says in his explanations that he was interviewing Carlos for a story about coaching philosophy, and Carlos only answered questions about the people Matt asked him about.

Okay, so, um, you're interviewing the coach of the last dominant WTA player about coaching philosophy. And you, I dunno, just forgot to bring up one of the most dominant players since Justine left... who attributes her recent success ENTIRELY to a change in coach/coaching philosophy?

:spit: Awesome.

JadeFox
Oct 1st, 2008, 08:50 AM
The Matt Cronin's of the world are the main reason why I decide not to go into journalism.:rolleyes:

Ian Aberdon
Oct 1st, 2008, 05:57 PM
Can't say I've ever heard of Matt Cronic? Ah well, maybe as well I didn't.

~Kiera~
Oct 1st, 2008, 08:42 PM
I take it that Li Na has this so-called "charisma" then? ;)

redsonja
Oct 1st, 2008, 09:25 PM
I take it that Li Na has this so-called "charisma" then? ;)

Who? :shrug: The great Matt Cronin didn't bring her up, so she's probably not even worth discussing, like that tall Russian chick. :shrug:

~Kiera~
Oct 1st, 2008, 09:29 PM
:lol:

дalex
Oct 1st, 2008, 09:41 PM
Why you all picking on Matt? He was reading this forum today, my guess is he didn't like what he saw. :tape:
Good on him for not getting into discussion with you guys, though, he prolly wouldn't stand a chance.

redsonja
Oct 1st, 2008, 10:08 PM
Why you all picking on Matt? He was reading this forum today, my guess is he didn't like what he saw. :tape:
Good on him for not getting into discussion with you guys, though, he prolly wouldn't stand a chance.

Whatever. He's free to read and dislike as he wants, and personally I had no problem with what he said about Jelena, I still think that was more a language issue with Carlos than anything else. But I still think that (a) Anna C was treated miserably and (b) leaving Dinara out was a very odd decision given her role on the tour at the moment and the purported subject matter of the article. So what. :p

дalex
Oct 1st, 2008, 10:25 PM
Just sayin'...:lol:

I have a feeling that Matt isn't a fan of JJ, but whatever, that doesn't bother me. [I'll hate you Matt if you start bashing her in your articles!!! *Yeah nothing bothers me...* :lol:]

redsonja
Oct 1st, 2008, 10:29 PM
I have a feeling that Matt isn't a fan of JJ, but whatever, that doesn't bother me.

I have to say that from what he writes about her and the tone of his voice when he talks about her, I have to agree. :lol: I don't care, except that it does seem like a reporter (rather than a straight up blogger) would go a leeeeeetle further to try to conceal his dislike of someone who's going to show up in his subject matter an awful lot. :lol: But again, whatever.

дalex
Oct 1st, 2008, 10:54 PM
I have to say that from what he writes about her and the tone of his voice when he talks about her, I have to agree. :lol:

Was he the one completely bored while doing an online radio interview with her at some tourney? That was hilarious! :lol:

redsonja
Oct 2nd, 2008, 12:17 AM
Yes. And just today I was listening to something where he said JJ wasn't fit to carry Justine's racquet bag, and the disgust in his voice when he said it was diviiiine. :lol:

Brena
Oct 2nd, 2008, 07:53 AM
Yes. And just today I was listening to something where he said JJ wasn't fit to carry Justine's racquet bag, and the disgust in his voice when he said it was diviiiine. :lol:

ooooh, lovely - a hater! I'll bad rep him. Ha! Take that, Cronic! :rolls:

Bruno71
Oct 2nd, 2008, 08:05 AM
I don't know how Matt feels about JJ...I find his articles to usually be pretty unbiased, or at least attempt to be. Obviously Carlos has a lot to say always, and seems to have a bit of a mental block when it comes to saying things in a regular fashion, but, whatever.

It's interesting that Matt says JJ has something to prove when she said in China "I have nothing to prove" :lol: But I do think she knows she has stuff to prove. I also thinks she has this charm x-factor that Carlos speaks of, but unless the player is a ballbasher I guess it's not noticed by many.

~Kiera~
Oct 2nd, 2008, 12:29 PM
More about Sveta, but it does talk about Jelena

http://tennisworld.typepad.com/thewrap/2008/10/the-eternal-que.html?cid=133019129

The Eternal Question
Posted 10/01/2008 @ 5 :21 PM

There’s death. There are taxes. There’s the sun rising in the east. And there’s this question, pondered every three or four months by tennis fans all over the world: What’s the deal with Svetlana Kuznetsova?

After the last two weekends, we’re still waiting for a satisfactory answer. Kuznetsova reached the final in Tokyo two weeks ago and did the same in Beijing on Sunday. Both times she was beaten by nearly identical, and identically depressing, scores: 6-1, 6-3 by Dinara Safina at the Toray Pan Pacific Open and 6-3, 6-2 by Jelena Jankovic at the China Open. Both times Kuznetsova betrayed little emotion and afterward offered a less-than-eye-opening explanation, beyond the fact that her opponent had played better than her.

What makes Kuznetsova so questionable is not the fact that she’s an underachiever. It’s true that she doesn’t live up to her potential, but she does it in a very specific way: She can’t win finals. Her loss to Jankovic in Beijing was her 10th loss in her last 11 title rounds. Kuznetsova is the athletic match of any woman save the Williams sisters. She's always a threat and always in the Top 10. She has helped the Russians to multiple Fed Cup wins. She can beat anyone, and often does—she was 4-2 against Jankovic coming into Sunday and had defeated her in the quarterfinals in Tokyo the week before. But once she faced her in a final, Kuznetsova didn’t stand a chance. You could see it right from the opening games.

Why, anyone with a knowledge of these two women’s styles might ask, did Kuznetsova, the bigger hitter, begin 5 feet behind the baseline while Jankovic, the most defensive-minded of the top players, stood on top of hers? From there Jankovic played with more purpose than she usually does. She dictated the rallies by going behind Kuznetsova, by redirecting the ball whenever she wanted, and by finishing points with down the line winners. Jankovic has had her own struggles in finals, but on this day she made a point of playing a more aggressive game without decreasing her usual margin for error. The pressure of the moment had sharpened both her tactics—she wanted to get Kuznetsova on the run as soon as possible and force her to play defense—and her execution.

Contrast this with the Russian, who continued to camp out well behind the baseline. From that position, she couldn’t have played with a purpose or a plan even if she had wanted to. Everything off her racquet was reactive. Even the winners she did hit, like a scorching pass at 3-2 in the first set, seemed random and unlikely to be repeated. By going up the line so often, Jankovic exposed Kuznetsova’s very weak defensive backhand, where she’s forced to take one hand off the racquet and slice the ball back. She dumped at least half a dozen into the net. This isn't just a shot she doesn’t like to hit in a match, it also seems to be one she doesn’t like to practice. Whereas Jankovic raised her game for the occasion, Kuznetsova looked defeated after five games, as if she had resigned herself to another loss in a final.

From a playing perspective, two flaws always stand out for me in Kuznetsova’s game. The first is the heavily Western forehand grip and fast, go-for-broke swing she uses on her forehand. The combination allows her to put high balls away for impressive winners from just about anywhere. The downside is that, like James Blake, it doesn’t allow her to hit her forehand as a consistent rally ball—her timing and footwork need to be virtually perfect all the time. And Kuznetsova lacks the discipline to be perfect very often, especially on key points, where she has a disconcerting habit of not being in the right position when she makes contact. Up a break point at 3-2 in the first set, she stood flat-footed and sailed a routine forehand long. She lost that game and was broken in the next one.

Positioning as a whole is another of Kuznetsova’s eternal issues. You might say she’s cursed—or spoiled, depending on how you look at it—by her athleticism, which allows her to muscle shots while she’s falling backward or sideways, and hit winners from places other players can’t. The problem is that Kuznetsova is always falling backwards or sideways when she makes contact, and against Jankovic she rarely showed the patience needed to work a point until she was inside the baseline before she pulled the trigger. While Jankovic took her shots on the rise and from the middle of the court, Kuznetsova hit hers on the run and from the sidelines. She never made a concerted effort to break that pattern.

What is it about finals that Kuznetsova can’t deal with? In her press conferences, she doesn’t seem to have much idea of what she did wrong other than miss her shots and lose to the better player that day. Maybe at a certain point in a final, when things don’t start well, Kuznetsova mentally caves because she knows she had a successful week anyway. Or maybe the thought of losing another final wears on her to the point where stops trying to battle it. On Sunday she showed no fire, frustration, anger, or emotion of any kind. By the last game, she had checked out. Kuznetsova began it with three unforced errors, including a crazy, pointless forehand wide and an embarrassing forehand volley to the same spot. Jankovic put her out of her misery on the fourth point with a passing-shot winner.

Of the Russian women who broke through four years ago, Maria Sharapova, half-American anyway, has gone on to win more majors; Anastasia Myskina is out of the game; Elena Dementieva has had her ups and downs, but will always be hampered by nerves on her serve. Kuznetsova is somewhere in the middle of them, not a ringing success but not a disaster either. Perhaps her U.S. Open win in 2004 led us to believe she was tougher mentally than she really was, and we've never adjusted our expectations downward. Still, she's exasperating. Her off-court persona is fun-loving and jocky. She can hold her own on a soccer pitch with the men, and she loves her hip-hop and night life. This person is pretty much the opposite of the floundering, impassive character who shows up during final-round matches.

The only Russian woman to reach No. 1 is Sharapova, but like I said she’s at least half-American, especially in the way she takes success as her right, as the product of her will. In fact, the only year-end WTA No. 1s from the Eastern bloc, Martina Navratilova and Monica Seles, are American citizens (Navratilova's reign at the top began one year after she became a U.S. citizen; on the men's side, Czechoslovakia's Ivan Lendl reached No. 1 for the first time less than two years after he moved to the States). This season Ana Ivanovic and Jelena Jankovic, both of whom trained in the West, have a chance to add their names to that list. Early this year, Ivanovic seemed to be coming around to the idea that she was a No. 1, that success was her right; now it’s Jankovic and even Safina who appear to be thinking the same thing for themselves. All three have, at different times in 2008, played with a heightened sense of purpose—Beijing was as focused as I’ve seen Jankovic in a final. They’ve left Kuznetsova, who is more powerful and athletic than any of them, 4 feet behind the baseline and four spots below them in the rankings. After watching her scramble pointlessly for two sets on Sunday, I can only conclude that she's content in both of those places.

http://www.tennisweek.com/news/fullstory.sps?inewsid=6619651

Jankovic To Regain Top Spot

Jelena Jankovic lost to Serena Williams in the US Open final, but will replace her as World No. 1 when the latest Sony Ericsson WTA Tour rankings are published on Monday.

The 23-year-old Serbian, who previously held the No.1 ranking for one week — August 11, 2008 — will succeed Williams, who lost to Li Na in Stuttgart today, at the top of the rankings. Williams held the No.1 ranking after clinching the US Open title in September and has held the top spot for the past four weeks.

Jankovic has won more matches than any other player on Tour this year, compiling a 55-16 record in her first 18 tournaments of 2008. She has already secured a spot in the singles competition at the season-ending Sony Ericsson Championships – Doha 2008 and currently holds the top spot in the Race to the Championships.

Over the course of 2008, Jankovic has won the Tier I 2008 Internazionali BNL d’Italia in Rome and just last week, captured the China Open in Beijing. She also reached the finals of the 2008 Sony Ericsson Open in Miami and the 2008 US Open, her first career Grand Slam final. In addition, she has advanced to the semifinals at two of this year’s Grand Slams, falling to eventual champion Maria Sharapova at the Australian Open and eventual champion Ana Ivanovic at Roland Garros. The Serbian star also reached the 2008 semifinals of the Barclays Dubai Tennis Championships in Dubai, the Pacific Life Open in Indian Wells, CA and the East West Bank Classic, presented by Herbalife, in Los Angeles.

Jankovic began defining herself as a potential Sony Ericsson WTA Tour World No.1 approximately two years ago, when she labored past a string of ten consecutive opening round losses early in the 2006 season and suffered a ranking drop to No.38 in the middle of the year. She successfully turned the season around and vaulted to No.12 by year end. Since then, the Serbian has been a consistent figure in the Top 10, securely staying inside the top elite since February 26, 2007. Her season-ending ranking has improved from No. 194 (in 2002), to No. 85 (in 2003), to No. 28 (in 2004), to No. 22 (in 2005), to No. 12 (2006) and to No. 3 (in 2007).

Since Justine Henin retired on May 14, 2008 and immediately took her name off the rankings, four players have held the No.1 ranking: Ana Ivanovic (12 weeks), Jankovic (two weeks as of October 6), Maria Sharapova (three weeks) and Serena Williams (four weeks).

mattcronin
Oct 2nd, 2008, 07:16 PM
To some points:

Of course I like JJ as a person, who doesn’t other than Ivanovic and Sharapova☺?

She’s very likeable, engaging and is great for the press as she’s a quote machine.

But… that doesn’t mean that I’m in love with her game or how she’s performed this year. She should have won Roland Garros but choked in the 3rd set in the semis against AI.

She should taken Serena to a 3rd set at the Open and had she done so, had an excellent chance to win the match, as Williams was tiring. But she didn’t because she muffed some key shots.


She’s not mentally tough enough to stand up against the other elite players deep at the Slams yet. She may be by the Aussie Open, but she has to cease her whining and stand up and be counted. She has to realize how good she is, not continue to think about all the ways she can lose.

She does not have Henin’s make-up or on-court variety, that’s pretty clear. But she’s as good as Myskina was and is capable of winning one Slam.

I’m not sure why everyone is so up in arms about what Carlos said about Chakvetadze. Anyone who has followed her over the past 2 years knows how emotionally fragile she is. She was that way before her December mugging. Do any of you remember the ’07 US semis against Kuznetsova and how badly she played even though she came into the match in far better form?
If you believe that she has top-5 stuff, and I do, you can’t possibly think she’s playing anywhere near her potential now. She needs to get her house in order or she’s going to fall way back to the pack. That’s not being mean, it’s simply a reality and given what a straightforward, no-nonsense person that she is, I’d bet she’d agree. The one thing I would say though knowing her a little bit is that I was probably wrong thinking that Carlos would be a great coach for her as she’s very sensitive and he can be a bit of a hard case.

On the omission of Safina and Dementieva et al: In our conversation, I wasn’t going down the list of players and asking for comments on each one. It didn’t evolve that way. But I agree that she deserved at least a mention. She’ll get a big one if she wins The Championships.

That’s all for now and thanks for reading and commenting,

Matt

Ian Aberdon
Oct 2nd, 2008, 07:21 PM
Evening Matt, looking forward to the responses from my fellow posters...:devil:

Brena
Oct 2nd, 2008, 07:29 PM
I'd like Sonj to answer the Chaky bit, since that one got to me the most, and I still can't understand how anyone can defend Carlos's words, but I'm not very articulate when i'm angry, so... :)
And I had no idea Ana and Maria disliked JJ :confused:

redsonja
Oct 2nd, 2008, 07:33 PM
Of course I like JJ as a person, who doesn’t other than Ivanovic and Sharapova☺?
:lol:

But… that doesn’t mean that I’m in love with her game or how she’s performed this year. She should have won Roland Garros but choked in the 3rd set in the semis against AI.

She should taken Serena to a 3rd set at the Open and had she done so, had an excellent chance to win the match, as Williams was tiring. But she didn’t because she muffed some key shots.

She’s not mentally tough enough to stand up against the other elite players deep at the Slams yet. She may be by the Aussie Open, but she has to cease her whining and stand up and be counted. She has to realize how good she is, not continue to think about all the ways she can lose.
I actually don't think that there are very many people even in this forum who would disagree with any of this. Whether it's choking or, as Nadia Petrova said, her getting bored, it's gotta stop pronto.

She does not have Henin’s make-up or on-court variety,
Game make-up, no. Actual make-up... :lol:

I’m not sure why everyone is so up in arms about what Carlos said about Chakvetadze. Anyone who has followed her over the past 2 years knows how emotionally fragile she is. She was that way before her December mugging. Do any of you remember the ’07 US semis against Kuznetsova and how badly she played even though she came into the match in far better form?
I personally was unfortunate enough to be at that match and would probably need some hefty therapy to forget it. Ugh. But given the armed robbery in her home which was directly attributed by the robbers to her status as a wealthy professional athlete (which is a lot different from a random mugging), I still think it was an insensitive thing for Carlos to say. Or at least an insensitive way to phrase it. I mean, I don't know Anna, and I don't know Carlos, but I know what her situation is like (headcase athlete not helped by difficult outside events), and having coaches publicly accuse me of lacking commitment would not have been a help. So maybe I'm transferring too much.

On the omission of Safina and Dementieva et al: In our conversation, I wasn’t going down the list of players and asking for comments on each one. It didn’t evolve that way. But I agree that she deserved at least a mention.

It just seemed odd. But hey, no one pays me to write about tennis. :)

(So I better get back to my real job :p)

Thanks for popping in to explain your POV.

Optima
Oct 2nd, 2008, 07:35 PM
Hi Matt, thanks for responding.

I still solidly believe she has 2 or 3 slams in her, if she gets her head screwed on straight. Which, she's been doing a better job with that.

redsonja
Oct 2nd, 2008, 07:37 PM
I still solidly believe she has 2 or 3 slams in her, if she gets her head screwed on straight. Which, she's been doing a better job with that.

For a set or a set and a half at a time, even! :hearts:

дalex
Oct 2nd, 2008, 07:45 PM
Evening Matt, looking forward to the responses from my fellow posters...:devil:

:rolls:

She has to realize how good she is, not continue to think about all the ways she can lose.

Hi Matt.

I think she knows how good she is. And that is - very good, great... Some media seem to forget that "just" because she hasn't won a Slam. And I don't approve! No. :lol:

Anyway, we all know why JJ's losing all those "big" matches - she's still a headcase, but there's still more than enough time for her...

Oh and next time you have an interview with her, let the girl talk, she really likes talking about herself, shoes, flowers - anything BUT tennis. :rolls:

Brena
Oct 2nd, 2008, 07:46 PM
I personally was unfortunate enough to be at that match and would probably need some hefty therapy to forget it. Ugh. But given the armed robbery in her home which was directly attributed by the robbers to her status as a wealthy professional athlete (which is a lot different from a random mugging), I still think it was an insensitive thing for Carlos to say. Or at least an insensitive way to phrase it. I mean, I don't know Anna, and I don't know Carlos, but I know what her situation is like (headcase athlete not helped by difficult outside events), and having coaches publicly accuse me of lacking commitment would not have been a help. So maybe I'm transferring too much.



I knew Sonj would put it nicely! :yeah:
I have never been a professional athlete so I can't identify with Anna on that level, but I am maybe a bit too sensitive person and Carlos's words (through the entire interview, but especially in this part about Anna) sounded incredibly callous to me. One thing is what coaches say to their proteges in private, during practice sessions, but to say publicly that someone is a mental wreck is unprofessional, insensitive and completely uncalled for. The effect of his words on Anna can be only negative, since she is a mentally fragile person.
Maybe his poor command of English langauge is too blame, I don't know, but I just can't condone such a comment. I understand that professional sport is cruel, but there are limits to everything. :shrug:

schorsch
Oct 2nd, 2008, 07:48 PM
Maria and JJ get on well from what I've seen... JJ is even fond of Yuri ;) She thinks he's hilarious. Just think of Birmingham final and AO semis interviews before the match.

Ian Aberdon
Oct 2nd, 2008, 07:53 PM
I must admit I thought Maria & JJ got on, maybe that was then, this is now...:shrug:

Brena
Oct 2nd, 2008, 08:07 PM
I must admit I thought Maria & JJ got on, maybe that was then, this is now...:shrug:

I suspect a falling-out over the hair glitter... ''Glittergate'':boxing:

RFS
Oct 2nd, 2008, 08:07 PM
Well said Sonj... :yeah:

Ian Aberdon
Oct 2nd, 2008, 08:20 PM
Glittergate! :haha:

~Kiera~
Oct 2nd, 2008, 10:38 PM
http://tennisworld.typepad.com/tennisworld/2008/10/marcelo-and-jel.html

Marcelo and Jelena

by Pete Bodo

On the face of it, you couldn't come up with two individuals more different than surly Marcelo Rios, the former ATP world no. 1 who still retains the distinction of being the only male player who's been ranked no. 1 but never won a Grand Slam event, and the girl who stole so many hearts at the US Open while doing splits, dressed as a daffodil, Jelena Jankovic.

But Jankovic may accomplish what just eluded Rios's grasp in 1988 - when he also came within a few matches of securing the prestigious year-end no. 1 ranking, rather than merely taking advantage of a seam in the calendar to sneak into the top spot. Rios was no. 1 for six weeks, which may seem a short time, but is a month longer than the tenure Carlos Moya enjoyed at the top (the "least weeks ranked no. 1" record will never be broken, although somebody might one day share it with our favorite bunned-out, zinc-oxide samurai warrior, Pat "Stinky" Rafter).

Regular readers know that I hold the year-end no. 1 ranking in high esteem, and it me it's partly because the ATP has always produced worthy year-end no. 1s. To me, securing the annual top spot is the top accomplishment in the "general excellence" category - that body of achievements that can't be linked to performance a single event. Let's face it, in any given year, any of about a dozen or more candidates can play lights-out tennis for two weeks and take advantage of a confluence of circumstances to win a major (see "J" for Johannson, or "G" for Gaudio). I wouldn't belittle the effort it takes too win a major, but in order to be considered a great player you need to be consistent and able to step up and assert yourself on big occasions, too.

For that reason, I've always had a bone to pick with the women's ranking system, or perhaps it's just with the inconsistency (commitment or performance-wise) of the top women players of this era. Lindsay Davenport finished no. 1 on three separate occasions (2001 and '04 and '05) when she failed to win a major. But then, Lindsay' has been a Grand Slam semifinalist (or better) on 17 occasions, and won just three titles (by contrast, Justine Henin won 7 majors in 16 trips to the semis or better (feel free to fact check my math). I'd be tempted to call her the exception that proves the rule, but not when she's turned the same feat three times.

Now, Jankovic is poised to follow in Davenport's footsteps, following Li Na's upset of Serena Williams in Stuttgart. And if that happens, it will further de-value the idea of the year-end no. 1 ranking. The Kremlin Cup, which starts on Monday, is the last Tier 1 event on the calendar. Serena is entered in it, as well as the YEC in Doha - but that's it (as of now) for her. Jankovic also is entered in both, and Zurich as well - and she has almost no points coming off from 2007. Just about anything she earns will be gravy and padding for what seems more and more like an inevitable top-ranking for 2008. And let's face it: Jankovic is many things, almost all of them delightful. But she's not a great player - not yet.

And let's not forget Dinara Safina in this conversation, either - she's defending semifinal points in Moscow, and a handful from Zurich and Linz. A strong finish capped with a win in Doha could vault her to the top, especially if Serena doesn't make a big push for the top spot, or if Jankovic doesn't have great results. The thing is, Jankovic almost always goes deep in events. So she's in the driver's seat. So we have three strong contenders for the year-end no. 1 slot,but only one of them has bagged a major this year.

Among the men, every year-end no. 1 in the Open era won at least one major before he collected the top annual ranking, and Lindsay did, too. But we're now in a position to have a female year-end no. 1 who's has yet to win a major. Compared to the realities coughed up by the ATP system, it's clear that the WTA is rewarding consistency and commitment to a degree that skews most people's sense of performance-based justice - or am I wrong about that? The WTA seems wedded to a ranking system that is more of a consistency rating than an accurate reflection of competitive ability, and one other unfortunate thing about that is the way it diminished the value of the year-end ranking . I prefer a rankings system that demands that you win a major in order to finish no. 1 for the year, although unusual circumstances could certainly conspire to create the exception - as they almost did in '98 i the ATP tour.

That year, the defending no. 1 Pete Sampras got to semis or better in only the last two majors, while Rios built his strong showing on back-to-back wins at Indian Wells and Key Biscayne. He was also a finalist at the Australian Open, losing to Petr Korda, who later that year was convicted of a doping offense following his Wimbledon drug test.

You have to wonder how long Korda was able to get away with doping, and how much illicit drug use might have affected the final in Melbourne. Had Rios won that Australian final, Sampras might not have even bothered trying to catch him in the rankings. As it was, Sampras made a Herculean push in the fall to retain his year-end no. 1 ranking for a record sixth straight year, and even then the top spot was up for grabs until Rios pulled out of the year-end championships (with a bad back that helped cut short his puzzling career), averting a potential showdown match for the top spot.

I'm glad Sampras ended up with the top ranking in '98, because it's hard to argue that a guy (or woman) who can't manage to win a major ought to be considered the best player of the year. And while neither tour claims that the year-end ranking boils down to that, to my mind it does - and should. There's always room for argument on that, especially when there's no clear-cut, dominant player on the scene. That's fine, too. The New York Giants are the defending Super Bowl champs, and hence the best team in football - even though the New England Patriots had complied a perfect season going into that ultimate game.

Our sport doesn't have a Super Bowl, although some constituents have tried mightily to turn the YECs into just that. What we have, instead of a final showdown of that magnitude, is a year-end no. 1 ranking. And make no mistake about it - the prestige of the year-end no. 1 spot was ingrained in the sport long before we had quantifiable results via a points system. Back in the day, various entities (including Tennis magazine), issued a year-end Top 10, usually based on the vote of a panel of experts (much like the college football rankings in the US). The system was a little too subjective, but it existed not to create confusion or stoke the egos of "experts" as much as to produce something for which everyone longed - an annual "champ" of tennis.

The WTA has struggled in recent years to promote the YEC, and build up its prestige. Now, with a move out of the media spotlight to Doha, it needs more than ever to make it seem as if the YEC matters. Here's an intriguing question: Will Serena make a Sampras-like drive to capture the top ranking, adding events to her schedule, or targeting Jankovic in a potential showdown in Doha. I hope she will. In addition to any other positive outcome, it would make the annual ranking something more than a laundry list of who compiled the most performance points.

Given the recent history of the WTA YEC, as well as the vagaries of the ranking system, Serena may be tempted to take a pass on Doha, especially if odds on snatching back the ranking from Jelena seem remote. In the bigger picture, one way to make the YEC more than "just another tournament" held at a time of year when everyone is tired and eager for a break is to tweak the system to try to ensure that whoever wins the YEC will also have won at least one major. It's a change from which everyone would benefit.

дalex
Oct 2nd, 2008, 11:09 PM
^ I don't get it and I tried really hard. :rolls:

redsonja
Oct 2nd, 2008, 11:17 PM
The WTA seems wedded to a ranking system that is more of a consistency rating than an accurate reflection of competitive ability

I'm not sure how these are different? :shrug: I mean, if you have consistently good results (i.e., only going out of a tournament before the quarterfinals once all year), doesn't that show that you have competitve ability? Sure, Jelena doesn't have any "big wins" for the year, but she also doesn't have any absurdly early losses. Show me a major winner that's true of, and I'll show you who should be world no. 1. I understand that the Slams are the most important tournaments in tennis, but I don't get this mindset that if you win one and have an otherwise inconsistent year, you are automatically better than anyone who didn't. I mean, who is going to even try to argue with a straight face at this point that Maria, Ana or Venus had a better year than JJ? :spit:

дalex
Oct 2nd, 2008, 11:28 PM
I mean, who is going to even try to argue with a straight face at this point that Maria, Ana or Venus had a better year than JJ? :spit:

Many people in GM: "I'm sure Jelena would change her season for any one of those players'!"

I'd accept that as truth (without even checking it with JJ :lol:), but it still doesn't mean they should be *ranked* above Jelena.

ms_nut
Oct 3rd, 2008, 01:59 AM
I don't know how Matt feels about JJ...I find his articles to usually be pretty unbiased, or at least attempt to be. Obviously Carlos has a lot to say always, and seems to have a bit of a mental block when it comes to saying things in a regular fashion, but, whatever.

It's interesting that Matt says JJ has something to prove when she said in China "I have nothing to prove" :lol: But I do think she knows she has stuff to prove. I also thinks she has this charm x-factor that Carlos speaks of, but unless the player is a ballbasher I guess it's not noticed by many.

:tape: I Disagree.He has been biased against JJ and i agree with the other posters.I too feel that he kinda dislikes her.It was hilarious when he kept picking JJ's opponents to win at the US Open :tape::lol:(Wozniaki,Dementieva) and she kept proving him wrong.
:rolleyes::rolleyes: And let's not even go on about Carlos.Sure, Justine has a 9-0 record against JJ, but the way he mentioned JJ as "good" but not "good enough".If not for JJ's choking:sad:, she would have handed Justine's ass to her several times...For "just a good player" JJ sure came close to beating her on several occasions......

Bruno71
Oct 3rd, 2008, 05:36 AM
And let's not even go on about Carlos.Sure, Justine has a 9-0 record against JJ, but the way he mentioned JJ as "good" but not "good enough".If not for JJ's choking:sad:, she would have handed Justine's ass to her several times...For "just a good player" JJ sure came close to beating her on several occasions......

To be honest, I think what you wrote kind of underscores the notion that JJ lacks that "extra something," and I can see why Carlos' experience with Justine as her adversary might lead him there. But I still say that JJ wouldn't be anywhere near where she is without that extra bit.

Wayn77
Oct 3rd, 2008, 07:13 AM
Crikey I have missed all of this ...

Is that actually the real Matt Cronin posting in JJs forum?

Brena
Oct 3rd, 2008, 07:25 AM
Crikey I have missed all of this ...

Is that actually the real Matt Cronin posting in JJs forum?

To quote JJ: ''Who??'' :lol:

^ I don't get it and I tried really hard. :rolls:

Phew! I was worried for myself for a while.
Anyway, JJ darling, please win a stupid GS, whichever you like, so all these smart-asses finally stop boring us to death. I mean, it can't be that hard - Puppy won one after all. :p j/k, j/k :lol:

Wayn77
Oct 3rd, 2008, 07:37 AM
To quote JJ: ''Who??'' :lol:


What TV? Who Carillo? Matt who?

Well, if Cronin is out there I always enjoy listening to your commentary at the USO every year.

And a big :nerner: for pithily tipping Dementieva to win the USO SF in straight sets. Just cause JJ messed up serving it out on the first attempt against Bammer in the quarters. She gets bored and distracted when she's winning easily you know. A psychological defect if you like. The need to fight against something, to come from behind to reproduce her best tennis. Ms Jankovic needs to learn to be a more consistent front-runner.

Brena
Oct 3rd, 2008, 07:50 AM
''JJ - confusing tennis people since 2006 ''

RFS
Oct 3rd, 2008, 08:21 AM
''JJ - confusing tennis people since 2006 ''

:haha: that had me laughing out loud in the middle of a right crisis... why does crap wait until FRIDAY to come flying at me?

Wrekin
Oct 3rd, 2008, 08:46 AM
Crikey I have missed all of this ...



Quite. I go on the road for 48 hours and Matt Cronin starts posting in here and JJ sneaks back to #1. You just can't turn your back for five minutes around here....:haha:

ms_nut
Oct 3rd, 2008, 12:46 PM
To be honest, I think what you wrote kind of underscores the notion that JJ lacks that "extra something," and I can see why Carlos' experience with Justine as her adversary might lead him there. But I still say that JJ wouldn't be anywhere near where she is without that extra bit.

That's true, obviously JJ needs a little tweak here and a big tweak there(Serve etc) to reach a new level.(I think she is already working pretty well on her serve.. Better 1st Serve speed, 2nd serve kicks etc).But Matt Cronin tried to make his point comparing JJ to Venus,Serena and Sharapova. JJ has been a top player for a year and a half now.He should have compared her to someone else who was in the same boat..(Ana maybe..:confused:).Not a 9-time GS champions who has been a top 10 player for 10 years now..:o.JJ still has time to improve her game.She made a big "breakthrough" only towards the end of 2006.If 4 years from now, JJ was still stuck in "just a top 10 player-- with no GS title", his point may have been valid. (Five years from now, JJ may well have 6 GS titles under her belt:p,)

Cat123
Oct 3rd, 2008, 12:59 PM
I think the rankings are correct (and not just because JJ's #1 now!) Of the 4 slam winners this year, they've all had some shocking results.

SF SF R4 F (JJ) is surely better than W R4 R2 - (Maria) (Though I know she was injured and that's not her fault!! And I love her too. I'm just trying to make a point here. ;) )

~Kiera~
Oct 4th, 2008, 06:01 PM
http://edition.cnn.com/2008/SPORT/10/04/tennis.jankovic/

Jankovic sees off Venus in Stuttgart semis

(CNN) -- Jelena Jankovic celebrated her elevation to world number one with a hard earned victory over Wimbledon champion Venus Williams 6-7 7-5 6-2 in Stuttgart on Saturday to reach the final of the Porsche Grand Prix.

The Serbian star will play Nadia Petrova of Russia for the title as she bids for a second successive tournament win.

Coupled with her victory in the China Open, Jankovic's performances in Germany mean she will be in top spot in the new WTA Tour rankings on Monday, win or lose the final.

She will succeed Venus Williams' sister Serena who was not competing in the tournament.

Petrova closed on her second Porsche Grand Prix title when she beat Victoria Azarenka of Belarus 6-4 6-4 in the earlier semifinal.

Jankovic has a broken toe nail on her left foot and got two shots of painkillers to be able to play against the sixth-seeded American.

"I was really fortunate to play," Jankovic said. "I got two injections, they hurt so much I was screaming."

The first set was settled on a lengthy tiebreaker when Williams capitalized on her third set point as Jankovic hit a backhand long.

Jankovic had also wasted a set point in the tiebreaker.

Jankovic squandered a 3-1 lead in the second set, wasted two break points at 3-3, but took the set when she broke again in the 12th game, doing one of her trademark splits to get a ball back down the line.

It was called out but Jankovic challenged the call and the replay showed that the ball had hit the line and Jankovic had tied it up.

The Serb broke serve for a 2-0 lead in the third, staved off a break point in the next game, two more in the fifth game and held for 5-2.

An error by Williams gave Jankovic two match points. She wasted one with an error of her own, but Williams than put a forehand long.

In a match between two unseeded players, Petrova got early breaks in both sets against the 19-year-old Azarenka, who had upset Olympic champion Elena Dementieva in the quarterfinals.

"I am so excited to be back in the final," Petrova told the Associated Press.

~Kiera~
Oct 4th, 2008, 06:03 PM
http://www.porsche-tennis.de/prod/pag/tennis.nsf/web/english-tournament_pressreleases_T08_0153_en?OpenDocument&cont=news_topnews#pagetop

“You have to have fun”

Stuttgart. She’ll be the number one player in the world on Monday, but Jelena Jankovic is never one to take herself too seriously. Although very aware of her position as the best player in the world, something she also achieved briefly earlier this year, she is always ready to laugh at herself and the chaos she sometimes leaves in her wake.

Things happen to Jankovic that just don’t happen to other players. One day at the Australian Open she was being driven, she thought, to Melbourne Park for her match. But then she realised she was in fact being driven in the opposite direction, to the practise courts, and she was nearly late for her match. And when she was in Dubai earlier this year she walked into a press conference and, without being asked a single question, she began a 10-minute monologue on being out in the city and getting totally lost. When she finished and stood up to leave the room she was loudly applauded by the assembled media. That just doesn’t happen with anyone else, but Jankovic is different.

One of her funniest stories involved her week at the Porsche Tennis Grand Prix a year ago. “That was the funniest story ever,” she said. “I was so tired after a long day and I went back to the hotel and knocked on the door, and all these rooms are next to each other and look the same and I didn’t really pay attention to the number. I knocked and thought my mum was going to open. She opened the door and I just went in. I didn’t even look who it was and when I realised it was Justine (Henin) I asked her what she was doing in my room. And she was ‘What are you doing in MY room?’. It was so funny. It was the first time I’ve seen her laugh. Normally she’s really serious. It was a funny experience. There are always some stories with me! It’s nice. You have to have fun and enjoy it. If you don’t have fun, if you’re not laughing and enjoying your time, it’s very difficult being around this job. It helps me.”

This year she has been making people laugh again, this time about her adventures in the hotel restaurant. “In our hotel we have a breakfast buffet and a lot of different food, and I just woke up feeling I had to have an Eggs Benedict. They didn’t have it in the buffet so I went to the waiter and asked him to make it. Then the waiter brought this biggest thing ever. It looked like for five people. And I finished it all! And the night before when I was in the Beerfest I ordered two times the duck and all that. They were saying ‘Where does this food go?’ I told them it’s winter time and I need the energy.”

Although she has blisters on her feet and a torn toenail, pretty much routine for any tennis player, Jankovic is far more upbeat this year than last. She has played less events this year and feels the benefit of that. “I feel fresh. I’m not tired like I was last year. I was really exhausted around this time and I didn’t have the motivation to play. I was just waiting to finish the year and rest a little bit because I’d played so many matches. This year it’s a different story. I’m not feeling tired. Actually I feel good and really ready to play and I feel confident, which is the most important thing. Each match that I play I try to improve. I always have a game plan when I play against my opponents and trying to execute my shots and go into the match prepared, tactically and mentally. I’m improving, and of course I can get better and better and this is why I’m working very hard every day, to be fitter as well. I feel a lot better than I did, for example, at the Olympics, when I was coming back from an injury to my knee. I didn’t feel as fast and was completely out of form, and now every day I feel that I’m getting stronger and stronger. When it comes to three-set matches I feel I’m prepared and can play those matches without a problem.”

“It’s a relief,” says Jankovic. “I’m again with a smile on my face and I’m enjoying my tennis. It’s quite difficult. Since the beginning of the year I was travelling with a lot of different injuries and I also got sick around March. I had some bacteria and was always blowing my nose. I was thinking about all these health issues bothering me, and then it’s hard to concentrate on tennis. And also you cannot practise as much as you would like to and have to take many days off. It’s amazing how quickly you get out of shape, and then it takes so much time to get back in form again and get confident. You go backwards, and you have to go forwards again. Staying positive is the most important thing in those times. Now I’m just happy that I’m healthy. All I ask is that I stay like this the rest of the year.”

~Kiera~
Oct 4th, 2008, 06:17 PM
http://www.earthtimes.org/articles/show/235391,jankovic-edges-williams-meets-petrova-in-stuttgart-final--summary.html

Jankovic edges Williams, meets Petrova in Stuttgart final -

Stuttgart - New world number one Jelena Jankovic rallied to beat Venus Williams 6-7 (8-10), 7-5, 6-2 on Saturday for a place in the final of the Porsche Grand Prix in which she meets the 2006 champion Nadia Petrova. Jankovic, 23, missed a set point in the tiebreak of the first set, but finally defeated Williams for the fifth time in eight meetings in 2 hours 45 minutes.

Jankovic will reclaim the top spot in the rankings on Monday, dethroning US Open champion Serena Williams who went out early in Stuttgart.

"It was very tough. You have to play at your best against Venus to win. I am happy to get to the final," said the second-seeded Jankovic.

"Maybe I wanted it more in the third set."

Jankovic won her second title of the year at the China Open last week in Beijing and is now playing in her fifth 2008 decider, against Petrova who defeated Victoria Azarenka of Belarus 6-4, 6-4 in the first semi-final and is yet top drop a set.

"I have had two tough matches but some energy left for the final. Nadia plays well indoors. I will try my best to win a second title in two weeks," said Jankovic.

Jankovic leads their series 5-2, but the confident Petrova said: "I have saved a lot of energy, I am ready for tomorrow."

After all, Jankovic took two hours to defeat Vera Zvonareva in two tiebreaks in the quarters and spent even more time on court on Saturday.

She traded breaks with the sixth-seeded Williams early on and then wasted a set point at 8-7 in the tiebreak. Williams took the set three points later when Jankovic hit a forehand long.

Jankovic squandered an early lead again in the second set but locked the sets with another break in the 12th game.

She carried the momentum into the final set where she raced off to a 3-0 lead, saved break points at 3-1 and won on her second match point when Williams hit a groundstroke long.

Jankovic complained that Williams took a long time before serving and also said that she required two painful injections before the match after tearing a toe nail in Friday's match.

"I was really fortunate to play. I got two injections, they hurt so much I was screaming," said Jankovic.

Williams said: "I made too many errors, that's always tough. Less errors would have helped."

Petrova, 26, needed just 1:29 hours to beat Azarenka for the second time in three meetings, wrapping up the duel of unseeded players with a service winner.

Azarenka, 19, ran out of steam after upsetting eight seed Agnieszka Radwanska in the second round and Olympic champion Elena Dementieva in a quarter-final marathon.

"I am so excited to be back in the final. When I stay focused everything goes well," said Petrova.

The 18th-ranked Petrova chose the Porsche sports car after winning in 2006, but would opt for the prize money of 100,000 dollars this time around instead of the car.

"I am still trying to get the first car to Moscow. I think this time I will take the money," Petrova said.

Jankovic joked that she already had "a better" Porsche at home and would also chose the cheque.

http://canadianpress.google.com/article/ALeqM5i8Dx049--6ISPMl6vjuby_RgdefQ

Jelena Jankovic and Nadia Petrova advance to Porsche GP final
10 minutes ago

STUTTGART, Germany — Jelena Jankovic, soon to become the No. 1 player in the world again, overcame foot pain to beat Wimbledon champion Venus Williams 6-7 (8), 7-5, 6-2 Saturday and reach the Porsche Grand Prix final.

Jankovic will play Russian Nadia Petrova on Sunday and will be shooting for her second title in two weeks. The Serb won the China Open last week and will be the latest No. 1 when the new WTA Tour rankings come out Monday.

Petrova moved within one win of capturing her second Porsche Grand Prix title when she beat Victoria Azarenka of Belarus 6-4, 6-4 in the other semifinal match.

Jankovic has a broken toenail on her left foot and got two shots of painkillers to be able to play. Williams, seeded-sixth, was playing in her first Stuttgart tournament in 10 years.

Williams used her third set point to win the first when Jankovic hit a backhand long. Jankovic had also wasted a set point in the tiebreaker.

Jankovic squandered a 3-1 lead in the second set, wasted two break points at 3-3, but took the set with the help of a challenge. She did one of her trademark splits to get a ball back down the line.

It was called out but Jankovic challenged the call and the replay showed that the ball had hit the line and Jankovic tied the match.

The Serb broke serve for a 2-0 lead in the third, staved off a break point in the next game, two more in the fifth game and held for 5-2. An error by Williams gave Jankovic two match points. She wasted one with an error of her own, but Williams than put a forehand long.

In a match between two unseeded players, Petrova got early breaks in both sets against the 19-year-old Azarenka, who had upset Olympic champion Elena Dementieva in the quarter-finals.

"I am so excited to be back in the final," said Petrova, a Russian who won the tournament in 2006. "The main thing for me is to stay focused, then everything goes well for me."

Petrova is looking for her second title of the year after winning in Cincinnati. Two years ago, Petrova was ranked third in the world but she has now dropped to No. 18.

She has not lost a set in three matches so far this week.

"I saved a lot of energy, I am ready for tomorrow," she said.

Petrova said she would probably choose the winner's purse US$100,000 rather than the red convertible Porsche offered as an alternative by the title sponsor of the indoor event.

"I am still trying to get the first car to Moscow," Petrova said, citing taxes and red tape.

She jumped to a 4-0 lead before Azarenka won the next three games, but Petrova stayed ahead to win the first set. Petrova also led 2-0 in the second, then lost the next three games but broke serve for a decisive 4-3 lead and won with a service winner on her second match point.

~Kiera~
Oct 4th, 2008, 10:33 PM
http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/1/newsroom/stories/?ContentID=2683

Jankovic Outrallies Williams; Petrova Stops Azarenka

STUTTGART, Germany - Jelena Jankovic had been a fixture in the later rounds of Sony Ericsson WTA Tour events through the first eight months of the year, but came away with one title; now she has a shot at capturing titles in back-to-back weeks for the first time in her career, after toughing out a three set victory over Venus Williams in the semifinals of the Porsche Tennis Grand Prix on Saturday afternoon.

Jankovic, the No.2 seed at the $650,000, Tier II event, battled for two hours and 45 minutes for a 67(8) 75 62 victory over a No.6-seeded Williams.

Jankovic is now 5-3 against Williams, but more importantly 2-0 this year, having beaten the American in another three-setter in the quarters of Rome.

"It was a very high quality match and I think the fans enjoyed it," Williams said. "She moves really well and is a great competitor. In the end it came down to the errors I was making. I didn't take my break point chances and I have to work on that. That's the great thing about tennis, you always have another opportunity."

"You always have to bring your best game against Venus," Jankovic said. "We've had a lot of three set matches. I knew today I had to get the first strike on her. I was really happy to win the match and hope I can recover for tomorrow."

In her first 18 events of the year Jankovic fell before the quarterfinals just once, suffering a fourth round loss to Tamarine Tanasugarn at Wimbledon. Her two titles came on the clay courts of Rome in May and on the hardcourts of Beijing just last week. She will chase her third Tour singles titles of the year - and the eighth of her career - on the indoor hardcourts of Stuttgart on Sunday.

Awaiting Jankovic in the final will be Nadia Petrova, who, in recent months, has been returning to the form that once took her all the way to No.3 in the world. After starting the year with a 4-9 record she has gone 34-10 since May, winning one title at Cincinnati and reaching quarterfinals or better seven other times.

Unseeded in Stuttgart, Petrova hasn't had to face a seeded player but has faced those who took them out, with a second round win over Patty Schnyder (who beat No.5 seed Svetlana Kuznetsova), a quarterfinal win over Li Na (who beat No.1 seed Serena Williams) and a semifinal triumph over Victoria Azarenka (who beat both No.8 seed Agnieszka Radwanska and No.4 seed Elena Dementieva).

Petrova's 64 64 semifinal win over Azarenka broke a head-to-head tie, as the two had split their previous meetings, 1-1.

"It gives me huge satisfaction to show my best tennis again," Petrova said. "I've been working very hard since the spring; it has taken a while for the results to show but I'm very proud of how I'm playing. To get to the final of a tournament like this without dropping a set is now easy, but I made the best of the draw. I love it here. I have nothing to lose tomorrow and will give it my best show."

This will be the eighth time Jankovic and Petrova square off, with Jankovic up in the head-to-head, 5-2. More bad news for Petrova is that she has fallen to the Serb in all three of their meetings since 2005 - once in 2006, once in 2007 and once earlier this year, at Los Angeles (in straight sets).

Both doubles semifinals were also played on Saturday and in the end it was top seeds Kveta Peschke and Rennae Stubbs and the wildcard pairing of Schnyder and Anna-Lena Groenefeld who moved into the title match. The doubles final will follow the singles final on Sunday.

~Kiera~
Oct 5th, 2008, 01:14 PM
http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/1/newsroom/stories/?ContentID=2685

Jankovic Defeats Petrova for Second Straight Title

STUTTGART, Germany - Jelena Jankovic had been a fixture in the later rounds of Sony Ericsson WTA Tour events through the first eight months of the year, but only came away with one title; now, for the first time in her career, she has captured titles in back-to-back weeks. The Serb followed up her triumph in Beijing with triumph in Stuttgart this week, a perfect accompaniment for her return to the world No.1 ranking.

Heading into the Porsche Tennis Grand Prix, the race for No.1 was in the headlines. But without even playing it was Jankovic who secured the top spot, as Serena Williams lost to Li Na in her opener. Jankovic was guaranteed to return to the pinnacle of the women's game after the tournament; it by no means relaxed her, though.

Jankovic, who was seeded No.2 behind Williams, was devastating in her 62 60 opening round win over Alona Bondarenko, then toughed out a pair of nail-biters in the quarters and semis, first edging No.7 seed Vera Zvonareva in a pair of tie-breaks, 76(8) 76(5), then rallying from a set down and grinding nearly three hours to get past a No.6-seeded Venus Williams, 67(8) 75 62. In the meantime, Nadia Petrova was building her own momentum on the top half of the draw.

Unseeded in Stuttgart, Petrova didn't have to face a seeded player but did face those who took them out, with a second round win over Patty Schnyder (who beat No.5 seed Svetlana Kuznetsova), a quarterfinal win over Li Na (who beat No.1 seed Serena Williams) and a semifinal triumph over Victoria Azarenka (who beat both No.8 seed Agnieszka Radwanska and No.4 seed Elena Dementieva).

Petrova hadn't beaten Jankovic since 2005 and that trend continued on Sunday, as the scrappier Jankovic ran down everything Petrova could throw at her then took the offensive often with her pinpoint groundstrokes, particularly her down-the-lines. They both produced some high quality tennis but the 23-year-old Serb was consistently in charge, pulling off a 64 63 championship victory.

In her first 18 events of the year Jankovic fell before the quarterfinals just once, suffering a fourth round loss to Tamarine Tanasugarn at Wimbledon. Her two titles came on the clay courts of Rome in May and on the hardcourts of Beijing just last week. In Stuttgart she won her third title of the year and, for the first time in her career, won titles in back-to-back weeks. She is now 8-10 in finals.

Petrova is now also 8-10 in finals. The Russian had a dismal start to the 2008 season, going 4-9, but has since been showing the form that once took her all the way to No.3 in the world, going 34-11 since May. During that stretch she won her eighth career title at Cincinnati and has reached the quarterfinals or better seven other times, including runner-up finishes at Tier II events in Eastbourne and here.

The doubles final, which followed the singles final, saw top seeds Kveta Peschke and Rennae Stubbs taking on the wildcard pairing of Schnyder and Anna-Lena Groenefeld.

~Kiera~
Oct 5th, 2008, 03:57 PM
http://afp.google.com/article/ALeqM5j75H0VafjsqoiuPEVJlJJbF9VDIw

Second straight tennis win puts Jankovic number one
1 hour ago

STUTTGART, Germany (AFP) — Jelena Jankovic will regain her world number one ranking on Monday less than 24 hours after winning Stuttgart's WTA event with a 6-4, 6-3 win over Nadia Petrova in Sunday's final.

With world number one Serena Williams losing in the second round here last week, Jankovic will reclaim top spot after capturing her second consecutive WTA title after taking the China Open title in Beijing.

"I am really excited about winning here, it's my second win in two weeks and my confidence is high," said Jankovic.

"I played some good tennis this week and I am proud of myself."

Jankovic must now choose between the prize of a brand-new Porsche 911 Carrera 4S Cabrio or 98,500 dollars of prize money.

She joked: "I already have a Turbo, so why not the Carrera as well?"

The 23-year-old Serb started with a hiss and a roar as she raced into a 2-0 lead after breaking Petrova in the first game and it proved to be enough to take the first set 6-4 after 46 minutes.

Petrova, the 2006 Stuttgart champion, is playing well above her ranking of 18th in the world, having won the Cincinnati tournament in August, and she broke Jankovic for the first time to level the second set 3-3.

Having beaten Venus Williams in Saturday's semi-final despite losing the first set, Jankovic again responded in style by breaking her opponent back and hold her service to take a 5-3 lead.

"I had gone a bit flat in the second set, that is normal because I have played a lot of games, but I wanted to respond and I found another gear," said Jankovic.

"It was important to re-establish myself at that point in the game."

She broke Petrova again to claim the second set - and the match - 6-3 to claim her third WTA title of the season after wins in Rome and Beijing.

Having broken a toe nail in Friday's quarter-final win over Russia's Vera Zvonareva, Jankovic again received pain-killing injections before the game.

"With the injections, I didn't feel a thing when I was playing," she said.

"But two or three hours after the game the pain kicks in and it hurts a lot, it will take a lot of time for the nail to grow back.

"The physio has told me to wear flip-flops for the flight home.

"But it's winter here - I want to wear boots."

Beaten-finalist Petrova praised the new champion and said she has taken plenty of heart from her run to the final.

"I fought hard for everything out there, but it wasn't to be," admitted the Russian.

"I'd like to congratulate Jelena, she is having an amazing run at the moment and this is another win for her.

"I tried my best here and I am looking forward to coming back to Stuttgart again."

~Kiera~
Oct 5th, 2008, 03:59 PM
http://ap.google.com/article/ALeqM5ikQlcGXw2AVzg2zxtOs_MpDrkGCwD93KCPNO1

New No. 1 Jankovic wins Porsche Grand Prix
By NESHA STARCEVIC – 1 hour ago

STUTTGART, Germany (AP) — New No. 1 Jelena Jankovic won her second title in two weeks, defeating Nadia Petrova of Russia 6-4, 6-3 Sunday in the final of the Porsche Grand Prix.

The 23-year-old Serb also won the China Open last week and the Italian Open earlier this year.

"I am really proud of myself," she said. "I am playing with a lot of confidence and I played some good tennis this week."

Jankovic was assured of taking the top ranking Monday from Serena Williams regardless of the outcome of the final. She already held the No. 1 spot for one week in August.

"I feel that every day I am getting better and better. I am really working on my game, I want to reach my full potential," Jankovic said.

Williams became the No. 1 after defeating Jankovic at the U.S. Open final, but the American will drop in the rankings after losing her opening match in Stuttgart.

Jankovic won her eighth career title after overcoming a brief lapse in the second set against the 18th-ranked Russian, who won the Stuttgart tournament in 2006.

After the win, Jankovic took a spin in the red Porsche 911 convertible given to the winner and appeared to have more trouble controlling the powerful car than the match.

She broke serve in the opening game and it was enough to give her the set against an error-prone Petrova.

"I really wanted to win this trophy, and when you want too much, sometimes it doesn't work in tennis," Petrova said. "I gave it my best."

Jankovic also broke to start the second set, but Petrova broke back to tie it at 3-3. The Russian was unable to keep the momentum, however, and dropped serve again after a series of errors. Jankovic won the match when Petrova pushed a forehand long.

"I got a bit flat in the middle of the second set, I had some tough matches behind me and I was getting tired," Jankovic said. "I tried to stay positive, to be aggressive and to switch into a higher gear, it was an important game."

Petrova had not dropped a set this week until the final. Jankovic has been playing with a painful left foot after tearing off a toe nail. She needed painkiller shots before her semifinal win over Venus Williams and got two more before the final.

Asked about her foot at the post-match news conference, Jankovic misunderstood the question and replied, "The food is great."

Realizing the mistake, Jankovic burst out laughing and then added:

"It's numb during the match and I don't feel anything, but after a couple of hours it hurts a lot," she said. "The doctor told me to wear flip-flops but I am flying to Serbia tonight, I can't go in flip-flops like I am going to the beach."

Jankovic is scheduled to play the Kremlin Cup next week. Although she left open whether she would actually show up in Moscow for the tournament, which Williams is skipping.

"I feel tired now, but mentally I am not tired, I am hungry to do well. I want to finish the year as No. 1," she said.

Only Jelena :lol:

I guess she is thinking about skipping Moscow.

Just Do It
Oct 5th, 2008, 05:11 PM
Asked about her foot at the post-match news conference, Jankovic misunderstood the question and replied, "The food is great."

:rolls:

maya-serbia
Oct 5th, 2008, 07:06 PM
Asked about her foot at the post-match news conference, Jankovic misunderstood the question and replied, "The food is great." :lol::lol::worship::worship::lol::lol:

~Kiera~
Oct 6th, 2008, 11:58 AM
http://tennisworld.typepad.com/tennisworld/2008/10/monday-net-post.html

WTA - Jelena Jankovic

Not too much to add from last week's notes on Jankovic. But picking against her this week is simply impossible. Jankovic won yet another loaded tournament (Stuttgart featured eight of the world's Top 10 women), and continued to build on her recent run to the U.S. Open final. With Serena Williams suffering from an ankle injury, Jankovic appears to have the clear inside track on the year-end No. 1 ranking.

One thing that really impressed me from Jankovic this week was her ability to fight through in pressure situations. In her quarterfinal match against Vera Zvonareva, Jankovic stayed resolute in both tiebreakers, prevailing to set up a semifinal with Venus Williams. In that match, Jankovic lost the first set in a tiebreaker - now the pressure was really on. But she stayed focused, besting Williams in a close second set (7-5) that turned the match around. Jankovic rode the momentum to a comfortable 6-2 third set victory.

Jelena Jankovic - the total package? At the moment, yes. But as I said last week, Melbourne - and not Doha - will be what ultimately defines her as a player.

Brena
Oct 6th, 2008, 12:05 PM
But as I said last week, Melbourne - and not Doha - will be what ultimately defines her as a player.

I gather from this statement that he's certain JJ will win Doha. :rolls:
Even if JJ would win the YEC + all 4 GSs next year, people would say ''Well, not bad, but does she have the Bangalore title, hmm? No, she doesn't! Serena has it, and Jelena can't even get close to it because of Zi Yan, who is clearly a more complete and charismatic player''.

Wayn77
Oct 6th, 2008, 12:14 PM
:lol: :lol:

I'm gathering from that article world domination awaits, greatness is within touching distance.

As long as Jelena stays away from Sofia Arvardksson in the Australia draw, everything is gonna be fine.

Kampi
Oct 6th, 2008, 12:15 PM
I gather from this statement that he's certain JJ will win Doha. :rolls:
Even if JJ would win the YEC + all 4 GSs next year, people would say ''Well, not bad, but does she have the Bangalore title, hmm? No, she doesn't! Serena has it, and Jelena can't even get close to it because of Zi Yan, who is clearly a more complete and charismatic player''.

This is exactly what would happen.:lol::haha:

But I know something....she would take it with a BIG smile on her face and we all, too.;):lol:

redsonja
Oct 6th, 2008, 01:32 PM
Wait, now I'm supposed to expect her to win Doha? Crap. And here I was all expecting Dinara or Serena to win Doha. :lol:

MagicMilan
Oct 6th, 2008, 02:00 PM
:lol: :lol:

I'm gathering from that article world domination awaits, greatness is within touching distance.

As long as Jelena stays away from Sofia Arvardksson in the Australia draw, everything is gonna be fine.
True :lol:
I must say I was never more positive about Jelena's game, I think we're in for something big next year. Doha will tell us lot about her progress, it's totally different thing to win 3, 4 or 5 consecutive matches against high quality players

~Kiera~
Oct 6th, 2008, 03:12 PM
http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/tennis/columns/story?columnist=ubha_ravi&id=3628151

Venus seeks retribution, title in Moscow
By Ravi Ubha
Special to ESPN.com

Tournament: Kremlin Cup
Surface: Hard indoors
Prize Money: $1.34 million
Draw: 32
Top seeds: Jelena Jankovic, Dinara Safina, Elena Dementieva, Ana Ivanovic

A Russian has won Moscow's Kremlin Cup four times in the past five seasons, and it might happen again this week: Ten of the 24 direct acceptances in the draw represent the home nation, including 2007 champion Elena Dementieva and the transformed Dinara Safina.

Mind you, Jelena Jankovic, in a battle with Serena Williams for the year-end No. 1 ranking, and Venus Williams are also present at the season's final Tier I event. Serena is absent due to an ankle injury, so won't be able to avenge last year's defeat to Dementieva in the finale.

First Quarter: The rematch

Jankovic is considered a bit of a drama queen, but give the Serb some credit for toughing out victories. Against Venus Williams in the semifinals of the Porsche Tennis Grand Prix in Stuttgart, Germany on Saturday, Jankovic battled past the reigning Wimbledon champion 6-7 (8), 7-5, 6-2 in almost three hours. Prior to the encounter, she received a pair of pain-killing injections after splitting a toenail against Vera Zvonareva in a tight quarterfinal. Of course, Jankovic let everyone know she's averse to needles and thus let out a few screams.

In action for a fourth straight week, Jankovic faces a possible rematch against Venus Williams in the quarterfinals. Given a first-round bye, Jankovic need only win one match to advance to the last eight, and neither wild-card Vera Dushevina or the slumping Nicole Vaidisova figure to pose a problem.

Without the luxury of a bye, Williams opens against a familiar foe, Flavia Pennetta. The steady Italian leads their head-to-heads 2-1 and upset Williams in the third round at this year's French Open.

Prediction: Williams

Second Quarter: Dementieva, Petrova on collision course

Dementieva, the Olympic champion, has cooled slightly, eliminated in the quarterfinals in her last two tournaments. Playing at home and defending the title may give the soon-to-be 27-year-old a boost.

Her opener in the second round is likely against Ukraine's Alona Bondarenko, thrashed by Jankovic in Germany.

The probable quarterfinal sees Dementieva face countrywoman and 2006 finalist Nadia Petrova. Petrova, inching closer to 2006 form, reached the Stuttgart final following semifinal showings in her previous two events.

Petrova starts with a qualifier, which could be more difficult than normal given the depth in qualifying -- Slovenian Katarina Srebotnik and Italian Francesca Schiavone, both inside the top 25, were the top two seeds.

In an intriguing first-round match, 2006 winner Anna Chakvetadze, showing little signs of emerging from her slump, faces Danish teen Caroline Wozniacki.

Prediction: Petrova

Third Quarter: Ivanovic in tough

Ana Ivanovic needs a lift.

Riding high from winning her first major at the French Open and ascending to the No. 1 ranking only four months ago, a thumb injury has contributed to a paltry 5-5 record since.

Like Jankovic and Dementieva, Ivanovic benefits from a free pass in the first round. Unlike those two, a tricky opponent surfaces next, either rising Slovak Dominika Cibulkova or France's Marion Bartoli. The latter has struggled with injuries, too, and is barely over .500 in 2008, yet you never know.

The all-Russian battle between Maria Kirilenko and Zvonareva, the seventh seed, is another enticing first-round pairing. Kirilenko, still devoid of consistency, nevertheless claimed the Korean Open two weeks ago; Zvonareva, one of the most consistent performers this season, won the Guangzhou International in China a week earlier.

Prediction: Zvonareva

Fourth Quarter: More Russians

Stop the presses: Safina lost in a tournament before the semifinals. It happened in Germany, with Venus Williams easing past Safina in the quarterfinals. Her coach, Zeljko Krajan, must have been ruing the defeat more than usual -- Safina promised to give him the sporty Porsche that goes along with the winner's check if she won the tournament.

Safina has a comfortable-looking opener in the second round versus fading two-time Grand Slam champion Amelie Mauresmo or Mauresmo's younger French compatriot, Alize Cornet, who struggles on hard courts.

Seeded fifth, Svetlana Kuznetsova is involved in perhaps the most mouth-watering first-round tussle. For the third time since mid-August, Kuznetsova meets surging Chinese Na Li. Li prevailed on home turf at the Olympics, while Kuznetsova returned the favor in Tokyo last month.

Kuznetsova, who recently split with her longtime coach, Stefan Ortega, reached back-to-back finals before losing in the first round in Stuttgart.

Prediction: Safina

Semifinals

Williams doesn't get bageled often, but Petrova did the honors in the Fed Cup semifinals last year in Vermont. She still lost in three and is 0-4 lifetime against Williams.

Safina is 0-2 this season versus Zvonareva. Both losses, however, came prior to her blossoming under Krajan. Safina hadn't overcome Petrova in five tries, all prior to this season, then dropped a single game when they squared off in Tokyo last week.

Prediction: Williams, Safina to advance

Final

Trailing 4-3 in the first set against Safina in Stuttgart, Williams won seven straight games to effectively end the contest. Safina led Serena Williams early in the U.S. Open semis, too, with the Russian eventually steamrolled.

If Venus Williams is on her game, which partly means serving well and staying focused, the home crowd might not be able to help Safina much.

Prediction: Williams

redsonja
Oct 6th, 2008, 03:35 PM
Both losses, however, came prior to her blossoming under Krajan.

:tape:

Also, I think that maybe they should start giving Jelena something to bite down on when she encounters needles. To cut down on the screaming. :p

Brena
Oct 6th, 2008, 06:39 PM
:tape:

Also, I think that maybe they should start giving Jelena something to bite down on when she encounters needles. To cut down on the screaming. :p

I have no idea what JJ's talking about (as usual), but maybe she wanted to say that the broken nail hurt awfully - I broke a toenail once (while playing badminton barefoot on concrete) and it hurt so much (plus was a disgusting sight, plus I'm a bigger wuss than JJ) that I screamed and screamed like a maniac (I was about 10 years old, but still).

redsonja
Oct 6th, 2008, 06:44 PM
I broke a toenail just a couple of weeks ago and it definitely hurt like a sumbitch. But my major point was, even though I hate needles and do not enjoy getting injections-- particularly not right in injury sites (owwwwwwww)-- I manage not to scream like a 3-year-old when it has to be done. :p

Brena
Oct 6th, 2008, 07:12 PM
I broke a toenail just a couple of weeks ago and it definitely hurt like a sumbitch. But my major point was, even though I hate needles and do not enjoy getting injections-- particularly not right in injury sites (owwwwwwww)-- I manage not to scream like a 3-year-old when it has to be done. :p

Oh, I don't scream anymore when I see an eedle heading my way - now I just faint. It's more ladylike.

Here's little something from a Serbian magazine called ''Pulse'' I'm skimming through: JJ was asked to recommend a book, a CD, a film, a theatre show and a TV show. Here are her recommendations:


BOOK - ''I would definitely recommend ''The Power of Your Subconscious Mind'' by Joseph Murphy. This book mostly teaches you how to revive and keep the power of positive thiniking. The technique presented in this book can be used by people from all walks of life - businessmen, housewives, students... With a help of this book everyone can learn how to successfully cope with everyday frustrations and chores. It will turn your bad life experiences into something from what you'll emerge stronger. It certainly helped me.''
CD - ''I can listen to all kinds of music, from classical music to rap. But, like most of the young people, I like the fantastic Justin Timberlake the best.''
TV SHOW - ''It may sound strange, but I ahve no time for watching TV. Sometimes I watch something amusing, but I do that really rarely.''
FILM(DVD) - ''Who can resist Richard Gere and Winona Ryder in the film ''Autumn in New York''. this romatic, and yet sad story is something I always enjoy watching. I already saw it three times, and I'm sure I'll watch it many times more. Also, I always save some spare time to see a good comedy. A little laughter can't hurt.''
THEATRE SHOW - Despite all the training sessions, travelling and other obligations, I occasionally manage to see a theatre show. I heard that the Belgrade production of ''Les Miserables'' is excellent. I'll definitely see it this year. At least, I hope I will.''

Not too exciting, but I thought why not share it. :)

Tashi
Oct 6th, 2008, 07:14 PM
I'm the biggest wuss on the planet. I would've demanded general anesthesia for what JJ had to go through. Or they would've needed at least ten men to hold me down.:lol:

redsonja
Oct 6th, 2008, 07:23 PM
You people all need to take a chill pill! It's like 5 seconds out of your entire life! :lol: Although I do admit that once I had to have an x-ray taken that required the technician to move around pieces of a really painful injury (trust me, you don't want the details :tape:), and I threatened to kick him if he touched my hand one more time... he did, and I did. :p (But I was 11. :p)

As for the recommendations... that book sounds totally sketch, like you might see it on some infomercial at 3 in the morning. :lol:

Tashi
Oct 6th, 2008, 07:30 PM
5 excruciatingly painful seconds. And the memory lasts a lifetime.:p

The book, :lol:. "Autumn in New York" is a movie I never in my life want to see it again. I cried like a baby the first time I saw it.

Brena
Oct 6th, 2008, 07:39 PM
You people all need to take a chill pill! It's like 5 seconds out of your entire life! :lol: Although I do admit that once I had to have an x-ray taken that required the technician to move around pieces of a really painful injury (trust me, you don't want the details :tape:), and I threatened to kick him if he touched my hand one more time... he did, and I did. :p (But I was 11. :p)

Maybe I shouldn't admit these things publicly, but when I was a little girl (and looked like an Eskimo child suffering from jaundice :lol:) I was so afraid of needles that once when I had bronchitis and had to receive a set of injections, my parents had to call a couple of friends to help them catch me (I would hide under the bed so they had to move it in order to grab me), carry me to the doctor's (in a mini-van, becase two of them had to hold me the entire ride because I would struggle to escape), catch me again (because I ususally managed to slip away and run away screaming), and hold me while the nurse gave me the injection. It was always the same nurse and she hated my guts and went green every time she saw me (because I would be struggling, screaming, thrashing my free limbs trying to hit her...) and my parents were really tempted to give me up for adoption (or so they say).

As for the recommendations... that book sounds totally sketch, like you might see it on some infomercial at 3 in the morning. :lol:

:lol: As long as it helps her I don't care if it's Justin Timberlake's autobiography.

~Kiera~
Oct 6th, 2008, 09:24 PM
http://tennisworld.typepad.com/thewrap/2008/10/looking-out-for.html

Looking Out for No. 1
Posted 10/06/2008 @ 3 :26 PM

What do the rankings mean, exactly? It is a little absurd to have a number next to your name that can change from one week to the next, as this ESPN ad with Roger Federer once pointed out. “You know what I like about tennis are the rankings,” SportsCenter anchor Neil Everett says to Federer. “I like to know exactly where you stand at all times.” Federer—who, by the way, is the best actor among the current crop of pros—replies, “Yeah, it works for us,” before going on to say that Everett probably wouldn't make his Top 10 if he had to rank the network’s anchors.

While they can’t measure a hierarchy of excellence or ability in any precise way—was Serena Williams really the best tennis player in the world last week and the second-best this week?—the rankings don’t lie when it comes to achievement over the long term. That’s why Jelena Jankovic, who at 23 has reached just one Grand Slam final (which she lost), is at the top of the charts again as of today.

When Jankovic first ascended to No. 1 this summer, I wrote that it was indicative of a tour with a power vacuum, and that the women’s game made no sense in the wake of Justine Henin’s retirement. That was partly a reaction to the fact that Jankovic had made her jump at the same time that she was losing in a quarterfinal. It reminded me of the dark days on the men’s side a decade ago, when Yevgeny Kafelnikov lost six matches in a row even as he was taking over the top spot.

The women’s tour is still trying to fill the vacuum. Ana Ivanovic may not have been ready to take on that responsibility, and the Williams sisters, despite their wins at Wimbledon and the U.S. Open, remain more committed to major titles than ranking spots. So that leaves us with Jankovic, a player of remarkable consistency, as well as mental and physical resilience. Most champions—like, say, Rafael Nadal in 2008—have success at Grand Slam events and then ascend to the No. 1 position. Jankovic has essentially eaten her dessert first. The question now is whether she’ll be heartened and inspired enough by this success to translate it back into a win at a Grand Slam sometime soon. The leading question for the WTA in 2009 may be, Is there more to Jankovic’s game than just week-to-week consistency and resilience, or is she just a placeholder for the next true No. 1?

The last two Sundays, in Beijing and Stuttgart, have made me think that our favorite distractible drama queen is getting more ambitious in her old age, and that her game may have more to offer than what she’s shown so far. Jankovic has struggled in finals in the past (she was 6-10 in them before Beijing) and has often seemed satisfied just to reach the later rounds of events. None of that is surprising for a late-bloomer and chronic head case who almost quit the game three years ago and likely never expected to be challenging for Slams. But rather than backing into the top spot this time, Jankovic seized both of these tournaments and won them with what I took to be a new sense of entitlement.

The match that was most representative of her attitude in Stuttgart was her three-set semifinal win over Venus Williams. Jankovic played the first set in her usual manner—smooth and steady, taking few risks and running everything down. There’s a wallboard-like efficiency to her game, but she’s a stylishly constructed wallboard. There’s nothing extraneous to her strokes, which doesn’t mean they’re strictly utilitarian, either. Jumping, taking the ball early, never off-balance, redirecting the ball at will, Jankovic has more grace than can be contained in the word “grinder.”

Against Venus, though, it wasn’t quite enough to get her through the first set, which she lost in a tight tiebreaker. It may have been a blessing. Rather than losing confidence, Jankovic reacted the way a No. 1 should: She got mad. She had already been hitting her first serve with a little more extension and authority, particularly wide in the deuce court, than she usually does. Through the second set, she did the same with her ground strokes. For the rest of the match, Jankovic took the initiative in rallies and got Williams on the run by hitting the ball earlier, harder, and closer to the lines. She followed those shots up with swing volleys, overheads, and touchy-feely stretch volleys. More than anything, Jankovic showed off her unique ability to hit the ball down the line with lots of pace and little margin. If she does go on to be a long-term No. 1, that may be her contribution to the evolution of women's tennis.

Two moments from her semi with Williams stick out. The first came when Jankovic was up 6-5 in the second set and at deuce on Venus’ serve. As I said, the Serb had worked herself back into the match by hitting with more abandon. But she had missed a go-for-broke forehand on the previous point, which would have given her the set. Now, after a long, exhausting rally, she went for another forehand up the line and even added a loud whoop as she hit the ball. It worked: The shot was a winner that left Williams, for one of the few times in her life, huffing and puffing. Jankovic hadn't let her earlier miss make her more cautious. She went on to break for the set.

The second moment came when Jankovic was up a break in the third set at 3-1, but was faced with three break points. Venus had broken her back at one point in the previous set, and she looked almost certain to do it again here—she's always been a tough player to finish off. But Jankovic went deep into her well and came back with three very different, but equally effective answers. She won the first break point with a big-cut forehand that landed near the baseline; she won the second by putting Williams on a string and moving her back and forth along the baseline; and she won the third with a crafty little sharp-angle, heavy-topspin flick forehand that landed at the corner of the service line and sideline. Jankovic held from there and never looked back.

Picture that last shot for a second: Who did it remind you of? That’s right, Martina Hingis. In her fluidity, variety, love of competition, and lack of explosiveness Jankovic bears more than a passing resemblance to Martina Hingis. The Swiss used those subtle skills to sneak in five major titles, but she couldn’t match the Williamses' power. Jankovic has had the same trouble at the big events; she fought hard but finally couldn’t track enough of Serena’s missiles down in the final at Flushing Meadows this year. In the last two sets against Venus in Stuttgart, though, Jankovic proved that she can go for more, can expand her comfort zone, can dictate rather than scramble, and still remain as consistent and versatile as she’s always been. She may have more explosiveness than she's allowed herself to show in the past. She'll need it, even if it costs her some consistency, to win the big matches that Hingis couldn't win later in her career.

Like I said, Jankovic’s mid-career desire for more success will be a—perhaps the—women’s story going into next season’s major events. It’s not like she doesn’t have the personality of a winner. I’ve never see anyone as simultaneously theatrical and wholly concentrated on the task at hand. Jankovic may be the least isolated, least alone great player on a tennis court since John McEnroe. During the most crucial games of the Stuttgart semi, late in the second set, she gesticulated wildly toward her box after missing a ball and engaged in running monologues with her coach and her mom. After one backhand miss, she let out a “Nooo!!!” that sounded not unlike a female Chewbacca. But when she finally broke at 5-6, Jankovic gave the crowd a wide smile as she watched her last shot sail past Venus and land on the line for a winner. It was a look of genuine joy at playing tennis, without a hint of gloating in it. She kept smiling toward her entourage as she walked off the court. Whether angry or happy or wacky, Jankovic is the rare player who can share the sport with the people watching her and still perform at her best.

That doesn’t mean Jankovic is a sweetheart. She milks arguments with the umpire to annoyingly dramatic effect, and, like her fellow Serb Novak Djokovic, she can lose her patience with the ball kids who don’t bring her sweaty towel to her quickly enough. And just because Jankovic engages the crowd doesn’t she isn’t single-minded, even a little ruthless, about winning—even up 5-2 in the third, she wasn't afraid to take an injury timeout.

Hmm…single-minded and a little ruthless on the inside, not always a sweetheart on the outside: Sounds like a No. 1 to me.

Katie.
Oct 6th, 2008, 09:33 PM
Oh, I don't scream anymore when I see an eedle heading my way - now I just faint. It's more ladylike.
:lol: I am the same! Well I haven't actually fainted but when I had to have a routine injection that I needed to go abroad on holiday I was sooooo scared for the whole day, then I felt weak afterwards and I had to be given oxygen and had to lie on the bed thing. My dad was waiting outside and wondering what was taking so long haha.

Also thanks for the JJ bit you posted! And Sarah for all the articles :)
and chronic head case
:haha: yup!

Optima
Oct 6th, 2008, 09:51 PM
Excellent article.

Wayn77
Oct 6th, 2008, 10:00 PM
Brilliant article ...

Full of praise and feel-good stuff of course.

Who the hell wrote that?

~Kiera~
Oct 6th, 2008, 10:06 PM
Steve Tignor.

Cat123
Oct 7th, 2008, 12:11 AM
THEATRE SHOW - Despite all the training sessions, travelling and other obligations, I occasionally manage to see a theatre show. I heard that the Belgrade production of ''Les Miserables'' is excellent. I'll definitely see it this year. At least, I hope I will.''

Not too exciting, but I thought why not share it. :)

Jelena likes Les Mis :hearts: Now I love her more.

It's FANTASTIC. Everyone should see it (especially if you're in London. Nancy Sullivan as Eponine is brilliant) :angel:

Ha! I am such a geek when it comes to musical theatre, you'll have to excuse my occasional outburst...

Tashi
Oct 7th, 2008, 01:20 AM
http://www.tennischannel.com/news/NewsDetails.aspx?newsid=4699


Steve Flink: Why Jankovic Matters

Over this past weekend, I spent my share of hours watching the women's event on television from Stuttgart. By the time Tennis Channel picked up that tournament, Serena Williams had suffered a perplexing loss in her opening round contest, bowing 0-6, 6-1, 6-4 to the ever opportunistic Li Na of China. Williams had not competed on the Sony Ericsson WTA Tour since her triumphant run at the U.S. Open had concluded more than three weeks earlier, but I had hoped Serena would do much better than that in her initial indoor appearance of the fall campaign. Too often for a player of her championship caliber, Serena beats herself. After that defeat, she withdrew from this week's Moscow event with an ankle injury.

That was surely not the best of news for avid followers of the women's game. And yet, the week ended on a much more positive note as Jelena Jankovic captured her second consecutive tournament by overcoming Venus Williams in an exceedingly well played, three set semifinal before ousting Nadia Petrova 6-4, 6-3 in the final. The way I see it, Jankovic is the single most enjoyable player to watch in the women's game. She is forever probing, looking to break her opponents down systematically, shaping masterful game plans that make her adversaries as uncomfortable as possible. She is a clear and precise thinker, and a strategist of the highest order. Her mind is one of the mightiest weapons in the women's game.

It is no wonder that Jankovic won a WTA Tour best 72 matches in 2007, and it is not surprising that she is the leader again this year with 58 match victories. No one is more industrious. No one can surpass her match playing prowess. In an era of overwhelmingly big hitters and explosive shot makers, at a time when power is nearly always a prerequisite for victory, during a period when being flashy can count for an awful lot, Jankovic stands out because she is so dissimilar from most of her rivals. She knows how to take the initiative and can control points by subtly stepping up the pace, and her two-handed backhand down the line is the defining shot in her arsenal.

But the core of her identity on the court is built largely around having the sharpest mind in her business. Her court sense is remarkably good. Her anticipation is excellent. In many ways, she reminds me of Martina Hingis. Martina, too, was surrounded by players who had the capacity to blow her off the court, by adversaries who would sometimes refuse to allow her to establish a rhythm. Like Hingis, Jankovic is tactically agile and she uses her intuitive powers to thwart big hitters.

I particularly enjoyed her battle with Venus Williams in the penultimate round at Stuttgart. Time and again, these two players seem to bring out the very best in each other. In their spirited career head-to-head series, Jankovic and Williams have collided on eight occasions. The 23-year-old Serbian now holds a 5-3 edge over Venus. They have met in three of the four majors, with Jankovic stopping Williams at Wimbledon in 2006 and Roland Garros in 2007, and Venus recording a 4-6, 6-1, 7-6 (4) victory in the quarterfinals of the 2007 U.S. Open. That was the highest quality battle they have ever fought against each other.

In any case, the Stuttgart encounter was a delightful clash. The players exchanged early service breaks and then proceeded to an opening set tie-break. In that sequence, Jankovic saved two set points and then had a set point herself with Venus serving at 7-8. Venus got out of that jam with a service winner down the T, and then Jankovic made consecutive backhand unforced errors to drop the set. In the second set, Williams rallied fiercely from 3-1 down, got back to 3-3, and had Jankovic down 0-40 in the critical seventh game. Jankovic responded with a backhand half volley drop shot which Venus could not handle. Then Jankovic opened up the court beautifully with a two-hander crosscourt, setting up a forehand swing volley winner. Next, Jankovic rolled a forehand deceptively down the line into an open space. She had averted all three break points with poise under pressure. Jankovic collected the next two points to hold on gamely for 4-3.

Williams was pushing hard to record a straight set win, but Jankovic had other notions. With Venus serving at 5-6, the 28-year-old American saved three set points, but a determined Jankovic caught the edge of the sideline with a forehand down the line passing shot at full stretch to seal the set on her fourth opportunity. In the final set, Jankovic took a 3-0 lead and never looked back, claiming a well deserved 6-7 (8), 7-5, 6-2 victory.

This was no mean feat against the Wimbledon champion indoors. Venus went after Jankovic at full force and was devastatingly potent off the ground through much of the contest. Moreover, she attacked judiciously, and volleyed crisply. But, in the end, Jankovic managed to play the match essentially on her terms, prolonging the back court exchanges, showing why she is the finest defensive player in women's tennis.

But Jankovic also asserted herself just enough to keep Venus honest, shifting from defense onto offense at unexpected moments. Her signature moment came in the last game of the second set, when she concluded a gripping 28 stroke rally with a brilliantly struck forehand down the line winner. It was not the pace of her shot that enabled Jankovic to win that point; it was her extraordinary precision.

There was never much doubt that Jankovic would topple Petrova, who stood at a career high of No. 3 in the world in May of 2006. Before taking the crown in Beijing the previous week, Jankovic had won only one tournament all year long, but now she is picking up steam. She has regained the No. 1 world ranking she first garnered in the middle of August. Her status at the top is twofold: it is a tribute to her immense consistency, to the fact that she has been a quarterfinalist or better in 18 of the 19 tournaments she has played in 2008. But it is also a reminder that none of the leading players has adequately stepped up since Justine Henin retired in May.

Maria Sharapova, Ana Ivanovic, Serena Williams and Jankovic have all taken turns residing at No. 1 in the world since the departure of Henin. Sometimes, you want to stand up and scream, "Will the real world champion please stand up." Jankovic might well end this year as the top-ranked player, despite having not won a major. I don't think that would be a good thing for the women. I recall other years when the No. 1 year-end world ranking was garnered by players who did not win a single Grand Slam event.

In 2000, Hingis did not secure a major but finished on top. That was also the case with Lindsay Davenport in 2001, 2004, and 2005. Both players had great years in those cases, but without collecting Grand Slam titles they should not have been rewarded with the honor of the No. 1 world ranking. I wish the WTA and ATP Tours would have a provision explicitly stating that winning at least one Grand Slam title is mandatory for a player finishing a year at No. 1. Jimmy Connors was unable to secure any majors in either 1975 or 1977, but he still completed those seasons at No. 1 on the ATP computer. In 1982, Connors won Wimbledon and the U.S. Open and was undeniably the best player in the world, but John McEnroe--- who did not come through at a Grand Slam event--- concluded that year above Connors at No. 1. Go figure.

Jankovic has posted solid results all across 2008. She made it to the semifinals of the Australian and French Opens, and reached her first "Big Four" final at the U.S. Open. She is to be commended for her consistency. In 2009, she will have a reasonably good chance to win one of the Grand Slam events. But, in my view, she does not deserve to finish this year at No. 1 without having taken a major. Nonetheless, whether or not Jankovic ends this year as the preeminent competitor in her sport, this much is certain: the women's game is a more intriguing place because she is in the thick of the battle. The craftsmanship, creativity, and ingenuity of Jelena Jankovic amount to a triumph for all of us.

Kampi
Oct 7th, 2008, 06:31 AM
Thank you Sarah and Tashi:wavey::kiss:

Really two great articles.:D

Brena
Oct 7th, 2008, 06:45 AM
Jelena likes Les Mis :hearts: Now I love her more.

It's FANTASTIC. Everyone should see it (especially if you're in London. Nancy Sullivan as Eponine is brilliant) :angel:

Ha! I am such a geek when it comes to musical theatre, you'll have to excuse my occasional outburst...

Please feel free to have those outbursts as often as you like, I love hearing about West End musical scene!
I was also delighted she chose a musical (and a good one at that), but I also found it so funny she wants to see the Belgrade production although she could see whatever she chooses in London or on Broadway :lol: Crazy JJ...

RFS
Oct 7th, 2008, 06:53 AM
Wow - awesome postive praise for JJ...
Thanks Sarah and Tashi

Cat123
Oct 7th, 2008, 12:15 PM
Please feel free to have those outbursts as often as you like, I love hearing about West End musical scene!
I was also delighted she chose a musical (and a good one at that), but I also found it so funny she wants to see the Belgrade production although she could see whatever she chooses in London or on Broadway :lol: Crazy JJ...

There's nowt wrong with being Patriotic!!! :kiss:

I have no frame of reference, I've only seen it the once, but Les Mis London was awesome a few weeks ago. Even though I had understudy Valjean. 'Joseph' is next on my list! :lol:

~Kiera~
Oct 7th, 2008, 01:25 PM
http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/tennis/notebook?page=notebook/tennis10072008

Is Jankovic truly worthy of the No. 1 player status?
By Sandra Harwitt
Special to ESPN.com

Presumably, it's all in the way you look at it when you peruse the Sony Ericsson WTA Tour rankings.

This week, Jelena Jankovic returns to the top of the charts for the second time this year and in her career.

Jankovic is talented. But is she truly No. 1 material at this point in time?

The computer says she is, so history will show that is the case. The Serbian has played the computer right -- she plays a lot of tournaments, which certainly pleases tournament directors worldwide.

Jankovic consistently does well at each and every stop she makes on the WTA Tour -- in 19 tournaments played this year, she failed to reach the quarterfinal round or better only once. In all, she won titles at Beijing, Stuttgart and Rome and reached two additional finals, five semifinals and eight quarterfinals.

But there are those pundits around the game who argue the computer should be designed so someone who has never won a Grand Slam title cannot ascend to the rankings' throne. To date, Jankovic's best result at a Slam was her final appearance at the U.S. Open last month.

Since the computer rankings commenced Nov. 3, 1975, Jankovic is the only of the 18 players to be ranked No. 1 who has not secured a trophy at a major.

"I don't think you can say you have to win a Grand Slam to be No. 1," says Tracy Austin.

Austin continued by giving Jankovic the props she deserves for her success: "What we are giving Jelena Jankovic credit for is one, for the quantity she plays and two, for her consistency. The way the computer is now, she's accomplished reaching No. 1 fair and square by playing more tournaments than the other top players and with quality finishes, but not necessarily winning the big titles. The way the rankings are now, you certainly can't punish Jankovic because she's playing by the rules."

But if history tells the tale, Jankovic's No. 1 ranking is a good omen: Two players before her grabbed the top ranking prior to a major title.

Frenchwoman Amelie Mauresmo achieved No. 1 on Sept. 13, 2004, and spent 39 non-consecutive weeks at the head of the computer rankings but didn't win the first of her two Grand Slam titles until the 2006 Australian Open.

Kim Clijsters assumed the No. 1 role for the first time Aug. 11, 2003, prior to earning her sole victory at a major at the 2005 U.S. Open.

~Kiera~
Oct 7th, 2008, 11:59 PM
http://tennisworld.typepad.com/tennisworld/2008/10/jelena.html

Greed is Good

Posted 10/07/2008 @ 4 :51 PM

So the other day I received this email from former tennis magazine intern Montana Nick McCarvel, a recent graduate of Seattle University now working for Seena Hamilton. Nick spends his days in New York sipping decaf tea and dreaming about his childhood - and the clean air - of Big Sky country (where I'll be going for the last week of October, to hunt and hike the rugged Milk River coulee country). Nick wrote:

Hey Pete,

How are you? I sure hope you enjoyed your summer weeks in Montana as much as I did! The state steered clear of fire season this year, so while you were out hunting I was smacking the tennis ball in the fresh Rocky Mountain air.

After all that summer tennis-playing, I've been thinking about someone who plays a lot of tennis herself: Jelena Jankovic. This girl is slowly but surely shedding the skin of "The Best Player Who Never..." and is becoming a bona fide champion. I'm not sure what to call Jelena Jankovic's win in Stuttgart over Venus Williams last Friday. An upset? A shocker? ... A relief? If anything, it was a bit of redemption for Jankovic, after that loss to Serena in the US Open final.

Those who, at the start of the year, tabbed her the I'm Top 5 because I play the most on this injury forsaken tour may have to revisit their thinking. She's been incredibly consistent this year, losing to just two players outside of the Top 50. She made the semis (or better) at three Slam events and won titles on three different surfaces (Rome, Beijing and Stuttgart).

Jelena's victory in Germany demonstrated that she's on an official campaign to end the year number 1, not just "on paper" but in the mind's of the game's elite as well. After wins over Venus and Nadia (Petrova) this week, JJ has chalked up 2008 victories over both Williams sisters, Petrova, Elena Dementieva, Vera Zvonareva, Agnieszke Radwanska and Svetlana Kuznetsova - most of the cast that will take part in the Season Ending Championships next month in Doha.

So often in tennis - particularly women's tennis - players are expected to peak as fast as their down-the-line backhands fly over the net. But in Jankovic's case, some were calling her the "new Martina Hingis" - but not it a good way. It was because, in 2007, she logged i97 matches, in over 25 tournaments, and launched herself to the year-end no. 3 ranking. Critics said it was her her quantity of play - not the quality of her game or results - that explained the high ranking. And it didn't help her own cause when she lost all three of the matches she played at the year-end WTA Championships (including losses to lower-ranked players Anna Chakvetadze and Marion Bartoli), and then abruptly withdrew due to injury.

It was a disappointing finish for the Serb, and it suggested that she was destined to become a bogus champion - the "funny girl" who always finished second (or worse). Worse yet, she embarked on 2008 with a dismal loss to Sharapova in Melbourne - a loss in which she looked ragged, flat and - more than anything else - tired. Injury lingered (as did the feeling that she had overplayed and shot her wad in 2007), but she began to refute the charges with her first win of the year, in Rome. Incidentally, she beat Venus there, along with a few solid clay-court players, like Flavia Penetta.

Since that tournament, Jankovic is 28-7. After her win over Venus in Stuttgart, she fairly beamed: "Playing Venus is always very hard, as she makes you run around. But I was very fortunate to be playing at all. Before the match the doctor gave me two injections and I screamed. It was so painful. But I was able to play."

That Jankovic has been able to stay healthy for so long has contributed to her consistency. I think if she can stay fit, she'll end this year on a much brighter note than the last. She's played fewer events in '08, and looks pretty well positioned to end the season with an exclamation point instead of a question mark.

I guess the big question for '09 is: Is Jelena ready to win a Grand Slam event? She's showed for much of 2008 that she can be great, but can she be grand? Can she continue to shed the Cloak of the Nearly Great? Only time will tell, and as a fan of hers I'm okay with that - after all, she's patient, passionate, and slowly but surely building to a peak - as long as her body holds up.

So what do you think Pete? Am I right about a Jelena breakthrough in 2009? Or is she going to be another one of those could-have, would-have girls - a la Kournikova, young Kim Clijsters, Dinara Safina (so far) and the like. I'm betting on her for two majors in '09. Can you imagine the acceptance speeches?

Cheers,
Montana Nick

So here's my reply:

Hey Nick: We had a great time in Montana, although it was a family vacation - hunting season is in the fall! Watching my boy Luke ride Studley the cow pony across the prairie under that big sky, hanging on to the pommel with both hands, little feet dangling and unable to reach the stirrups - it was a fine, fine thing. Sorry to miss you in Helena - we were there just one night.

Anyway, you hit all the issues with Jelena and managed to suppress your KAD gene nicely. Jelena made a convert of me this year; she's a girly-girl and a jockette, in a post-feminist kind of way (if that's not too hard to digest). Here's what I like most about her: this year, she proved that she's not just a points and prize-money hungry pro, toting her racket bag the way an ambitious and acquisitive Wall Street guy lugs his briefcase, eyes downcast and oblivious to all else.

You know, some Wall Street dude once said, "Greed is good" and while present events make that crack seem offensive, it's equally applicable - but with no down-side - to tennis. When Billie Jean transformed the pro game, her first goal was to create more and better playing opportunities for women. Those opportunities now exist, but Jelena is far, far ahead of her peers in recognizing and taking advantage of them. This girl loves to play tennis; her joie d'combat is remarkable; to me it was best exemplified in two matches she played with Serena - the US Open final, and that wacky, riveting match they produced in Miami.

We've had a few great examples of players who keep their eyes on the prize in recent years, starting with the top two men. Rafael Nadal and Roger Federer may complain and moan about the scheduling, and fatigue, but they've always put in the hard yards. Can anyone fault either of those guys for playing too little, or with insufficient drive, regardless of surface or location?

By contrast, the WTA pros have been less faithful to the game. Even the otherwise exemplary Justine Henin at times chose to play hide-and-seek in the commitment department. I don't want to second guess anyone's reasons for taking a break, or start pointing a finger, but the bottom line is that Jelena has shown an enormous - and singular - amount of desire, drive, physical fitness, mental and emotional stamina, and heart. As a result, she's doing something that few WTA women in recent years have: pushing through a long, exhausting, difficult period with the simple intention of finishing no. 1 for the year.

I wrote recently that I didn't like a system that enabled a player who hasn't won a major in any given year to bag the YE no. 1 ranking (I did, however, stipulate that the system should not be designed specifically to prevent that from happening, on the odd occasion). Nobody in his right mind would blame a player for "playing too much" and reaping what rewards he or she could in the process. The irony is that some of those very same people who trashed Jankovic for playing so frequently are the first to protest when someone appears not to play enough.

The way Jankovic reclaimed the no. 1 ranking, and made holding it her goal for the rest of this year, is refreshing - it takes courage to pursue the YE no. 1 ranking with abandon, because there's a lot on the line. On both tours, the drive to make the year-end championships is starting to spin off some surprising results (see the recent losses by Gilles Simon and Stan Wawrinka), which gives you a good idea of the kind of pressure this kind of year-end push entails. Hats off to Jelena for tucking in her chin, sticking her head down, and moving forward. And don't forget that there's no substitute for match play when you want to get in a groove - provided you're winning enough of them, as Jelena is.


But. . .

It's still a pity that Jankovic didn't find a way to grab that first major this year. And because she didn't, there will always be a caveat attached to her season. I have no problem with that, being in the camp that puts performance on big occasions on a higher plane than week-in, week-out consistency. But I also feel that whatever happens at the end of this year, Jankovic has removed all doubt about her potential as a Grand Slam winner. Her versatility and facility on all surfaces is conclusive.

I was surprised when Jo-Wilfried Tsonga won Bangkok a few weeks ago, and it turned out to be his first ATP Tour level title. Did anybody seriously doubt that Tsonga had the game (and drive) to win one? That's how I feel about our split-happy, Jumbotron-watching, daffodil diva - It used to be a matter of "if" with her on the Grand Slam front; now it's a matter of "when." I predict that when she does it, she'll make that dazzling victory speech you long to hear - and then dramatically call for a gurney, on which they can wheel her out of the stadium as she waves to her fans (and checks out her make-up on the Jumbotron).

Jankovic brings so much to the game these days that I don't even mind the relentless focus on her injuries. Just keep playing, baby. That's what they pay you for, and that's become the main reason I've grown to respect you so much. That would be my message to her, Nick.

All the best, pard, and when I head out to the Rocky Mountain front in a few weeks, I'm making a point to stop in Fort Benton to check out the statue of Shep .

-- Pete

schorsch
Oct 8th, 2008, 01:03 AM
The irony is that some of those very same people who trashed Jankovic for playing so frequently are the first to protest when someone appears not to play enough.

spot on !!!

oleada
Oct 8th, 2008, 04:36 AM
:sobbing:
I love it!

Nina.
Oct 8th, 2008, 11:42 AM
our split-happy, Jumbotron-watching, daffodil diva

how lovely :hearts::lol:

xcrtbckhnd
Oct 8th, 2008, 12:18 PM
Nice read, thanks for sharing.

~Kiera~
Oct 9th, 2008, 12:02 AM
http://ukpress.google.com/article/ALeqM5jxgExYelPpZ9XO7G47-kxML3lxNA

Stars line up for Hong Kong event
5 hours ago

World number one Jelena Jankovic, Wimbledon champion Venus Williams, Australian Open champion Maria Sharapova and India's Sania Mirza will headline January's revamped JB Group Classic exhibition tournament in Hong Kong.

The annual exhibition tournament will see teams from Europe, Russia, the Americas and Asia-Pacific competing in singles and doubles matches at Hong Kong's Victoria Park to fall in line with events such as the Hopman Cup and the ATP World Team Cup.

Sharapova will make her regular visit to Hong Kong ahead of her Australia Open defence and will spearhead the Russian challenge, with Williams leading the Americas team on her sixth visit to Hong Kong.

Last year Sharapova again used the Hong Kong event as her only warm-up before heading to Melbourne to win a third grand slam by beating three of the top four rank players from the quarter-finals stage.

Current world number one Jankovic will headline Europe's bid, while Mirza will take her place in the Asia-Pacific team.

"We are delighted to be inviting tennis stars who represent every corner of the World and are thrilled that world number one Jelena Jankovic is spearheading Team Europe," said the president of the Hong Kong Tennis Patrons' Association, Ian Wade.

"Jelena is one of the most popular and talented players on tour and a fierce competitor. She currently leads the WTA Tour Race and has won more matches than any other female player this year."

The remaining field for the event, which will be held from January 7-10, will be announced later in the year.

schorsch
Oct 9th, 2008, 01:51 AM
NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!

I hate that tournament. I mean I don't hate it cause betfai* I think will show some matches :p, but I just hate the idea of going to a tournament where you cant win a real title and wta pts when the season isnt over. I mean an exho here or there for charity at the end of the year. Ok. But the rest... blah :ras: The only exception being HopmanCup.

It would be so much better to play one of those other tournies and pick up a nice trophy and wta pts, but I guess its a nice and relaxed preparation and she'll get to see a new place, get yummy $$$ and play a bit of dubz to work on her volleys. I really hope the transition game and volleys will be an important part of her offseason this year.

Masha and JJ playing dubz :drool: :drool: :drool: :drool: :drool: :drool: :drool: :drool: :drool: :drool: :drool: :drool: :drool: :drool: :drool: :drool:

But they usually dont put the top players together and also Masha often gives her spot to a young player :haha:

schorsch
Oct 9th, 2008, 02:52 AM
this year they invited larcher de brito. maybe next year it will be robson ?

~Kiera~
Oct 9th, 2008, 11:21 AM
New blog

Moscow

This has been an amazing fortnight for me, one in which all the hard work of this year - and all the other years has paid off. Not only did I regain my No 1 spot in the world ranking I won two back - to - back tournaments. It really is't easy to be playing matches almost every day especially if you have to play three sets. By Saturday in Stuttgart my body was beginning to rebel and I knew that I would be having a very tough match with Venus Williams. You know she can serve so that it is almost impossible to reach the ball and when she lets rip the ball screams across the net. She is also lethal at the net. Still I had my game plan and I stuck to it pretty well - I've been hitting the ball cleanly and more powerfully and I think I can use the court pretty well. I also manage to stay in the rallies and keep the errors down. In the match I kept my concentration up, moved her around and then got a few good winners and eventually I was sure I was going to win. It was a sort of final and it felt great. On Sunday I was up against Nadia Petrova ? Nadia has been playing very well recently so I couldn't just lie in bed! In fact I was pretty stiff when I got up but I did a bit of light practice and then I was ready to go on court and win. I also got another Porsche ? my second one so maybe I will have to open up a garage :)

If ever you go to Stuttgart (or Germany) you have to try the apple Schorle - it has become my favorite drink. It is apple juice mixed with sparkling water, I think I must have drank 10 liters in 7 days!

The down point of the week is that I have just discovered that my luggage has been lost in no man's land. When I got off the plane, we waited forever for my bag that never showed up. I had my camera, lap top, ipod and other important things in there so I am sad to think I may never see those things again. When you travel so much I guess sometimes these things happen but now I have to download new songs and take a lot of new pictures and that is the reason i couldnt write to you guys!

I'm now in Moscow where there will be a lot of support for the home players. My parents are here with me again and I love having their support. However I know that even if you are not there, maybe hundreds of miles away you will be wanting me to play my best and that helps me to keep focused. I want to keep up my form and remain a worthy champion. So take care and if you feel it's turning cold go out and hit a few balls.

Lots of kisses

JJ

redsonja
Oct 9th, 2008, 11:55 AM
That sucks. But, who checks their iPod on a flight? Isn't that practically the whole point of an iPod? :p

~Kiera~
Oct 9th, 2008, 12:21 PM
That sucks. But, who checks their iPod on a flight? Isn't that practically the whole point of an iPod? :p

Considering the amount of times her luggage has been lost or delayed, you'd have thought she'd have learnt by now to carry important items in her hand luggage.

дalex
Oct 9th, 2008, 12:37 PM
I had my camera, lap top, ipod and other important things in there so I am sad to think I may never see those things again.

In Serbian part of the site she mentions her new Fendi shoes are also missing. I guess those are fairly important? Sonja? :lol:

redsonja
Oct 9th, 2008, 12:42 PM
Ohmigod. :eek:

Although I still think the iPod/computer is worse. The shoes should be pretty easy to replace, but redownloading all that music? Ugh.

Nina.
Oct 9th, 2008, 01:32 PM
Oh no, not again lost luggage!

If ever you go to Stuttgart (or Germany) you have to try the apple Schorle - it has become my favorite drink. It is apple juice mixed with sparkling water, I think I must have drank 10 liters in 7 days!
So it's special in Germany? It doesn't exist in other countries? I have never given it a thought when I was somewhere else...

~Kiera~
Oct 9th, 2008, 07:33 PM
http://afp.google.com/article/ALeqM5i8uoNTSBUgguNAiqKosw4Kw9l7EA

Jankovic beats pain, Davydenko breezes into Moscow tennis quarters
1 hour ago

MOSCOW (AFP) — World number one Jelena Jankovic of Serbia battled through the pain barrier on Thursday to beat Russian Vera Dushevina and advance to the quarter-final of the Kremlin Cup, a 2.4-million-dollar joint ATP and WTA event.

But there was no such trauma for the ATP event's top seed, Nikolay Davydenko of Russia barely breaking sweat as he dispatched Spaniard Guillermo Garcia-Lopez 6-1, 6-1.

Jankovic, 23, dropped the first set and was 2-0 down in the second before receiving on-court treatment and gaining her composure to win 6-7 (6/8), 6-3, 6-2, her fourth win over Dushevina in their five head-to-head meetings.

"Today I felt pain in my back when I practised and during the match I was feeling more and more pain," Jankovic said. "It was really difficult to play as I was struggling the pain.

"I felt worse and worse and was even ready to quit playing when I was one set and 2-0 down.

"But after the doctor put that anesthetic cream on my back and I took the pain killer everything changed. I did my best trying to serve well and it worked."

The rivals traded breaks throughout the opening set before the 22-year-old Russian wildcard won 8-6.

In the second Dushevina, currently ranked 77th in the world, broke immediately for a 2-0 lead but Jankovic broke back twice to level at one set all.

Jankovic started the third set with a couple of breaks for a commanding 4-0 advantage and proceeded to wrap up the game and set up her 19th quarter-final in the 20 tournaments she has played this season.

Russia's Vera Zvonareva, who was seeded seventh here, also booked a quarter-final pass, outclassing Slovakia's Daniela Hantuchova 6-1, 6-0 to record her fourth head-to-head win in as many meetings.

Zvonareva, currently ninth in the world, ran out to a 4-0 lead before Hantuchova even chalked up her first point of the match.

After winning the opening set in 23 minutes, the 24-year-old Russian underlined her supremacy in the second, taking it at love to set up a meeting with another Slovak, Dominika Cibulkova, for a place in the semis.

"I didn't make any unforced mistakes," Zvonareva said. "I was serving and returning well. But I know that one can have just one or two such easy matches during the season."

On the ATP event, Davydenko was pleased with the 56-minute masterclass he handed Garcia-Lopez.

"The score speaks for itself. I played confidently and controlled the match," said the local favourite who is seeking his fourth title in home events this year.

In the semi-finals, Davydenko will meet seventh-seeded compatriot Marat Safin, who beat Frenchman Julien Benneteau 6-4, 0-6, 6-2.

Another Frenchman Paul-Henri Mathieu, the 2002 champion here, battled into the quarter-finals from a set down, beating Dudi Sela of Israel 6-7 (3/7), 7-5, 7-6 (7/0) to face compatriot Fabrice Santoro.

Meanwhile, Serbia's Viktor Troicki upset his eighth-seeded compatriot Janko Tipsarevic, ousting him in straight sets 6-3, 6-4 to set up a match against Germany's Mischa Zverev, a 6-2, 2-6, 6-1 winner over Russian Teimuraz Gabashvili.

Arina's_fan
Oct 9th, 2008, 10:53 PM
Hello everyone from Moscow :) I have a lot of Jelena's pictures, but at first - interview after match against Vera - Jelena's interview after second round (http://www.kk.rodionova.net/audio/jj_interview_after_2_round_eng.MP3)

дalex
Oct 10th, 2008, 08:49 AM
Thank you Arina's fan! :worship:

I was able to download that with my crappy dial-up connection and it really was a funny press conference. JJ is love. :inlove:

Cat123
Oct 10th, 2008, 09:36 AM
Thankyou!!! :D

JJ's reaction to that question about Ana is hilarious :lol: At least swimming pools weren't mentioned.

iheartjelenaj
Oct 10th, 2008, 12:44 PM
Great blog :)

She's so rich, I didn't know that the red 911 Carrera 4S Cabrio was her second freakin' Porsche! Daaannngggg!!!

And that sux that her luggage got lost again. Couldn't she have fit the lap top, iPod, and camera in a carry-on? I guess she thought that she wouldn't need to use them on a flight, but still, just to be sure...
At least she can afford to buy new ones, and so much more.

~Kiera~
Oct 10th, 2008, 05:11 PM
http://www.clubcall.com/tennis/serb-still-track-third-straight-title-798116.html

Serb still on track for third straight title
Tennis, 17:29, October 10, 2008

World number one Jelena Jankovic maintained her red-hot form to remain on course for a third title in succession at the Kremlin Cup.

The Serbian right-hander beat Italy's Flavia Pennetta 7-6 (8-6) 6-3 in Moscow to set up a semi-final clash with defending champion and Olympic gold medallist Elena Dementieva.

Pennetta led 3-0 in the first set tie-break, but lost all her momentum with a double-fault and Jankovic stole it 8-6.

The Italian then had chances to go 4-2 up in the second set during a game of 12 deuces, but Jankovic clung on and broke her spirit - finally running out a straight-sets winner.

Dementieva beat fellow Russian Nadia Petrova 6-4 4-6 7-6 (8-6) to clinch her berth in tomorrow's semi-final.

Assessing Jankovic's form, Dementieva said: "She is the strongest player in the world. She's playing terrific tennis and has just won back-to-back titles on different surfaces and in different parts of the world.

"It won't be an easy match. It will be interesting for me to challenge her."

schorsch
Oct 10th, 2008, 05:25 PM
Dont fall for it JJ, its a tactic :bolt:

:lol:

Brena
Oct 10th, 2008, 06:43 PM
Dont fall for it JJ, its a tactic :bolt:

:lol:

:lol:
Demented: ''Jelena, you're awesome!''
JJ: ''I know, but... it's nice of you to remind me...Wait, I'll go get my mirror, you play on your own for a couple of points''... and that's how Demented held her serves...

Arina's_fan
Oct 11th, 2008, 08:42 AM
Today's evening I will post interview after QF and SF matches :)

~Kiera~
Oct 11th, 2008, 01:17 PM
http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/tennis/7665179.stm

Jankovic into Kremlin Cup final

World number one Jelena Jankovic recovered from being a set down to beat defending champion Elena Dementieva and reach the Kremlin Cup final.

After a dreadful opening set, the 23-year-old fought back, winning 12 of the next 13 games to carve out a 0-6 6-1 6-0 win in one hour 45 minutes.

Jankovic will now face Russian Vera Zvonareva, who saw off compatriot Dinara Safina 6-2 7-6 (7-5).

After wins in China and Germany, the Serb is chasing a third straight title.

"I wasn't playing bad in the first set, I was playing my game," Jankovic said. "But Elena had answers for all of my shots.

"I tried to find an opportunity and finally I caught the initiative. I'm happy I was able to win this match as we both played very good tennis."

Zvonareva took command of the second semi-final, breaking Safina twice to wrap up the first set inside half an hour.

Safina forced the tie-break in the second set but the world number nine clinched it to reach the final for the first time.

"I tried to perform my best tennis today," Zvonareva said. "It was my first ever Kremlin Cup semi-final and I wasn't under pressure - I really enjoyed playing here."

In the men's semi-finals, seventh seed Marat Safin takes on German Mischa Zverev and unseeded Russian Igor Kunitsyn faces Frenchman Fabrice Santoro.

Tashi
Oct 11th, 2008, 01:41 PM
Nice words from Demented.:hug:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/sport/feedarticle/7853445

Jankovic to meet Zvonareva in Kremlin Cup final

MOSCOW, Oct 11 (Reuters) - World number one Jelena Jankovic overcame a dreadful start to power past holder Elena Dementieva 0-6 6-1 6-0 in the Kremlin Cup semi-finals on Saturday.
The Russian third seed blew Jankovic off the court in the first set but the Serb returned the favour by taking 12 of the last 13 games to clinch the see-saw encounter that lasted one hour 45 minutes.

The top seed will face Vera Zvonareva in Sunday's final after the Russian upset second-seeded compatriot Dinara Safina 6-2 7-6 in the second semi-final.
Former world number one Marat Safin, Dinara's older brother, will represent the Safin family in the men's final on Sunday after his semi-final opponent, 98th-ranked German Mischa Zverev withdrew with illness, the ATP said.

Unseeded Russian Igor Kunitsyn takes on Frenchman Fabrice Santoro in the second men's semi later on Saturday.

Jankovic, who also beat Dementieva in the U.S. Open semi-finals last month, said: "I didn't play bad in the first set but Elena was just too good. "But I tried to stay positive and wanted to take the initiative from her and dictate the points. "I must say I'm a bit tired physically as I've played a lot recently but mentally I'm fresh and tomorrow I'll try to win my third title in a row," added the in-form Jankovic, who won titles in Stuttgart and Beijing in the past two weeks.

Dementieva gave credit to her opponent. "Her defensive game is just phenomenal," the Olympic champion told a news conference. "No matter what shot you hit, she is able to get to it and hits everything back at you. It seems like she can cover not only a tennis court but a whole soccer field. "Well, she is number one and she played like number one."
(Editing by Pritha Sarkar)

дalex
Oct 11th, 2008, 01:49 PM
Lena :hug:
Who's the Russian that doesn't think JJ should be #1? Not Lena nor Dina and I'm sure it's not Vera either. Chakky, Kuzy, Masha?

~Kiera~
Oct 11th, 2008, 01:52 PM
I'm guessing it's Sveta, since she's already said something similar before.

http://www.skysports.com/story/0,19528,12110_4299659,00.html

Jankovic rolls on to final
Top seed beats defending champ while Zvonareva downs Safina
By Elliot Ball Last updated: 11th October 2008

Jankovic was outplayed by Dementieva in the opening set, but the top-seeded Serbian fought back in style as she recorded a 0-6 6-1 6-0 victory over her Russian opponent.

Jankovic, who stretched her winning run to 11 matches after ousting the third seed in 77 minutes, is chasing her third title in a row.

Any thoughts of being crowned Moscow champion seemed unlikely though after the 23-year-old failed to win a point on her opponents serve in the first set while winning just five of 20 service points.

But Jankovic quickly responded, claiming six of 11 break points over the next two sets to earn the victory and advance to her sixth final of the season.

The win was Jankovic's sixth in nine career meetings against Olympic gold medallist Dementieva, who had been hoping to make her fourth appearance in the final of her hometown event.

Response

Jankovic, who took the top ranking from Serena Williams on Monday, admitted the going was tough in the opening set.

"Elena was better than me in the first set," she said.

"She really had an answer for all my shots, she was always on the ball. I just couldn't do anything - she was too good."

But the Serb felt it was the other way around in the second set: "I was thinking, what I need to do is to be better than her.

"I wanted to dominate, to be aggressive and try to win the points. I really put a lot of pressure on her to take the initiative from the first stroke."

Despite performing so impressively in the first set, Dementieva confessed she took her foot off the gas, which eventually cost her the match.

"I have a feeling that I really didn't push a lot in the second and the third sets," Dementieva said.

"And I didn't finish points at the net, which was very successful in the beginning of the match."

The Russian did pay respect to her opponent, insisting the Serb has one of the best court coverage's on the tour.

"She (Jankovic) has a great defensive game and it's almost impossible to hit a good shot from the baseline because she can cover the whole court."

Finalist

The world No. 1 will now square off against seventh seed Vera Zvonareva, who beat second seed Dinara Safina 6-2 7-6 (5) in their all-Russian encounter.

Zvonareva came through in straight sets to make her sixth final of the year, beating Safina for the third time this season and makes her first final on her home soil.

Safina's older brother and formerworld number one Marat Safin will represent the Safin family in the men's final on Sunday after his semi-final opponent, 98th-ranked German Mischa Zverev withdrew with illness, the ATP said.

ms_nut
Oct 11th, 2008, 03:06 PM
:rolleyes: Sveta's such a B*tch sometimes.Now that she's not only losing in finals but also to the very first player capable of beating her, she should instead focus on issues like " Do i deserve to be Top 10"
:sad: Poor thing, she plays more tournaments that JJ and is stuck at #7 or something...:kiss:

schorsch
Oct 11th, 2008, 04:18 PM
Lena :hug:
Who's the Russian that doesn't think JJ should be #1? Not Lena nor Dina and I'm sure it's not Vera either. Chakky, Kuzy, Masha?

my guess would be chakve.

redsonja
Oct 11th, 2008, 04:20 PM
Well, we know Chakky's father doesn't think she should be #1. :p

Brena
Oct 11th, 2008, 04:55 PM
my guess would be chakve.

Probably Chaky - Masha probably doesn't care, I can't imagine Sveta saying bad things about other players behind their back, and Chaky's still traumatised so she can't think clearly. :p

Piska
Oct 11th, 2008, 06:06 PM
Lena :hug:
Who's the Russian that doesn't think JJ should be #1? Not Lena nor Dina and I'm sure it's not Vera either. Chakky, Kuzy, Masha?

no, no...Vera, Dementieva, Nadia, Sveta and others, except Dushevina off course, said only nice words or nothing about JJs #1.
And i didnt read anything about Sharapova during this Kremlin Cup.
Other russian "specialist" said, that JJ doesnt deserve her spot etc...like Sobkin (Misha Youznijs coach), Chakys father and others (sure you didnt hear their names ever :lol:)

~Kiera~
Oct 11th, 2008, 06:23 PM
Probably Chaky - Masha probably doesn't care, I can't imagine Sveta saying bad things about other players behind their back, and Chaky's still traumatised so she can't think clearly. :p

No, Sveta says it straight to the Russian press :lol:

She whined to them before about Jelena saying she was only #1 because she plays so many tournaments and she always complains about injuries when she loses.

Piska
Oct 11th, 2008, 06:28 PM
No, Sveta says it straight to the Russian press :lol:

She whined to them before about Jelena saying she was only #1 because she plays so many tournaments and she always complains about injuries when she loses.
aha, also Sveta says, she doesnt like JJs and Anas play at the net :lol:

~Kiera~
Oct 11th, 2008, 06:35 PM
aha, also Sveta says, she doesnt like JJs and Anas play at the net :lol:

Sveta doesn't seem to like much of anything :lol:

Tashi
Oct 11th, 2008, 06:54 PM
Sveta, you know I love ya and you're still my hero for "stealing a smooch" from David buuuut....jealous much?:o

дalex
Oct 11th, 2008, 07:13 PM
Sveta doesn't seem to like much of anything :lol:

:rolls:

Sveta is love. :inlove:

schorsch
Oct 11th, 2008, 08:12 PM
$veta should steal Dinaras coach :p

limedrops
Oct 11th, 2008, 08:12 PM
I love Lens's comment about how she could cover a soccer field, especially since Lena is good at covering courts herself.

redsonja
Oct 11th, 2008, 08:22 PM
$veta should steal Dinaras coach :p
:eek: That is like the cruelest idea I have ever heard. Poor Dina.

That would be a public meltdown the likes of which has not recently been seen outside of the Dow Jones index. :p

louisa.
Oct 11th, 2008, 09:54 PM
awhh Elena! :hug:
i almost feel bad now. almost :p
better luck next time hey?
:bounce: Finals time! 3 in a row JJ, come on!

Arina's_fan
Oct 11th, 2008, 09:56 PM
Jelena's interview after SF in Kremlin Cup 2008 (http://www.kk.rodionova.net/audio/jj_interview_after_sf_eng.MP3)

Jelena's interview after QF in Kremlin Cup 2008 (http://www.kk.rodionova.net/audio/jj_interview_after_gf_eng.MP3)

Kampi
Oct 12th, 2008, 05:41 AM
Thanks a lot Arina's fan:wavey::D

~Kiera~
Oct 12th, 2008, 12:05 PM
http://afp.google.com/article/ALeqM5jJcLlktY1ShJwAu_1Q4sKZgrJPJA

World number one Jankovic wins Kremlin tennis Cup
31 minutes ago

MOSCOW (AFP) — World number one Jelena Jankovic of Serbia beat Russian Vera Zvonareva in the final to win the women's draw of the 2.4 million dollar Kremlin Cup on Sunday.

Jankovic won 6-2, 6-4 in one hour 21 minutes to record a fourth victory in five head-to-heads with Zvonareva this season and clinch her fourth crown this year.

"I feel really emotional winning my third event in a row here," Jankovic said. "I feel great as the world's number one and really enjoy it.

"It was very tough to win the final as Vera never gives up. She forced me to play my best tennis to win today. I had a lot of fun this week and probably will come back here next year to defend my title."

The 23-year-old Serbian, who was playing her her sixth final of the season, started the match with an immediate break for a comfortable 2-0 lead. Jankovic then broke again to take the opening set in 33 minutes.

In the second set Jankovic produced two more breaks but Zvonareva, ranked ninth in the world, picked up steam and broke back to level on both occasions.

But in the ninth game Jankovic managed to make the deciding break, going on to wrap up the match and take the title.

Jankovic received a silver trophy and a 196,900-dollar prize check, while runner-up Zvonareva pocketed 105,800 dollars.

Kampi
Oct 12th, 2008, 12:13 PM
Thank you Sarah:wavey::kiss:

becky.really
Oct 12th, 2008, 12:24 PM
196,900-dollar prize check

not bad for a weeks work!

Tashi
Oct 12th, 2008, 01:56 PM
http://www.skysports.com/story/0,19528,12110_4303690,00.html


Jelena Jankovic won the Kremlin Cup after beating Vera Zvonareva 6-2 6-4 in Sunday's final in Moscow.

The world number one clinched her third title in a row after a dominating performance against the seventh seed.

Zvonareva was competing in her first final in front of a home crowd, but the Russian was unable to live with the top seed's powerful baseline hitting.

Jankovic, who came into Moscow winning back-to-back titles at the China Open and the Porsche Grand Prix in Germany, was thrilled to win her fourth tournament of the season.

Emotional

"I feel really emotional winning my third event in a row here," Jankovic said.

"It was very tough to win the final as Vera never gives up. She forced me to play my best tennis to win today."

Jankovic, who beat Zvonareva in her two previous events, said she knew she had to earn every point.

"I was really expecting a tough match," she said.

"I was really focused from the start of the match. I went out there aggressive and really played my game and I was really going after the shots.

"Especially the first set I played quite well. I was dominating. But then the second set my level of tennis went down a little bit and I let her come back into the match.

"At the end of the second set I focused a little bit and changed the match in my favour."

The 23-year-old Serbian, who was playing her sixth final of the season, came out of the blocks sharp, gaining an immediate break for a comfortable 2-0 lead. Jankovic then broke again to take the opening set in 33 minutes.

In the second set she produced two more breaks but Zvonareva, ranked ninth in the world, picked up steam and broke back to level on both occasions.

Deciding break

But in the ninth game Jankovic managed to make the deciding break, going on to wrap up the match and take the title.

Jankovic, who received a silver trophy and a 196,900-dollar prize check, had a difficult start to her season with numerous injuries early on but post US Open she has been the woman to beat.

"I'm quite close to finishing the year as the No. 1 player in the world, so it's really a huge achievement for me," she said.

"I feel great as the world's number one and really enjoy it."

terjw
Oct 12th, 2008, 02:14 PM
"It was very tough to win the final as Vera never gives up. She forced me to play my best tennis to win today. I had a lot of fun this week and probably will come back here next year to defend my title."



Interesting she says probably.

~Kiera~
Oct 12th, 2008, 02:45 PM
Russian unfortunately seems to translate much better than Chinese :sad:

http://kremlincup.rambler.ru/press_conferences.html?id=98796

Jelena Jankovic: "Even I do not believe in it, how well I play now"

Way out in the finale of "Kremlin Cup" tennisistka Serb Jelena Jankovic to gain leadership in the world ranking by the end of the season. But that first racket did not stop the world and won the Moscow tournament, a victory which was the fourth for it this year. The final "Kremlin Cup" Jankovic pick off rossiyanku Vera Zvonareva - 6:2, 6:4.

- Elena, with whom the Russian tennis players you have been the hardest to play in this tournament?

- You can not compare these players. Each has its own style and plays well. Each of them pushed me to show my best tennis. But I persisted fight, and I was able to win this tournament.

- What you could oppose itself if it were Vera Zvonareva at the scene?

- I can not answer that question because I play against my rival, but I'm not against himself. And I'm not going to reveal any secrets, how to play against me.

- How do you set to today's game?

- I knew that today would be a difficult match, and that Vera hard player and makes few mistakes. We played with it and in Stuttgart and Pikine, and I knew what to prepare. I am therefore very first ball played very focused, aggressive and extremely focused. And in the first web based me do it, and the second, I podsela at the beginning, and Vera entered the game. But then again, I met and was able to complete the match in their favor.

- What is your attitude to the new schedule WTA, which has criticized some athletes?

- I do not know. I have not looked at the calendar, did not speak nor his coach nor with his team. Therefore, I can not give any comments on this matter. I still find that in 2008, and when 2009 comes, and then talk about it.

- Vyigrav third tournament in succession, to the extent you fulfill the goals of the season?

- I actually found a very good result, winning three tournaments in succession. I can say that every time I go on court, then tried to show my best tennis. I was close to complete the year on the first line of world rankings. I think this is a huge achievement and very proud of them. Great work, which was carried out, is bearing fruit.

- How will you prepare for a tournament in Doha?

- Do I have an obligation to Doha to play the tournament in Zurich, after which I will take a two-week break. I hope that this is enough to not come to the final tournament in Doha tired.

- Your rival say that you are invincible.How you so much and why are so strong Serbian tennis school?

- Actually, there is still a great many components in my game, which I need to work with my coach. I must improve and filing, and tactics, and much, much more. I do not know why rival say that I am invincible. Maybe because when I am healthy and I have no injuries, they are really difficult to play with me. Earlier this year I have been very difficult, and because of the injury, I could not play at full strength. But after the Olympics things went up the hill. I became to work hard, to strive to train. And do not even believe in it, how well I play tennis now.

- Tell you Nowak Dzhokovichu that he was not in vain came to Moscow?

- I do not know about Dzhokovicha. It is his decision to come to Moscow or not.

- You have said that Moscow's courts are not fast enough. Maybe this is what played a role in your victory?

- I would have preferred to have the same coverage as in Stuttgart, where it was much faster. When you play right through, it is expected that the ball fly away. And here he comes back to you. And so it was difficult for me to play the first few quarters. And it is in the finals I felt better. I was not tired, adjusted to Corti and well played.

Dmitry Sachkov

schorsch
Oct 12th, 2008, 02:56 PM
http://vision.rambler.ru/users/genaval/1/53/ video jj press conference

schorsch
Oct 12th, 2008, 03:16 PM
she says she MUST play zürich :weirdo:

дalex
Oct 12th, 2008, 04:06 PM
In Jelena's world when she commits to a tournament then she must play it. :shrug:
At least you'll get to watch her, Schorsch...And who knows, maybe she'll win another title! :eek:
It's so strange being a fan of a player that wins all the time. Feels good but strange.

http://eurosport.yahoo.com/12102008/58/wta-tour-jankovic-claims-third-straight-title.html


World number one Jelena Jankovic overpowered Vera Zvonareva 6-2 6-4 in the Kremlin Cup final to win her third title in a row.

Later, unheralded Igor Kunitsyn upset former world number one Marat Safin 7-6 6-7 6-3 in an all-Russian men's final to clinch his maiden title.

Jankovic, making her debut in Moscow, broke the Russian twice to take the first set in just over half an hour.

The in-form Serbian, who also beat Zvonareva on her way to winning titles in Stuttgart and Beijing in the past two weeks, led 4-2 in the second but allowed the seventh seed to break back to level at 4-4.

The top seed, however, earned another break in the ninth game before going on to clinch victory after 81 minutes when Zvonareva overhit her forehand on matchpoint.

"I've played her twice in the last two weeks so I really knew what to expect and was focused right from the start," said Jankovic.

"I dominated in the first set but in the second my concentration slipped a little bit but I was able to get myself together in the end."

The 23-year-old has been playing almost non-stop in the last couple of months and must keep going for another week before taking a well-deserved rest.

"I've worked really hard in the last three weeks, winning three titles in a row. It's not easy," she said.

"But I still have my commitments to play next week in Zurich. Then, I'll take a two-week rest before playing (next month's season-ending WTA Championships) in Doha.

"I've had a tough season, overcoming a number of injuries but I'm quite close to finishing the year ranked number one and I'm really proud of it," she added.

Zvonareva, who reached her first Kremlin Cup final on her eighth appearance in Moscow, said she could do little to stop Jankovic.

"It seems she had an answer for everything I tried," the 24-year-old Muscovite said.

"In the first set, she didn't allow me to play my game and I was lost on the court. And after winning the first set she was relaxed and just went for her shots."

Kunitsyn, the world number 71, broke in the sixth game of the final set to take a 4-2 lead. The 27-year-old, playing in his first ATP final, held his nerve and sealed victory by firing his seventh ace past Safin on his first matchpoint.

Safin, seeded seventh and bidding to claim his first title in almost four years, reached the final without hitting a ball when his semi-final opponent, German Mischa Zverev, withdrew with illness on Saturday.

The big Russian has not tasted success since winning the Australian Open in January, 2005.

Katie.
Oct 12th, 2008, 04:47 PM
Russian unfortunately seems to translate much better than Chinese :sad:
:lol: It's a little disappointing reading something that sounds normal!

She sounds like she will probably be off to Zurich then.

Arina's_fan
Oct 12th, 2008, 09:02 PM
Interview after Final by JJ (http://www.kk.rodionova.net/audio/jj_interview_after_final_eng.MP3)

дalex
Oct 13th, 2008, 04:08 PM
http://www.mtsmondo.com/sport/vesti/text.php?vest=112476

Jelena Jankovic: I can do even better

World No.1, Jelena Jankovic, has been on a 12 matches winning streak for the last three weeks, and with those victories she completed a hat-trick of titles - Beijing, Stuttgart and Moscow.

That is a rare accomplishment in women's tennis. Before JJ, the last player to do so was Nicole Vaidisova in 2005, but she did it in smaller tournaments - Seoul, Tokyo and Bangkok.

"This is a phenomenal achievement and I'm very proud of myself for doing this. I've worked very hard, practiced a lot and all my hard work is starting to pay off. I'm playing better and better with each tournament, I'm full of confidence, I'm constantly improving in every way possible and I think it shows on the court. In the first half of the season I had a lot of health problems, had a lot of injuries and I just couldn't be the player I wanted to be. After the Olympic Games that period is finally over. Since then I didn't have any injuries that could have prevented me to play just like I wanted. I'm healthy now and the results are evident", says Jelena.

After the win over Zvonareva in the final of Moscow she cried...

"It was emotional, we all cried. I remembered the times when nothing was going my way, when I was injured and couldn't play like I wanted. Tears started pouring down my face, tears of joy. It was my happiest on-court moment that I've been waiting for so long."

Is this the start of Jelena's domination on WTA tour?

"I want to dominate, but I'm still very far from that. I still have to work on many segments of my game and elevate it. I only need to be healthy, so I can keep working and improving and then I can reach that goal. I'm happy to be #1, that's a big achievement for Serbian tennis. I'm very motivated to achieve even better results. I want to continue in this rhythm, want to win Grand Slams and big titles and I'm ready for all the challenges ahead of me."

Next stop - Zurich...

"I'm exhausted, I've played 4 tourneys in just as many weeks, but I'm under contract for tournament in Zurich, so that's why I have to play there. After Zurich I have a short break and then preparations for the Championships in Doha."

Serbian player will go into Championships ranked #1 in the world and as #1 in the Race for season 2008.

"I want to end this season in best possible way, by winning the Championships. That would be my crowning achievement for this season."

iheartjelenaj
Oct 13th, 2008, 08:42 PM
^^ Ya just gotta luv 'er! :hug:
She knows she's good, but still keeps humble (maybe b/c Henin isn't on the tour anymore and she still hasn't won a G.S). but ppl have gotta give JJ props now. 3 in a row. hasn't been done since '05. Now that's sayin' somethin'.
_________________________________________________

I saw this on the SE WTA website:
http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/1/newsroom/stories/?ContentID=2704

October 13, 2008

Jankovic in Pole Position to End Year as No.1

ST PETERSBURG, FL - The No.1 ranking has changed hands several times since the May retirement of Justine Henin, as several players produced outstanding results on the Sony Ericsson WTA Tour. But the contest has crystallized in recent weeks, and it now appears Jelena Jankovic, who entered her third career week at the very top on October 13, has built enough of a lead on her rivals to all but guarantee she will ride out the year as No.1 - regardless of results to come.

The projection is based on a couple of assumptions, however. Chief among them is that Dinara Safina - who rose to a career high ranking of No.2 on October 13 after reaching the semifinals of the Kremlin Cup - doesn’t enter Tour events at Luxembourg, Linz or Québec City in the next couple of weeks. The 22-year-old Russian hasn’t formally signed up for any of these tournaments, and would need to be granted a wildcard to compete.

US Open champion Serena Williams is also mathematically in with a chance of snatching the No.1 spot at the finish line. But the American, who slipped to No.3 this week, is recuperating from an ankle injury sustained at Stuttgart. Like Safina, she is not expected to play before the Sony Ericsson Championships at Doha.

Jankovic is helped by the fact she didn’t win a match at the season-ending Championships in Madrid last year, so she isn’t defending big points. This year, of course, she has been tremendously consistent, and on Sunday became the first player since Nicole Vaidisova in 2005 to win three tournaments in three consecutive weeks, burnishing her Tier II triumphs at Beijing and Stuttgart with Tier I glory at Moscow. Jankovic also reached her first Grand Slam final at Flushing Meadows, falling to Serena, and earlier in the year defended her title at Rome.

In terms of her standing on the league table of all-time No.1s, Jankovic has already passed Evonne Goolagong, who made it to No.1 on April 26, 1976 and was there for two weeks. All things being equal, by the end of calendar 2008 Jankovic will have been No.1 for a total of 14 weeks, leapfrogging Venus Williams (11 weeks), Ana Ivanovic (12 weeks) and Arantxa Sánchez-Vicario (12 weeks).

Next in Jankovic’s sights after that will be Maria Sharapova and Jennifer Capriati, who both sit on 17 weeks. To surpass them, Jankovic will need to do well enough during the summer swing Down Under to still be No.1 at the end of the Australian Open. Assuming she manages that, the Serb will be breathing down the necks of Kim Clijsters (19 weeks) and Tracy Austin (21 weeks). Beyond that, the rungs on the ladder begin to spread out, with Amélie Mauresmo next at 39 weeks.

I like the fact that they're already projecting future results and when/if JJ is bound to surpass former No.1's, ha.

~Kiera~
Oct 13th, 2008, 09:12 PM
New blog

Zurich

My dear fans,

Here I am with another title under my belt, another great week of tennis which passed just like a fairytale and with a biggest smile on my face which is not going off of my face. I am so happy and proud of myself at this moment. You have seen yesterday what has happened after the match against Zvonareva. Tears from happiness were going down my face and it was the best feeling, the moment I waited for a while. My whole team was emotional, we all cried. I remembered the days when I was not doing well, when I was injured and struggled a lot. I worked so hard and all this hard work is starting to pay off. I want to continue to progress, to keep working to improve some of the segments which will bring my game to the next level.

I am writing you from Zurich (and at the moment I eating my favorite chocolate bar in the world mmm!) I arrived here early this morning and I am having a day off of tennis. I am exhausted which is normal because I have played 4 tournaments in a row and I have to play this tournament because it's my commitment tournament. I will try my best to do well here and than I will have 2 weeks off to prepare and get ready for the Sony Ericsson Championships in Doha.

I will tell you what has happened after the ceremony, where besides the ?plate?,(trophy) I also received a watch with brilliants. As soon I finished all that formal stuff, press conference etc, I went to the hairdresser and got a trim as well as I changed my bangs. I had them on the side for a while and now they are again across my forehead as you could see in the picture. I like changing my hair style as well as taking care of my hair and getting manicures and pedicures are my favorite things to do after I finish a tournament. With that nice hair style I went to celebrate with my team.

I was so happy because my parents were here with me in Moscow, I appreciate so much their support. We celebrated my victory in one exclusive restaurant and before that a limousine came to pick us up and brought us to the red square which is so beautiful and impressive. We really enjoyed the short walk in the heart of Moscow and than we went to dinner. I received 100 red roses which smelled so nice from one of my friends. We all had so much fun, laughed a lot and enjoyed ourselves! As you all know as a professional athlete there is not much time for celebration because you have to get ready for the upcoming challenges?

Here in Zurich I will try to continue my winning streakand I would also like to thank all of you great support!!! It really means a lot to me!

Big hug and kiss,
JJ

Optima
Oct 13th, 2008, 09:21 PM
I freaking love her :hearts:

Cat123
Oct 13th, 2008, 09:23 PM
100 red roses from a 'friend' hmmm? ;) :lol:

Wayn77
Oct 13th, 2008, 09:27 PM
100 red roses from a 'friend' hmmm? ;) :lol:

Marat Safin up to his old tricks again? ;)

On a more serious note ....

I freakin love her to bits as well :hearts:

redsonja
Oct 13th, 2008, 09:34 PM
I love how she's clearly writing it on no sleep at all, eating a huge chocolate bar on her bed at like 10 in the morning. :lol:

Cat123
Oct 13th, 2008, 09:42 PM
Sweetie, if you absolutely have to play this tournament (I believe you, you do) any sane player would not have played 4 more before hand. :rolleyes: Just a tip for the future... Love you too! :hug:

JadeFox
Oct 13th, 2008, 09:45 PM
Sweetie, if you absolutely have to play this tournament (I believe you, you do) any sane player would not have played 4 more before hand. :rolleyes: Just a tip for the future... Love you too! :hug:

Whoever said that she was sane?;):lol:

However, if being crazy mean she's winning, I say bring on the crazy!:drool::bounce:

Cat123
Oct 13th, 2008, 09:54 PM
I certainly didn't! :lol: The reason that no other player has ever won 3 tier I/II tournaments in a row, is because anyone else capable of that feat have the common sense not to try ;)

oleada
Oct 13th, 2008, 10:13 PM
100 roses from a "friend"? :hehehe:
I love her :hearts:

дalex
Oct 14th, 2008, 08:43 AM
:hearts:

Serbian blog always has extra hilarity, like:

In the land of Federer, best watches and chocolates...

For the end, using the sports terminology...LET'S GOOOOO!!! (in Serbian..."IDEMOOOOO!!!")

:lol:

-NAJ-
Oct 14th, 2008, 09:20 AM
Will Jelena get "Tour ACES Award" in Doha?

Last year she did.

I can't find points for that. Hmm

-NAJ-
Oct 14th, 2008, 09:22 AM
In the land of Federer, best watches and chocolates...

:lol:

Brena
Oct 14th, 2008, 03:00 PM
I'm going through a stack of Serbian dailies, reading sports pages and relishing JJ's success. :drool: Most of them are simply quoting JJ's latest blog entry and the post match interviews, but I've found some things I haven't read before (and I'm not really sure when JJ said them):
In ''Kurir'' (this is a really trashy one, as the Serbian posters already know :lol:) JJ's cited as responding to the reporters' question about who her best friend on the WTA tour is with ''Nole'' :lol: (she says they hang out together whenever they meet and watch each others matches if they have time and so on). There's also JJ's reaction to Dushevina's (and Zvonareva's (!) - ''Jankovic is Jankovic, she'll never change, you just have to accept it's the way she is'') accusations about her faking the injury - JJ's very upset about that, she says her back hurt terribly and can't understand how someone might think she's lying.
And my absolutely favourite Anatard/JJ-hater G.A. (thet's how he signs his articles) from the ''Politika'' daily writes (commenting on JJ's picture with Guus H. from Moscow) that he hopes Guus told JJ how the Russian football team ended up at the Euro championship because they didn't save any strength for the last round matches (!!!) And he concludes that it would be too much to hope that JJ could win YEC as well.
BTW, when JJ won Stuttgart he didn't even write an article, they just published a short AP report :rolls:
It's unbelievable, I'm thinking about writing them an e-mail.

дalex
Oct 14th, 2008, 03:14 PM
I thought that G.A.'s Latest article (http://www.politika.rs/rubrike/Sport/Tenis/Jankoviceva-najbolja-i-u-Moskvi.sr.html) wasn't anti-JJ at all. Where did you find that Guus H. comment?

So, Jelena and Nole are gurlfriends...:worship: (though I honestly doubt in everything written in Kurir!)

Piska
Oct 14th, 2008, 03:30 PM
There's also JJ's reaction to Dushevina's (and Zvonareva's (!) - ''Jankovic is Jankovic, she'll never change, you just have to accept it's the way she is'') accusations about her faking the injury - JJ's very upset about that, she says her back hurt terribly and can't understand how someone might think she's lying.

Thanks Zoja fot your translation )

This is Zvonarevas quote, but she said it with nice smile on her face.
Before the final she was asked many-many times about JJs medical timeouts and acts on court :help: I think she was tired with this kind of questions and answered so :confused:

Brena
Oct 14th, 2008, 03:32 PM
I thought that G.A.'s Latest article (http://www.politika.rs/rubrike/Sport/Tenis/Jankoviceva-najbolja-i-u-Moskvi.sr.html) wasn't anti-JJ at all. Where did you find that Guus H. comment?

It's in today's printed edition, I can't find it on the site either. That one is from yesterday's papers, so I guess this one might appear online tomorrow. It's actually a very short, pointless and malicious (oooh, I love when he suffers :devil:) comment accompanying the pic.

So, Jelena and Nole are gurlfriends...:worship: (though I honestly doubt in everything written in Kurir!)

:lol: This was on their sports page, and it's not really anything sensational, so I thought it's probably not fabricated. :shrug:

Brena
Oct 14th, 2008, 03:36 PM
Thanks Zoja fot your translation )

This is Zvonarevas quote, but she said it with nice smile on her face.
Before the final she was asked many-many times about JJs medical timeouts and acts on court :help: I think she was tired with this kind of questions and answered so :confused:

Hey, thanks for the explanation! It doesn't sound mean to me either, probably our press wanted to create some drama :lol: so they took Vera's comment out of the context.

~Kiera~
Oct 14th, 2008, 03:43 PM
http://www.iht.com/articles/ap/2008/10/14/sports/TEN-Zurich-Open-Jankovic.php

Jankovic putting fear into opponents as the No. 1
The Associated Press
Published: October 14, 2008

ZURICH, Switzerland: Jelena Jankovic is enjoying the respect she gets as the top-ranked player in women's tennis.

The 23-year-old Serb, who arrived in Switzerland on Tuesday looking for her fourth straight WTA title at the Zurich Open, is the topic of conversation for many of her rivals on tour.

"Maybe I have more intimidation," Jankovic said. "Because some of the players when I played in Moscow, they say it's impossible to beat her."

The performance that has others doubting themselves is her Kremlin Cup semifinal comeback Saturday against fifth-ranked Elena Dementieva. After losing the first set 6-0, Jankovic bounced back to take the next two sets 6-1, 6-0.

"One quality that I have is that I don't give up," Jankovic said. "You believe in yourself and feel that you can do anything because this is the confidence that you have from winning a lot of matches."

Jankovic has now won 12 matches in a row, collecting titles in Beijing, Stuttgart, Germany, and Moscow.

She admits the globe-trotting is tiring, but returning to the top ranking last week — after a week as No. 1 in August — can be inspirational.

"With a good, positive mind and attitude, I feel that I can do anything on the court, the feeling I have in this moment," said Jankovic, who has been training even harder since recovering from a knee injury after Wimbledon in July.

"I wasn't able to practice for three weeks and I got completely out of shape. I lost the muscle so quickly," Jankovic said. "That is my body type so I have to work very hard in the gym to keep my body strong."

While her performance level intimidates opponents, Jankovic believes her 1.77-meter (5-foot-9 1/2) physique does not.

"The girls in the top 10 are all very tall, very strong, and I am one of the smallest and weakest ones," she said. "So I have to work harder than them to be up there."

Jankovic has long had a reputation for hard work. Her 72 wins in singles was a WTA Tour-best in 2007, and she has a 63-16 record heading into the Zurich Open, an indoor hard court event.

A year ago, she was exhausted by the time of the season-ending WTA Championships in Madrid, Spain. Not this time.

"I feel ready to finish the year and I feel very motivated," said Jankovic, who is almost certain to end 2008 as No. 1.

This year's WTA Championships, in Doha, Qatar, from Nov. 4-9, is Jankovic's next competitive stop after Switzerland.

"I would love to win," she said. "That would really be the crown."

Whether Venus Williams joins Jankovic among the elite eight players in Doha will depend on her results this week. The 28-year-old American is ninth in the standings after Vera Zvonareva reached the final in Moscow last week, losing to Jankovic in straight sets.

The Russian stepped up the pressure on Williams by securing a late wild card entry to the Zurich tournament.

"I am not going to be entering any extra tournaments," Williams said. "If someone can enter more tournaments and play better than me then I'm going to wish them a lot of luck.

"If I play well enough to earn my place then I'll deserve to be there. You know, I'll probably get in."

Williams has a first-round bye and opens against Alona Bondarenko of Ukraine. Jankovic begins Thursday against either Nadia Petrova of Russia or Flavia Pennetta of Italy.

Brena
Oct 14th, 2008, 03:55 PM
The girls in the top 10 are all very tall, very strong, and I am one of the smallest and weakest ones,"

:awww: Awww! Poor tiny little Jeca. :lol:

redsonja
Oct 14th, 2008, 04:20 PM
:awww: Awww! Poor tiny little Jeca. :lol:

:awww:

You just need higher heels, honey! See if you can get some that are like 5 inches so you can be as tall as Ana and Dinara. :lol:

schorsch
Oct 14th, 2008, 09:15 PM
from blick paper ... sry i was too lazy to translate :lol:

blick: Jelena Jankovic, you must respond to your odyssey so as to feel exhausted. Or not?

Jelena Jankovic: This one can say. I'm in Moscow at 4.30 clock up, have my stuff packed, I drove to the airport, flown to Zurich, check back to the hotel. And now I got a little sleep gegönnt.


You have within three weeks in Beijing, Moscow and Stuttgart twelve games and won the following three tournaments. The long trips are worth it.

It is a madness, three pieces to win. Above all, because you across time zones and traveled again must adjust. I lift my level to level.


With the successes you are likely to silence their critics who have said you were a random-number-1.

If you only win a tournament and then the number 1 is perhaps a coincidence. But who wins three pieces, so that proves something. That is my opinion. I'm quite sure at the moment the best. I have the racquet speak for themselves. (laughs)


They travel throughout the year across the world. Are you also have woken up and did not know where you are?

But surely. The last week has me a girlfriend in the early morning call, and I actually told her: Sorry, I do not know where I am. It is already extremely how much we travel. I have so many miles on my card that I can not even need. Here I hate to fly.


You miss your home in Serbia?

Yes, I would like to be in my own bed to sleep in my house, together with family and friends. When I'm away so long, I will be nostalgic, to begin my home verklären. The other: That's just my job.


Power of luxury that you enjoy on the tour, much easier?

I'd be lying if I would say, a nice cozy room or a suite liked me. A comfortable bed, and I enjoy good food. But I could live without.


Youth find your friends that you are still the same?

They say that I had my feet on the ground and I do not behave like a celebrity. It is important to me. I was raised. I have the same friends and keep the same humor.


Nevertheless, your life for your friends must be surreal.

It is certainly quite something else and sometimes even despite the luxury difficult. You do not always enjoy everything. But if you delight in his tennis and feels successful, gives the money more than anything in the world.


Serbia is blessed with tennis stars. You, Ivanovic, Djokovic. Is it a tough fight to win the favor of the people?

That I am often asked. Even if we are good like we were best friends and so on. I think simple: Serbia can be happy that it has such athletes. And we should respect and we do not see as a competitor. It has space for all of us.


This year they have already played 79 matches. They are probably not in December Active Holidays plan, right?

In no case. I'll go somewhere where nobody knows me where I am nobody to ask autographs or photos. And my phone off, I will. So much is certain.

schorsch
Oct 14th, 2008, 09:17 PM
thats a great word to use though... describing jj's schedule : odyssey

schorsch
Oct 15th, 2008, 02:10 AM
again too lazy to translate. from swiss news agency :

'I'm still the same, only happier'
For the fourth time is Jelena Jankovic in the Zurich Open at the start. But this year is for the Serb everything else: it is the number 1 in the world and currently form the strongest player of the WTA Tour.

On 11 August was the first time Jankovic top in the world rankings. It was - three months after the resignation of Dominatorin Justine Henin - just a brief interlude. Even a week later, the 23-year-old Jankovic supremacy again. And they would have in the past few months back at the forefront of fighting, they would probably be the weakest No. 1 in history.

Now speaks everything that Jankovic year as the number 1 will quit. Dinara Safina and Serena Williams have only theoretical chances, the tournament winner nine times before the end of the season yet detect. The question of whether the world is right now and they really the best player in the world, Jankovic answered without hesitation 'yes: "In August, it was not so. At that time I felt exhausted and anything but strong.

Since then a lot has changed. Within less than two months left Jankovic their modest first season half forgotten. When she reached her first U.S. Open Grand Slam finals and won last as the first player since 2005 (Katerina Srebotnik) three tournaments in a row: "Now I want also in Zurich finally show a good performance. I'm especially physically a lot better on it than last year. " Just three matches they could at the Hallenstadion in the last three seasons to win.
More fitness, more success

What was, but Jankovic is not too meaningful. The Belgrade-born "JJ" looks forward to what comes: "I want to win the Masters, the year as number 1 and then quit my first Grand Slam title here." Is it - as is expected - after the season finale in Doha in early November still at the helm of the world, it would input into an illustrious circle found. Since the introduction of the WTA rankings 1975, only eight different players this season as number 1 quit: Chris Evert (5 times), Martina Navratilova (7), Steffi Graf (8), Monica Seles (2), Martina Hingis (3), Lindsay Davenport (4), Serena Williams (1) and Justine Henin (3).

The opportunity to add to this list grouped allowed to Jankovic with a lot of work. "I have noticed after Wimbledon that I am harder on my physical work must be seen as yet," the alia betrayed by Nick Bollettieri-trained Wahlamerikanerin. "I'm slight as most of my competitors and quickly lose my muscles. Although I like the gym does not, but must be physically strong, in order to play well and prevent injuries."

The only Grand Slam title missing

In the role of the WTA sign Jankovic obviously feels comfortable here. "Just imagine, I'm the best tennis player in the world and there are seven billion people on this planet. But that is why I have not changed. I'm still the same, just a little bit happier. I laugh even more, because everything is still more fun, "says the open-minded Serb, in Zurich as in the past two tournaments, not only by her mother Snezana, but also from her father accompanied Veselin.

In order to complete their luck, missing her but still mainly a Grand Slam title. Therefore they are already looking forward now to next year and the Australian Open in January. "I go in mid-November two weeks into the holidays and store the legs up," said Jankovic. Then, they are in the U.S. for the next season before, so they do not return until the autumn to wait for the right durchzustarten.

By Julien Oberholzer (Si)

дalex
Oct 15th, 2008, 09:04 AM
Thanks Schorsch.

Interesting translations...http://www.buzzjack.com/forums/style_emoticons/default/kink.gif

We have the first one in Serbian in today's Blic.

~Kiera~
Oct 15th, 2008, 11:56 AM
Thanks, schorsch :)

Brena
Oct 15th, 2008, 01:02 PM
Thanks Schorsch.

Interesting translations...http://www.buzzjack.com/forums/style_emoticons/default/kink.gif


oh noes, that smiley! You Pink Princess, you! :lol:
Thank you, Schorschy! :kiss:

We have the first one in Serbian in today's Blic.

Yep, and they also say Ana has been given some kind of ''personality award'' by a German tennis magazine, but the evil neighbours are not gonna hear about it from me :ras:

~Kiera~
Oct 15th, 2008, 01:09 PM
Yep, and they also say Ana has been given some kind of ''personality award'' by a German tennis magazine, but the evil neighbours are not gonna hear about it from me :ras:

They had her picture on the WTA site with the award along with some huge caption about all the other awards she has won this year, including "Women's Tennis Player of the Year 2008".

Shouldn't they have waited until the end of 2008 before giving such awards out? It looks a bit daft now.

schorsch
Oct 15th, 2008, 01:25 PM
well, i was lazy so i used google translate :ras:

that's an award given by the readers of tennismagazin.de i think. uhm, basically there's a serbian working there who is ana pro and rather masha/ jj contra, so thats reflected in their stories. but well. last time i checked a certain someone had no personnality whatsoever :confused:

Sabine Lisicki
Philipp Kohlschreiber
Lindsay Davenport
Ana Ivanovic
Novak Djokovic

those were the nominees chosen by the them to be voted.

Brena
Oct 15th, 2008, 04:36 PM
well, i was lazy so i used google translate :ras:

that's an award given by the readers of tennismagazin.de i think. uhm, basically there's a serbian working there who is ana pro and rather masha/ jj contra, so thats reflected in their stories. but well. last time i checked a certain someone had no personnality whatsoever :confused:

Sabine Lisicki
Philipp Kohlschreiber
Lindsay Davenport
Ana Ivanovic
Novak Djokovic

those were the nominees chosen by the them to be voted.

:rolls: It's always the same story with Serbians - if you want to get anything you have to know/be related to someone who works somewhere. :shrug:

If the main competition was Lindsay, I see why Ana got the award. :p

schorsch
Oct 15th, 2008, 06:33 PM
:haha:

~Kiera~
Oct 15th, 2008, 09:16 PM
http://www.tennis.com/features/general/features.aspx?id=149052

Viewpoint: Fall Fodder - Four Up, Four Down

As the men make their last October visit to Madrid and the women tune up for their season-ending tournament with a swing through Zurich, here’s what’s right—and wrong—in the world of tennis.

Up: Jelena Jankovic

I’ve called Jankovic an undeserving No. 1, simply because she hasn’t won a major title. Well, her charms are wearing me down. Since playing like a champ in a spirited U.S. Open final, the 23-year-old Serb has won three tournaments and 13 of 14 matches, clinching the top ranking for the rest of the year. Injuries and apathy have hurt the women’s game in recent years, but Jankovic plugs away no matter the circumstances (she has played 78 matches so far this season). If she stays healthy, I like her chances of adding a major to her resume in early 2009.

Down: David Nalbandian

Fall is the least important quarter of the tennis season—a perfect time for David Nalbandian, one of the most disappointing players in the game, to dominate. Nalbandian won in Stockholm last weekend and wants more in Madrid this week, where he beat Tomas Berdych in the second round (he’s also the defending champion). Why then, you ask, do I give him a “thumbs down”? Because he won’t stop whining about the Davis Cup final, which will be played in Mar del Plata rather than Cordoba, Nalbandian’s home city and the preferred venue of his fellow players and coach Alberto Mancini. Nalbandian has railed against the Argentine tennis federation and the ITF, suggesting that backroom dealings figured into the choice. He’s also said he might not play the final against Spain.

It’s attitudes like this, of course, that have prevented the wildly talented Argentines from winning the Davis Cup. Spain may have Nadal, but Argentina has better fast court players (Nalbandian and Del Potro) and an imposing record at home (they haven’t lost in Argentina in 10 years, a 13-match streak). Maybe Mar del Plata was the wrong choice. But so what? It’s still in Argentina, on the surface of the team’s choice, in front of home fans excited about a chance to make history. If that’s not enough to make Nalbandian forgo the badmouthing and play hard for his country, then he doesn’t deserve to play.

Up: Marin Cilic

Juan Martin Del Potro has had a more impressive year than Cilic, but which of these 20-year-olds has a brighter future? Cilic, who plays Andy Murray in Madrid tomorrow, could easily move inside the Top 10 next year.

Down: Dinara Safina

Safina has played exceptionally well this year, but I couldn’t understand her recent rant against the WTA’s new calendar. Safina complained that the new calendar would bar top players from too many small events—like the tournament in Moscow. Huh? I thought the gripe for most women on the tour was that they were asked to play too often, that they were too injured to compete at their best. Now Safina and a few of her compatriots say that the new schedule—which offers big increases in prize money—would prevent them from playing enough? I’ve heard some legitimate concerns about the Roadmap, as the WTA calls it, but this isn’t one. If Safina wants to complain about more money for less effort—not a bad deal in a down economy—it just proves she’s related to Marat.

Up: Robby Ginepri

The American beat Nikolay Davydenko today and will face Frenchman Gilles Simon in the third round of the Madrid Masters.

Down: Simone Bolelli

The Italian, who was suspended by his federation for refusing to play Davis Cup, embarrassed himself again this week when he retired against Andy Murray with a sore shoulder but took the court a short time later to play doubles (he and his partner, Andreas Seppi, lost). A spokesman for the ATP told me that the tournament doctor cleared Bolelli to play and asked if he intended to compete hard. I believe Bolelli was healthy enough—in fact, I doubt he was injured at all, just embarrassed by the thrashing Murray was giving him (Murray led 6-0, 2-1 when Bolelli retired). Bolelli, by the way, got into the draw as a lucky loser (and this is the thanks he gives). A new ATP rule is in order: If you retire from a match because of an injury, no doubles allowed on the same day. Your tournament is over.

(For more, see Ubaldo Scanagatta’s website, which has Bolelli coverage in English and Italian.)

Up: Rafael Nadal

The world No. 1 has played more tennis to this point than he has in any previous year on the tour, but he still has the energy to support his home country’s event by playing singles and doubles. Nadal has played 87 singles matches and 16 doubles matches so far this year. He still has Paris, the Masters Cup, and the Davis Cup final to go. Let’s just hope he scales back his schedule next year—we’d all like him to stay healthy.

Down: Future stars

Whither Agnes Szavay and Anna Chakvetadze? Last year, these two were destined for stardom. But Szavay, who hasn’t won consecutive matches since July, has lost three straight and watched her ranking fall to 27 since April, when she reached a career high of 13. Chakvetadze hasn’t played well since a robbery at her home last year, during which masked attackers tied her up and stole hundreds of thousands of dollars in cash and jewelry. The 21-year-old was ranked No. 5 last year; she’s at No. 12 now and falling, having lost six of her last seven matches.

Wayn77
Oct 15th, 2008, 09:35 PM
Up: Jelena Jankovic

I’ve called Jankovic an undeserving No. 1, simply because she hasn’t won a major title. Well, her charms are wearing me down. Since playing like a champ in a spirited U.S. Open final, the 23-year-old Serb has won three tournaments and 13 of 14 matches, clinching the top ranking for the rest of the year. Injuries and apathy have hurt the women’s game in recent years, but Jankovic plugs away no matter the circumstances (she has played 78 matches so far this season). If she stays healthy, I like her chances of adding a major to her resume in early 2009.


Tell me about it.

A woman with apparently unlimited stocks of effortless charm ...

wears us all down .... eventually. :kiss:

дalex
Oct 15th, 2008, 09:35 PM
Unlike some people (:lol:) I'm not too lazy to do translations. Now that I've spent 1.5 hours translating this I really wish I WAS!!! :rolls:

http://www.novosti.rs/code/navigate.php?Id=13&status=jedna&vest=130434&datum=2008-10-15

For me there are no limits!

http://www.novosti.rs/upload/images/2008/oktobar/1510/jelena-jankovic.jpg

Backhand, autographs, forehand, photoshoots, volley, designing, smash, shopping, training, then the charity work. Jelena Jankovic's life is as exciting as five set match between Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal. Always thrilling, filled with beautiful shots on all courts, with many smiles that go with them. Even if, on a rare occasion, the ball goes out.

You have a very dynamic life. How do you manage to make things pleasant and useful at the same time?

- Love for something, good organisation, positive energy, the goals you put in front of yourself - they're all the factors that help you do much work in just one day. Every day in my life is like that - diverse. From early morning until late at night my days are filled with all kinds of activities. The things I manage to do in one day many people cannot do in a week. I always want to give my best on the court, but tennis is not everything in my life. There are other things in life you should do after you're finished with your every day job. It's very important to have a good balance between work and the life outside tennis - which is my greatest love. I like to laugh, get to know different cities and I always enjoy shopping.

Is the idea of you being an actress just a caprice?

- It's definitely not caprice. Besides tennis, acting is something that I also love, something that would be a nice profession for after I'm finished with my tennis career. I already had the chance to try myself as an actor. Reebok did a short movie about me in Hollywood in 2007 and I was acting together with young actress Brittany Snow. The directors say I'm talented and I had movie offers, but tennis is still my main preoccupation. Still, I hope that one day I'll have a chance to try myself on the big screen. I really appreciate the support of our great director Emir Kusturica who also said I was talented and that he'll have a supporting role for me in one of his movies. At the moment the final works are being done on the documentary about my life directed by Tanja Brzakovic, we're hopeful that the Belgrade premiere will be very soon and hopefully people will like it.

How much of actual designing do you really do for Mona?

- That's just a hobby, and I really love designing. I do it in between tournaments or even during if I have some free time. In cooperation with "Mona" I designed a collection for young women and businesswomen. I've designed jackets, bags, shirts, evening gowns...My mother helps me a lot, too.

You also design your tennis outfits?

- I've designed the dresses I wore at Olympic Games and US Open. I got positive comments for both and I did them in cooperation with my sponsor Reebok. On court I like to wear dresses that are elegant and feminine.

What's the best thing about tennis, beside playing?

- Week after week tennis players travel from one city to another, one country to another, so we spend a lot of time on the plane. Many people say it gets tougher with time but that's not the case for me. For me that's the best thing about tennis - traveling, getting to know different parts of the world, big cities, diverse cultures, famous landmarks, new people...

They say there are no friendships in tennis world. Why is that?

- Well generally there aren't many friendships and rivalry between players is the reason for that. It's not that we're not friendly to each other, but there are no true friendships, generally speaking it's all about good manners you get in home upbringing. I have few friends among players, I think I'm a friendly person and I don't look at those girls at the top as my rivals, they only motivate me to play better.

How does one day in your life look when you're at a tournament and how does it look when you're not playing tennis?

- The day begins with a healthy breakfast and then I go to the club to practice. The duration of it depends on whether I'm in a tournament or not. There are no rules, but my days are always filled with different activities and I don't even know how I manage to do all those things - trainings, work with the media, activities I do for my sponsors, charity work, lunch, dinner, going to theatre or to some important event, party, photoshoots, fashion shows...It's really difficult to describe one day 'cos each one is different, equally exciting and can't never be repeated. Interesting thing is that on a day I have a match to play I only practice for about 25-30mins.

What is the most beautiful city/country that you've visited?

- For me, the most beautiful city is Rome and some of the most beautiful moments of my career happened there. I won my first international tournament there when I was 11, two times in a row I won a professional tournament there, they called me "the queen of Rome" two times. Beside Belgrade there's a special place in my heart for Rome as well. As for the countries, there are many and, beside Serbia of course, I have to mention Spain. It's such a beautiful country and people have similar mentality to ours - they're hospitable, cheerful, and have a rich tradition. In Spain, there are many beautiful places to visit, they know to treat you in a way that makes every moment enjoyable, and I also love their paella!

You're #1 on WTA tour and you're probably playing the best tennis of your career. How did that happen, what's changed?

- I enjoy being on the court, playing tennis, I'm carefree 'cos I'm healthy. Finally I can be the real JJ and the results are evident. I'm working really hard to improve my game, you can see the changes, but you're gonna see even more. Since I've started working with my coach I improved many segments of my game, especially the serve which was always my weakest shot - now it's faster and more precise. I'm satisfied with how things are going, but I think I can do better and I'll show it.

Do you expect another reception on the Belgrade City Hall balcony?

- The reception we got after Roland Garros 2007 was special moment in my career and I'll always remember it. My wish is to celebrate winning Grand Slam in "Marakana" (:lol:) with music and with all people of good will. (Marakana is the popular name for FC Red Star's stadium which is the biggest stadium in Serbia :eek:)

Can Serbia win Fed Cup one day?

- Yes! We have the quality to win it and I'm sure we will in a few years. Playing for one's home country is a big honor and responsibility because you're not playing just for yourself, but for your people as well, and they're all expecting of you to do your best. I always gave my all for our team and I even played better than in professional tournaments. That's because it's always a special feeling playing for your country and that gives you extra motivation.

MOTHER SNEZANA ABOUT HER DAUGHTER'S POPULARITY

How do you feel during Jelena's matches and how do you deal with constant traveling and your daughter's popularity?

- I'm a fairly calm woman. Wins and losses are part of the game and for me the most important is to support my daughter. All the traveling is tough for me, but because Jelena is my daughter - I somehow manage to deal with it. Believe it or not, but we, as Jelena's parents, are not really aware that our daughter is #1 in the world. We've not changed and we're still friends with the same people as before and nothing's changed in our lives. We're taking it as something natural and many people are surprised that Jelena's popularity hasn't changed us one bit.

terjw
Oct 15th, 2008, 09:52 PM
OK my thumbs up and down to Fall Fodder:

Up for his comments on Jelena.

Down for his comments on Dinara.

So he thinks Dinara should keep quiet about a rule preventing top player from playing where they like. And if it is not changed will result in all or most of the top Russians prevented from playing at Moscow next year. :confused:. If something is just plain wrong - why should Dinara keep quiet about it. Totally irrelevant that comment about the women griping they were asked to play too much. Dinara plays a full schedule herself anyway. He should address the issue Dinara raised.

Katie.
Oct 15th, 2008, 10:08 PM
Unlike some people (:lol:) I'm not too lazy to do translations. Now that I've spent 1.5 hours translating this I really wish I WAS!!! :rolls:

http://www.novosti.rs/code/navigate.php?Id=13&status=jedna&vest=130434&datum=2008-10-15
Thanks very much for translating all of that :hug:
Hopefully she will get her dream GS celebration soon :lol:

schorsch
Oct 16th, 2008, 12:18 AM
uhm, nadull just withdrew from doubles and has asked repeatedly for the trainer, so there you are with your ups :lol:

schorsch
Oct 16th, 2008, 03:16 AM
interview with eric van harpen

Blick: You have been on the tour for what seems to be an eternity, you've celebrated a win at Wimbledon with Conchita Martinez, have brought Maria Sharapova and Patty Schnyder to the upper echelon of the tennis world, have already coached players like Ana Ivanovic and Anna Kournikova. Don't you ever think, ok it's enough already? Or can't you just get enough of the tour?
Eric van Harpen (currently Kirilenko's coach): I wouldn't have a problem with just letting go at once if I wanted to, but this happens to be my job. The only thing that motivates me is to have a player that really wants to get to the top. Like Ana Ivanovic for example otherwise it gets tough.

B: Have the young women got the right attitude?
E: No, I don't really think so. There are only few that have got a tremendous amount of joy for tennis. One of them is Jankovic. Even if she loses a lengthy rally, she'll smile. Because she enioys playing.

B: Patty Schnyder thought that the seemingly endless changes at the nr.1 ranking are comparable to the stocking market. There are also supposed to be certain players, that many don't appreciate being the nr.1 player. Do you share her opinion?
E: One can't possibly say that Jankovic, who has been reaching semis and finals and winning tournaments throughout the year doesn't deserve this. She deserves it even more than a girl who doesn't win nearly anything, but a GS. The ranking is the barometre of concistency.

B: Do you have a favourite player apart from your player Maria Kirilenko?
E: Well ok, Jankovic is not the kind of player, that will wow you everytime with some fantastic winner all the time. But, she has no weaknesses. She's nearly unbeatable in terms of defence. Once she starts dictating it gets really difficult to get yourself out of this situation. She's very strong when it comes to moving and mentally as well, in terms of intelligence.
.
B: There are still a lot of people who miss Martina Hingis...
E: Oh my, Martina Hingis. Just forget about that already. Ana Ivanovic for example, that's a girl who is obsessed at improving. She's still very young. She also might end up piling up three tournaments in a row. And the ones that are following her are very good players as well. (The young ones)

B: But they say they lack variety.
E: Sure sure, I've got to say Hingis was very clever. But which of Hingis' shots was extraordinary? Maybe in the past it used to be the backhand. But nowadays most of the girls are able to play an unbelievable backhand. Hingis couldn't play a forehand. Neither was she able to serve. She was clever, yeah. But both of the WS can play sensational tennis. At the momement we have unbelievably many good players. Safina, Dementieva, Sharapova, Jankovic, Ivanovic, Kuznetsova.

B: You're coaching Maria Kirilenko, a Russian. You used to coach Sharapova and Kournikova. Are there some general rules with Russians?
E: I didn't have my biggest results with Russians. I don't really know why. Well, that means, I probably know why. They are drilled to stereotypes from childhood on and then don't change much anymore. Just to drop down a few rankings in a period of change makes them freak out so much that they'd rather not change anything in the first place. I hope that I can achieve that with Maria next year. I have also given her an ultimatum. I told her we'd have to change some things or else I just couldn't work with her anymore.

B: You have got the reputation to say as an "employee": You're losing me and not the other way around.
E: Yeah, yeah. I don't just randomly say that of course. I have got a tennis academy, which does quite well. But I don't wanna think about that now. She's just gotta change now. She's got to get fitter, change physically. Because all of the new girls, the Cibulkovas, the Wozniackis and so on and so on are all moving well. The times where you just could stand still and whack the ball like Davenport are over.

B: Do you sometimes get the feeling that certain girls compromise their training because of their sponsors and other events?
E: That just all is a part of the game. Sponsors are extremely important. That just has got to be done otherwise the Tour couldn't survive. The Tour needs this image. Not that they only play well, but also that they look good or try to be appealing. If you have 10 ugly toads, it isn't rally easy to sell tennis. For this reason it's not that bad that they put some time in for these kinds of events, because they all look decent.

B: You are a successful coach of women. Don't you ever think of changing to the men's tour?
E: I've got to say that Igor Andreev is a very dear friend of mine and he asked me if he had to pay me for my efforts. I told him: No, no you dont have to pay me anything. That would be a vacation for me. I still have the dream to travel around the world with a man.

B: Why?
E: They just are much more grounded, you can joke around with them, you can do silly stuff with them, too. They are not gonna fire you right away just because they missed a smash in a stupid way on match point. They would tell themselves: Well, that means that I have got to smash more in practise to improve this shot.

B: Are you a masochist?
E: Well, I'm not, but I have a slight tendency towards being one indeed, I guess.

oleada
Oct 16th, 2008, 03:55 AM
Thanks schorsch
He likes JJ :hearts:

louisa.
Oct 16th, 2008, 07:32 AM
Thanks schorsch and alex for the articles! :wavey:

Katie.
Oct 16th, 2008, 08:27 AM
Yay lots of JJ love in that interview!
Thanks schorsch :)

~Kiera~
Oct 16th, 2008, 11:53 AM
Did Jelena pay him for that interview? :lol:

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2008/writers/jon_wertheim/10/14/10.15/

Comparing Jelena and Ana, the best to not win a major and more

I used to think this notion was controversial and didn't want to submit it for fear of being ridiculed, but I think the time has finally come: Jelena Jankovic is a better No. 1 than Ana Ivanovic. Here's a few reasons why.

Ana was tremendously helped in reaching No. 1 by Justine Henin's retirement and a cupcake draw to her first slam (Ana faced zero slam finalists vs. Dinara Safina, who faced a combined 4 slams, 5 finals, and several match points). When Jelena became the top-ranked player, everyone said she needed to at least reach a slam final to deserve it. She ends up doing it and doesn't embarrass herself in the process. The press (and I used to think justifiably so) keep hounding her about not deserving such a prestigious position, and yet she continues to win day in and day out.

I don't think I even need to remind anyone of Ana's W-L record at the moment. Jankovic, for being accused of not being as mentally tough as her compatriot, seems to have proved otherwise (maybe we should have suspected this when Ana's team had to hide from her the opportunity of reaching No. 1 at the French). And I know people could say Ana's been injured (her's was probably far more serious than the laundry list of Jelena's injuries), but let's compare with the other No. 1s in the past couple of years who've come back from an extended injury.

-- Robert Kelso, Los Angeles

• Several of you have written in these past few weeks making a similar, if less detailed, observation. It's unfortunate that these comparisons have to be made. But, realistically, it's inevitable. You have two colleagues from the same small country, roughly the same age, with contrasting styles and mannerisms and ... well, what do you expect? I don't disagree with Robert's premise, but I still say we ought to reserve judgment until Ivanovic is at full strength. Clearly she is just a shard of the uninhibited ball-striker who won the French Open. There's a mental component to her struggles these past few months, but she is injured as well. So let's hold off here.

Let's do, however, take this opportunity to give some props to Jankovic, who appears to be filling the vacuum at the top of the WTA rankings and acquitting herself like a No. 1 player. On the heels of her run to the U.S. Open final, Hammerin' Jank has won three titles and will finish 2008 with the No. 1 ranking. Plus, she's done it with that polished smile on her face and a sense of candor we haven't seen since Martina Hingis.

What's more, at a time when even the former players are lamenting the one-dimensional ball-bashing on the women's tour, Jankovic plays a whimsical retrieving style that relies on more than brute force. I'm still wary of going overboard praising a top player who's never won a Slam. (See below). And I still worry that Jankovic plays too many events for her own good. But she's been the best player in the business these past few months. And for that, to borrow a phrase, I have to praise you like I should.

Now that Jelena Jankovic has won her fourth title of the year in Moscow (and third in as many weeks), what do you think it would take for her to win the WTA Player of the Year Award? It seems as if she's got the No. 1 spot sewn up for the year on the strength of a late fall surge, but I wonder what it would take for the WTA to give her the nod over Serena (whose four titles overall, including the U.S. Open, and Wimbledon final do seem more noteworthy).

-- Bryan Cameron, Philadelphia

• I may have to revisit this if J-squared turns in a dominating performance at the year-end championships. But I just can't support awarding the equivalent of an MVP award to a player who hasn't won a Grand Slam. Much as we all love the Kremlin Cup and the China Open and the other tour events, the four Slams are the tentpole events. They call 'em majors for a reason. I'm sticking with Serena.

At the Porsche Tennis Grand Prix, the car is not addition to the prize. The winner has to decide if she takes the money ($100,000) or the car (140,000€). So no wonder that Jelena took the car.

-- Krzysztof, Poznan, Poland

• When I was researching my book on women's tennis way back in 2000, I remember a WTA operative telling me that cars were provided in addition to the cash. However, on further review, it sounds as though the policy is now either/or. Function of the economy, perhaps. Take the cash or take the car. (As Jim of St. Pete, Fla., noted, it's not exactly Sophie's Choice.)

Talk about a win-win. As Krzystof notes, even leaving emotion out if it, the player is better off taking a $140k car over $100k in cash. (I know, it's Euros and not dollars, but I'm too lazy to play around with the shift and option keys and find that symbol.) At the same time, the sponsor is providing the car at cost. So they're effectively providing a $140k prize for a cost of...what? Half that? Either way, everyone goes home happy.

Jon, to your point about J.J. vs. Dementieva. In yesterday's semi, Elena served an incredible 100 percent in the first set. By the third, that had dropped to 44 percent. In contrast, J.J. served at 94 percent in the third set. That's very telling about E.D.'s woes. Is it me or is Jelena serve getting much better?

-- Richard Hicks, NYC

• I think the take-away ... wait, before I go further, which phrase has become more cloyingly overused lately: "game changer" or "the take-away?" Anyway, I think the lesson from that match is this: the serve is really the cornerstone of a player's game. Once the initial delivery goes, everything else follows. Conversely, when you're winning easy points on your serve, everything else often falls into place.

Aside: How often do you see two of the world's top players compete in a match that goes 0-6, 6-1, 6-0? Wacky times in women's tennis.

How much different is the indoor season from the outdoor hard court season? That was always a time when Hingis used to shine. Now it looks like Jankovic has become the indoor leader. BTW, I used to look on the Season Championships as the indoor slam. Now the championships seem just like another outdoor hardcourt tournament.

-- Jerry White, Mineral, Va

• I've never been a big fan of the indoor season. Part of it is the dreary, climate-controlled nature of it all. But I also feel as though the results are of limited value. There are no Slams left on the calendar. The players are all banged up. Some of the year-end slots have already been filled. The whole thing smacks of anti-climax. If you're Federer or Nadal or Venus or Serena, do you really care about your results in October and November? I think it's no coincidence that the Thomas Enqvist types -- today it's Nalbandian -- clean up here. The big boys have pretty much shifted to cruise control.

~Kiera~
Oct 16th, 2008, 05:21 PM
http://www.cnn.com/2008/SPORT/10/16/tennis.zurich.ap/

Pennetta ends Jankovic's winning streak

ZURICH, Switzerland (AP) -- Jelena Jankovic's 12-match winning streak has been ended by Flavia Pennetta, after the Italian beat the world No.1 5-7 6-3 6-3 to reach the quarterfinals of the Zurich Open.

Jankovic, who won three straight titles heading into the tournament, said she was tired from her recent schedule.

"I didn't have any gas in the tank," she said. "I am not a machine. Flavia took advantage, she was the better one today."

Jankovic fell to the ground at 6-5 in the first set and appeared to hurt her left wrist, but she still broke Pennetta when the Italian double-faulted.

The Serb again went down while getting broken in the third game of the second set, and she soon called for a trainer to treat her bleeding right knee. "I feel like I have been in the war, when I come off the court with bruises and cuts," said Jankovic.

The final set went with serve until Pennetta hit a backhand winner to lead 5-3. She had two match points in the next game and took the first of them with a powerful ace.

Jankovic had been 5-0 against the 17th-ranked Pennetta, including a straight-set win in Moscow last week after the Italian had knocked out Venus Williams.

Pennetta said she tried to take more risks and challenge the top seed. "Last week I didn't have a lot of luck and today I was more aggressive," she said.

Jankovic, who has never made it past the second round at the Zurich Open, took over the No. 1 ranking this month after consecutive victories in Beijing, Stuttgart, Germany, and Moscow. Her final tournament of the season will be the November 4-9 WTA Tour Championship in Doha, Qatar.

Elsewhere, 18th-ranked Victoria Azarenka of Belarus routed Monica Niculescu of Romania 6-0 6-0. Niculescu, who upset seventh seed Anna Chakvetadze in the first round, failed to convert any of her six break-point chances.

schorsch
Oct 18th, 2008, 09:21 PM
In the recent getting to know Monica Niculescu ( :o ) interview on wtatour.com she said that she likes watching Jankovic and Venus, because she can learn a lot from them and she also said that Jankovic is always very nice to her when she was asked who she go on with on the tour. Also she feels like her match against JJ in RG, specifically the first set, was one of the best matches she's ever played.

becky.really
Oct 20th, 2008, 10:01 PM
There was a short JJ vox pop type thing in Sundays Times
Should be on the website...had a posy piccy of JJ that made me laugh as well xxx

~Kiera~
Oct 21st, 2008, 01:35 PM
http://www.jj-jelenajankovic.com/eng/news.php

Jelena is staring in a new TV commercial for Knjaz Miloš Company | 21.10.2008.

After winning three tournaments in a row and returning to the first place on WTA list, Jelena Jankoviæ is in Belgrade again for shooting TV commercial. Jelena is staring in a commercial for Knjaz Miloš’s Aqua Viva Hydroactive brand which she presents as a promo face since May this year.

In front of a special „Phantom“ camera, Jelena is a real star. The director of this TV commercial, Aco Boskoviæ, is fascinated with her positive energy and professional approach.

In this commercial Jelena plays against herself and wins thanks to the mental and physical power that she gets from Aqua Viva Hydroactive.

This bottle, with Jelena Jankovic’s face, is already sold in one million samples only two month since launching on Serbian market. Such sales can only indicate what an extraordinary combination Jelena Jankoviæ and Aqua Viva Hydroactive are.

-NAJ-
Oct 21st, 2008, 01:49 PM
tomorrow(19h) JJ will be in Delta City (shopping centar in Belgrade). Promotion JJ aqva viva water.

~Kiera~
Oct 21st, 2008, 01:56 PM
http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/tennis/notebook?page=notebook/tennis10212008

Marathon woman

After a lot of collective whining from the gallery about the carousel at the top of the WTA rankings, Jelena Jankovic went out and did exactly what someone needed to do -- grabbed the brass ring and hung on. Jankovic won three straight tournaments before her second-round ouster in Zurich, which rung up her tour-high 80th match of the season. (Nadal tops the men's charts at 90 matches, boosted by extended Olympic and Davis Cup play.)

Jankovic, never shy about detailing her numerous physical ailments, says she hasn't felt this healthy all season -- an interesting paradox in these times when tennis is trying to pare down schedules. We are unmoved by the argument that the indoor season produces "fluky" results or that fields are weaker this time of year. Jankovic has the same options to play (or not to play) as every other top woman, and brava to her for making that summit climb.

~Kiera~
Oct 22nd, 2008, 12:42 PM
http://www.blic.co.yu/sports.php?id=3159

Jelena plays against herself
Author: T. Dragojevic | 22.10.2008 - 08:41

The world’s number one tennis player Jelena Jankovic is spending her days in Belgrade, preparing for the crown of the women’s tour – the WTA Championships in Doha, Qatar. She used a window between her practice sessions to shoot a commercial for the “Knjaz Milos” company.

Jelena is the new face of one of the biggest Serbia’s bottled water manufacturers, while the commercial, in which Jankovic plays tennis against herself and wins owing to the water, is to be aired shortly. Jankovic was paid a visit from the Serbian FED Cup and Davis Cup team coaches Dejan Vranes and Bogdan Obradovic in the Belgrade Arena. The former had a chance to discuss with the WTA leader her recent success, while he will have to wait for a briefing with Serbia’s number two Ana Ivanovic until the $600,000 Linz Open finishes.

~Kiera~
Oct 22nd, 2008, 12:47 PM
http://www.hinduonnet.com/thehindu/thscrip/print.pl?file=20081025502202300.htm&date=tss3143/&prd=tss&

Jankovic’s beauty lies in her willingness to struggle

ROHIT BRIJNATH

Jelena Jankovic is like a sculpture you need to ruminate over for a while before you identify her beauty. She can’t out-hit and out-power her opponents, so she must annoy and outsmart and outrun them. Which she does, to the point where opponents look like they want to sue for harassment.

The best player in the world needs to have won at least one Grand Slam title, so sue the Women’s Tennis Association computer which spits out her name as No.1.

The best player in the world needs to be a tunnel-visioned beast, but she laughs at herself on the big screen during changeovers. She was asked a few weeks ago how her injured foot was and replied: “The food is great”. Then she giggled at her mistake.

The best player in the world is expected to own a thousand-yard stare and never admit to weakness, but she lay down on court for 30 seconds like a distressed drama queen after one point at the US Open.

Asked if the pavement was hot, she countered: “No, but I thought I was going to get my dress really dirty, and then that was my biggest concern.”

Then again, maybe we should have more best players in the world like Jelena Jankovic.

Jankovic interests deeply on two levels. First, her ability to find a smile and a sunny quote even in defeat and distress. It will be suggested that it is precisely this lack of hard-nosed desire that is impeding her, as if this constantly injured athlete suffers from a medical condition called killer instinct deficiency. Problem is, Roger Federer would laugh in your face if you ever equated niceness with an absence of toughness.

Second, Jankovic interests because she is unattractive. Not ugly in the way she looks, but in the way she plays. She’s a marathon runner with a tennis racquet, an athlete who operates on a rectangular track, a player whose matches shouldn’t be measured in points won but miles run.

We normally turn up our noses at players like this. If we’re feeling generous we pay them second-hand compliments, brush them off with patronising words like “grinder” or “hard worker” or “utility player”. As if this is some polite way of proclaiming them as untalented, untouched by beauty, unfamiliar with flair. A retriever after all is a fine dog, it is a terrible label for a tennis player.

The preference in any sport is instinctively for the artistic and the aggressive, a player must either paint a beautiful picture or a belligerent one. It is easy to fall for the effortless Ronaldo and hard to resist the menacing Serena. Go for it, crowds insist, just don’t bloody sit back.

The attacker is seen as a refined fellow with an open mind, who relishes adventure and is an athletic relative of Indiana Jones. We like golfers who attack pins and tennis players who try to kiss the lines. There is an electric appeal to the sportsman literally going forward (rushing to the net to volley, running at defences in football, stepping out to hit a six), for it suggests audacity and initiative.

Jankovic is none of this, she’s not obviously entertaining, not a conspicuously pretty champion, but a champion nonetheless. She’s like a sculpture you need to ruminate over for a while before you identify her beauty. She can’t out-hit and out-power opponents, so she must annoy and outsmart and outrun them. Which she does, to the point where opponents look like they want to sue for harassment.

As she said: “There are taller girls out there. I can’t compete with their strength and height, so I have to find other ways of getting an advantage. I have been getting stronger in the gym, but tennis is like a game of chess. Sometimes you have to be smarter than your opponent to get an advantage to win the game.”

So she chases down balls with the zeal of a bounty hunter, she’s allergic to error, she keeps opponents off balance, she constructs points sagely, she turns every point into some test of character. Only after watching for a while is Jankovic revealed: she has the speed of an Inca courier (as miler John Landy was once famously described) and a monk’s willingness to embrace struggle. Tenacity, we tend to forget amid the blizzards of muscular shot-making, is a talent in itself.

This life of Jankovic’s, it is a hard sporting life for nothing comes easy, no point is cheap, no set short, no opponent daunted. Venus’ serves are like fullstops, Jankovic’s are like the opening of a conversation. Everything she does must be earned. But she is not alone, we see her family all across the landscape of sport. In the persistence of Dirk Kuyt, the bloody-mindedness of Lleyton Hewitt, the doggedness of Vijay Singh, the stoic method of Rahul Dravid.

It’s like some equitable God has given them half a helping of flair (or muscle or height), but a double serving of sweat and intelligence. They’re not first in line as exhibits in a sports museum, but don’t think of picking a team without them.

Jankovic, in a strange way, represents us, she is the ambassador of the average man. We want to be Federeresque, it’s what we dream of, but it’s Jankovic who reminds us that sport has place not just for the preternaturally gifted but also the industrious. Work hard, coaches bellow and fathers urge: here is proof that it goes a long way.

Anyway, the saucy Serb might grin and say, this beauty business, it is overrated. And she might offer as evidence the words of Emil Zatopek. As that face-contorted, tongue-flapping, head-shaking ugly champion once put it: “I shall learn to have a better style once they start judging races according to their beauty.”

schorsch
Oct 22nd, 2008, 03:45 PM
somebody shoot that man.

Brena
Oct 22nd, 2008, 08:34 PM
tomorrow(19h) JJ will be in Delta City (shopping centar in Belgrade). Promotion JJ aqva viva water.

Hey, guys - my sister's laptop's been restored to the working order, so I have Internet again. :)
I actually went to this shopping mall today to see JJ and try to grab an autograph for Ros. Alas, there was a pack of very wild and belligerend kids (I think that I was by at leaqst 20 years older than 90 % of the crowd except for a few old ladies :lol:) who swarmed around her, so I just managed to grab a couple of unautographed posters.
However, I had a close up view of JJ and she even passed by me when arriving. :cool: She was wearing a short elegant black dress and impossibl high heels :lol:, she had lost her voice for some reason (hopefully not by singing too much) but she was really cute and she is beautiful.

JadeFox
Oct 22nd, 2008, 08:40 PM
Hey, guys - my sister's laptop's been restored to the working order, so I have Internet again. :)
I actually went to this shopping mall today to see JJ and try to grab an autograph for Ros. Alas, there was a pack of very wild and belligerend kids (I think that I was by at leaqst 20 years older than 90 % of the crowd except for a few old ladies :lol:) who swarmed around her, so I just managed to grab a couple of unautographed posters.
However, I had a close up view of JJ and she even passed by me when arriving. :cool: She was wearing a short elegant black dress and impossibl high heels :lol:, she had lost her voice for some reason (hopefully not by singing too much) but she was really cute and she is beautiful.

Nice to hear there was a crowd. And she was rocking the sky high heels likes a true diva.:lol:

I hope her website post some pictures.

Wayn77
Oct 22nd, 2008, 08:58 PM
However, I had a close up view of JJ and she even passed by me when arriving. :cool: She was wearing a short elegant black dress and impossibl high heels :lol:, she had lost her voice for some reason (hopefully not by singing too much) but she was really cute and she is beautiful.

Thanks for the report Zoja.

Close up and in the flesh isn't she just .... in a totally modernistic way?

~Kiera~
Oct 22nd, 2008, 08:59 PM
Thanks Zoja :wavey:

http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/blog/index?entryID=3657244&name=tennis

Nadal, Jankovic reach No. 1 in vastly different ways

Wednesday, October 22, 2008 | Feedback | Print Entry

Posted by Stephen Tignor, TENNIS.com

What does the No. 1 ranking mean? As of today, two very different things on the men's and women's tours.

The comparison is impossible to resist at the moment. Rafael Nadal and Jelena Jankovic clinched the year-end top spots on each tour, a first for both players. It's the second time this year the two have ascended together: In mid-August, they debuted at No. 1 at the same time.

But that's about all the two players had in common this season. Nadal's effort to surpass Roger Federer could best be described as Herculean. The Spaniard dominated the French Open like no one since Bjorn Borg, and he beat Federer, the five-time defending champion, in a final for the ages at Wimbledon. Throw in an Olympic gold medal, three Masters titles, an 8-2 record against Federer and Novak Djokovic and a trip to the Davis Cup final, and you have one of the finest seasons by a male pro in the Open era.

Jankovic? Well, she didn't lack the effort -- she has played 80 matches in 10 months -- but her season simply can't be compared to Nadal's. Jankovic reached one major final (the U.S. Open), compiled a 63-17 record and won four tournaments. However, three of them came in tennis' least-significant season, the post-U.S. Open indoor tour, when there's little more than money on the line.

Is this Jankovic's fault? No -- at least not yet. At 23, she's a late bloomer who likely never thought she would compete for major titles and thus focused on playing and winning as many matches as possible. That's a recipe for becoming a backdoor No. 1 on a tour in which the two biggest talents, Venus and Serena Williams, have always concentrated on Slam victories rather than rankings.

Now is the time for Jankovic to change her approach and pressure herself to beat the best players at the biggest tournaments. Will she? Watching her win three events over the past month, I've begun to think that earning the top ranking has both helped Jankovic's confidence and made her more ambitious. She hasn't seemed satisfied reaching semis and finals. For the first time, she's been willing to leave her defensive, ultra-consistent comfort zone to win those matches. Becoming No. 1, oddly enough, might just be a stepping-stone in Jankovic's career. Let's hope so, because the WTA needs hungry young stars.

Nadal's year-end No. 1 status, on the other hand, is the summit of a four-year journey full of grinding and grunting, brutally bashed ground strokes and nonstop running. If Jankovic has, for now, slightly diminished the significance of the WTA's top spot, Nadal has elevated the men's version. In his four-year reign at No. 1, Federer made being the best player in the world look effortless. Nadal -- with his tenacity, clay-court dominance and mental fortitude that allowed him to beat Federer in a heart-wrenching fifth set at Wimbledon -- has shown how much effort it really does take to be the best in tennis today. As Federer himself said when Nadal took over at No.1, "Look what he had to achieve to get it. … That's what I like to see."

That's what we'd like to see on both tours in 2009.

~Kiera~
Oct 22nd, 2008, 09:06 PM
http://sports.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/articleshow/msid-3630092,flstry-1.cms

I play to be No. 1: Jankovic

BANGALORE: Jelena Jankovic has a novel way of saying three cheers. The Serbian star recently celebrated her new-found status as the No. 1player in the world with three successive WTA crowns in Beijing, Stuttgart and Moscow, cementing her place at the top of the game. The 23-year-old is enjoying her new-found status and is determined to finish the year No.1.

Excerpts from an interview:

Does being No. 1 in the world give you an edge when you walk on court?

For me being No. 1 in the world is a dream come true. At the moment, I go on the court with a lot of confidence, but I don’t take anything for granted. I know its important to keep pushing myself to get better. I’m very happy with my ranking though.

Does being No. 1 without having won a Grand Slam, make the ranking a trifle incomplete?

I would love to win a Grand Slam and I am working hard for that. I didn’t make the ranking system. If the system says I’m No. 1, I am happy to be there.

Would you trade your ranking for a Slam title?

I want both. This year, I’ve already reached many of my goals and I still have the season-ending WTA Championships ahead of me. I want to do well there.

Your chances in the season-ending WTA championships?

I’ll take it one match at a time. I try not to look beyond the first round, but I am feeling pretty good at the moment. I’m a bit tired from four tournaments in a row, but I had a few days of rest after Zurich and that has given me time to recover.

How important is it for you to end the year as No 1 in the world?

It’s important. When I play, I play to be number 1. It’s not easy to stay there, but of course, I want to finish as No 1 in the world.

Your serve appears to be a weakness, especially against the big hitters, players like the Williams sisters and Maria Sharapova?

I’m working on my serve. It has improved and it can still get better. It’s good for me to know that there are areas of my game that I need to work on and improve because otherwise I would’ve already fulfilled my potential.

After Justine Henin quit tennis in the summer, the No.1 ranking has changed hands a bunch of times. Is there a lack of consistency at the top of the tennis order?

I like to think it’s exciting. A lot of girls are trying to finish number one and I’m one of them. There are some good rivalries being created and hopefully the fans will enjoy that.

How have your countrymen reacted to your number one status in the women’s game?

Serbian tennis is doing well at the moment. I hope it’ll continue to do well in the future. Already, today, you can see the impact of our success with more kids talking about tennis and also playing tennis. The facilities aren’t the best, but the talent is definitely there.

You are into designing your own gear now, do you have any particular preference in style?

I get to work with Reebok on my outfits. I like having some of my input there. I like to wear stuff that reflects my personality. I like to wear things that are stylish, but a little different. This year, I’ve worn some great dresses.

Are there any special designs you are working on for the 2009 season?

That’s a secret. But yes, we start planning early, sometimes a year in advance.

You’ve often spoken of your love for acting?

I like to express myself and acting gives me a good opportunity to do that.

When you came to Bangalore for the WTA Tournament in March, you wore a sari for the first time. Did you enjoy the experience?

I like trying on new outfits. It’s one of the great things about being a professional tennis player. You get to visit and learn about new cultures. I enjoyed my time in Bangalore very much and I hope to come back and wear a sari again in the future.

Optima
Oct 23rd, 2008, 12:15 AM
Hey, guys - my sister's laptop's been restored to the working order, so I have Internet again. :)
I actually went to this shopping mall today to see JJ and try to grab an autograph for Ros. Alas, there was a pack of very wild and belligerend kids (I think that I was by at leaqst 20 years older than 90 % of the crowd except for a few old ladies :lol:) who swarmed around her, so I just managed to grab a couple of unautographed posters.
However, I had a close up view of JJ and she even passed by me when arriving. :cool: She was wearing a short elegant black dress and impossibl high heels :lol:, she had lost her voice for some reason (hopefully not by singing too much) but she was really cute and she is beautiful.

:sobbing:

In reality, I doubt I'll ever have the chance to see speak with her/get an autograph or even see her live.

ms_nut
Oct 23rd, 2008, 12:36 AM
:kiss::kiss: Thnx Kiera. That article "Jankovic’s beauty lies in her willingness to struggle" is one of the best ones i've read in a while.It touches strings of my heart that haven't been in a while...:lol::lol:. Usually they make such articles about players when they're getting ready to retire etc.I always loved reading some of those touching articles about Seles.:kiss::kiss:

schorsch
Oct 23rd, 2008, 01:00 AM
while it has some good stuff in it, i hate that article. i like to think of jj as somebody who blends offense and defense, who can do anything on a court without much of a liability and her offense is not be talked down. i hate all those idiots who say all she does is running and running. blah. annoys me. she's no errani or something :sad:

cirrus012
Oct 23rd, 2008, 04:29 AM
The article Jankovic’s beauty lies in her willingness to struggle seems so familiar. I think I read it in the local papers. The writer is a sports correspondents for The Straits Times, I think. It's rubbish 'cos you've to pay to read their articles online, even if you subscribe to their print edition.

Katie.
Oct 23rd, 2008, 11:08 AM
Hey, guys - my sister's laptop's been restored to the working order, so I have Internet again. :)
I actually went to this shopping mall today to see JJ and try to grab an autograph for Ros. Alas, there was a pack of very wild and belligerend kids (I think that I was by at leaqst 20 years older than 90 % of the crowd except for a few old ladies :lol:) who swarmed around her, so I just managed to grab a couple of unautographed posters.
However, I had a close up view of JJ and she even passed by me when arriving. :cool: She was wearing a short elegant black dress and impossibl high heels :lol:, she had lost her voice for some reason (hopefully not by singing too much) but she was really cute and she is beautiful.
:eek: No way, what is she going to do not being able to speak :help: :lol:
Thanks Zoja :)

ms_nut
Oct 23rd, 2008, 11:33 AM
while it has some good stuff in it, i hate that article. i like to think of jj as somebody who blends offense and defense, who can do anything on a court without much of a liability and her offense is not be talked down. i hate all those idiots who say all she does is running and running. blah. annoys me. she's no errani or something :sad:

I guess he was trying to make the point that she doesn't play hard ball-bashing tennis:lol:.Some of his examples were indeed way off.. like the point that she is good because she is industrious, when we all know she is super talented;).Also, she has a beautiful game that i can watch for hours on end.. (provided there are no picnics, of course)

Kampi
Oct 23rd, 2008, 12:22 PM
Anyway, thx for all the articles Sarah:wavey::worship::kiss:

-NAJ-
Oct 24th, 2008, 09:22 AM
According to "Alo" Jelena is in Spain- Madrid
;)
Sweet interview with Sneki
http://www.alo.co.yu/sport/8765/Jelena_nije_prva_samo_u_nasoj_kuci

I hope that someone will translate on English.
My translation will be full of errors:lol::lol:

schorsch
Oct 24th, 2008, 10:05 AM
http://66.102.9.104/translate_c?hl=de&sl=sr&tl=en&u=http://www.alo.co.yu/sport/8765/Jelena_nije_prva_samo_u_nasoj_kuci&usg=ALkJrhiGTM5bbZqYFhbCzhll5M8pQrVllw

~Kiera~
Oct 25th, 2008, 11:49 PM
http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/1/newsroom/stories/?ContentID=2736

JJ Secures Year-End No.1

ST. PETERSBURG, FL, USA - Following an intense and unprecedented year-long battle for the No.1 ranking that witnessed five different players holding the top position, Jelena Jankovic will conclude the 2008 season at No.1. Jankovic, who will lead the singles competition at the Sony Ericsson Championships – Doha 2008, will emerge as the year-end No.1 regardless of the results.

The 23-year old secured the year-end No.1 ranking shortly after winning 12 straight matches and three straight titles, at Beijing, Stuttgart and Moscow. She won the first of her four 2008 titles at Rome in May.

"It has been a truly amazing year for me," Jankovic said. "Winning four Sony Ericsson WTA Tour titles, over 60 matches and to make it to two semifinals and a final in the Grand Slams this year is a dream come true. I worked really hard this year and to finish No.1 is where I want to be and where I hope to stay."

"Jelena has had an incredible 2008 season and earned the year-end No.1 ranking," said Larry Scott, Chairman & CEO of the Tour. "Jelena's entertaining all-court game and off-court charisma have attracted millions of fans around the globe, and helped make this season one of the most memorable in recent memory. The battle for the No.1 ranking is sure to remain fiercely competitive in 2009, and no doubt Jelena will be among those vying for the top spot again."

"We are delighted to congratulate Jelena on this great accolade," said Aldo Liguori, Corporate Vice President and Head of Global Communications & PR at Sony Ericsson. "It is a tremendous achievement to finish the year as Sony Ericsson WTA Tour world No.1. It has been a fantastic year for Jelena and the Tour and we look forward to seeing Jelena return to defend her title next year, in what is expected to be another exciting and great year for women's tennis."

Jankovic first claimed the No.1 ranking on August 11, 2008, staying there for one week. She returned to top spot on October 6 and has held it ever since. She has also won more matches than any other player on Tour this year - 63 - and has reached the quarterfinals or better at 19 of her first 21 events, her only early round losses coming at Wimbledon (fourth round) and Zurich (second round).

Jankovic began defining herself as a potential No.1 approximately two years ago, when she labored past a string of 10 consecutive losses early in the 2006 season and suffered a ranking drop to No.38 in the middle of the year. She successfully turned the season around and vaulted to No.12 by year's end and since then the Serb has been a consistent figure in the Top 10 since February 26, 2007.

Jankovic was one of five players to hold the No.1 ranking this year, along with Justine Henin (20 weeks), who retired on May 14 and immediately took her name off the rankings; Ana Ivanovic (12 weeks); Maria Sharapova (three weeks); and Serena Williams (four weeks).

http://img186.imageshack.us/img186/3867/jankovic08yearendno1200tb1.jpg

дalex
Oct 26th, 2008, 07:39 AM
:hearts:

#1 :worship:

Kampi
Oct 26th, 2008, 08:33 AM
Thank you Sarah:wavey::kiss:

God, this is really that kind of WTA-Tour article you want to have and read over and over again. Now it is official, hahaha.....BIG CONGRATS to our Jelena.:hearts::worship::hearts:

GO JJ:bounce: