PDA

View Full Version : Jelena Jankovic News and Articles Thread, vol 2


Pages : 1 2 [3] 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21

RFS
Aug 14th, 2008, 11:10 AM
I'd love her to - but Super-Saf has just buried Mad-Saf ... somewhere under the clay in Paris, I think :lol:

But - I will be keeping fingers and toes crossed... I'd cross eyes and fingers, but it makes it difficult to work and type!

Piska
Aug 14th, 2008, 11:17 AM
thank you dalex
Kiera, Wrekin
Kuzzy is a good girl, no doubt, but i didnt read in her russian interwievs anything positives about serbian girls. Only, that she respects Puppy for number one achievement.
Recently:
Q: Sveta, do you use make-up oncourt.
Answer: About make-up on court Jelena Jankovic could answer you better, than me. Make up it is important, but i go out on court to play my tennis.

~Kiera~
Aug 14th, 2008, 11:28 AM
Sveta is getting a lot more outspoken recently :lol:

дalex
Aug 14th, 2008, 11:36 AM
Lovely Kuzy :hearts:
I guess she's a lot more outspoken in Russian media.
But, it's weird cos she's the most liked player on the tour. Even JJ is full of praise for her. But judging by Piska's posts she's clearly not too fond of JJ.

Wrekin
Aug 14th, 2008, 11:42 AM
Sveta is getting a lot more outspoken recently :lol:

And a tad grumpy, it would seem.

Make up it is important, but i go out on court to play my tennis.

Thanks Piska

Not a wise remark to make about someone who's above you in the rankings, I feel.

Hashim.
Aug 14th, 2008, 11:46 AM
sexy sveta not so sexy in the interview:ras:

Cat123
Aug 14th, 2008, 02:01 PM
Miaow!! Catty. I'm not sure I like this Sveta!

Ian Aberdon
Aug 14th, 2008, 06:09 PM
That's my Sveta!!! :lol:

redsonja
Aug 14th, 2008, 07:49 PM
My goodness, Svetlana. :lol:

Cat123
Aug 14th, 2008, 08:00 PM
:( I'm shocked and suprised and saddened! Me no like. :rolleyes:

redsonja
Aug 14th, 2008, 08:08 PM
Everyone says bitchy things occasionally. She's gonna have to back it up with more if she wants me to believe she's evil. :lol:

Besides, I'm sure Jelena would be happy to remind her that at least she won the one title she has on her rankings for the year; Svetlana was losing the Pilot Pen final until Agnes Szavay had to retire. :devil:

Cat123
Aug 14th, 2008, 08:12 PM
Ooh, now who's bitchy? :lol:

I remember that. I remember being a bit upset. Agi :sad:

дalex
Aug 14th, 2008, 08:30 PM
I like bitchy Sveta...She's funny. The only comment I didn't like is the one about the rankings but who cares - Sveta is likely to drop out of top 5 after USO. :tape:

redsonja
Aug 14th, 2008, 08:33 PM
Ooh, now who's bitchy? :lol:

I never made any pretense of being anything else. ;)

Bruno71
Aug 15th, 2008, 05:28 AM
I like bitchy Sveta...She's funny. The only comment I didn't like is the one about the rankings but who cares - Sveta is likely to drop out of top 5 after USO. :tape:

Never underestimate potential Sveta draws. One of these days they'll come up with one that'll actually win her a 2nd slam.

redsonja
Aug 15th, 2008, 06:19 AM
Never underestimate potential Sveta draws. One of these days they'll come up with one that'll actually win her a 2nd slam.

... by accidentally putting her name in the Juniors draw?

Protic
Aug 15th, 2008, 08:25 AM
http://www.itftennis.com/olympics/news/newsarticle.asp?articleid=18975

Olympic spotlight on...Jelena Jankovic
25 Jul 2008


Q: What are you looking forward to with Beijing?

JJ: I'm just looking forward to having another great experience and having a good time. And I will try to give my best. I would love to win a medal out there. Just being there with all the people from my country, all those successful athletes in many different sports.

Q: What are your memories of the Athens Olympics?

JJ: Being there and seeing all these top athletes is an amazing feeling. Representing your country is something special as well. It's a great event and an amazing atmosphere to be out in.

Q: When you were part of the team walking out in Athens, did you get goosebumps?

JJ: Yeah, I did get goosebumps. You are not just playing for yourself; you're representing your country. Holding the flag, just walking in a huge ceremony with all these countries coming out, all these athletes. Of course you get goosebumps, of course you get really excited. You're just happy to be there.

Q: Tennis is such an individual sport, but it's different when it's Fed Cup or the Olympics.

JJ: Yeah, we don't have a lot of opportunities to play as a team. When you play Fed Cup, you're not just playing for yourself; it's the whole team. When you win, it's not that Jelena Jankovic won, it's that Serbia has won and gone through.

So it's really a great thing and I really love playing for my country and always try to give my best. I really give my heart out there. It’s the same in the Olympics: we go there to represent our country and we want to win medals, we want to be successful.

Q: What sport did you enjoy watching last time and would go and see again in Beijing?

JJ: I'm a huge fan of basketball actually. I love playing basketball, just for fun, for recreation, and I love watching it. So that will be the sport for sure I won't miss.

Q: And if you had the chance to play another sport at the Olympics, what would you pick, besides tennis?

JJ: I would actually pick volleyball.

Q: Beach volleyball or indoor volleyball?

JJ: No, I don't want to match up against the Brazilians (laughter). No, just the regular volleyball. I like to play volleyball; I don't say that I'm good at it, but I have fun playing it.

Q: If you had the opportunity to meet one Olympian, who would that be?

JJ: There are so many people. I mean, you are in the Olympic Village, and you are like, “Oh my God, look at that person, look at that one, look... Can I have your autograph?.” It's embarrassing.

You can exchange the little pins. That's what happened in Greece four years ago where we were all exchanging the pins from different countries. By the time you end the tournament, you go home and you have all these little pins from many different places... It's a great memory to have.



-------------------------------

Totally unrelated. It's 8th anniversary of this little event:

Fischer Junior Open 2000
Dates : 14 Aug to 20 Aug 2000

Final
Jelena JANKOVIC (YUG) (5) defeated Dinara SAFINA (RUS) 6-0 6-0

http://www.itftennis.com/juniors/tournaments/tournamentresults.asp?Event=1100003912&Tournament=1100000632

дalex
Aug 15th, 2008, 08:30 AM
OMG @ that juniors' result, Protic! :spit:

дalex
Aug 15th, 2008, 05:03 PM
http://www.mtsmondo.com/peking2008/text.php?vest=106555

JJ: At the moment I cannot play better than this

"At the moment she is much better than me. She's stronger and hits the ball harder. At times it felt like I was playing against a man. She's improved so much and I wouldn't be surprised to see her get to #1 soon", said Jelena after the QF defeat.

"This is my maximum at the moment. Behind me I have 3 weeks that felt like a break almost, or a light practice, because of my knee injury and now I have this problem with the calf as well. All that keeps me away from practicing as hard as I would want and consequently I cannot improve and be fit. Unfortunately, I lost."

Jelena admits that she wasn't serving well.

"I had a weak first serve and that's why I was broken that many times. Later, I wasn't able to break back. This loss is tough but I'll stay positive and hopefully these injuries will heal quickly."

Serbian player now awaits the therapies, recovery and rest. There's not much time cos US Open starts soon.
"As soon as I recover I'll start practicing really hard so I can be ready for the USO that starts very soon."

Even though she didn't win a medal JJ takes with her good impressions about the Olympics.

"Impressions are great. I was a part of the Serbian team and that makes me proud. It was fun, but I'm really sorry I didn't win a medal. I didn't get to see other Serbian sportsmen and cheer on them cos my matches were always scheduled late so I spent most of the day training and resting. If my flight isn't too early, I'll go watch Čavić."

I don't know why she's complaining about the serve, maybe someone asked her about it? It looked good to me. Maybe not in the crucial moments but she served very well, especially the last two sets. The problem was that she made too many UEs. Seeing those stats Sarah posted she had the same # of UEs (56!!!) as Dina and 10 winners less (18 for JJ). Those are not "JJ stats".

~Kiera~
Aug 15th, 2008, 05:25 PM
I don't know why she's complaining about the serve, maybe someone asked her about it? It looked good to me. Maybe not in the crucial moments but she served very well, especially the last two sets. The problem was that she made too many UEs. Seeing those stats Sarah posted she had the same # of UEs (56!!!) as Dina and 10 winners less (18 for JJ). Those are not "JJ stats".

Thanks, Alex.

I really didn't think the serve was the problem, either. In fact, it's been looking much better to me than it has in the past.

дalex
Aug 15th, 2008, 05:42 PM
I really didn't think the serve was the problem, either. In fact, it's been looking much better to me than it has in the past.

I agree, there were no aces but Dina was returning well. JJ's return was better than in her other matches here, but still needs some improving.

Basically, I think that Dina was able to play big points better - serve winners on BPs for JJ, hit hard near the lines, use her chances on JJ's serve and so on...It's a shame and IMO it's the same story all over gain. I'm not even sure her movement wasn't at "her best", that also looked good to me. We'll see how the "new JJ" will do at USO... It doesn't look that promising to me if she doesn't improve her shotmaking abilities (if there's an opening DTL or crosscourt, however small it may be, you go for it and you don't miss it) and if she doesn't stop making so many UEs.

Bruno71
Aug 15th, 2008, 06:57 PM
The one point in her career where her serve really wasn't her biggest liability and she brings it up as the one :lol:

Dina was unbeatable in the 1st set (boy I'm sure GM is having another field day with JJ saying she played like a man...shades of Hingis), but JJ really did have her chances from then on and fell short. That's about the size of it. If anything, I thought there just wasn't enough pop on her shots and she didn't move to the ball well enough at times, but basically like she said, she just got outplayed.

edit: she may have meant a weak 1st serve %.

дalex
Aug 15th, 2008, 07:10 PM
I find it funny that she believes she has enough time to recover from these injuries, get rested and then get fit for the USO. No no, unless she's already recovered somehow during that press conference. :lol: I'm somewhat tired of JJ getting close but never going all the way. And to think there will probably be plenty of that in years to come is just...SCARY. :lol:

Bruno71
Aug 15th, 2008, 07:13 PM
I find it funny that she believes she has enough time to recover from these injuries, get rested and then get fit for the USO. No no, unless she's already recovered somehow during that press conference. :lol: I'm somewhat tired of JJ getting close but never going all the way. And to think there will probably be plenty of that in years to come is just...SCARY. :lol:

It's just kinda...I don't know, sad?...that it seems to have taken JJ years and years to get to the place she's at and she's still short of where Dinara has travelled in just a few months. There's something unusual about Dinara's transformation...it just doesn't seem natural. It's like she improves a year's worth in a week.

JJ has to really nail down a fitness regime and work hard to avoid any further fluke injuries as much as possible. Otherwise, yes, we'll see her come up short again & again.

дalex
Aug 15th, 2008, 07:30 PM
It's just kinda...I don't know, sad?...that it seems to have taken JJ years and years to get to the place she's at and she's still short of where Dinara has travelled in just a few months. There's something unusual about Dinara's transformation...it just doesn't seem natural. It's like she improves a year's worth in a week.

JJ has to really nail down a fitness regime and work hard to avoid any further fluke injuries as much as possible. Otherwise, yes, we'll see her come up short again & again.

I'm not sure that the comparison between JJ and Dina is right. Though I'm not sure what you were thinking, either. Could be true about playing the big matches - Dina seems better just because she beat many GS champs this year, and some other top players as well. But JJ did that last year and had some great wins over WS. I still think we haven't seen JJ playing her best tennis this year. Somehow her shots don't seem as penetrating and accurate as before. She's making so much more UEs. Whole this year I've been thinking her movement wasn't as it could be or should be. Maybe it's just that this transition in her game takes some time. Maybe JJ needs to adjust to the fact she can serve better and still move fast around the court. Also, I never thought her big results would come much sooner since she started playing tennis so late for a professional.
It feels like the time has come but it's yet to really come if you know what I mean...and now we're starting to wonder if it will ever actually come. :lol:

redsonja
Aug 15th, 2008, 07:32 PM
I'm convinced that there was some kind of cosmic transfer of power between Justine and Dinara in Berlin. :p

That said, Jelena should be taking notes from Dinara's experience. Get truly healthy, and then your commitment to your fitness doesn't even have to require a difference in your tournament schedule-- it's not like Dinara took months and months off and became a different player. She dedicated herself to a different training process, and this is the result. And Dinara's only a year younger than Jelena, it's not as if she's new and fresh and had to learn her way around the tour.

It is sad to watch Jelena keep doing this to herself, because she has such immense and obvious talent, but seems to get lost inside her matches, even if she doesn't necessarily lose focus. Like I think when she wasn't going for her openings today, it wasn't because she was picnicking, but because she didn't really know what to do.

That said, this is still the best match I've seen her play since Wimbledon, and losing a tough 3-setter against Dinara Safina isn't anything to sneeze at these days.

I still think we haven't seen JJ playing her best tennis this year. Somehow her shots don't seem as penetrating and accurate as before. She's making so much more UEs. Whole this year I've been thinking her movement wasn't as it could be or should be. Maybe it's just that this transition in her game takes some time.
This is actually far better than I expected her to be this year. Once she pulled her hamstring at Hopman Cup and then refused to let it heal, it was obvious that this year was going to be very hard for her. If you had told me in January that, by the middle of August, she would only have gone out before the quarterfinals in one tournament, I would have had you committed to an insane asylum. :p I actually think that her results this year are sort of a testament to her talent, rather than proving that it may not be quite up to snuff. It's just so infuriating to watch her destroy her body, which pretty much destroys the rest of her game, because if she would just take 2-3 months off and get healthy, I think that the work she's doing with Etcheberry and Sanchez would pay off in an enormous way.

дalex
Aug 15th, 2008, 07:54 PM
It is sad to watch Jelena keep doing this to herself, because she has such immense and obvious talent, but seems to get lost inside her matches, even if she doesn't necessarily lose focus. Like I think when she wasn't going for her openings today, it wasn't because she was picnicking, but because she didn't really know what to do.

I dunno what to think about this anymore. It can't be her fault only. She has a lovely family that follows her around, great coach, doctors & bonebreakers :p. I don't think she's stupid, she must be listening to someone and it just looks like either no one is saying the right things to her or she is too big of a drama queen and telling more about it than what it really is. Or she's just stupid to know what's good for her. I know you would say she's too smart for her own good, but I just don't believe that...:rolls:

That said, this is still the best match I've seen her play since Wimbledon, and losing a tough 3-setter against Dinara Safina isn't anything to sneeze at these days.

Not much there to choose from...Is it? :p
Still, as I already said - those stats if correct just don't look like usual "JJ stats". She was able to keep up with Dina's pace for the better part of the match. The "first set Dina" is the best player EVER, so I'm not even gonna take that set into consideration.
edit. I think she played better against Domi the other day but it was a completely different ball game and I don't think it would have worked against Dina. But she really looked fit in both these matches. :eek:

This is actually far better than I expected her to be this year. Once she pulled her hamstring at Hopman Cup and then refused to let it heal, it was obvious that this year was going to be very hard for her. If you had told me in January that, by the middle of August, she would only have gone out before the quarterfinals in one tournament, I would have had you committed to an insane asylum. :p I actually think that her results this year are sort of a testament to her talent, rather than proving that it may not be quite up to snuff.

Yeah, it's better than expected - points wise...but she didn't have many "great wins" this year. She beat the WS and that's it. And she got to #1. :yeah:
Now we're waiting for her to back that up. *waiting* :lol:

redsonja
Aug 15th, 2008, 08:09 PM
I dunno what to think about this anymore. It can't be her fault only. She has a lovely family that follows her around, great coach, doctors & bonebreakers :p. I don't think she's stupid, she must be listening to someone and it just looks like either no one is saying the right things to her or she is too big of a drama queen and telling more about it than what it really is. Or she's just stupid to know what's good for her. I know you would say she's too smart for her own good, but I just don't believe that...:rolls:
My beliefs, opinions, and theses about what goes on in Camp Jankovic are way too extensive to go into here. :lol:

Not much there to choose from...Is it? :p
:haha: Well, when you put it like that...

edit. I think she played better against Domi the other day but it was a completely different ball game and I don't think it would have worked against Dina. But she really looked fit in both these matches. :eek:
Yeah, I was actually really impressed that on the set changeover in the Domi match she seemed to have figured out exactly what she needed to do to beat Domi, and stuck with it for the rest of the match. That was impressive. :yeah:

But I still think the Dinara match was a little better because she was able to hang with, let's face it, the current best player in the WTA. I know she had a lot of unforced errors, but I would say that there are really only two games that she could have made a huge difference in (you know, not things like serving out the second set on the first try instead of the second, I don't think that would have made a very big difference to the match overall)-- I think she could have broken Dinara in the first game of the third set if she hadn't fallen over, and of course getting broken from 40-0 up was ridiculous. Other than that, yeah, she could have played cleaner and taken different chances, and maybe she would have come out on top, but those are the only two games in the match that I personally would point to and say, this would really have made a difference.

Yeah, it's better than expected - points wise...but she didn't have many "great wins" this year. She beat the WS and that's it. And she got to #1. :yeah:
Now we're waiting for her to back that up. *waiting* :lol:
[crickets chirping]

дalex
Aug 15th, 2008, 08:36 PM
My beliefs, opinions, and theses about what goes on in Camp Jankovic are way too extensive to go into here. :lol:

When is that reality show gonna start, already! :lol:
I seriously think we need it to actually *know* what's going on there.

I think she could have broken Dinara in the first game of the third set if she hadn't fallen over, and of course getting broken from 40-0 up was ridiculous. Other than that, yeah, she could have played cleaner and taken different chances, and maybe she would have come out on top, but those are the only two games in the match that I personally would point to and say, this would really have made a difference.

I actually agree with this. I just don't like the fact that ballbashing is what it takes to beat JJ nowadays. I can't believe some of those shots of Dina. Or is it the fact that JJ is agreeing to play like that that bothers me... It really looked like a men's game with more UEs to me. They were both hitting hard but Dina just won more of those points and usually by hitting the lines. :shrug:

[crickets chirping]

:rolls:

~Kiera~
Aug 15th, 2008, 10:15 PM
http://afp.google.com/article/ALeqM5iihNKSMEPg3YvbhrowBy25ksVgug

Jankovic was pleased with her run to the quarter-finals despite being plagued by a calf injury.

"You cannot expect miracles to happen when you have some problem. I've been taking injections before I went on court just to be able to perform, otherwise I couldn't play," she said.

Bruno71
Aug 15th, 2008, 11:29 PM
A miracle to me would be JJ waiting until an injury is fully healed, and her body is fully fit, before playing a tournament. But I'm just crazy that way.

ChriS.
Aug 15th, 2008, 11:50 PM
I have not seen of her matches this week but it seems like she is only reaching a certain level and is unable to play her very best tennis. If the reason for all these losses at key stages of a tournament are down to her physical state then I would not be too unhappy but I really expect more of her. I just hope that she has not peaked already because I do not really see any improvements in her game this year. I am starting to lose faith in her ability to beat top players.

limedrops
Aug 16th, 2008, 02:07 AM
She's only 23 she still has at least 5 years left in her if not more, she should take a break now while she sill relatively young, I hope she takes a break after the USO until AO or YEC. I've been reading blogs around the internet and some say the same with Rafa who plays a lot and his knees are taped up and some people want him to slow down as well.

She's only had two wins against top players this season, the Williams, and I hope she'll get another chance at the USO since I don't see her pulling out. Yet I'm still worried she's playing on painkillers/injections which is not good.

Bruno71
Aug 16th, 2008, 05:58 AM
I think Jelena's made improvements to her ground game and definitely seems to have made some progress with both her 1st and 2nd serve. But obviously her overall fitness has taken a nosedive, so we have yet to see her at her best. I'd be much more optimistic about next year if she takes most of the fall off.

Ian Aberdon
Aug 16th, 2008, 07:43 AM
Are we watching burnout in progess? Didn't Kim not get fed up of constant injuries? Is JJ heading down the same route?

~Kiera~
Aug 16th, 2008, 08:16 PM
http://www.qctimes.com/blogs/?p=2164

Professional crybabies?

We are professionals. We are not fans. We do not take pictures. We do not cheer. Sandy’s words were jumping hurdles in my mind as I was preparing myself to cover Great Britain’s top player, Andy Murray. I wasn’t really nervous about interviewing him from the start. I had enough practice during the early arrival of the athletes when I interviewed Athens singles and doubles gold medalist, Nicolas Massu from Chile and Spain’s other Boleyn sister, top 10 player, Tommy Robredo. Plus, Andy was expected to win against Chinese Taipei’s Lu Yen-Hsun, ranked 75 in men’s singles.

But when Andy transformed into a gargoyle, yelling at the meek Chinese ball boys to give him the ball after reaching over a dozen unforced errors, my stomach started to churn just a bit.

Sandy did a wonderful job of preparing us on how to be professional journalists, cover a match, and ask appropriate questions for ONS purposes, but I must have missed the lecture on how to deal with emotionally challenged tennis players who might just throw a racket at your face for saying hello.

The Olympics is a major tournament for any player, of course, but the emotional distress the players go through tends to rear its ugly head through 3 year-old temper tantrums. Looking at Andy for example, the young lad just lost it on the court. Not only did he take it out on the frail ball boys, but also his racket.

Como?

Yes, America. The man started talking to his racket, yelling at it, “Every time, here!” Um, note to Andy. Rackets don’t talk, not even in fairyland. The sad thing about the whole situation, other than him losing to Lu, was having to play doubles with his brother Jamie an hour later. And the result? You already know. But I can’t just focus on Andy, for a handful of players began to lose focus and their composures, like 19 year-old Victoria Azarenka from Belarus who started slamming her racket on the court when she lost the first set to Venus Williams. She would look to her parents sitting in the stands opposite me with bewildered eyes as her mum gestured her to calm down. She would scream in emotional agony every time she couldn’t return Venus’s overpowering serve.

I had another bundle of nerves pinch my stomach when I was sent to get quotes from the stoic world No. 3 Serbian Novak Djokovic. He started the first game strong, earning his first point with a racket-shattering ace. But when Rainer Schuettler from Germany tied the second game at deuce after an intense rally, Novak threw his racket in self-disgust. I was beginning to wonder if he had some unknown Murray British blood running through his veins.

But in all fairness of journalistic objectivity, for every couple of crybaby players I witnessed, there were twice as many well-behaved players, like world No. 1 women’s singles player, the sweet and angelic Jelena Jankovic, who stops to talk to every reporter who repetitiously asks her the same annoying questions as the others before them.

Or let’s not forget America’s sweetheart, Lindsay Davenport, who said she was honored to have been greeted by our soon-to-be-former president and his father before the opening ceremony. What a brave thing to say. James Blake is officially a chatterbox. The man will talk your ear off, which is great for a reporter doing an in-depth interview over coffee and a breakfast burrito, but not for us flash quote reporters who need quick sharp nuggets, or as Sandy so eloquently puts it, sexy quotes.

But I have to admit that I gave an unnoticeable victory fist when Blake beat Roger Federer on center court. Darn that lingering fan spirit!

I can’t help but feel extremely sad for all the players that lose.

When you see the disappointment in their faces when match point is achieved by their opponent, the life flowing through their bodies all of a sudden hits a dam — it just stops.

I will never forget the look on Venus’s face when I exited the ONS office after the remaining matches got delayed due to light rain. She was leaning on a wall next to the main press conference room, waiting to answer the question-filled journalists about her upsetting loss to China’s pride and glory, Li Na, while Federer was giving his spiel.

Her face was missing. There was no expression. No movements of the brow. Not even a blinking of the eyes. Her mind had taken a leave of absence. I wanted to tell her that I was proud of her and that she is still a remarkable player. I would have even given her a hug. Not as a fan, but because I felt she needed one.

But Sandy’s voice erupted in the back of my brain with the mechanical refrain: “We are professionals. We are not fans. We do not take pictures. We do not cheer.”

So I walked right passed her, as if I never noticed.

Cameron Coker of Davenport is a University of Iowa student volunteering in Beijing for the Olympics.

Ian Aberdon
Aug 16th, 2008, 08:24 PM
:lol: Wonder if the ballboys think JJ is "sweet & angelic" - WE know she is...but do THEY! :lol:

redsonja
Aug 16th, 2008, 08:58 PM
Hey, I only saw her yell at ballboys once this week. And I'm not entirely sure she wasn't just talking louder in hopes that maybe they would suddenly begin to understand English. :lol:

Cat123
Aug 16th, 2008, 09:31 PM
Angelic?! :devil: :lol:

louisa.
Aug 16th, 2008, 10:57 PM
:angel: course Jelena is an angel!
about time someone realised! :p

ChriS.
Aug 17th, 2008, 12:16 AM
She's only 23 she still has at least 5 years left in her if not more, she should take a break now while she sill relatively young, I hope she takes a break after the USO until AO or YEC. I've been reading blogs around the internet and some say the same with Rafa who plays a lot and his knees are taped up and some people want him to slow down as well.

She's only had two wins against top players this season, the Williams, and I hope she'll get another chance at the USO since I don't see her pulling out. Yet I'm still worried she's playing on painkillers/injections which is not good.Now she has reached her first goal of being number 1 she should just concentrate on the slams. She needs to win one to show her quality. Your right she has plenty of time left - I just watched the amazing 33 year old Zhang Ning who has overcome injuries to win her second gold in badminton (the only woman ever to do that) having been the oldest every player to win gold at the last Olympics.

дalex
Aug 17th, 2008, 08:57 AM
"But in all fairness of fan objectivity", of course JJ is sweet and angelic with journalists. I would be surprised if she wasn't chasing them to be nice to them and tell them her story. :lol:

Sweet & Angelic JJ :hearts:

~Kiera~
Aug 18th, 2008, 12:36 PM
http://www.tennisgrandstand.com/archives/1594

“I’m the most consistent player, so that’s why I became number one in the world. And my time will come. I’m only 23 years old. It’s not like I’m at the end of my career.” - Jelena Jankovic, defending her rise to the top of the women’s rankings without having reached the final of a Grand Slam tournament.

STANDING TALL

Jelena Jankovic showed how much a champion she is when she participated in a gala event in Beijing called Champions For Children. Jankovic took time out before the Olympic tennis competition got underway to support UNICEF in her role as National Ambassador for Serbia, and she also chatted with 14-year-old Chinese tennis champion Liu Yingchong. At the event, which focused on the most vulnerable children, Jankovic advocated for equality for girls. Other celebrities at Champions For Children included movie star Jackie Chan and classical pianist Lang Lang.

redsonja
Aug 20th, 2008, 02:30 AM
New blog:
http://www.jj-jelenajankovic.com/eng/blog.php

Dear Fans,

I am safely back from the Olympics. What an experience that was. Although I was not at my very best, it will still go down as one of my most memorable times on tour. I was sad that the doctors advised me to miss the opening ceremony because I needed to rest my calf but I guess you all saw how amazing it was on TV. To have so many athletes from so many different countries all in the same place at the same time was an experience of a lifetime.

The amount of organization that went into the event was incredible. Everything there was well organized but very strict. I was given specific practice times and our court time was limited to blocks of 45 minutes every day. We had transportation arranged to and from the Olympic village but I didn't get a lot of time to go and see the sites of Beijing. I really enjoyed being with my Serbian team mates and all the athletes in general. Although I didn't get the chance to see any of the other events, I want to congratulate both Milorad Cavic for the silver and Novak Djokovic for the bronze medals that they won at the Olympics - Serbia is proud of you! Obviously I want to congratulate Dinara who beating me in quater-finals. She has been playing really well and is proving to be a tough competitor this year. All of my matches were played really late at night apart from one. I did the best that i could, suffering with an injury throughout the whole tournament was not easy. I am very sad because I have lost and that I have not fulfilled desire to bring a medal to mu country, but it�s like just that, I gave my maximum in this moment, and I believe that it will be better, that we will enjoy some new triumphs, even in four years on the OI in London!
I am proud that the dress that I was wearing and helped design was getting so many compliments!

Despite the duties that every competition requires, I got the time to take a part in humanitarian action of UNICEF that made me very happy. On the event �Champions for the kids� in Beijing, I met the Hollywood star Jackie Chan, who is also the ambasador of UNICEF, and we both had the same mission in this humanitarian ation, which had the aim of raising awareness about the children in China. It is always a good feeling, when you are able to be devoted to the comunity.

Other than that, life was hot out there. It was also pretty humid but the air wasn't so bad. The organization made an effort with the food as well - offering a selection of d ifferent types of food. As I can be pretty adventurous, I didn't mind trying a bit of everything although I have to admit that McDonalds had the longest line of all the restaurants!

I am now in Serbia visiting my doctors, having some treatments so not too much time to rest because I leave tomorrow for New York. I am hoping to be healthy for the US Open so keep your fingers crossed for me. New York is one of my favorite cities and I think I am going to have to bring out my credit card and visit some of the shops when I am there! I am looking for to promoting my new Reebok dress. I really like how it fits and I hope you do too. I also have anew Prince bag that I will be taking with me on court so, now that I look good, I better play well too! :))))

That's all I have for now, but be sure to follow along in New York. I will write again soon.

Love, JJ

louisa.
Aug 20th, 2008, 07:01 AM
:)
glad they got the site fixed :D
good luck to her in new york.
:lol: love that the credit card gets a mention.

дalex
Aug 20th, 2008, 07:27 AM
I am looking for to promoting my new Reebok dress. I really like how it fits and I hope you do too. I also have anew Prince bag that I will be taking with me on court so, now that I look good, I better play well too!

:rolls:

I am now in Serbia visiting my doctors, having some treatments...

O bonebreaker, bonebreaker, wherefore art thou bonebreaker? :lol:

...so not too much time to rest because I leave tomorrow for New York.

Well, it was an ambitious plan - healing, rest and getting fit in a week. She can do without the rest bit. :lol:

louisa.
Aug 20th, 2008, 07:35 AM
hehe, i also love her theory of "now that I look good, I better play well too!"

Brena
Aug 20th, 2008, 07:58 AM
:rolls:

Jelena... you always look good, but you really might try to play well too for a change :p
oh, j/k, bring on the new dress and some pics from your shopping adventures with Bethanie! :)

redsonja
Aug 20th, 2008, 11:59 AM
I love that she has another new Prince bag. I swear she only had the other one for like two weeks. :lol:

Nina.
Aug 20th, 2008, 12:27 PM
a new dress :bounce:

Marilyn Monheaux
Aug 20th, 2008, 03:16 PM
a new dress :bounce:

:eek: I couln't believe it when I read it the first time :lol:

The Reebok guys let her play the same dress from January to June (different colors don't count)
and now she has a new one for every tournament:confused:
Maybe they realised that JJ is the one and only poster model they need! :bowdown:(Sorry Nicole...)

Whatever she will wear I'm sure she'll look fab:hearts:

Don't know if it has been posted but this is her new prince bag
http://cornedbeefhash.files.wordpress.com/2008/07/prince-proteam100-bw.jpg

дalex
Aug 22nd, 2008, 09:52 AM
http://tennisworld.typepad.com/thewrap/2008/08/opener.html
As for the women’s side, I was struck by the fact that the top seeds are both from the tiny country of Serbia, something that should continue to amaze us—by the way, why do these things happen in little clusters: two Belgians (Henin and Clijsters), two Germans (Becker and Graf), now three Serbs (Ivanovic, Jankovic, and Djokovic)? Other than that, this looks like a repeat of last year’s women’s event, when most of the heavy artillery was up top—this should quiet conspiracy theorists who speculated that it was done to help Maria Sharapova in 2007; do you think the USTA would go out of its way to put Jelena Jankovic into its prime-time final? In 2007, the result was that Svetlana Kuznetsova was allowed to sneak through in the bottom half. She might do it again.

The Women
First Quarter
Ana Ivanovic is back at No. 1, which I suppose makes sense; she has won a Slam. But she’s still recovering from a thumb injury and hasn’t done much of anything since losing early at Wimbledon. So we don’t have much to go on when it comes to her form. There are some quasi-names near her—Dellacqua, Kanepi, Dechy, Cornet, plus Mauresmo and Petrova—but I’ll take Ivanovic into the quarters, where she might face Dinara Safina. The trendy pick would be Safina there; she’s been the player of the summer. But it’s hardly a sure thing. She may be a little disappointed, her momentum a little slowed, after coming so close to gold in Beijing, and Ivanovic has also beaten her the last three times they’ve played. But I think Safina's form has been too good for her not to extend it to her second Slam semi. She's made the quarters at Flushing before, and, for what it's worth, her brother has also played some pretty good ball here in the past.
Semifinalist: Safina

Second Quarter
This section is bracketed by the Williams sisters. It’s never clear what you’re going to get from these two, but I don’t see much to keep them from facing off in the quarters. Perhap Szavay on Serena’s side, and a bigger perhaps for Radwanska on Venus’—she upended Sharapova here last year. As for a rematch of the Wimbledon final, I don’t think Serena wants an unpleasant surprise like that twice in a row. What she wants is a Slam of her own in 2008, to match her sister's.
Semifinalist: Serena Williams

Third Quarter
Here’s where it starts to get a little rough, where we start to miss the Henins and Sharapovas of the world. The two top seeds are Elena Dementieva and Kuznetsova. Their primary challengers, at least on paper, are Chakvetadze and Schnyder. Kuznetsova reached the final last year, but Dementieva is on a high after winning a gold medal (on the same surface she’ll see in New York) and has been to an Open final of her own before. I think she’ll continue with her strong play.
Semifinalist: Dementieva

Fourth Quarter
Finally we stagger into the bottom quarter, led by Jankovic and Olympic bronze medalist Vera Zvonareva. This Serb has also been hurt, but she made her Slam breakthrough at the Open a couple years ago. Her draw includes a testy opponent in Caroline Wozniacki, who took her to three sets at Wimbledon, in the fourth round.
Semifinalist: Jankovic

Semifinals: S. Williams d. Safina; Dementieva d. Jankovic
Final: S. Williams d. Dementieva

~Kiera~
Aug 22nd, 2008, 11:20 AM
http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/tennis/usopen08/columns/story?columnist=ubha_ravi&id=3547710

Time is ripe for Safina to take advantage of ailing tour members
By Ravi Ubha

Tournament: U.S. Open
Surface: Hard
Draw: 128
Top seeds: Ana Ivanovic, Jelena Jankovic, Svetlana Kuznetsova, Serena Williams

Who's on first? Ana Ivanovic, for the time being, in what's turned out to be a wacky season in the women's game.

Ivanovic missed the Olympics with a thumb injury, fellow Serb Jelena Jankovic's is dealing with a calf strain and the Williams sisters have gimpy knees. Much like the Olympics, it's a battle of the fittest.

Jankovic, if healthy, won't have a better chance to reach a first Grand Slam final. Almost all of the major contenders are in Ivanovic's top half.

First quarter: Safina in pole position

After winning a silver medal at the Olympics, Dinara Safina lavished heavy praise on her coach, Zeljko Krajan.

"I have to thank God that I met him,'' Safina said.

Imagine her words if the Russian can win a Grand Slam.

Safina, who, not surprisingly, admitted she was tired following a hectic three months, is still the hottest player in the women's game -- and vitally, healthy.

There's little early danger for the Russian. In fact, French teen Alize Cornet, better on clay, appears to be her only road block before the quarterfinals.

Ivanovic is meant to be waiting, though the thumb injury puts that into question. Big-hitting Aussie Casey Dellacqua looms in the second round, sentimental favorite Amelie Mauresmo might surface in the third and dark horse Nadia Petrova is a potential opponent in the fourth.

Prediction: Safina

Second quarter: Williams & Williams

We could be in store for a first Grand Slam quarterfinal meeting between sisters Venus and Serena Williams. Both show up in this section.

Like Safina, Serena, who blew a set and break lead to eventual champion Elena Dementieva in the Olympic quarterfinals, has an easy looking first three rounds. Ukraine's Julia Vakulenko, a possible second-round foe and one of the breakout performers of 2007, has gone 3-10 in 2008 thanks largely to a wrist injury.

Venus starts against the attacking Samantha Stosur -- Serena crushed the Aussie in Beijing -- and is slated to face 27th seed Alona Bondarenko, a doubles opponent in China, in the third round. Bondarenko has cooled in the second half of 2008.

To the fourth round, then, and if Venus is off her game slightly (remember, she hasn't won a non-grass-court major since 2001), Pole Agnieszka Radwanska or feisty Slovak Dominika Cibulkova, two teenagers, could knock her off.

Serena over Cibulkova in the fourth round.

Prediction: Serena Williams

Third quarter: It's up to Elena

Here's what Dementieva had to say after winning gold in China: "That was the biggest goal in my career. I don't know what to dream about [now]. There is nothing compared to the gold medal, nothing.''

Hmm. You think she'll be motivated for New York?

If not, Italian wall Francesca Schiavone should fancy her chances in the third round. If yes, Dementieva should ease into the quarterfinals. Her only serious threat is the slumping third-seed Svetlana Kuznetsova, last year's finalist. Other seeds in the not-so-packed section are Schiavone, Shahar Peer, Anna Chakvetadze, Patty Schnyder, Maria Kirilenko and Katarina Srebotnik.

Peer and the inconsistent Kirilenko face tough first-round opponents in Li Na and Tamira Paszek, respectively.

Prediction: Kuznetsova

Fourth quarter: Jelena's gift

A few dark horses lurk in Jankovic's quarter, but the No. 2 should cope -- again, assuming the calf is better.

Jankovic, so nearly a U.S. Open finalist two years ago, potentially faces Chinese battler Zheng Jie in the third round. In the fourth, it could be either Victoria Azarenka or fellow teen Caroline Wozniacki, on the other side of the net at Wimbledon when Jankovic fell badly and hurt her knee.

Another sentimental favorite, Lindsay Davenport, the 1998 champion hindered by a knee injury herself, has a tough start against rising Canadian Aleksandra Wozniak.

Given her path, Vera Zvonareva, seeded eighth, has a decent shot of following up her Olympic bronze with a fourth-round showing.

Prediction: Jankovic

Semifinals

Kuznetsova, the 2004 U.S. Open champion, has had trouble winning big matches the last two years; Jankovic is in the same boat.

Just imagine how much fun watching this one would be.

For what it's worth, Kuznetsova leads their head-to-heads 3-2. Safina downed Williams the last time they met, on clay this year, which won't hurt her confidence. At this point, she's also the steadier.

Prediction: Safina, Jankovic to advance

Final

Safina got her feet wet at the French Open, when the tennis gods were seemingly on her side, by reaching a first Grand Slam final. Instead of suffering a letdown, she's only improved. If Safina is on her game, Jankovic will struggle, as she does with other big hitters.

Prediction: Safina

schorsch
Aug 22nd, 2008, 12:04 PM
me wants a new prince bag, too :sad:

ce
Aug 22nd, 2008, 01:37 PM
i like his prediction

Ian Aberdon
Aug 22nd, 2008, 05:39 PM
Are these Prince Bags a Womens'-only thing?
Do you get Mens' Prince Bags too?
Can you trade them in for a better model?
Can I get one? :lol:

Cat123
Aug 23rd, 2008, 08:39 AM
I really think Safina will run out of steam before the semis. I expect a Williams in the final.

Hashim.
Aug 23rd, 2008, 08:13 PM
Q. Give us a health and fitness update. How are you feeling this week?

JELENA JANKOVIC: I'm feeling all right. I don't have ‑‑ at the moment, you know, to knock on wood, I don't have anything, any problems, any injuries. I'm trying to get back in shape, so I'm trying to train very hard and doing my best, you know, to get as fit as possible for the tournament.


Q. Did you come directly from Beijing?

JELENA JANKOVIC: No, I went to see my doctors at home in Serbia. There was a problem with my calf in Beijing, and I was taking injections to play that tournament because I couldn't do it.

Now I'm finally ‑‑ I got over that injury so I'm fine, but takes time for me now to get stronger again and fit.


Q. How is it being in New York the last Grand Slam?

JELENA JANKOVIC: It's great. I love New York. It's one of my favorite Grand Slams. You know, the atmosphere here is great and has so much energy, so I really look forward to playing this tournament. I will try my best.


Q. Considering the summer that you've had, I mean, how do you feel coming in about your own game, your chances here to compete?

JELENA JANKOVIC: So far I had a tough year with injuries, so many injuries, and I was also sick in the middle of the year.

So I've been, you know, struggling, because when you have this kind of problems it's tough to train 100%. I finally decided to train, and I have some other problem where I have to rest one week or two weeks, so I lose.

It's amazing how quickly you get out of shape, and then it takes you again a lot of time to get back there. And when you start by having one injury, you know, your whole body is compensating and you start having pains in places where I'm not used to.

So it's been tough, but hopefully, you know, that's the past, and hopefully I can start playing without having any problems and just enjoy my tennis.


Q. Was competing, having to, being in Beijing, was that a particularly tough thing to deal with and then to come right from there to here? Was that very trying?

JELENA JANKOVIC: Yeah, I played Olympics, special feeling to represent your country. I really tried my best, and like I said, I was taking the injections so I don't feel the pain when I was going on, you know, to play my matches. Otherwise I wouldn't be able to go on court and play.

But now I'm finally, you know, I don't have that problem anymore. It's finished, and now it's just a matter of, you know, getting, you know, firm again, you know, getting all these muscles back and feeling like I used to feel before when I was fit and ready to play.

At the moment, I'm still working very hard, and some of the things don't happen overnight. I need time, you know, to train. You cannot get your endurance and your strength back in a few days. So I will try to keep working hard and we will see how everything goes.


Q. Compared to the other Grand Slam tournaments, each one has such a unique feel to it, very different from the other. What are your thoughts on this particular one?

JELENA JANKOVIC: It's quite special. Especially playing here at night, it has a very unique atmosphere and energy. I remember playing last year here against Venus. It was a night match, and we had standing ovation when it was 6‑All in the third. Just those moments are quite unique, whereas some of the other Grand Slams you don't have night matches.

The atmosphere is completely different. So I really enjoy everything here, and I really, you know, I love the fans. They get so into it and they're quite enthusiastic, so it's a lot of fun.


Q. You said you went to Serbia before you came?

JELENA JANKOVIC: Uh‑huh.


Q. How is it with you, Ana, and Novak having such great years? What is it like every time you go back home?

JELENA JANKOVIC: Every time we go back home, people really appreciate our results, really support us all the way, and they wake up in the morning to watch us play whenever we're playing. People are always up to date and seeing how we're doing.

Because tennis nowadays, believe it or not, is the most popular sport in Serbia. Before that that was never the case, because we didn't have any players and we didn't have a tradition in tennis.

Now that we have three top three, 1, 2, 3 in the world, it's really amazing. A lot of the young kids are playing, a lot of people are so interested in tennis, and it's a great thing for our country.


Q. Do you guys talk about that when you're in the locker room or...

JELENA JANKOVIC: We got used to that. We try to do our job. We try to ‑‑ especially when I go back home, I want to be just a normal person. I want to see my family. I want to see my friends. I don't really like to be in the spotlight and all this, do all these crazy things.


Q. Some athletes when they achieve that kind of success in their country can't go home. It's too hard to go home because they are so mobbed and there is so much expected of them. Do you ever feel that way?

JELENA JANKOVIC: No, because I try to keep low maintenance. I really don't go to places where I will be seen. I just go there to really rest and recover from, you know, the traveling and from the tournaments.

I go to see my family, and I hang out there and with my friends, as well. When I go out, I don't really ‑‑ you know, when you get in the room and you're like, Oh, here I am. I'm here. So of course people will come up to you and they want to, you know, take a picture with you or have an autograph or just say something to you, Congratulations, you're doing well, we're so proud of you.

I don't really ‑‑ it's normal. I'm kind of used to it, and I don't feel, you know, that pressure from the people. If I go out somewhere, it's fine. That's the way it has to be. That's the price you have to pay for doing well, for being successful.


Q. How big of an issue is jet lag? Are you still dealing with it now?

JELENA JANKOVIC: Oh, my gosh. After Beijing I went to Serbia, so it's six hours less than in China, and then six hours, another six hours less here, so I've been waking up at 6:00 in the morning every morning here.

By the time it's like 7:00 or 8:00 in the evening, I'm already ‑‑ I can't keep my eyes open, so I'm having a hard time. I'm trying to adjust, especially ‑‑ you know, maybe I will play some of the night matches here, and it's very important for me to be ready for that.


Q. Are you worried about it at all come next week? Do you think you'll be adjusted?

JELENA JANKOVIC: I hope so, you know. Already I arrived here few days ago, so every day I'm getting better and better. But I'm waking up so early which, you know, it's like a clock. I'm so adjusted to a certain, you know, time, and I don't even need an alarm. I just wake up. It's really annoying. I want to sleep longer, but it's not the case at the moment.


Q. How much pressure do you feel to try to become No. 1?

JELENA JANKOVIC: I don't understand.


Q. How much pressure do you feel trying to become No. 1?

JELENA JANKOVIC: I already did. (Laughter)

Q. Right, right, but to regain that, and also, do you feel pressure from some of the younger players who are coming up, any specific players that you find that are sort of dangerous that are doing well now?

JELENA JANKOVIC: Pressure for ‑‑ I mean, I achieved, I arrived in No. 1 spot last week, so it was a big goal of mine, and not many players have achieved that. And any player to have reached that spot, I'm really proud I joined this selection of great champions.

I don't really feel any pressure, you know. Like I said, I had a tough year and I've been struggling quite a lot. I'm trying to improve my tennis to start training again very hard, because without the training, it's tough to expect results.

Going through injuries, I haven't been able to train the way I wanted, so I hope that I can do it, and now from now on and for the rest of the year.


JJ's interview today:)

http://www.usopen.org/en_US/news/interviews/2008-08-23/200808231219517169859.html

~Kiera~
Aug 23rd, 2008, 08:21 PM
Thanks Hashim.

I knew she'd be cured again :lol:

Cat123
Aug 23rd, 2008, 08:56 PM
Q. Do you guys talk about that when you're in the locker room or...

JELENA: No, Ana doesn't talk in the locker room. Nto to me anyway. You know, we have a professional relationship we do our jobs. We're rivals so we don't really, you know, have conversations. She might talk to other people about it but i usually can't hear over the squeak of her shoes. If Novak was in our locker room I'd be a bit worried, Sharapova isn't here so there's no reason for him to be. I wouldn't go into the boys locker room either... Erm... No, we don't talk about it. :rolleyes:


;)

RFS
Aug 23rd, 2008, 09:18 PM
JELENA: No, Ana doesn't talk in the locker room. Nto to me anyway. You know, we have a professional relationship we do our jobs. We're rivals so we don't really, you know, have conversations. She might talk to other people about it but i usually can't hear over the squeak of her shoes. If Novak was in our locker room I'd be a bit worried, Sharapova isn't here so there's no reason for him to be. I wouldn't go into the boys locker room either... Erm... No, we don't talk about it. :rolleyes:


;)

LMAO :haha:

Marilyn Monheaux
Aug 23rd, 2008, 09:35 PM
JELENA: No, Ana doesn't talk in the locker room. Nto to me anyway. You know, we have a professional relationship we do our jobs. We're rivals so we don't really, you know, have conversations. She might talk to other people about it but i usually can't hear over the squeak of her shoes. If Novak was in our locker room I'd be a bit worried, Sharapova isn't here so there's no reason for him to be. I wouldn't go into the boys locker room either... Erm... No, we don't talk about it. :rolleyes:


;)

Awesome!! :haha::rolls::tape:

Marilyn Monheaux
Aug 23rd, 2008, 09:40 PM
Are these Prince Bags a Womens'-only thing?
Do you get Mens' Prince Bags too?
Can you trade them in for a better model?
Can I get one? :lol:

How about a green version for you?
http://cornedbeefhash.files.wordpress.com/2008/07/prince-proteam100-bg.jpg

The rest of the Prince stable also gets some attention with a new Pro Team 100 line being produced for the Open. Each bag in the line will be made available in two distinct color options — black and green and black and white. While both will have a sleek, classic black base color, one version will feature — for the first time ever — the Prince logo in its updated green colorway accented by silver paneling.

The other version will feature a classic white Prince logo with white accents on the straps and underside. The Pro Team 100 collection comes in a triple, six, and twelve-pack racquet bag; plus a locker bag, wheeled duffle, and a backpack. Both the six and twelve-pack contain a thermal foil lining crucial for increased protection and temperature control.

Who gets what: The racquet each Prince player uses will dictate which version of the bag he or she carries. Those playing the O3 Speedport Black, O3 Speedport White, O3 Speedport Pro White or O3 White will carry the black/white version, while those playing the Ozone Tour, Ozone Pro Tour, O3 Hybrid Tour, and all other O3 models will carry the green/black version.

Players like Nikolay Davydenko, Juan Carlos Ferrero, Sam Querrey, Mike and Bob Bryan, and Jelena Jankovic will all carry their Pro Team 100 bags in events prior to New York.

Jankovic, who plays with the O3 Speedport Pro White, and currently sits at the doorstep of the world’s #1 ranking, will be the first woman on tour to sport the black/white bag.

“My life is pretty much packed into my racquet bag — it is my most valuable piece of luggage,” said Jankovic. “Whether in my hotel room, heading to an early morning workout or in the middle of a night match at the U.S Open, wherever I am, my racquet bag is usually with me so it has to be able to withstand what tennis players put it through, but also look great on court. I love the look and design of this bag line — and am proud and excited to be one of the first to carry the black/white version on tour.”

~Kiera~
Aug 23rd, 2008, 09:54 PM
http://www.bangkokpost.com/sportsplus/sportsplus.php?id=129895

US Open: Jankovic pronounces herself fit and healthy - for a change

By Bill Scott

New York (dpa) - Second seed Jelena Jankovic, never far from surgery, pronounced herself fit on Saturday less than 48 hours before the start of the US Open.

The Serb received treatment for one of her frequent and numerous niggles - her calf - last week in Belgrade, after a quarter-final Beijing Olympic loss to Dinara Safina.

"I'm feeling all right, knock on wood," said the 23-year-old, who had a brief reign at the number one ranking this month, before falling back to second behind compatriot Ana Ivanovic.

"I don't have any problems, any injuries. I'm trying to get back in shape, so I'm trying to train very hard and doing my best, to get as fit as possible for the tournament."

Jankovic reached the New York quarter-finals in 2007 after a semi- final the year before. After four titles in 2007 she only has Rome to her credit for this campaign.

While she was thrilled to have played for Serbia in Beijing, Jankovic is putting all that behind her as she concentrates on the 2008 concluding major at Flushing Meadows.

"Finally I don't have my (physical) problem anymore, it's finished. It's now a matter of getting all these (leg) muscles back and feeling like I used to feel before when I was fit and ready to play.

"I'm still working very hard, and some of the things don't happen overnight. I need time to train. You cannot get your endurance and your strength back in a few days.

"So I will try to keep working hard and we will see how everything goes."

The second seed starts with American teenaged wild card Coco Vandeweghe, ranked out side the Top 500 and with only four WTA-level appearances in her career.

While now out of her sickbed, the drama-queen Serb cannot forget what she's been through and is aiming to take baby steps at the wrapup major. "I've had a tough year with injuries, so many injuries, and I was also sick in the middle of the year.

"I've been struggling, because when you have these kinds of problems it's tough to train 100 per cent - I finally decide to train, and I have some other problem where I have to rest one week or two weeks, so I lose (matches)."

Though it's not the Olympics, Serbian pride will be a major factor for Jankovic during her New York adventure.

"Tennis nowadays, believe it or not, is the most popular sport in Serbia," she said. "That has never been the case. We didn't have any players and we didn't have a tradition in tennis.

"Now that we have three top three in the world (Ivanovic, herself and men's number three Novak Djokovic) it's really amazing. It's a great thing for our country."

louisa.
Aug 23rd, 2008, 11:09 PM
thanks for the interview and article guys! :D

~Kiera~
Aug 23rd, 2008, 11:45 PM
http://www.foxsports.com.au/story/0,8659,24232442-23210,00.html

Jankovic hopeful for first Grand Slam

From correspondents in New York

August 24, 2008 JELENA Jankovic goes into the US Open knowing that in order to capture her first Grand Slam title she needs to raise her game to the next level when it counts the most.

The knock on the world number two Jankovic continues to be her failure to breakthrough at a Grand Slam.

The 23-year-old Serbian has yet to reach a final in the 20 Grand Slam appearances and despite going deep into just about every tournament this year she has just one win on her resume.

She blames that in part on injuries.

"I am working very hard and some of the things don't happen overnight," she said. "You can't get your endurance and your strength back in a few days. I will keep working hard and we will see what happens."

In the semi-finals of the French Open, Jankovic appeared to be headed to victory when she was up 2-0 in the third set before losing to countrywoman Ana Ivanovic.

Jankovic has reached the quarter-finals or better in 14 of 15 tournaments this year and was rewarded for her consistent play earlier this month when she earned the world number one ranking for the first time in her career.

But it was a short stay at the top as Ivanovic quickly claimed it back.

Jankovic had to fight through a calf injury to get to the round of eight at the Beijing Olympics. She received pain injections from a doctor prior to her matches.

"There was a problem with my calf in Beijing and I was taking injections to play that tournament," she said. "I had to take the injections so I didn't feel the pain. Otherwise I wouldn't have been able to go on the court and play."

Jankovic said tennis recently became the number one sport in Serbia thanks to the success of players like her, Ivanovic and men's No. 3 Novak Djokovic.

"Believe it or not tennis is the most popular sport in Serbia," Jankovic said. "That was never the case before. We didn't have a tradition of producing great tennis players."

"Now we have the top three in the world. It is really amazing. A lot of young kids are playing. A lot of people are so interested tennis. It is a great thing for our country."

She is looking forward to the challenge of competing in the US Open but doesn't know if her conditioning will be enough.

Besides the leg injury in Beijing, she was upset in the fourth round at Wimbledon while dealing with a knee injury.

"Knock on wood I don't have any problems or injuries at the moment."

"I am just trying to get back in shape. I am training hard to get as fit as possible for the tournament.

"It is amazing how quickly you get out of shape and then it takes you a long time to get back there."

Ian Aberdon
Aug 24th, 2008, 07:55 AM
"Low maintenance" is NOT how I would describe JJ! :lol:

~Kiera~
Aug 24th, 2008, 03:36 PM
http://www.signonsandiego.com/sports/golf/20080824-9999-1s24usopen.html

Coco goes big time

Coco Vandeweghe of Carlsbad, 16, drew an opening test against No. 2 seed Jelena Jankovic after being awarded a wild card into the women's main draw. This means that Vandeweghe, a 6-footer who can whip in 100 mph serves, could have her match scheduled in Arthur Ashe Stadium.

“She has power,” said longtime San Diego teaching professional Ben Press of Vandeweghe, “but it won't trouble Jankovic. If Coco wins four games, she should feel very good about it. She should think about just winning games instead of thinking about winning the match.”

My US Open Qualifying Week Reports (http://www.tennisforum.com/showthread.php?t=354387)



[snip]

Walked around the grounds and saw Kaia Kanepi in her classic shades on P1. Then sat in on a bit of Jankovic’s practice session on Armstrong, working out her groundies, volleys, and overheads with her hitting partner. Not very crowded for Jelena because the much bigger star from Serbia, Nole, was over on Grandstand. This was Jelena and Nole’s first day on the grounds at Flushing. At one point Jelena went over to the cooler and asked for a Gatorade, and shockingly could not get one. The woman said they were out because they were at the qualie matches. I bet they were all over at Grandstand for Djok, Fed, and Nadal, lol. Then Jelena was sucking on a water bottle and I was taking pictures because she was so close. And she stared at me and we had eye contact for a while, so I smiled (what else could I do?) and she just glared back at me. Bitch.

[snip]

Back at the practice courts, Jelena Jankovic was practicing in an all gray outfit on P5 (closest to the fence). Got some good pics of her and her mom. My friend and I noticed that Jelena’s butt was super sweaty, but the sweat was isolated to her but cheeks and not the crack area. Which means she wear playing tennis in a thong. But I am happy to say that Jelena was good with fans today and did sign for a long time.

Dawn123
Aug 26th, 2008, 07:05 AM
JELENA JANKOVIC
Monday, August 25, 2008


Q. It seems like this time of the year every year you come out on the court with either your knee bandaged or thigh or ankle. It didn't appear like you had any bracing this evening. What's your general state of health?

JELENA JANKOVIC: Well, at the moment, you know, I'm healthy, and I don't want to talk about that. I don't have any problems, but I've been struggling throughout the whole year. I had so many injuries and when I started with one, and it was like a chain, you know, my whole body was compensating. I got all these injuries that I never had before.

So I had a tough time overall throughout the year, but now I finally am healthy and I'm trying really to work hard. Even after the match, I did some fitness, I did some strengthening for my legs and for my arms. I need to get in shape again and get stronger and get fitter so that I can, you know, from my perspective avoid those kind of injuries. But you can be unlucky and twist an ankle, so that when I'm playing, you know, I don't have as much as I can, I can try to stay healthy. I try my best.


Q. Were you at all able to feel happy about being No. 1 for a week? Did that actually mean anything to you?

JELENA JANKOVIC: No, it means a lot to me, because especially after having, you know, a tough year, I've been struggling, I haven't been able to train the way I want to, I haven't been in my best form, and to reach in the No. 1 spot is amazing. And it's something that will stay in my record, in my biography for the rest of my life. And nobody can take that away from me. And I'm only the 18th player to achieve that. So it's a huge achievement, and I'm really proud to join a selection of great champions.

But of course I want to keep developing my game, keep improving, but in order to do that, it's very ‑‑ the priority is to be healthy, and I haven't been healthy throughout almost the whole year.

So it's very tough to be at your best game, at your top level, but, you know, I will try my best, you know, for the hopefully for the rest of the season. If, I hope, I pray to God just to stay the way I am now and then I can work on my game and try to get better and better each day.


Q. You said on Saturday that the change in time zones from Beijing to Serbia to New York had made you tired, and in the evenings 7:00 or 8:00 you were having trouble staying awake. Were you tired at all tonight?

JELENA JANKOVIC: I'm tired now. I'm actually falling asleep now. It's about time for me to go to bed, but when I was on the court, I really didn't think about sleeping. I was just excited to go on court and to play my match and get the job done, especially I was, you know, I wanted to be awake, because I didn't know my opponent very well, I didn't know who she is, the way she plays. All I knew she was a junior and I only heard that she was 16 years old they said when they were introducing her on the court. So I didn't really know much about her.

So it's always tough to play an opponent who doesn't have anything to lose, who you don't know very well, who is, you know ‑‑ it's always a tough opponent especially in the first round with the windy conditions out there. But I did as much as I needed to do to win the match.

http://www.usopen.org/en_US/news/interviews/2008-08-25/200808251219718813765.html

Dawn123
Aug 26th, 2008, 07:54 AM
Unlike Szavay, Jelena Jankovic says she is "not much of a car specialist." Hyundai of Serbia sponsors the 23-year-old player, but she prefers to zip around in a 2008 Porsche 911. "My Porsche is fast, in good shape, and stylish - just like me," says the.

Up-and-coming Jankovic, now ranked No. 2 on the WTA Tour, has her eyes on other sexy cars, too, and doesn't seem phased yet by time constraints. "I saw an Aston Martin that I really like," she says. "First I have to win a few more tournaments though."

http://www.newschannel5.com/Global/story.asp?S=8895358

redsonja
Aug 26th, 2008, 01:33 PM
"My Porsche is fast, in good shape, and stylish - just like me,"
Oh, so it breaks down every five miles and is always in the shop? Awesome.

Cilla
Aug 26th, 2008, 01:35 PM
Oh, so it breaks down every five miles and is always in the shop? Awesome.
:rolls:

Cilla
Aug 26th, 2008, 01:43 PM
JELENA: No, Ana doesn't talk in the locker room. Nto to me anyway. You know, we have a professional relationship we do our jobs. We're rivals so we don't really, you know, have conversations. She might talk to other people about it but i usually can't hear over the squeak of her shoes. If Novak was in our locker room I'd be a bit worried, Sharapova isn't here so there's no reason for him to be. I wouldn't go into the boys locker room either... Erm... No, we don't talk about it. :rolleyes:


;)

:haha:

:worship:

Ian Aberdon
Aug 26th, 2008, 06:10 PM
So our girl didn't want to talk about her injuries, before proceeding to...............talk about her injuries! :lol:

Gotta love her! :hearts:

Brena
Aug 26th, 2008, 06:22 PM
Oh, so it breaks down every five miles and is always in the shop? Awesome.

:haha:
But they repair it very quickly every time.

RFS
Aug 26th, 2008, 06:24 PM
:haha:
But they repair it very quickly every time.

With the use of her trusted car-crusher...

~Kiera~
Aug 27th, 2008, 08:33 PM
http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/1/newsroom/stories/?ContentID=2514

And Now For Something Completely Different...

Post-match press conferences usually focus on the match just played or the match coming up, how the players feel about their form or their seasons, even their career goals. But there's a lot we still don't know about the stars of the Sony Ericsson WTA Tour, on and off the court. We recently caught up with about a dozen of them and asked some questions that were... different.

The first four were posted over the last two weeks; here are the next two...

If there was one question you've never been asked but want to answer...

Jelena Jankovic: "They never ask me why my hair never moves. I use tons of hairspray because of my bangs. Even if I used 100 pins it would all fall out. So I wish they would ask me about my perfect hair!"

Ai Sugiyama: "I am very proud of being on the Tour for 16 years now, and would love to talk more about that. They've been asking me about breaking the Grand Slam appearances record, so I do talk about my career when they ask about that. I hope I'll be around longer. This is all motivation for me to keep going."

Elena Dementieva: "I think they've asked me everything at this point, I've been playing for a long time. I know one I don't really like - about my serve! But they haven't been asking me about my serve as much because I've improved it."

Liezel Huber: "I'd love to talk more about how good tennis has been for my life. Without it I wouldn't have met my husband, come to this wonderful country, have the life I have... and likewise for my family. It has been so rewarding."

Cara Black: "People focus so much on the here and now. They don't ask about what we have been through in our careers - that might make a much more inspirational story, especially when it's about those of us who have come from third world countries to where we are now."

Dominika Cibulkova: "Nobody has ever asked me the size of my feet. They ask about my height. My feet are a US 6."

Patty Schnyder: "They've asked me everything. Journalists, fans... I have no secrets anymore! I've been around for a while so I've been asked everything."

What do you think of the Tour's main sponsors?

Alizé Cornet: "I have a very good cell phone from Sony Ericsson. I still live with my parents so I don't need any appliances, but my brother has a new flat and has Whirlpool, and it's a very good brand. When I move out I'll get them too!"

Katarina Srebotnik: "All my life I had Ericsson phones, and when it became Sony Ericsson I switched to Sony Ericsson. It's my favorite phone company. I'm very excited it's the title sponsor for the Tour. Whirlpool is also a great sponsor."

Ai Sugiyama: "Sony Ericsson is the biggest sponsor in women's sports. We're getting much better things than we used to, like prize money. It's not a huge jump each year but it's gradually getting higher and higher. I think we're up 40% from what we got in 2004, which is great. We have to appreciate what we have right now; it's incredible compared to what we got when Billie Jean started it all. But this is a job, and we have to take it seriously. We have to work for the sponsors and the Tour as well, like doing interviews and appearances when they need us. All of us - the players, the Tour, the sponsors, the fans - have to work together and continue to make our sport a success."

Patty Schnyder: "I have Sony Ericsson phones, which is really cool. I also have a Whirlpool microwave. I think the Tour has some great sponsors."

Edina Gallovits: "I use Sony Ericsson phones. The camera phone is awesome. I don't have any Whirlpool stuff but when I get a house I'll give them a call."

Vera Zvonareva: "I have a nice washing machine and dryer from Whirlpool back in Moscow. I really like them! My Sony Ericsson phones are great, too."

Dominika Cibulkova: "Sony Ericsson gives us phones, two per year actually. I use mine all the time. It's perfect!"

Jelena Jankovic: "Our sponsors are great. I use a lot of their products, especially Sony Ericsson phones. I have lots of them. It's great technology, great designs. I have a washing machine and dryer from Whirlpool and they work really well."

Elena Dementieva: "I use Sony Ericsson phones and really like it. We get a lot of them, brand new ones. It's always fun to have something new."

What is your speficic favorite shot?

Agnes Szavay: "Drop shot and backhand down the line. It has been like that since the beginning. I feel good when I hit either of those shots."

Alizé Cornet: "When I was younger I always liked my backhand better, but now I like my forehand the best. I feel I can hit it anywhere. It's a great sensation."

Ai Sugiyama: "Backhand. I've always liked my backhand the best!"

Jelena Jankovic: "Backhand down the line. It's my signature shot. It's a natural shot too - I've had the same technique since I was little, I just have a lot more power on it now."

Elena Dementieva: "My forehand. Any forehand - crosscourt, down the line, angle... It has always been my favorite shot."

Patty Schnyder: "I like the backhand drop shot, especially on clay. I like the forehand angle too."

Dominika Cibulkova: "Crosscourt forehand. It wasn't always like that. I used to like my backhand better, but now my forehand has become more dangerous."

Cara Black: "Volley. It's just a natural shot for me and feels really good. My favorite volley is the backhand angle, although I like every type of volley."

Liezel Huber: "My forehand, but more specifically the forehand putaway - the one I can hit really hard!"

Vera Zvonareva: "The drop shot. Although I don't use it that much sometimes, I love it. It's fun, and people get excited when a player has lots of variety."

Edina Gallovits: "The tweener! That's the between-the-legs shot..."

Olga Govortsova: "Just winners in general. Forehands, backhands, serves, volleys, whatever. It depends on the point and what shot I'm getting, but I feel really good about anything that ends up being a winner!"

Who is the most difficult player for you to play against?

Edina Gallovits: "Coetzer. I remember hitting like 16 shots into the corner and she would get them all back. She'd make me run left, right, left, right, and she would never miss, so it was really, really difficult to win each point."

Elena Dementieva: "It would have to be Anna Smashnova, especially on clay. She's retired now, but she was so tough. I remember playing her at Roland Garros. I was cramping and ready to retire but she had been cramping too and she retired first, so it was lucky for me. Whenever we played I just got so tired."

Patty Schnyder: "Venus. It's obvious when you look at my record against her. I've had almost 10 tries and I've never beaten her. I've been close before; there was one match where I had match points and I feel like I had her that day, but she's such a great champion. And when she's playing well the whole match it's scary. It actually stresses me out to play against her."

Vera Zvonareva: "I always say Anna Smashnova. Every time I played her we ended up playing for more than three hours. It's tough to go out there knowing it will probably be three hours before you're finished."

Katarina Srebotnik: "Monica Seles. She's my all-time idol. I played her once in World Team Tennis and it was one of the hardest matches I've had to play because I couldn't keep my mind off of how much respect I had for her. It was hard to focus on hitting the ball!"

Dominika Cibulkova: "Brenda Schultz-McCarthy on grass. I didn't like it at all! Her serve was so good and I couldn't get any rhythm. It's good there aren't too many players like that. Venus has a big serve, but she doesn't come into the net as much as Brenda does. Against Venus I can at least get a rhythm!"

Cara Black: "I don't have any big weapons and it's hard for me to put the ball away against a grinder, so anyone in that category - Coetzer, Smashnova..."

Liezel Huber: "When I was playing singles, anyone who would keep you out there for three hours. Players like Smashnova, who would just grind out every point."

Serena Williams: "Venus Williams. Hands down."

Alizé Cornet: "There are a lot of good players in the Top 50, Top 100... It's hard to pick one. Even when I lose I usually fight really hard and don't lose too easily, so I can't really pick any matches where I felt I was completely blown out. Of course it can be tough to play someone who plays consistently and keeps their mistakes down, but I'm like that so I can't complain about them!"

Ai Sugiyama: "Venus and Serena. There really powerful and you don't get much of a rhythm against them because they control the points. I think one time I was close to winning - at the 2003 French Open - but most of the time I'm not close."

Agnes Szavay: "The top players are definitely the toughest to play. I beat Jelena Jankovic in Beijing last year but it was the toughest match I've had so far on the Tour. I never played Henin but she was probably really tough too. I've lost to Kuznetsova twice... I haven't played Sharapova yet... But they're all so mentally tough, you have to work hard on every point."

If you weren't a tennis player, what would you be?

Ai Sugiyama: "A golfer. Or something to do with music, like a singer or dancer, or a musical actor. I was always doing ballet, figure skating, gymnastics and playing outside when I was younger."

Vera Zvonareva: "I've been doing this since I was six years old. I can't imagine doing anything else. But right now I'm studying at the university in the faculty of economics, so maybe when I'm done with tennis I'll try to do something in that field. I actually got my first degree in physical education so this is my second."

Patty Schnyder: "An astronaut. It was the first thing I wanted to be when I was a kid. And I'm still so impressed with pictures of space. It really grabs me."

Jelena Jankovic: "An actress. I've always watched a lot of movies. With my brother and my friends when we were much younger, I would always try imitating all of these actors. I loved being in school plays too."

Katarina Srebotnik: "Something to do with animals, dogs especially. Not a vet, because I'm not very good with things like that; more like helping them through adoption and helping them find a good owner."

Elena Dementieva: "A doctor. I love medicine. My grandma is a doctor and I've always admired her for it. Right now I would probably be in medical school."

Edina Gallovits: "Probably a snowboarder. I've been getting into that over the last few years. We went on vacation a few years ago and I went skiing and got really bored, so I took a snowboarding lesson. I bought a snowboard right away!"

Olga Govortsova: "A gymnast. I always did both tennis and gymnastics when I was a kid and when I was six my mom chose tennis for me. Maybe I'm too tall for gymnastics now, so that was probably a good decision!"

Alizé Cornet: "A scientist. My older brother, who is 30 now, is a biologist, and I always wanted to do what he was doing. I'd love to study microbiology and cells, and just know everything there is to know about them."

Dominika Cibulkova: "I think I'd be an actress, because when I was younger I was always in school plays and loved it. I always wanted to be a star!"

Cara Black: "I'd probably be a physio or a sports agent. Definitely something to do with sports. When I was young I always thought I'd do something with sports."

Liezel Huber: "Definitely something to do with helping people or animals, but nothing to do with tennis probably. Maybe a social worker, a vet or a foster parent. Salary wouldn't matter, just the feeling of helping people."

If you could meet one person you've never met, who would it be?

Dominika Cibulkova: "I like a lot of singers. Probably Justin Timberlake. I like his style and songs. He's really cool. If not him then maybe 50 Cent."

Liezel Huber: "It would have to be someone who gives back or does humanitarian work. I get inspired by people that give their time and work tirelessy for worthy causes. I'd probably pick a celebrity who does that kind of thing - like Angelina Jolie or Oprah Winfrey - but not because of their celebrity status."

Alizé Cornet: "Since I was young my idol has been Andy Roddick. He's a role model for me. I've never had a chance to speak with him, but if it comes one day I'll be so happy. It would be a dream come true for me. I try to hit my forehand like him. My service motion is kind of like him, although his serve is amazing."

Elena Dementieva: "I would love to spend a day with President Putin. I like him a lot. He's very intelligent. It would be very interesting for me."

Edina Gallovits: "Tiger Woods. I just think he's one of the most amazing athletes in the world. I think he's great. He wrote history."

Jelena Jankovic: "Justin Timberlake. I like his music and I like his looks. And I liked the song he did with Madonna a lot."

Katarina Srebotnik: "I have always wanted to go to a Céline Dion concert. I hope one day I'll finally get to see her and maybe even meet her. I'd love to have a photo taken with her and chat with her... I heard a rumor she might only tour for a year after she's done in Vegas, but I hope it's just a false rumor."

Ai Sugiyama: "Michael Jordan. The way he thinks and what he says are amazing. Since I was young I've been a big admirer of his. He was my idol. And obviously the way he plays basketball is so nice to watch. I can only hope I'll have the chance to meet him one day."

Agnes Szavay: "Jennifer Aniston. She's my favorite actor and I'd love to meet her one day. I really love Friends."

Vera Zvonareva: "I really like Angelina Jolie. Not only is she a great actress, but she seems like a really interesting person. I'm also a big fan of Matt Damon, also a really good actor. I love some of his movies, like The Bourne Identity and The Talented Mr. Ripley."

дalex
Aug 27th, 2008, 08:38 PM
If there was one question you've never been asked but want to answer...

Jelena Jankovic: "They never ask me why my hair never moves. I use tons of hairspray because of my bangs. Even if I used 100 pins it would all fall out. So I wish they would ask me about my perfect hair!"

:spit:

Cilla
Aug 27th, 2008, 08:40 PM
Jelena Jankovic: "They never ask me why my hair never moves. I use tons of hairspray because of my bangs. Even if I used 100 pins it would all fall out. So I wish they would ask me about my perfect hair!"

*death*

:o :rolls: :spit:

~Kiera~
Aug 27th, 2008, 08:44 PM
http://ap.google.com/article/ALeqM5iJ9B5p2n1Aysj0mmFc-LCzQunJYwD92QRLLO4

No. 2 Jankovic guts out tough 2nd round win
By IRA PODELL – 11 minutes ago

NEW YORK (AP) — Jelena Jankovic bent over her racket, leaned against a back wall with a towel pressed to her face, and sprawled on her stomach in the middle of center court.

Then the No. 2 seed gutted her way into the third round of the U.S. Open.

Jankovic outlasted Sweden's Sofia Arvidsson 6-3, 6-7 (5), 7-5 Wednesday on yet another uncharacteristically mild August day in Flushing Meadows.

The combination of not being in match condition following a summer knee injury and an array of hard forehands and well-placed drop shots by Arvidsson left Jankovic fighting to get her wind during the 2 hour, 44 minute match at Arthur Ashe Stadium.

"That was a really tough one," said Jankovic, who has reached the fourth round in the first three Grand Slam events this year. "As you can see, I am completely out of breath. She really pushed me to the limit."

Jankovic twice served for the win in the middle set against Arvidsson, yet couldn't put her away — even with a match point in reach. Jankovic held off Arvidsson in a back-and-forth third set when both had trouble holding serve.

When Arvidsson fired long on the final point, Jankovic had her third service break of the third set and eighth overall. There was suddenly a spring in her step as she waved and blew kisses to the crowd.

Even with the squandered chances on her serve, Jankovic still had an opportunity to advance without going the distance. She jumped to a 3-0 lead in the second set tiebreak before losing six straight points. Jankovic extended the set by winning two points on her serve, but fired wide as she approached the net — drawing an exuberant "Yeah" from Arvidsson.

Several times, Jankovic hunched over and leaned on her racket but didn't appear to be in distress. The Serb, who held the No. 1 ranking earlier this year, lost in the fourth round at Wimbledon after injuring a knee in the previous match.

If anything ailed her other than fatigue Wednesday, it wasn't evident in the decisive third set when she raced to a 3-0 edge. Jankovic doubled over again when a fortuitous shot by Arvidsson crept over the net after it smacked the cord in the fourth game, but that appeared more out of exasperation than discomfort.

After a drop shot eluded her dive, Jankovic dropped to the court face down and stayed there for several moments. If anything, it gave her a brief rest.

"I'm still not yet at my full potential, but I'm trying my best," said Jankovic, whose serve was broken twice in each set. "I am still a long way from where I want to be."

While Jankovic escaped an early exit, No. 8 seed Vera Zvonareva couldn't. Zvonareva was upended by Tatiana Perebiynis 6-3, 6-3 in the tournament's biggest upset yet. Svetlana Kuznetsova shook off an early break and rallied to a 7-6 (3), 6-1 victory over Sorana Cirstea.

JadeFox
Aug 27th, 2008, 08:45 PM
http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/1/newsroom/stories/?ContentID=2514

The talk about her hair is hilarious!:lol:

Brena
Aug 27th, 2008, 08:51 PM
Justin Timberlake

kill me now

EDIT: Ok, this is even worse : Céline Dion

дalex
Aug 27th, 2008, 08:57 PM
kill me now

Bang bang, (s)he shot me down
Bang bang, I hit the ground
Bang bang, that awful sound
Bang bang, my baby shot me down.

ueiL0THVG84

Brena
Aug 27th, 2008, 09:12 PM
Cibu and JJ have so much in common - they both want to be an actress and they love Justin Timberlake.
On teh other hand, Demented has her eye on a political career. :rolls:

~Kiera~
Aug 27th, 2008, 09:24 PM
Cibu and JJ have so much in common - they both want to be an actress and they love Justin Timberlake.

Plus, Domi is a big fan of Jelena - and Jelena is a big fan of herself, too ;)

Marilyn Monheaux
Aug 27th, 2008, 09:27 PM
"They never ask me why my hair never moves. I use tons of hairspray because of my bangs. Even if I used 100 pins it would all fall out. So I wish they would ask me about my perfect hair!"

Thats brilliant!!! :rolls::rolls::worship:

Brena
Aug 27th, 2008, 09:30 PM
Plus, Domi is a big fan of Jelena - and Jelena is a big fan of herself, too ;)

:rolls:

Well, and they were both prepared to die for their country (and almost did) last year in Kosice. What a pair - sucidal Justin Timberlake fans!

terjw
Aug 27th, 2008, 09:32 PM
Plus, Domi is a big fan of Jelena - and Jelena is a big fan of herself, too ;)

:lol::lol:

~Kiera~
Aug 27th, 2008, 09:44 PM
Well, and they were both prepared to die for their country (and almost did) last year in Kosice. What a pair - sucidal Justin Timberlake fans!

:lol:

Last week, Domi went to pretty much every event/party there was. She's following in Jelena's footsteps nicely :yeah:

~Kiera~
Aug 27th, 2008, 09:45 PM
http://www.usopen.org/en_US/news/interviews/2008-08-27/200808271219872448161.html

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. There came a time in the third set in which you were on the ground. You were down for about 30 seconds and there was no noise at all. Were you injured at all, or were you just trying to just regain yourself?

JELENA JANKOVIC: No, I was just tired, and I couldn't get up. I was so exhausted at that moment. I was breathing hard, and I didn't have the energy to get up.

That was the reason I was just lying there without, you know, kind of moving. I was just trying to come back to, you know, normal position where I can just stand up and regroup again and play the next point. That was it.

Q. Was the pavement hot?
JELENA JANKOVIC: No, but I thought I was going to get my dress really dirty, and then that was my biggest concern.

Q. Did you think about taking a nap?

JELENA JANKOVIC: I would have loved to, you know, take a nap on court, because I was really exhausted. But, you know, the rules are the rules. I had to keep going.

Q. You remember ever doing that before in a match, being down for 30 seconds or so?

JELENA JANKOVIC: No, not really. I do the splits and fall down, but for a few seconds. I get up right away. But I never lie there for ‑‑ I don't know how long I was lying there, but that was just ‑‑ I fell down.

I don't know what I did, so I couldn't get up. That's just the way it goes, because I was really tired.

Q. Why do you think you were so tired at that point?

JELENA JANKOVIC: I don't know. You know, to be honest, you know, after I finished the match I went to jog a little bit on the treadmill. I jogged for three minutes and I cramped.

I couldn't go anymore and I couldn't ‑‑ the part where I had the tear in my meniscus after Wimbledon, I couldn't ‑‑ my leg was straight, and I couldn't bend it.

It was really ‑‑ the muscle was, like, in spasm, and I had a lot of pain. I couldn't make another step, so, you know, I was ‑‑ my fitness trainer was there. He gave me a lot of things to drink and, you know, stretching and ice, massage and all this.

I finally recovered and I could go, you know, back to the locker room and take a shower. Otherwise I was really ‑‑ it was really uncomfortable.

It's not easy to get through this kind of things, but I'm not in the best shape. For me to play three hours, it's amazing at this moment, because I haven't been training, you know, as hard as I want to. I'm now training to get that, but, you know, it takes time. It's not going to happen overnight.

So I need, still, you know, a lot of days to get better and better. I feel that I'm improving, but, you know, it's going to take, you know, some time.

Q. So you won just in time.

JELENA JANKOVIC: Whew. You know, I was lucky. I was saying to my coach, I was saying, Can you imagine if this happened during the match? I probably wouldn't have been able to finish it. Luckily, I finish before it happens. So just in time.

Q. Is there one aspect of your game that's more difficult to get back after the injury?

JELENA JANKOVIC: You know, it's tough. Also the confidence in my shots, and sometimes, you know, I want to go for it, but, you know, the balls don't go in, you know. I don't have the same timing. I don't have the rhythm that I would like to.

But as you play the matches, ever day you should get better and better and more confident in yourself because you get match tough. It's not the same when you're practicing. You feel the ball very well, but then you go on the court and you just ‑‑ it's a completely, a different story.

So it takes, you know, time to play those matches and to feel comfortable and gain that confidence again where you can, you know, go for your shots and really believe 100% that you're going to make it, especially in the big moments.

Q. I just spoke to Sofia Arvidsson, and she felt you showed bad sportsmanship, especially you serve. She did with this with her hand and you still served. What is your comment on that?

JELENA JANKOVIC: I didn't really see that. Maybe she lifted her arm up, but I didn't see it. You know, I was so tired, and it doesn't mean it's bad sportsmanship. I didn't see that. If I did that, if that for her is bad sportsmanship, it was not my intention.

If she lifted her arm and I really saw it... No. And also, the receiver should always follow the server. When I'm ready to serve she should be ready to receive, as well. Those are the rules.

I mean, it's the opposite, you know. If she was, for example serving and I'm stopping her, you know, breaking her rhythm, and that's what she's doing to me, you know.

It's not ‑‑ when I'm ready, when I go to the line to serve the ball, she should be ready, and that's what is happening. And she can keep doing that, and the umpire can tell her, You have to be ready when she's there to serve. Those are the rules.

I'm sorry. Maybe she lifted her arm up once and I didn't see it and I served, but I don't think that would make a big difference in the match.

Q. Is it bad blood between you? Because she was a bit annoyed also when you lie down, you know, the ball we were talking about just before.

JELENA JANKOVIC: I don't know what is ‑‑ I have nothing, no problem with her whatsoever. You know, I go out there to play my match, and I tried my best. I don't really think about all the other, you know, factors.

If she's angry at me for going down, if she's angry because, you know, I didn't see her lifting her arm up, you know, you can keep going with all these things that happen in the match.

But all of the players, you know, do this, and we all try our best to win the match. And a win is the most important thing.

Q. What do you make of this situation where five of you have a chance to be No. 1 by winning this tournament?

JELENA JANKOVIC: It's okay, you know. I achieve ‑‑ you know, I was No. 1 in the world. By doing that I achieved one huge goal in my career, in my life, and it's something amazing. I would love to come back to that position.

But in order to do that, I feel that I really need to work hard. I need to lift the level of my tennis, and to try to play a lot better. I'm trying really hard, but because I had so many injuries I had a tough time.

You know, I'm trying to get, you know, get back to form, you know, the way I want to. And so I will try my best to do that.

Q. To follow up on that, that question, I mean, obviously you want to be No. 1, but do you think in your mind it's better for tennis to have a dominant player who's No. 1?

JELENA JANKOVIC: I don't know. Nowadays, I can see so many injured girls, so many girls that are struggling and are ‑‑ especially the top players, because we play a lot and everybody wants to beat us.

You really have to be in shape. You know, you have intense matches, so it's tough on our bodies, and many of us are having some problems.

So in the moment, maybe, you know, there is a chance that, you know, a couple of girls can, you know, become No. 1.

Me and Ana, we already been there, you know. We achieved the No. 1 spot. But the other girls could be the new No. 1s, depending on how we all do in this tournament, so it's going to be a battle.

Q. Aside from injuries, is there any other reason that you think it just kind of keeps being passed from one player to another?

JELENA JANKOVIC: No, I'm doing fine. I just ‑‑ I have no injuries now, and I don't want to say that I don't have anything and the next day I have something. I don't want to bring bad luck.

But now it's just, you know, to get back in shape. I feel a little bit weak. I'm not as strong as I used to be. I'm not as fast as I used to be. My endurance is not there. That's why I cramped after the match.

So it all needs work. In order to improve that, you need to spend a lot of hours in the gym working out, doing all these exercises to improve your fitness, and of course that will help and transfer to my tennis game where I'm going to feel more comfortable with my body and I'm not going to break down at some, you know, certain periods of the match.

Q. Can you go for a second week?

JELENA JANKOVIC: I hope so. I try my best. It's also mental. Sometimes like today in a match, I thought that, you know, I was so tired I couldn't go anymore. But then, you know, I kept saying to myself that I was not tired, I can go, and I pushed myself.

But, you know, with your mind, I think you can achieve big things.

Q. If you look at your draw, though, this is probably your best chance ever to reach a Grand Slam final if you play to your level. Are you saying that you cannot get to the level to reach a Grand Slam final here?

JELENA JANKOVIC: No, I didn't say that. You know, I will go one match at a time, and I will do my best and we will see how everything goes.

Like you said, you know, I haven't really, you know, checked the draw too far. But many people said, you know, I have the best draw as I ever had in the last two or three years, because I never really had good draws, especially in the Grand Slams.

But that doesn't matter. If you're playing well, if you're doing the right things, doesn't matter if you have a good or bad draw. You're going to go a long ways. I will just go one match at a time. What happens, happens.

Q. Having a good time otherwise?

JELENA JANKOVIC: Yeah, I'm always having a good time, especially off the court. I'm laughing, I'm enjoying my time. I'm just being me.

Q. Dancing?

JELENA JANKOVIC: I don't think I have enough energy to do some dancing. Too bad.

Q. You said you cramped on the treadmill after the match; is that correct?

JELENA JANKOVIC: Yes.

Q. Is that normal for you after a lengthy match?

JELENA JANKOVIC: No, it's not normal. I haven't cramped for a year or two years. I have no idea when was the last time I cramped, but I guess because I played three hours.

To be honest, when I started in LA I got tired after like 40 minutes; I couldn't do it. I couldn't play anymore, so it's a big improvement. I see already that I can play longer and longer, but, you know, it's still, you know, very far to my potential.

Q. Is it customary for you to go on a treadmill after a lengthy match?

JELENA JANKOVIC: You're supposed to just jog very, very ‑‑ very easy jog so that you kind of flush and get all the lactic acids from your muscles, so that you feel better. Then you stretch and then you can shower, and then you have a massage so you feel much better if you do that.

As when you just finish the match you're very tight and you're just go in and shower and you feel so stiff. But I didn't have enough, you know, power to jog, because I cramped after three minutes of jogging.

Q. And you cramped where? It was behind the meniscus?

JELENA JANKOVIC: Next to my kneecap, you know, the one I injured in Wimbledon. That was, I guess, the weakest muscle.

Q. How long would you have run if you didn't have the problem?

JELENA JANKOVIC: Ten minutes. After three hours, my work would be three hours and ten minutes.

дalex
Aug 27th, 2008, 10:14 PM
It's not ‑‑ when I'm ready, when I go to the line to serve the ball, she should be ready, and that's what is happening. And she can keep doing that, and the umpire can tell her, You have to be ready when she's there to serve. Those are the rules.

:rolls:

Jelena, babe, Sofia had to wait for you so many times. But, it's OK you're the #2 player in the world, it's only normal for lower ranked players to have to wait for you to dub your face with the towel, have a little rest at the back of the court, remove the pieces of mascara that got in your eye, have a 30sec naps on the court...:hearts: :hearts:

~Kiera~
Aug 28th, 2008, 12:46 AM
http://www.tennisweek.com/news/fullstory.sps?inewsid=6616985

Jankovic Climbs Off Court Into Third Round

Jelena Jankovic was floored.

Chasing a drop shot from Sofia Arvidsson that snaked over the net after a near 30-stroke rally in the eighth game of the third set today, Jankovic slid into a split in a failed effort to prolong the point then plopped down on her stomach and spent about 25 seconds staring into the blue court to take a break from a physical match. Clad in canary yellow-colored dress, Jankovic exhaled deeply with all the the exasperation of a weary world traveler stuck without a departing flight while searching for a stray contact lens on an airport floor and drained by the delay and uncertainty of her circumstances.

Jankovic's second-round match seemed to be a straight forward affair until the second-ranked Serbian, who lost the No. 1 ranking to compatriot Ana Ivanovic the week before the Open but retains her unofficial title as WTA Tour's reigning drama queen, found a way to complicate matters as only Jankovic can.

Failing to serve out the match twice in the second set, Jankovic squandered a 4-2 third-set before peeling herself off the court and making a stand to deny the 24-year-old Swede's second straight upset bid with a 6-3, 6-7(5), 7-5 win that spanned two hours, 44 minutes and seemed to squeeze every ounce of energy out of the 2006 US Open semifinalist.

Then again with Jankovic you never know if she's truly physically fatigued, more mentally drained or simply posturing to plant a seed of false security in opponents' minds. Sometimes it's unclear if Jankovic herself knows her true state of mind, but there was no mistaking her sense of relief after surviving yet another scare from Arvidsson.

In March, Arvidsson held a 5-1 lead over Jankovic in the final set of their second-round match in Miami, before Jankovic, relying on her guile and great legs that make any ball seem to be a retrievable object in her mind, fought back for a 6-7(7), 6-2, 7-6(9) victory. She would go on to reach the Sony Ericsson Open final where another comeback attempt fell short against Serena Williams.

"Last time played aginst her she was up 5-1 in the third, but I manged to come back," Jankovic said. "I made the finals in Miami so I don't mind it. I hope she brings me good luck again."

For more than two hours today Arvidsson delivered a sustained dose of annoyance through her deep crosscourt drives though Jankovic contributed to her own issues.

Jankovic spent time tugging at her knee and feet as if pained by leg injuries and at various times clung to the blue back wall as if it was the leader of a support group.

Asked if Jankovic's antics are an attempt to pump herself up or psych her opponents out by controlling the pace of play between points Arvidsson stopped short of accusing Jankovic of outright gamesmanship, but pointed out the Serbian's propensity for promoting aches and pains both real and imagined as all part of her unique package.

"I know how she is - she likes the drama," Arvidsson said. "She's a funny girl to watch. It's not like I don't like her, but if you know it before it's okay I guess. I've heard other players said something (about her). She played Wozniacki at Wimbledon and said she did not feel her leg, but come on if you don't feel your leg you cannot run. It's just the way she is - she takes a long time between balls when I am gonna serve, but when she serves it's really fast."

One of the smoothest movers on court, Jankovic is a joy to watch when she's on her game and while listening to her talk about her various injuries you begin to believe either she thinks of her body as a pin-cushion or pain or the ailments are her coping mechanism for on-court stress. Jankovic said fatigue prompted her fall to the court.

"I was just tired and I couldn't get up," Jankovic said. "I was so exhausted at that moment. I was breathing hard and I didn't have the energy to get up. That was the reason I was lying there without kind of moving. I was just kind of trying to come back to a normal position where I can just stand up and regroup again and play the next point."

Lying prone for nearly 30 seconds, Jankovic survived her "I've fallen and I can't get up" moment and arose to continue the match. Jankovic said afterwards she stepped on the treadmill in an effort to flush the lactic acid from her tired muscles, but cramped near her knee.

"I couldn't go anymore and I couldn't - the part where I had a tear in my meniscus after Wimbledon - my leg was straight and I couldn't bend it," Jankovic said. "The muscle was like in a spasm and I had a lot of pain. I couldn't make another step my fitness trainer was there....I finally recovered and I could go back to the locker room and take a shower. It's not easy to get through this type of things, but I'm not in the best shape."

Bending over behind the baseline at various points during the match, Jankovic looked like a woman struggling to finish the job, but Arvidsson said she's seen the script played out before.

"I always know with her she's always complaining about something then she's running so good any way so I knew she would start to complain when she's down," Arvidsson said. "I mean she was running a lot so she must have been tired."

Serving at 5-6, Arvidsson had a game point to force a tiebreaker, but Jankovic used her superior speed to lure the Swede into a forehand down the line. Leaving the entire court exposed Arvidsson paid the price when Jankovic hit a backhand winner to draw even at deuce.When Arvidsson's forehand found the top of the tape, Jankovic had match point after two hours, 44 minutes. She ended a draining duel when Arvidsson's backhand floated long.

While it was a resilient efffort from a woman who has contested semifinals in three of the four majors, but has yet to take the next step and reach a major final, you have to go back to Martina Hingis to find a former No. 1 so prone to using their skills simply to prolong points.

Seeing Jankovic, one of the smoothest movers and best pure athletes on tour, using is like watching someone trying to use a Maserati as a moving van. Jankovic, a bright and funny woman who takes college correspondence courses and briefly considering leaving the tour to attend college full time, has to realize on some level she's playing too passively. It's the tennis equivalent of basketball's four-corner offense, but in tennis there's no running out the clock and Jankovic will need to assert her game against top players in major matches - and improve her serve - before she can make her major breakthrough.

"If she improves her serve she's gonna be a lot more dangerous," Arvidsson said. "It's not something you're really scared of - she's serving 99 percent of the time to my forehand. She is maybe the best defensive player. It feels like I hit winners a few times and the ball is coming back all the time. She is sliding all the time she's maybe the best mover on the court."

Jankovic has a favorable draw, but figures to be severely tested in the third round by Wimbledon semifinalist Jie Zheng, who knocked off Ivanovic at Wimbledon. Jankovic beat Zheng, 6-4, 7-5, in the round of 16 in Miami in March and the 37th-ranked Chinese said she plans to try to take charge of points early in rallies.

"Jelena is a good player you can see today she played a tough match," Zheng said. "I lost a tough match to her in Miami. I have a good feeling at Wimbledon that I can beat a number one so I will do my best. She is an unbelievable mover. She can touch every ball. For me, I feel it's more tough because the court is not as fast (as Wimbledon) because I want to be more aggressive than Jelena. This is my first time in the third round of the US Open and I want to keep going and try my best."

Dinayer
Aug 28th, 2008, 01:01 AM
thanks ;)

Kampi
Aug 28th, 2008, 03:54 AM
Thank you Sarah:wavey::kiss:

redsonja
Aug 28th, 2008, 04:25 AM
"I always know with her she's always complaining about something then she's running so good any way so I knew she would start to complain when she's down," Arvidsson said. "I mean she was running a lot so she must have been tired."

:spit:

Brena
Aug 28th, 2008, 07:33 AM
Sometimes it's unclear if Jankovic herself knows her true state of mind,

what mind?

Lying prone for nearly 30 seconds, Jankovic survived her "I've fallen and I can't get up" moment and arose to continue the match.

:lol:

I actually feel for Sofia.

P.S. Thatnks for the articles, Sarah! :worship:

Bruno71
Aug 28th, 2008, 08:15 AM
I doubt JJ fast-serves Maria when they play. Grow some balls, Sofia, it might help you actually beat JJ when she's playing to the level of a Meusburger.

Destiny
Aug 28th, 2008, 09:00 AM
but retains her unofficial title as WTA Tour's reigning drama queen, found a way to complicate matters as only Jankovic can.

Soooooo true and that's why i love this girl

Funny lass :lol:

Sofia was so nice if i were her i would bitch so much about JJ

~Kiera~
Aug 28th, 2008, 10:54 AM
Sofia's blog (http://mbtksofia.wordpress.com/)

(English version from http://www.tennisforum.com/showpost.php?p=13945595&postcount=111)

I have every respect for Jelena Jankovic as tennis player, she is very good. perhaps best on the whole tour. Feel as if it strikes a winner several times and think we won the ball, then she slips out and whipped the ball and get back on with good length.

Outside the court, I am not, however, equally impressed by her. I had booked a massage after the game clock 17.30, when I get there, my name is gone. Then Jelena without saying anything to me removed my name and wrote her own.

Edit - Out of curiosity, I translated the original Swedish back to English myself. There's actually a sentence missing from the above translation.

After "then Jelena without saying anything to me removed my name and wrote her own" she goes on to say "Humble is not a word one associates with her."

Destiny
Aug 28th, 2008, 10:59 AM
:haha: Omg so funny

:lol:

Bitchy

RFS
Aug 28th, 2008, 11:15 AM
LOL!!! Wonder if Alize Cornet and Sofia hang out together!! :haha:

redsonja
Aug 28th, 2008, 01:18 PM
Classy, Jelena. :rolleyes:

Nina.
Aug 28th, 2008, 01:19 PM
JELENA JANKOVIC: No, but I thought I was going to get my dress really dirty, and then that was my biggest concern.

Just gotta love that girl :hearts:

дalex
Aug 28th, 2008, 01:47 PM
I'm having troubles believing that story from Sofia's blog, but whatever...:shrug:

redsonja
Aug 28th, 2008, 01:52 PM
I'm having troubles believing that story from Sofia's blog, but whatever...:shrug:

I believe it because it seems to me like the kind of thing that's not worth the effort of making up.

дalex
Aug 28th, 2008, 01:59 PM
I know, but it says she got there and her name was gone/removed. Then she said Jelena was the one who removed it. I thought it was normal for players to have their massages after the match...Is there only one massage therapist there at the USO and why wouldn't Jelena schedule her massage on time? From JJ's interviews I got the impression that it's part of her routine to have massage after a match, so why would she forget to schedule it...And how come is it possible to just remove player's name from a list and take her place...It's just weird...Maybe there's something we don't know?

Brena
Aug 28th, 2008, 02:08 PM
I don't know what to make of it - except that it's hilariously silly. :rolls:
I can't believe JJ would do something like that, not because I think she's too nice, but because it doesn't sound like her style - if she wanted the massage first she would have a Norma Desmond moment worthy of a diva JJ is: she would appear in a glamorous negligee, and say: ''I'm the star here, dah-ling, get lost from the massage table''.
Also, Sofia must be very very bitter about JJ. Had I lost twice in a such a stupid manner to someone, I'd dislike them too.
so there, I explained you everything :rolls:

BTW, Sarah, you speak Swedish?? :inlove:

redsonja
Aug 28th, 2008, 02:30 PM
Oh, I think there's like a thousand scenarios that make perfectly good sense, so I'm not really holding it against her. But it's just such a nonsensical thing to fabricate, and slightly rude no matter what the circumstances.

~Kiera~
Aug 28th, 2008, 04:16 PM
BTW, Sarah, you speak Swedish?? :inlove:

No I don't, although having re-read my post I can understand why you got that impression :lol: :o I just used a couple of online tools.

JadeFox
Aug 28th, 2008, 04:34 PM
Sofia's blog (http://mbtksofia.wordpress.com/)

(English version from http://www.tennisforum.com/showpost.php?p=13945595&postcount=111)



Edit - Out of curiosity, I translated the original Swedish back to English myself. There's actually a sentence missing from the above translation.

After "then Jelena without saying anything to me removed my name and wrote her own" she goes on to say "Humble is not a word one associates with her."

I'm sorry but this makes no sense to me. So when she got there, her name was gone. However Jelena removed her name and replaced it with her own? How would she know who removed her name if it was gone when she got there?:confused:

RFS
Aug 28th, 2008, 04:52 PM
I'm sorry but this makes no sense to me. So when she got there, her name was gone. However Jelena removed her name and replaced it with her own? How would she know who removed her name if it was gone when she got there?:confused:

Well quite :rolls:
That's what jumped out at me...

Oh well... Never mind Sofia... ONE of these days you'll convert an epic 3 setter with JJ into a win... but... ummm.... not this time huh!?

дalex
Aug 28th, 2008, 05:47 PM
http://www.mtsmondo.com/sport/vesti/text.php?vest=107892

US OPEN: Jelena and Verdasco, how come?

http://www.mtsmondo.com/slike/vesti/001/078/v107892p0.jpg

Fourteen months after winning Wimbledon together with Briton Jamie Murray, Serbian tennis player Jelena Janković once again decided to play in this competition at a Grand Slam tournament.

How come? Everyone who read Jelena's statements about doubles after Wimbledon 2007 would like to know that.

"I don't like doubles and I play it only for practice" (9. July 2007, after coming back from London).

"At the tournaments, my goal is never to go far in doubles. I play doubles to have some fun on court or if I promised partnership to someone" (31. January 2008, during the Fed Cup tournament in Budapest).

Now it's only left to see what was the deciding factor for this decision to have another doubles adventure at the USO?

Does JJ want to speed up the process of getting her fitness back after an injury? Does she want to have some fun? Why Verdasco?

In any case, partnership with the Spaniard is an obvious step up in the right direction in comparison to the partnership with the "worse" of the two Murray brothers. (:weirdo:)

Fernando is a much better tennis player, and you'd agree that he's better looking as well. On the other hand, it's questionable whether he would be willing to "die" on the court for Jelena, like Jamie did the last summer...

It's especially interesting that Jankovic and Verdasco will play the great Serbo-Slovenian partnership of Katarina Srebotnik and Nenad Zimonjic, the second favorites of the tournament already in the first round!

http://smileyjungle.com/smilies/lostit12.gif

Wrekin
Aug 28th, 2008, 05:57 PM
I'm sorry but this makes no sense to me. So when she got there, her name was gone. However Jelena removed her name and replaced it with her own? How would she know who removed her name if it was gone when she got there?:confused:

Well, playing devil's advocate, if JJ's name was booked in the slot instead, it would rather suggest....

But then I don't understand how they can book the time in advance anyway, when they don't know when they'll go on court, or come off it. 5.30 seems so precise :shrug:

But Sofia sounds bugged by it, and so would I be, humourless individual that I am :lol:

Probably all just a foul-up in the system.

redsonja
Aug 28th, 2008, 06:19 PM
http://www.mtsmondo.com/sport/vesti/text.php?vest=107892

Comedy gold. :lol:

дalex
Aug 28th, 2008, 06:28 PM
http://www.b92.net/sport/usopen2008/vesti.php?yyyy=2008&mm=08&dd=28&nav_id=315736

JJ for the B92: "I was exhausted"

"I was trying my best to finish the match. Physically I was very tired especially at the end of the second set and in the TB. I didn't have the strength to finish her off and she used that very well."

"When the 3rd set started I was mad at myself for staying on the court for a longer time. Nevertheless I was able to cool down and be calm in the deciding set. I didn't play well consistently - I was able to string together 3 good games and then I would start to struggle. I was repeating that pattern throughout the match."

"But, I need to take it easy. I had so many injuries and I'm trying to get back in form and strengthen my body. It's really hard, but that's the only way to get my level of play back. Right now I'm not in the best shape, but I don't want to panic yet. I need to work very hard, practice a lot, go to the gym regularly, so I can feel good on the court and be confident."

"The whole year I've been struggling with injuries. Last year I played more than hundred matches and I hadn't even chipped a nail. And this year, since that exhibition at the start of it all the time until now - I've had some kind of injury."

"First some old injuries reappeared, but then I got some completely new ones that I've never had before. I injured my left leg and I couldn't practice for 3 weeks because of it. Then I tried to lean more on the right leg in order to protect the left one and I got a calf injury. Luckily, I'm injury free at the moment and I'm training really hard so I can get fit again."

дalex
Aug 28th, 2008, 07:57 PM
http://www.boston.com/sports/other_sports/tennis/articles/2008/08/28/jankovic_down_not_out/
Jankovic down, not out
By Bud Collins
August 28, 2008

http://cache.boston.com/resize/bonzai-fba/Globe_Photo/2008/08/27/1219892219_2314/539w.jpg

NEW YORK - The lady was flat on her face on the pavement. Was this embarrassing with about 15,000 people watching?

"No, but I was worried about getting my dress really dirty," said Jelena Jankovic, a tourist from Serbia clad in a yellow tennis frock.

Had she been hit by a bus? Nothing that ordinary in the big city. Actually, she was running as though she were trying to catch a departing bus, chasing instead a nifty hit, a deft drop shot from the racket of a troublesome Swede named Sofia Arvidsson.

These two were engaged in a second-round jam of the US Open at Flushing Meadows, and the 24-year-old Arvidsson, though ranked No. 63, was giving No. 2 Jankovic a very hard time. Reaching desperately, vainly, for the ball, Jankovic tumbled. She was down. She stayed down. Seconds ticked by. Had the Swede provoked an Ingmar Bergmanesque scene of tense drama? More seconds slipped past, more than 30 of them. You expected umpire Dianna Kondratowitch-Pierce to climb down from her high chair and count Jankovic out. Was this prolific collector of injury withdrawals (11) and loser of midmatch TKOs (11) adding to her long string of mishaps?

Ah, no. The canny battler was just resting - "I was tired and couldn't get up" - thinking over her dire third-set situation. "I would like to take a nap. I was exhausted."

Meanwhile, Arvidsson burned, serving the eighth game.

It apparently was the flop that refreshes. Even though Arvidsson hung tough to 5-5, Jankovic pierced her in the last game for a 6-3, 6-7 (5-7), 7-5 victory. It took 2 hours 44 minutes on a gorgeous, balmy afternoon.

Jankovic said it ended just in time. "I was lucky. After I finished I went to jog a little on the treadmill. We do that to get all the lactic acid from your muscles and feel better. After three minutes, I cramped. Couldn't bend my leg. I couldn't have finished the match. The ideal is to run 10 minutes after a match that long."

Arvidsson has been difficult for her. "I was down, 1-5, in the third set to her at Key Biscayne," said Jankovic, "and saved five match points. Then I got to the final. Maybe this win was a good omen."

Arvidsson told Swedish journalists she wasn't too happy with Jankovic's performance.

Jankovic answered that with, "If she's angry at me for going down . . . these things happen in a match . . . we try our best to win the match. And a win is the most important thing."

A scrapper, Jankovic has a history of squelching match points. Knee and forearm problems have bothered her lately, but she says that's past, and she's whole, but has to get in better shape. "I hope I can get into the second week. It's mental as much as physical. It all needs work."

So here are the two belles of Belgrade peering at each other from the far ends of the draw - 20-year-old Ana Ivanovic at No. 1, 23-year-old Jankovic down low at No. 2 - yearning to advance to the final a week from Sunday. That would be a first: two Serbs in a major title bout.

For a week earlier this month, Jankovic was No. 1, then shoved aside by Ivanovic. "You know," Jankovic said, "I was No. 1 in the world. By doing that I achieved one huge goal in my career, in my life, and it's something amazing. I would love to come back to that position. But I need to lift my level. I'm trying real hard, but because I had so many injuries I had a tough time."

But a tougher time for the happy-go-lucky Jankovic was early in 2006. She was very unlucky, losing in first round after first round. Ten times. She was ready to pack it in and retreat to university.

Up stepped her No. 1 cheerleader, mother Snezana, lively, ebullient, urging her kid to smile (which she often does) in tight spots. "Try it a little longer," Snezana counseled. "Don't give up."

It worked, and her career turned around in a city of faith, Rome, with a quarterfinal performance at the Italian Open. She has since won it, in 2007 and '08.

Flat on her face, Jankovic was shutting out the world she lusts to conquer. Presently up and bright, she took the second steps to No. 1.

I don't know if her yellow dress got dirty. But there are dry cleaners.

http://smileyjungle.com/smilies/happy16.gif

дalex
Aug 28th, 2008, 08:16 PM
http://www.nypost.com/seven/08272008/sports/tennis/jankovic_wins_drama_filled_three_setter_126370.htm

JANKOVIC WINS DRAMA-FILLED THREE-SETTER
ANTICS BOTHER FOE

During today's U.S. Open match, Jelena Jankovic leaned against the Arthur Ashe Stadium wall with her head buried in her towel, spent nearly a minute sprawled face-down at center court, and coldly served right through a stop sign by foe Sofia Arvidsson, who essentially called her a drama queen.

After all the drama was done, it was the second-seeded Jankovic who pulled out a 6-3, 6-7 (5), 7-5 second-round win. Or at least, most of the drama, because after Jankovic had outlasted the plucky Swede, her right leg cramped up while jogging on the treadmill.

"I was so exhausted, breathing hard, I didn't have the energy to get up. That's the reason I was lying there. I would've loved to take a nap on the court . . . but the rules are the rules; I had to keep going,'' said Jankovic, who'll face Zheng Jie in the third round.

"After I finished the match I jogged for three minutes (on the treadmill) and I cramped. Luckily I finished before it happened.''

After dominating the first set, Jankovic served for the match twice in the second, but was broken both times. Then jumped ahead 3-0 in the tiebreak only to lose six straight points, eventually spraying her return wide to give the Arvidsson the set.

Jankovic took a 3-0 lead in the third set. At one point in the final set when Arvidsson's shot trickled over the net, Jankovic doubled over her racquet; and after diving for a drop shot, she stayed face-down so long the chair umpire asked if she was OK.

But when Arvidsson's final return sprayed long, there was a suddenly-spry Jankovic waving and blowing kisses to the crowd. Her antics rubbed her beaten opponent the wrong way, especially when she served through Arvidsson's stop sign.

When asked if that was good sportsmanship, Arvidsson responded "I guess not. I know how she is; she just likes the drama. She's always complaining about something, but she only starts to complain when she's down.

"It's not like I don't like her. It just gets a little (tiresome). I've heard other players say things. She saying she can't feel her leg, but then she's running. If you can't feel your leg, you can't run. It's just the way she is.''

For her part, Jankovic - who's complained about everything from hurting her back on the practice courts to having to blow her nose with paper towels instead of tissue - said she never saw the stop sign, but offered some advice.

"When I go to the line, she should be ready. Maybe she lifted her arm up and I didn't see it, but I don't think that would make a big difference in the match,'' Jankovic said. "If she's angry at me for going down, because I didn't see her lift her arm up, you can keep going with all these things. But we all try our best to win the match; a win is the most important thing.''

Wayn77
Aug 28th, 2008, 08:50 PM
tomorrow's order of play.


ASHE STADIUM
11:00 AM Start
1 Women's Singles - 3rd Rnd.
Jie Zheng (CHN) v. Jelena Jankovic (SRB)[2]

followed by
2 Men's Singles - 2nd Rnd.
Thiago Alves (BRA) v. Roger Federer (SUI)[2]

3 Men's Singles - 2nd Rnd.
Robert Kendrick (USA) v. Novak Djokovic (SRB)[3]

7:00 PM Start
1 Women's Singles - 3rd Rnd.
Lindsay Davenport (USA)[23] v. Marion Bartoli (FRA)[12]

2 Men's Singles - 2nd Rnd.
Andy Roddick (USA)[8] v. Ernests Gulbis (LAT)


ARMSTRONG STADIUM

11:00 AM Start
1 Men's Singles - 2nd Rnd.
Bobby Reynolds (USA) v. Fernando Gonzalez (CHI)[11]

followed by
2 Women's Singles - 3rd Rnd.
Elena Dementieva (RUS)[5] v. Anne Keothavong (GBR)

3 Women's Singles - 3rd Rnd.
Katarina Srebotnik (SLO)[28] v. Svetlana Kuznetsova (RUS)[3]

4 Men's Singles - 2nd Rnd.
Tommy Robredo (ESP)[15] v. Marat Safin (RUS)

Ian Aberdon
Aug 28th, 2008, 09:14 PM
Sofia dahling, a word of advice.

YOU'RE OUT. GET OVER YOURSELF!!!!:fiery:

дalex
Aug 28th, 2008, 09:47 PM
Third straight match on the AAS for JJ...C18 no more! :lol:

Bruno71
Aug 29th, 2008, 01:49 AM
I'm not saying it couldn't be true that JJ fast serves or usurps massage appointments, but I have a major pet peeve about it when players air their dirty laundry with other players in public. Oh well, I guess they all get sour grapes at some point or another.

~Kiera~
Aug 29th, 2008, 10:44 AM
http://msn.foxsports.com/tennis/story/8502260/Ivanovic's-fairy-tale-has-unhappy-ending-

The Sony Ericsson WTA Tour is a long way from its much-heralded Glam Slam Australian final between the striking brunette Ivanovic and the equally attractive blonde Maria Sharapova, which was won by the Russian. Once again the tour is being led by the walking wounded, or not at all.

Sharapova, the 2006 U.S. Open champion, is out for possibly the rest of the year with a rotator-cuff tear. Jankovic sustained a knee injury at Wimbledon that she just can't seem to shake mentally. Every match since then she's complained about being out of shape and unable to impose her relentless game.

That's too bad, because a happy Jankovic is a funny, delightful crowd-pleaser, but a miserable Jankovic is something else entirely.


By all rights, she should be fully confident that she can reach her first Grand Slam final, but at least as of Wednesday, she hadn't convinced herself that she has the power and precision to beat the best at the biggest tournaments. She's stockpiling excuses when she should be jumping up and down at being placed in the bottom half of the draw where only Olympic gold medalist Dementieva should be able to go toe to toe with her on a great day.

"Many people said I have the best draw as I ever had in the last two or three years, because I never really had good draws, especially in the Grand Slams," said Jankovic, who will face the tough Wimbledon semifinalist Jie Zheng in the third round. "But that doesn't matter. If you're playing well, if you're doing the right things, doesn't matter if you have a good or bad draw. You're going to go a long way."

дalex
Aug 29th, 2008, 11:24 AM
http://www.usopen.org/en_US/news/articles/2008-08-28/200808281219961565203.html
Matt Cronin's Day 5 Analysis
Thursday, August 28, 2008
By Matt Cronin

2-JELENA JANKOVIC V. JIE ZHENG

How exactly is Jankovic going to win her first Grand Slam when she feels so physically put upon? She's not going to without a complete change of attitude. Sure, she's only seven weeks past her knee injury at Wimbledon, but she's three mediocre tournament performances past that and should be no means be feeling way out of shape. Why she does is beyond the rest of the tennis world, given that she didn't have to take any substantial breaks this year.

The world No. 2 can win this event, but has to play much more aggressively and re-inject herself with some self-belief. If she is as hesitant as she was against Sofia Arvidsson in the first round, she'll lose in straight sets here, because Wimbledon semifinalist Zheng is a smart veteran who is way more consistent than the Swede is. This might be the upset special of the day for some folks, but Jankovic has whined her way through plenty of wins this summer and will do so here in three sets. But she has to step up her level or she'll go down to Azarenka or Wozniacki in the next round.

I don't get all this hype about Wozniacki and especially Azarenka. Azarenka is just another ballbasher and yeah, if she keeps those balls in she can trouble anyone...but what are the chances she will keep errors count low against a top player. Not big IMO.
Wozniacki doesn't have neither firepower nor stamina to beat a JJ playing at 70% of her full potential.

But I agree...JJ could lose to any of these players if she plays badly. I'm especially worried for today's match. Jie hits very flat and hard and doesn't make many UEs. :scared:

redsonja
Aug 29th, 2008, 12:14 PM
Cronin is so totally right. She has to stop letting herself off the hook with 8 bajillion excuses about her health. If you're so injured, don't play. If you're going to play, shut up about how tired and hurt and sore you are and just get on with it. Otherwise, Zheng or Wozniacki is perfectly capable of beating her. Azarenka I wouldn't be so worried about because besides having an underdeveloped game, she really seems to collapse in the 4th round of a major, every single time.

Brena
Aug 29th, 2008, 01:09 PM
Yep. Diva antics are one thing, but constant whining and bad play is something else. She has to get a grip, sort out the injuries issues, decide what she wants, and if she wants to play tennis than she should really play it. If she wants to pinch patio umbrellas, annoy Sofia Arvidsson, lie on the court, and whine about court 18 - she can knock herself out. But, if she just continues to torture us, herself (and the opponents) by this kind of game she played the day before yesterday, and then whine some more about having to endure a 3-hour match (well, darling, had you shown some interest in it you might have won it in an hour)I'll be hard pressed to have any sympathy for our JJ. Maybe she'll reconsider this when she realises how unpopular it's making her.
BTW, I also have no idea why people are all the sudden so excited with Wozniacki? She's a sweet girl, I don't mind her at all, but she never struck me as a particulary dangerous opponent for a (normal) top player. :shrug:
I don't know anything about Azarenka, but Jie Zheng is still my top worry (apart from getting my dress dirty).

~Kiera~
Aug 29th, 2008, 01:18 PM
BTW, I also have no idea why people are all the sudden so excited with Wozniacki?

She's pretty and blonde. That usually helps ;)

Optima
Aug 29th, 2008, 04:51 PM
People act like Wozniacki is the new savior of tennis, I don't get it. I like Caroline but she doesn't have any weapons.

Marilyn Monheaux
Aug 29th, 2008, 06:09 PM
She's pretty and blonde. That usually helps ;)

Probably. I hope they don't hype her up too much because she hasn't really had any "big" wins so far:shrug:
Even though I really like her and think she will have an excellent future I also think that she will need some time.
If she plays against JJ in the 4th round I hope we get to see a good match but I don't see Caro winning it.

Bruno71
Aug 29th, 2008, 06:10 PM
Cronin is so totally right. She has to stop letting herself off the hook with 8 bajillion excuses about her health. If you're so injured, don't play. If you're going to play, shut up about how tired and hurt and sore you are and just get on with it. Otherwise, Zheng or Wozniacki is perfectly capable of beating her. Azarenka I wouldn't be so worried about because besides having an underdeveloped game, she really seems to collapse in the 4th round of a major, every single time.

Yes, although Vika does worry me a lot. It's not like she doesn't have the weapons, and occasionally she can beat a toppish player. She's even beaten JJ before, and the last time they played, she extended her well past where JJ wanted to go :shrug:

Yep. Diva antics are one thing, but constant whining and bad play is something else. She has to get a grip, sort out the injuries issues, decide what she wants, and if she wants to play tennis than she should really play it. If she wants to pinch patio umbrellas, annoy Sofia Arvidsson, lie on the court, and whine about court 18 - she can knock herself out. But, if she just continues to torture us, herself (and the opponents) by this kind of game she played the day before yesterday, and then whine some more about having to endure a 3-hour match (well, darling, had you shown some interest in it you might have won it in an hour)I'll be hard pressed to have any sympathy for our JJ. Maybe she'll reconsider this when she realises how unpopular it's making her.
BTW, I also have no idea why people are all the sudden so excited with Wozniacki? She's a sweet girl, I don't mind her at all, but she never struck me as a particulary dangerous opponent for a (normal) top player. :shrug:
I don't know anything about Azarenka, but Jie Zheng is still my top worry (apart from getting my dress dirty).

I'm losing sympathy for JJ, but Sofia definitely acted a bit sore losery. If JJ annoys her with fast serving and massage stealing, complain to the umpire or to the WTA. This press conference whiny b.s. is rather Jelena-like :lol:

I really wasn't too worried about Zheng. I just felt she's been overrated since Wimbledon, and grass may be her most lethal surface. She's obviously very talented and is top 20 material, but JJ is a bad matchup for her. That seems to have played out again today.
People act like Wozniacki is the new savior of tennis, I don't get it. I like Caroline but she doesn't have any weapons.

Wozniacki has a MAJOR amount of confidence, but if not for that, she'd have no chance against even a 70% JJ. Caro is gaining confidence with each tournament this year, and is starting to believe she can beat the top players, and she is starting to do so. If she makes it to play JJ, she will walk on court believing she can beat her, and that will be more of a handful for JJ than she experienced even at Wimbledon.

redsonja
Aug 29th, 2008, 06:19 PM
Yes, although Vika does worry me a lot. It's not like she doesn't have the weapons, and occasionally she can beat a toppish player. She's even beaten JJ before, and the last time they played, she extended her well past where JJ wanted to go :shrug:
Oh, really? Oh. :lol:

(My brain is a sieve :p)

дalex
Aug 29th, 2008, 07:46 PM
JJ's interview from the usopen.org....

Q. Only 11 deuces. That's not bad?

JELENA JANKOVIC: Yeah, I wanted to go to 20. I just couldn't make.

No, I'm just kidding. Especially that last game was so tough. So many advantages, you know, from her side and I also had I don't know how many match points.

I had a really bad percentage of first serves. I was struggling with that stroke. But I managed to win at the end, so it was, you know, the most important thing.

Q. What are you trying to do to your dear mother, for heaven's sake?

JELENA JANKOVIC: I know. She told me she's under so much stress. It's so hard, you know, for her to be the box. It's tough for her to watch this. I wish I could finish 2 and 2 but it didn't work today. I hope the next match. I will try my best to make it easier for her.

Q. You can tell that you're under some stress, too.

JELENA JANKOVIC: Of course. I want to win. I'm out there to compete and really do my best. Of course, you're not there, you know, in a picnic. You're really in a battle and you're fighting out there.

So it's a tough time. You're under pressure and you want to perform at your best and you want to get out of that as a winner. So that's the most important.

Q. Of course you want to win every point, but when you're late in the second set like that, do you stop to think, what if we go to a third set, what would that be like?

JELENA JANKOVIC: I went to a third set the other match in my second round, so I didn't want to do that. I was a little bit frustrated with myself, because I ‑‑ in the first set I was serving well and holding my serves and doing quite well.

Then in the second set, I don't know what happened. I just lost my rhythm. Throughout the whole match I had a really bad percentage of first serves and mainly playing with second serves, which obviously doesn't help.

That game I really wanted to win so bad because I didn't want to go into a tiebreaker and I didn't want to, you know, let ‑‑ give a chance to my opponent to get into the third set. Then anything can happen, because we are both tired and who's going to last longer? So I'm happy that I managed to get the win in two sets.

Q. What did she do, if anything, that surprised you?

JELENA JANKOVIC: Well, she's a very solid player and moves well on the court. You know, she doesn't give you many free points, so she's really out there until the end.

So really, if you want to beat her, you really have to beat her until the end. She's not going to give up any time.

Q. Are you feeling well‑rested? Are you playing in better condition than the other night?

JELENA JANKOVIC: No, I'm feeling pretty good today. I was sore a little bit yesterday because I cramped in my left leg, and that was only, you know, a little bit of soreness in there. But today I felt fine. I'm a little bit, of course, tired after the match, but it's not that bad. It's normal.

Q. You going to play mixed doubles?

JELENA JANKOVIC: Yeah, I haven't played since I won Wimbledon, and to be honest, I don't know how that will work, you know, what I will do. But I think it's great for me to practice on my serves and my returns and try to, you know, also transform that ‑‑ transfer that to the singles matches. I hope that it can help my singles game as well.

Q. Some players seem to like a little drama in their matches. Are you one of those?

JELENA JANKOVIC: Not really. I wish I didn't have any drama in my matches. I wish I would win nice and in a simple way, you know, nothing there, just cruise through the match and that's it.

But sometimes, you know, it's more exciting for the fans and a little more stressful for the people in my box. But as long as you win, that's what matters.

Q. But in a way you like it a little bit?

JELENA JANKOVIC: I don't know. Who likes drama? Do you know anybody that likes to get involved into tight matches where you're maybe going to go into a third set or whatever?

I don't think anybody likes to be in this kind of situations. Everybody likes to win 2 and 2, easy, no pressure.

Q. Subconsciously some people might like that.

JELENA JANKOVIC: That's just part of the sport, you know, dealing with pressure and being in tight situations is what this sport is all about. You have to try to do your best when this happens, and then you form this drama or whatever you call it.

Q. What do you think about Ana's elimination?

JELENA JANKOVIC: I have no idea. I only saw it in the news last night. It's, you know, surprising. I have no idea how she played, what the other girl did. I have no idea. I only heard it in the news.

Q. What about the effect on the draw?

JELENA JANKOVIC: I'm in the lower ‑‑ bottom side of the draw, so I really don't have anything to do with the top side. For me that doesn't make a difference until ‑‑ if I go to the final and if we were supposed to meet in the final, then okay. But we are completely two different sides, so I follow my side of the draw.

It for sure will open up for somebody who's up there. I don't know who, because I haven't checked the draw.

Q. In your last two rounds you've been on the court for I think just a few minutes under six hours. Does that take a toll on you, that you're out there too long?

JELENA JANKOVIC: I don't know. I'm trying to also improve any fitness level and my condition. I feel a little bit I'm coming back. I'm feeling my strokes a little bit better and getting my timing back. Playing the matches, I think, helps a lot.

When you're practicing, it's not the same. But when you're dealing with pressure and matches and you're hitting the balls, when you're supposed to hit them well, and just feeling little by little you're gaining your confidence back, and that's what I want and that's what I'm looking for at the moment.

So, you know, I don't play tomorrow. I have a day of rest. I'm going to finish the press conference and then I'll play my mixed doubles in a couple hours, and I will take that as a practice, you know, try to work on my returns, serves, volleys, and have some fun out there. There's no pressure out there.

And then tomorrow, just a light hit, and then I hope that I will be ready for the next one.

Q. This is the second straight match where you kind of struggled to hold your serve. How concerned are you about that as you go forward in the draw?

JELENA JANKOVIC: It's okay. I served pretty well in the first set, but then somehow I lost the timing in the second set, because maybe I got a little bit tired. And then when you don't use your legs you don't accelerate as much with your arms, and the stroke falls apart and you don't do as well.

But I will work on that, and I hope that I will do better in my next match.

Q. Do you get tired of the media conferences after the matches? Sometimes when you're playing a match, are you thinking about what you're going to say afterwards?

JELENA JANKOVIC: You think when I'm playing a match I'm thinking about what I'm going to say to you guys (laughter)?

I'm thinking, what are they going to tell me? Because I had like five match points and I haven't made them. What are they going to tell me? Of course not.

Q. You don't think of a good answer?

JELENA JANKOVIC: The media is a way of sharing your information with the fans, with the people that follow you, and that's the only way to express yourself and tell how you feel, how the match was and whatever happened out there. I think it's a great way as long as you don't turn my story in another context.

Q. How hard is it when you lose?

JELENA JANKOVIC: Of course it's tough. Nobody likes to lose, and it's hard to even be up here and talk, especially in the beginning when it's all fresh. But I think we all have to go through that.

Q. There was one point you did the splits twice.

JELENA JANKOVIC: As long as I'm doing the splits, that means I'm healthy. I'm doing good. When I'm not doing the splits, you know there's something wrong. I'm not too sure about my body. If I go into a split, who knows if I'll come back up, you know?

redsonja
Aug 29th, 2008, 07:52 PM
Q. Some players seem to like a little drama in their matches. Are you one of those?

JELENA JANKOVIC: Not really. I wish I didn't have any drama in my matches.

Single most (unintentionally) hilarious thing she has ever said. :lol:

~Kiera~
Aug 29th, 2008, 07:53 PM
So first they tell her off and then they point out that she's a drama queen :lol:

дalex
Aug 29th, 2008, 07:56 PM
Of course, you're not there, you know, in a picnic.

:rolls: Not sure...Nah, especially not you JJ! :kiss:

If I go into a split, who knows if I'll come back up, you know?

:spit:

MagicMilan
Aug 29th, 2008, 08:05 PM
I want to win. I'm out there to compete and really do my best. Of course, you're not there, you know, in a picnic.
Shhhh JJ, you had too many picnics on court lately :o

Bruno71
Aug 29th, 2008, 08:19 PM
Best interview she's given in a little while anyway :) Along with Coin, best of the tourney so far.

дalex
Aug 30th, 2008, 10:51 AM
Bud Colins loves writing about JJ...
http://www.boston.com/sports/other_sports/tennis/articles/2008/08/30/jankovic_stars_in_this_drama/

Jankovic stars in this drama
By Bud Collins
August 30, 2008

NEW YORK - On and on the last act ran. It was running wild, should have finished several times... but... no...

On and on.

Neither the woman from China nor the woman from Serbia would let go of it. They played their parts with daring and dash and kept at it fiercely, sure that something good was ahead. So, on and on they went as the sun beat down, and they tried to beat each other to the punch. It was an abnormal act, stretching into the glorious afternoon like an extra-inning ballgame.

But it had to end, and the petite Chinese named Zheng Jie had the last word - a shriek of despair as she struck the concluding ball into the net.

Although generous applause from about 17,000 devotees in Arthur Ashe Stadium rained on both of them, it was the leading lady on the asphalt stage of the US Open, Jelena "Jelly" Jankovic who will stick around for a fourth-round encore after the 7-5, 7-5 victory. Another day, another successful drama for Jelly.

But what is she doing to dear old mom, Snezana, in the first row?

"I know. So much stress. It's tough on her to watch this stuff."

The dutiful daughter, Jankovic doesn't make it easy on her faithful. A Serbian spectator tells me, "She reminds me of Mira Stupica, our greatest actress. Drama is her specialty."

Jankovic's, too, but, rolling her brown eyes, "I wish I didn't have any drama in my matches. I wish I could cruise, win nice and simple."

That, however, doesn't seem to be the destiny of the world's No. 2 tennis player. It's almost always a grim struggle with lots of running, pirouetting, grimacing, some smiling, scrambling out of impossible positions, occasional skyward glances - perhaps to coax divine intervention?

Now she feels secure in the basement, the bottom of the draw. "I don't have anything to do with the top side. It makes no difference until, if I go to the final."

Next up for her, 18-year-old Dane Caroline Wozniacki, a 6-4, 6-4, victor over Victoria Azarenka. But upstairs are the iron: the Sisters Williams and Dinara Safina.

During one long point yesterday - few were short - Jankovic did the splits twice. Did that hurt? "No, it was good. As long as I'm doing the splits that means I'm healthy. When I can't, I know something's wrong, that I'm not sure about my body - if I go into a split who knows if I'll come back up?"

She fell on her face, literally, but kept coming up roses Wednesday in a tight three sets over Sofia Arvidsson, 2 hours 45 minutes. Two years ago she lost a semifinal here in three uproarious sets to Justine Henin, and last year a quarterfinal to Venus Williams in a third-set tiebreaker.

It's ever an adventure for the hustling, often-injured survivor of the Belgrade Belles, hanging in after No. 1 Ana Ivanovic was ding-donged by a French stranger, No. 188 Julie Coin, Thursday.

Ah, but nothing quite like that last act of Jankovic's triumph has been played in her career. It was the 24th game, Jankovic serving, and it twisted through more brambles than "Long Day's Journey into Night."

Zheng, 25, a mite of 5 feet 4 inches, 119 pounds, with twice as much fight as you'd think, surfaced at Wimbledon, a stunning semifinalist with wins over Ivanovic and Serena Williams to name two biggies.

"I know last game, it's last chance," she said with a great smile from here to Beijing, "but I feel today I play not too bad."

Very, very good for No. 37. Very, very close with her low-bounding, often sharply angled groundies - but she couldn't click on her six break points, one of which would have sent them into a tiebreaker.

Thus on and on they raced, making marvelous saves as the little woman in the white eye-shade refused to bend on four match points. It was deuces wild, 11 of them, as the act extended to a 28th point - enough for a set - and into the 18th minute of a duel that consumed 2 hours 9 minutes.

"If you want to beat Zheng, you have to beat her to the end," said Jankovic. "She won't give up." To the very end, the fifth match point, when Zheng swung hard with both hands but watched her backhand find the net. Hundreds of strokes, but no more. On and on . . . and off.

"How many deuces?" Jankovic asked. "Eleven? I wanted 20." Then she laughed. But didn't mean it. It was as close to an endless act that she wants to star in.

дalex
Aug 30th, 2008, 11:01 AM
http://www.newsday.com/sports/tennis/ny-spomain305822842aug30,0,2181124.story
Jankovic survives drama against Zheng

BY JOHN JEANSONNE |
August 30, 2008

So much of tennis theatrics is unintentional, tiptoeing around break-point trapdoors and shaky service trip wires. But if it's an emotive star the audience wants, prone to histrionics and able to project her every frustration and regret to the top row of vast Arthur Ashe Stadium, then Jelena Jankovic is their woman.

Jankovic's second-round match against China's Zheng Jie was engrossing enough at its core yesterday. The two grappled mightily for control of their service games, Jankovic providing Zheng with 17 break-point opportunities; Jankovic had 12 such chances. (Zheng converted six, Jankovic eight.)

They chased each other all around the court for more than two hours in the midday heat, and the contest was every bit as close as Jankovic's ultimate 7-5, 7-5 decision suggests. Beyond the nuts and bolts of play, though, was Jankovic's tendency to accentuate the negative.

On stage the day after Serbian countrywoman and top seed Ana Ivanovic was bounced from the tournament by the world's 188th-ranked player, Jankovic seemed to telegraph by her demeanor that she, as No. 2 seed, was destined for the same ignoble fate.

Instead, she remains one of five women - Serena Williams, Elena Dementieva, Dinara Safina and Ivanovic are the other four - who could emerge as the world's No. 1 player after the Open. Svetlana Kuznetsova, the 2004 U.S. Open champion and '07 runner-up, fell out of that company by virtue of her 6-3, 6-7 (1), 6-3 loss to Katerina Srebotnik.

While Kuznetsova and, before her, Dementieva (a 6-3, 6-4 winner over 87th-ranked Briton Anne Keothavong) performed at Louis Armstrong Stadium, which is Off-Broadway compared with Ashe, Jankovic melodramatically slumped with each missed first serve, a frequent occurrence. (She got only 53 percent in play.)

Between points, she sighed deeply, retreated to lean against the wall behind the service line, dragged herself slowly around the room, rolled her eyes. During one point, she twice did splits in reaching for a Zheng shot and, after the second one, sprawled on the ground for long seconds, apparently incapable of ever walking again.

"If I go into a split," Jankovic said later, "who knows if I'll come back up, you know?"

Each time play resumed, though, she sprightly went about pushing Zheng through long, scrambling rallies. "She move so fast," Zheng said. "She don't have miss."

A semifinalist at both the Australian and French Opens this year, as she was at the '07 French and '06 U.S. Open, Jankovic produced statistics, apart from her wobbly serve, indicating clean play, with 25 unforced errors compared with Zheng's 41. But that hardly translated to Jankovic's gloom-and-doom body language.

Her every movement between points amplified the already tense circumstances. With Zheng straining to push the match to a third set and Jankovic wanting "to win that [12th] game so bad because I didn't want to go to a tiebreaker," they played to deuce 11 times. Jankovic did not at last prevail until Zheng hit a forehand into the net on Jankovic's fifth match point.

Jankovic insisted she was not trying to add mystery to the proceedings. "Who likes drama?" she said. "Do you know anybody who likes to get involved into tight matches where you're maybe going to go into a third set or whatever? I don't think anybody likes this kind of situation. Everybody likes to win, 2 and 2. Easy, no pressure.

"But sometimes, you know, it can be more exciting for the fans and a little more stressful for the people in my box."


:lol: @ the bolded bit.

JJ is right - it's the media that wants drama and is doing a good job at using every thing JJ does or says for creating even more of it.

Kampi
Aug 30th, 2008, 11:21 AM
Thx Alex:wavey::)

Wayn77
Aug 30th, 2008, 12:03 PM
International Herald Tribune
(Global edition of The New York Times)

U.S. OPEN TENNIS
Jankovic struggles but squeaks into 4th round
The Associated Press
Published: August 29, 2008



NEW YORK: Jelena Jankovic won another squeaker on Friday, playing 28 points in the last game to finish off Zheng Jie, 7-5, 7-5, and become the first woman into the fourth round of the U.S. Open.

Jankovic, seeded second, is now the top seed in the women's draw after her fellow Serb Ana Ivanovic was defeated Thursday in the second round.

Jankovic came out full of energy, showing no ill effects of a bad left leg that cramped after she played Wednesday. She bounded back and forth and, in her trademark style, often came to screeching stops while doing the splits to reach shots.

A day after Ivanovic was upset by the 188th-ranked Julie Coin of France, the favorites restored order to Flushing Meadows.

Jankovic was joined in the fourth round by the fifth-seeded Elena Dementieva of Russia and Li Na of China. Dementieva defeated Anne Keothavong of Britain, 6-3, 6-4, and Li was stretched to three sets by Ekaterina Makarova of Russia, 6-1, 4-6, 6-2.

Brena
Aug 30th, 2008, 12:19 PM
"She reminds me of Mira Stupica, our greatest actress. Drama is her specialty."

*death* How on earth did that guy think of Mira Stupica of all people?? JJ's hamming it up reminds me more of Ivana Žigon. :haha:

дalex
Aug 30th, 2008, 12:35 PM
*death* How on earth did that guy think of Mira Stupica of all people?? JJ's hamming it up reminds me more of Ivana Žigon. :haha:

:spit:
Ohnoes, not Ivana Žigon! :scared:

Brena
Aug 30th, 2008, 12:50 PM
:spit:
Ohnoes, not Ivana Žigon! :scared:

:haha:
Sorry, j/k. But for me, she's the epytome of hamming.

louisa.
Aug 30th, 2008, 01:50 PM
:lol: i love the media.

RFS
Aug 31st, 2008, 08:39 AM
From Matt Cronin's round up on the USO Site (http://www.usopen.org/en_US/news/articles/2008-08-30/200808301220139383171.html):

2-JELENA JANKOVIC. V. 21-CAROLINE WOZNIACKI

If you thought that Jankovic was tested in her last two matches against Arvidsson and Zheng, stare deeply into this match because Wozniacki stayed with her for nearly all of three sets at Wimbledon and, since that time, has moved closer to the center of the tour map. The Danish teenager played a smart and lethal match in downing Victoria Azarenka in the last round and doesn't seem to be tiring on hardcourts, where she has won 15 out of her last 16 matches, including two titles.

She's a cheery sort with a fine all-around game, who seems to be maturing with every tournament. But that doesn't mean she'll beat JJ on a show court because, although the Serbian has been straining, that's been her modus operandi all summer long. Unlike against Zheng, she won't have to play numerous two-dozen ball rallies and will be able to go at Wozniacki quicker. It's really up to the Dane to make a bigger push on key points, but Jankovic can be opportunistic and, against younger players without a similar resume, is more adept at taking her gloves off. Wozniacki can win this match, but she's not going to do it by playing safe. She has to attack Jankovic's serve and forehand at every opportunity. She'll do it for nearly three sets, but at the end of the day, the Serbian will dig down deep once again and will her way to victory.

Cat123
Aug 31st, 2008, 09:06 AM
I like this guy!! :yeah:

~Kiera~
Aug 31st, 2008, 05:24 PM
http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport2/hi/tennis/7590856.stm

Jankovic battles into last eight

Jankovic showed all her experience and guile in the last two sets
World number two Jelena Jankovic fought back from a set down to book her place in the last eight of the US Open at the expense of Dane Caroline Wozniacki.

Jankovic was sluggish in the opening set and allowed the spirited Wozniacki to break early and seal the set 6-3.

However, the Serb found her rhythm in the second and secured a double break to win 6-2 and level things up.

And, with Wozniacki tiring, Jankovic dominated the third 6-1 to set up a tie with Sybille Bammer or Marion Batoli.

"I had to really play a lot more aggressive because it's quite windy and she was a lot more solid than I was in the first set," said Jankovic.

"I took a bit more control in the second and cruised through in the third so I am really pleased."

The second seed is one of four players who can overtake compatriot Ana Ivanovic as world number one at the end of the tournament.

дalex
Aug 31st, 2008, 05:37 PM
Oh, you're here Sarah, you weren't posting articles for 2 days! :eek:

Kampi
Aug 31st, 2008, 05:39 PM
Oh, you're here Sarah, you weren't posting articles for 2 days! :eek:

Even our great Sarah needs a break from time to time, Alex.;):lol: Btw, thx Sarah:wavey::D:kiss:

~Kiera~
Aug 31st, 2008, 05:56 PM
Oh, you're here Sarah, you weren't posting articles for 2 days! :eek:

Even our great Sarah needs a break from time to time, Alex.;):lol: Btw, thx Sarah:wavey::D:kiss:

:lol:

My sister had a baby girl this week, so I've been over at her place quite a bit.

Tashi
Aug 31st, 2008, 05:57 PM
^Congrats, Auntie Sarah!:D

RFS
Aug 31st, 2008, 05:57 PM
:lol:

My sister had a baby girl this week, so I've been over at her place quite a bit.

Awww congrats to Auntie Sarah :aparty: ... oh but shhhhh ... baby's prolly sleeping now huh?!

Kampi
Aug 31st, 2008, 05:59 PM
:lol:

My sister had a baby girl this week, so I've been over at her place quite a bit.

All the best wishes to your sister and her baby girl, Auntie Sarah.:bounce::aparty::D

Ian Aberdon
Aug 31st, 2008, 05:59 PM
*whispers* congrats, Sarah! :D

But really...surely JJ comes first? :lol:

дalex
Aug 31st, 2008, 06:17 PM
That's a good enough excuse. ;)
Congrats Sarah (and to your sister)! :kiss:

~Kiera~
Aug 31st, 2008, 06:19 PM
:lol:

Thanks everyone :hug:

Brena
Aug 31st, 2008, 06:51 PM
*whispers* congrats, Sarah! :D

But really...surely JJ comes first? :lol:

Well, of course, you have to set your priorities straight, Sarah! :lol: Oh, congrats! :kiss:

Q. As in Wimbledon, she was able to take a first set from you, but you came back strong. What was the difference? What changed out there?

JELENA JANKOVIC: In the first set, you know, she played quite solid. She put all these balls back. She didn't make any errors. I was the one who was all over the place.

And I couldn't really find my rhythm in these kind of conditions. She took advantage of that. But then I really tried to stay composed, and I was staying really calm. I thought, you know, what I need to do, you know.

I had to change something to get myself together again and do the right things. You know, I did that. In the second set I started playing a little bit more aggressively from one side; I was hitting the ball harder from the other. I was putting a little bit more spin, so I did the smart things and it worked out.

You know, I just cruised through the second and third set, and happy to get through in this way.


Q. Today was the first time it looked like you could really win this tournament.

JELENA JANKOVIC: Yeah, it's little by little every day I feel that I'm getting better and better. Physically‑wise, you know, I feel that I'm moving much better. My condition is getting better and better. I'm feeling the shots a lot better than I did, especially in the beginning of the tournament in the first few rounds.

So that is my goal, to keep, you know ‑‑ I strive to keep improving day by day and try to get my game together again.

And, you know, I think I'm on the right track. I look forward to my next match.


Q. How much of a goal is it of yours to regain the No. 1 position? You had it just a few weeks ago.

JELENA JANKOVIC: Yeah.


Q. You talked over the course of the last week on how special that was.

JELENA JANKOVIC: Yeah, it's a goal, but I want to win a Grand Slam. Of course, by winning a Grand Slam I will regain the No. 1 ranking again, and that is something I want really bad. I will try my best to achieve that.

I've been injured. I had a tough time this year, and finally I'm feeling good at the moment. I don't have any problems, and I don't want to ask for anything else. I just want to go out there and enjoy my tennis.

I'm happy that I'm getting better and better every time, and so that is the most important thing. Hopefully I can continue in this way, and I think I'm on the right track.


Q. You're the 10th player that Nick Bollettieri has helped to the No. 1 ranking. What has he meant to your career?

JELENA JANKOVIC: I came to Florida to his academy when I was 12 and a half, and I actually, as a young girl, I had no idea. I was always going to school. I played tennis only in the afternoons, unlike some of the other girls like Maria Sharapova and Tatiana Golovin who made it. Those were the girls that, you know, are now in the professional level.

It was, you know, difficult for me, you know, to be there as a young kid. I didn't know the language. But it made me quite strong, because there was a lot of competition over there.

Playing at his academy, playing with all the girls and having his help was amazing. I think he had, you know, quite a good part in my career when I was growing up, when I was developing at that early age.


Q. What's the key to how he succeeds?

JELENA JANKOVIC: I think it's going to his academy overall makes you quite strong mentally, because you're there to compete with all of these players that want to succeed, that want to be the best that they can be.

So there is ‑‑ you learn how to compete from a really early age. You're battling at the back courts. It doesn't matter you're playing against a skinny player, a fat player, a tall player, big, whoever. Doesn't matter even the age. You're playing against anybody, and this teaches you how to really play the game, because it's not the same just practicing.

Anybody can practice. But, you know, to be a good professional, to be a competitor, you need to go out there and really battle it out over there. That's what I learned over there. That's what made me, you know ‑‑ that's how I came here.

And also, of course, receiving instructions from the coaches. There is a another side of the story, of course. You're improving your technical things in your game and developing different parts, as well.


Q. Next opponent could be Sybille Bammer. Could you tell us a little bit about that.

JELENA JANKOVIC: This year I haven't played her, but last year I think I played her many, many times. I think three times in a row around this time last year. I have a positive score against her. I think I only lost to her once, but I think the last four, three, four times, I don't know how many times, I have beaten her.

I know how to play against her. She's a left‑handed player. She's an experienced player. You know, she runs very well. She's quite solid. But I will do my best.

I don't know who she's playing against.


Q. Bartoli.

JELENA JANKOVIC: Bartoli. So whoever wins. I know those players quite well, so I will do what I have to do in order to win.


Q. Caroline has been moving forward very fast, and she's top 20 now, 18. What is it she's doing so well, and how is she as a player?

JELENA JANKOVIC: She's a young player and she's quite solid. She has nothing to lose. She goes out there and, as you could see in the first set, she was hitting the ball and just going for her shots.

Really, she runs well. She doesn't give you many points free, so everything that you have to do, you have to earn it. It's tough to play against players like that.

So she's improving every time and getting better and better, and her results are showing. It's not easy to be in the top 20, as, you know, at that stage. She's very young, 18 years old only, so she has a good potential.


Q. When you were with Bollettieri, how much time did you spend in schoolwork during the week and how much of that was language, English language?

JELENA JANKOVIC: When I was ‑‑ I was going to school from I believe 8:00 in the morning till 1:15 or 2:00 in the afternoon, and then I would run ‑‑ you know, we would get in the bus and run, you know, just leave my bags, you know, outside of the cafeteria. I would go get in, grab some lunch quickly, run and change my uniform, you know, the school uniform, and put some shorts and shirt and go out and play.

That was, you know, how we did it. It was, you know, quite exhausting, you know, to ‑‑ it's not easy having your education and going to school and then playing your sport in the afternoon, because mentally, even though you're just sitting at classroom, you're not doing any running or anything like that, but mentally, it wears you out quite a lot.

So for me it was hard, but that was, you know, my first priority: to go to school and get my education, finish my high school. And then, you know, if I'm good enough, you know, maybe I will go professional, or whatever happens, happens.

But just to be secure, you know, to have ‑‑ to finish my school. It was very important for my parents and I, as well.


Q. With your coach and your mom this week, have they been saying anything to the effect that you can win a Grand Slam, your game is there, put the injuries aside?

JELENA JANKOVIC: No, I'm not really ‑‑ you know, I think I have a really good team around me at the moment. I have my fitness term, Pat Etcheberry, who has worked with many No. 1s in the world and many players who have won a Grand Slam.

He's doing really a good job so far, because I feel like I'm really getting better and better each day. I feel my body is getting fitter and I'm getting tighter. I feel that I can, you know, push off faster than I used to, you know, do it in the beginning of the week.

And everything, like, a little bit, pieces are ‑‑ I'm putting the pieces together with a positive atmosphere, with a great supportive, you know, system around me. My mom is always there for me and my tennis coach, you know.

I'm trying to also work on my tennis game. I'm trying to do my best to bring my game to the next level. You know, we will see how everything goes. I go one step at a time, and the most important thing is that, you know, I believe in myself, and I really want to do it.


Q. At the French and at Wimbledon when you had tough losses, you came in afterward and told us pretty good jokes, including the helicopter jokes. I wonder, do you actually consider humor to be an important tool for playing this tough tour? Because not a lot of players have it.

JELENA JANKOVIC: Humor, you mean?

I think it's part of my personality. It's just who I am, and I'm the kind of girl who likes to have fun, who likes to enjoy her time. I really ‑‑ as soon as I get off the court I become another person. I'm, you know, quite competitive, and a fighter on the court. But as soon as I step off the court, it's like two different girls.

I like to joke around, I like to laugh a lot, and probably if you would go ‑‑ you guys cannot go in the restaurant, I'm always probably the loudest one. I'm always laughing. I'm always saying so many things and just having a good time.

I think it's important, because we have ‑‑ it's not easy, you know, our sport and traveling so much and going from places to places all year and being away from family, being away from your friends. You really have to make the most of it and really enjoy yourself and have fun, whatever you do. Playing tennis, whatever, off the court, whatever you're doing. But it's important to be yourself, and I have a good time.

If you're not doing that, none of this is worth it. Even No. 1, Grand Slams, whatever, if you're depressed, if you're not happy.


Q. Seems like New York maybe more than any other Grand Slam city might fit your personality the best.

JELENA JANKOVIC: Actually, to be honest, this is ‑‑ you know, all of the Grand Slams, you know, I like them. They're special in their own individual way. But here I just have some special feeling, and I love the atmosphere.

It has so much energy, and especially those night matches when you play and you see that the crowd is really getting involved, and all these enthusiastic fans. It's quite unique and amazing.

So it really motivates you to kind of bring your best tennis, to try really your best and to push yourself to the limits and do it so that you can go really a long way and hopefully, you know, whatever happens, happens.

дalex
Aug 31st, 2008, 07:01 PM
That's a very good interview. She sounds really like her mind is in the right place at the moment. That's pretty strange. :lol:

Optima
Aug 31st, 2008, 07:01 PM
She just has to win this tournament :bigcry:

-crybaby mode-

It's so fucking destined for her! We'll have lots of helicopters around when she wins, and the yellow will match so perfectly with the silverness of the US Open trophy!

Brena
Aug 31st, 2008, 07:10 PM
That's a very good interview. She sounds really like her mind is in the right place at the moment. That's pretty strange. :lol:

First sign of the apocalypse coming. :scared:

JadeFox
Aug 31st, 2008, 07:14 PM
First sign of the apocalypse coming. :scared:

*Buys gas masks and tinfoil hats*



:bolt:

Marilyn Monheaux
Aug 31st, 2008, 07:22 PM
She just has to win this tournament :bigcry:

-crybaby mode-

It's so fucking destined for her! We'll have lots of helicopters around when she wins, and the yellow will match so perfectly with the silverness of the US Open trophy!

That's the plan!:yeah::lol:

I stopped making any predictions, since I almost always fail but this is her tournament, this is her year and she better wins this :o:armed:

Brena
Aug 31st, 2008, 07:23 PM
She just has to win this tournament :bigcry:

-crybaby mode-

It's so fucking destined for her! We'll have lots of helicopters around when she wins, and the yellow will match so perfectly with the silverness of the US Open trophy!

And she has a matching belt!

Ian Aberdon
Aug 31st, 2008, 07:44 PM
And matching hair! :yeah:

~Kiera~
Aug 31st, 2008, 08:20 PM
And the ability to say "you know" thirty nine times in just one interview :lol:

дalex
Aug 31st, 2008, 08:28 PM
Oh, Sar, you're bored again! :lol:

Me, too! Come on O'Sullivan, he seems to be winning yet another title. Hopefully they'll go back to tennis right away! Damn, he just missed a pot! :o

~Kiera~
Aug 31st, 2008, 08:31 PM
I am, but I blame her ridiculous love of those words for compelling me to actually count them all :lol:

http://ca.reuters.com/article/sportsNews/idCALV20504120080831?sp=true

Grand slam title the main aim for Jankovic
Sun Aug 31, 2008 3:58pm EDT

By Simon Cambers

NEW YORK (Reuters) - Second seed Jelena Jankovic kept alive her hopes of regaining the number one ranking after reaching the quarter-finals of the U.S. Open on Sunday, but said winning her first grand slam title was her main ambition.

The Serbian came through another war of attrition at Flushing Meadows to beat talented Danish 18-year-old Caroline Wozniacki 3-6 6-2 6-1, her greater experience and fitness seeing her through to the last eight.

Jankovic has enjoyed just one week as the world number one, earlier this month, but has yet to reach a grand slam final, having lost in the semi-finals on four occasions, including at Flushing Meadows in 2006.

The 23-year-old is one of four players who can overtake compatriot Ana Ivanovic as world number one at the end of the tournament.

"It (the number one ranking) is a goal, but I want to win a grand slam," Jankovic told reporters.

"Of course, by winning a grand slam I will regain the number one ranking again, and that is something I want really bad. I will try my best to achieve that."

In sunny, breezy conditions, the 18-year-old Wozniacki, seeded 21st, out-maneuvered and overpowered Jankovic in the first set but as the match wore on the Serbian began to win the majority of the longer rallies.

After leveling the match, she broke in the fourth game of the third set and then eased through the next three games to clinch victory and a match with either French 12th seed Marion Bartoli or 29th seed Sybille Bammer of Austria.

"In the first set, she played quite solid and didn't make any errors. I was the one who was all over the place," Jankovic said.

"I couldn't really find my rhythm in these kind of conditions. I had to change something to get myself together again and do the right things. In the second set I started playing a little bit more aggressively...and it worked out."

As she so often does, Jankovic went through the whole gamut of emotions on court, and said she liked to enjoy herself on court whenever possible.

"It's not easy in our sport, traveling so much all year and being away from family and from your friends," she said.

"So you really have to make the most of it and really enjoy yourself and have fun, whatever you do. Playing tennis, whatever you're doing. But it's important to be yourself, and I have a good time."

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2008/writers/jon_wertheim/08/31/us.open.midterm.grades/?eref=sircrc

U.S. Open Midterm Grades

Headed into final week of the final Grand Slam, here are out midterm grades:

A

Men's seeds: What parity? All top 10 reach Round 3 and even after Saturday's upset the top guns still remain.

Williams-Williams: Two of the few sources of stability in the women's game right now breeze through early rounds. Just a shame they're slated in the same quarter of the draw.

Anna Lena Groenefeld: Former top 20 player who disappeared into the ranking hinterlands, roars back.

Sam Querrey: American not only cruises through to Round 4 -- and gets the television date against Rafael Nadal -- but manages to use "boom goes the dynamite" in a news conference.

Fandom: Thanks in part to cooperative weather so far, U.S. Open set to shatter attendance records. Sure the lines can resemble Disneyworld. But it beats the alternative.

Teenagers: Juan Martin del Potro, Marin Cilic and Kei Nishikori (and even Ernests Gulbis in defeat) live up to hype.

A-minus

The Green Initiative: Good for the USTA for being proactive.

But there's still massive room for improvement. One example: do any red carpet guests not arrive in private SUV's?

Julie Coin: Pride of Clemson tennis, this French qualifier scores one of the bigger upsets in recent memory taking out top seed Ana Ivanovic. Then loses a winnable match against Amelie Mauresmo.

B

Donald Young: Young American shows his abundant talent in five-set first rounder against James Blake. Also reveals how far he is from a finished product.

Mother Russia: Plenty of top players are out -- including non-starter Maria Sharapova -- but two best bets for a title, Elena Dementieva and Dinara Safina, remain.

Jelena Jankovic: Serb is hardly making things easy on herself, but, at this writing she's still in the draw.

American women: Some fine efforts and encouraging results. But as usual, only the Williams sisters survive the early rounds.

C

Ana Ivanovic: Hard to recall a player whose game has fallen faster since reaching No.1. Serb bows out in Round 2, the victim of one of the bigger upsets in recent memory.

Richard Gasquet: Is there a cardiologist in the house? Hyper-talented Frenchman loses another five-setter.

Tomas Berdych: Boy, is this escalator headed in the wrong direction. Czech served off the court by Sam Querrey, 6-3, 6-1, 6-2, in Round 1.

Anna Chakvetadze: Semifinalist last year doesn't survive first round.

Empty suits in near-empty suites: It's a minor tragedy that common tennis fans can't acquire tickets while so many corporate boxes remain unoccupied.

Ian Aberdon
Aug 31st, 2008, 08:36 PM
The Corporate Box brigade are a pain in the arse in ANY sport.

~Kiera~
Aug 31st, 2008, 08:36 PM
http://www.tennisweek.com/news/fullstory.sps?inewsid=6617279

Jankovic Steps Forward

By Richard Pagliaro

It’s been an eventful month in the episodic existence of Jelena Jankovic, a woman capable of creating adventure out of a trip on the treadmill.

She stood at the top of tennis for a week, watched her Serbian successor, Ana Ivanovic, skid out of the tournament in the earliest exit of a top seed in Open Era history, slid into a series of splits around the court in retrieval mode for parts of her last two matches and reported suffering a case of cramps caused by an unrelenting adversary – the treadmill. Taking those developments in stride (as well as offering a brief meditation on the mind-body connection in one post-match press conference), a "firmer" Jankovic found herself down a set to the hottest player in women’s tennis, 18-year-old Caroline Wozniacki, who had wracked up 15 wins in her last 16 matches.

Even when she’s up, Jankovic can sound like a player who feels behind the curve, but she showed no signs of regression when it mattered most.

Stepping closer to the baseline and whipping her most willful shots of the tournament, Jankovic accelerated her ambition, raised her racquet-head speed and surged past Wozniacki, 3-6, 6-2, 6-1 into the US Open quarterfinals for the third consecutive season.

Jankovic, who joked after the match her mom Snezana has told her she's lost weight during the tournament, qualiying the comment wtih "Not losing weight just getting firmer, you know," shed her offensive inhibitions by moving the determined Danish teenager from side to side in a patient campaign of controlled aggression that wore Wozniacki out and elicited errors. Jankovic, who can regain the No. 1 ranking under a variety of scenarios, is set to play either 29th-seeded Austrian Sybille Bammer or 2007 Wimbledon finalist Marion Bartoli for spot in her second semifinal.

"Of course (regaining No. 1) is a goal, but I want to win a Grand Slam," Jankovic said. "Of course by winning a Grand Slam, I will regain the No. 1 ranking again and that is something I want really bad. I will try my best to achieve that. I've been injured I had a tough time this year and finally I'm feeling good at the moment. I don't have any problems and I don't want to ask for anything else. I just want to go out there and enjoy my tennis."

Widely regarded as one of the best pure athletes and fastest women on the WTA Tour, Jankovic’s failure to reach a major final in her career is largely due to three issues: Jankovic possesses the most pedestrian serve of any woman in the top 10 not named Elena Dementieva. She has a habit of playing her most passive tennis in the most important major matches. She’s long been bothered by nagging ailments, but since suffering a knee injury in her third-round win over Wozniacki at Wimbledon, she is even more sensitive to the aches and pains that come with playing the pro circuit.

So why is Jankovic a leading contender to play for the silver title trophy next Saturday night?

Three reasons: as the degree of difficulty has grown, Jankovic has improved her play on a round by round basis. The 2006 Open semifinalist stopped Arvidsson, who nearly knocked her off in Miami last March, 6-3, 6-7(5), 7-5, subdued Wimbledon semifinalist Zheng Jie, 7-5, 7-5, in the third round then withstood Wozniacki’s fast start. The spirited Serbian seems to be more relaxed by the high-energy New York crowd and has played her best Grand Slam tennis at the Open and she enjoys the softest draw of any remaining top seed. The fifth-seeded Dementieva, who plays Na Li tonight, and Bartoli are the only women remaining in the bottom half of the draw who have contested a a major final.

The only two former champions left in the women's field - Venus and Serena Williams - could collide in the quarterfinals while Jankovic eyes her best avenue for advancement to a major final.

"Physically, I feel I'm moving much better," Jankovic said. "My condition is getting better and better. I'm feeling the shots a lot better than I did, especially in the beginning of the tournaent in the first few rounds. So that is my goal and you know, I think I'm on the right track."

One of only two Danish women to contest the fourth round of a major (Tine Scheuer-Larsen, who reached the round of 16 at Roland Garros in 1985 was the other and if you remember that then you’ve probably been keeping company with Danish Davis Cup record holder and renegade world explorer Torben Ulrich), Wozniacki was a set removed from her first trip to a Grand Slam quarterfinal and that prodded Jankovic into producing more assertive play.

Jankovic moves so smoothly around the court it sometimes sounds as if she’s wrapped her Reeboks in velvet slippers. Throughout the first three rounds, she was too content to use her court coverage to race down wide balls, flip back defensive shots and prolong points rather than using her fast feet to set up quickly, take the ball early and control the center of the court. Changing her tactics, Jankovic step forward, hit through her shots and force Wozniacki to hit on the run. As the breeze picked up on the court, Wozniacki's willingness to play near the lines became a tricky proposition: her shots that had caught the corners in a calmer first set strayed wide in the final two sets. At her current pace of progress, Wozniacki could well be a member of the top 10 by this time next year, but the accumulation of matches left her with little resources and she surrendered eight of the final nine games.

"I felt like even though I was hitting the ball it wasn't going. I felt a bit tired," said Wozniacki, who lost to Ivanovic in the fourth round of the Australian Open in January. "Jelena, she's not No. 2 for no reason, you know. She took advantage of that and she came in and she was the one deciding where to play. I just didn't feel like I could overpower her today. I mean, I played a lot of matches and she was just better than me today."

The hustle, bustle and noise of New York - the city where "too much of everything is just enough" can be intimidating to some players, but for the first time in this tournament, Jankovic found her comfort zone and looked like a woman intent on sticking around for another weekend.

"To be honest, all of the Grand Slams, I like them," Jankovic said. "They're special in their own individual way. But here I have some special feeling and I love the atmosphere. (New York) has so much energy, especially those night matches when you play and you see the crowd is really getting involved and all these enthusiastic ans. It's quite unique and amazing. So it really motivates you to kind of bring your best tennis, to try really your best and to push yourself to the limits and do it so you can go a really long way and hopefully, whatever happens, happens."

Ian Aberdon
Aug 31st, 2008, 08:41 PM
You know (:lol:) it's a year to the day almost when...well...you know...Jamie & Jelena...err...spent some time together in the Big Apple...:lol:

This year..........? :angel:

Brena
Aug 31st, 2008, 08:43 PM
Williams-Williams: Two of the few sources of stability in the women's game right now

eh?

Ian Aberdon
Aug 31st, 2008, 09:06 PM
Exactly! :lol:

Cat123
Sep 1st, 2008, 08:59 AM
The Corporate Box brigade are a pain in the arse in ANY sport.

Ah, but they tip well! :angel:

Wrekin
Sep 1st, 2008, 09:45 AM
Ah, but they tip well! :angel:

I like to see a girl who gets her priorities right :lol:

Cat123
Sep 1st, 2008, 09:55 AM
My priorities are just fine!! How else am I meant to fund my musical theatre habit?! :lol:

~Kiera~
Sep 1st, 2008, 10:36 AM
http://tennisworld.typepad.com/thewrap/2008/08/two-matches-in.html

Ashe Sunday
Posted 08/31/2008 @ 7 :43 PM

Jelena Jankovic’s argument is hopeless. “Now you see it!” she yells at the chair umpire, who has called a let in the middle of a point. A plastic bag has flown onto the court. Jankovic had seen the same bag the point before but had not been given a let. The umpire tries to explain that she can’t do anything about that. “I have to see it to call a let.” The Serb stares at her, unable to muster a reply but unwilling to let her irritation go. Someone yells from the crowd, “Come on, J.J.” She shakes her head one more time and finally leans down to serve.

It’s early in the third set of the match between Jankovic, the No. 2 seed, and Caroline Wozniacki, a promising 18-year-old from Denmark. Two months ago, at Wimbledon, Wozniacki had Jankovic on the ropes before losing in three sets. The same thing is happening today. Wozniacki wins the first set but her game suddenly unravels in the middle of the second when she sends a rapid series of routine ground strokes into the net. She stops the bleeding momentarily at the beginning of the third by hitting an ace to level the set at one game each.

The wind is shifting and swirling lightly through Ashe Stadium. The match feels equally unsettled. It’s been on Wozniacki’s racquet up to this point. She took the initiative in the first set, and gave it back in the second. But Jankovic is not a player who closes the door quickly, even when given the chance. Her mind is too scattered and variable for that. In the course of one game, she has more words with the umpire, falls to the ground in a split and stays there for a dramatic moment, and then laughs at the crowd reaction—a loud “Awww”—when she gets a line-call challenge wrong. Jankovic is a performer as much as a player. Simply winning a tennis match wouldn’t satisfy her the way it does most of her peers. Losing one doesn’t crush her, either.

Wozniacki is young, and she looks it. Her visor, though it's pulled low, isn't enough to cover that fact up. As the match has gotten away from her, she has appeared to be more confused—at a loss, literally—than frustrated. She has played well, hit her shots, and done everything she needed to do to put herself in a position for a big upset and early-career breakthrough. The trouble is, it’s still too early. Wozniacki knows how to do everything else, but she doesn’t know how to win against the second seed on Arthur Ashe Stadium yet. Each time she earns a small lead, the confusion returns. Serving at 1-2, up 30-0, she takes a short ball from Jankovic and, rather than belting her forehand the way she normally would, she taps an ill-advised drop shot high over the net. Jankovic pummels it and goes on to break. Wozniacki looks haunted by the choice. She doesn’t win another game.

Afterward, when asked to “explain” how the match turned against her, she said in slow and guarded English, “I started out well. I played my own game. The second set, I don’t know, I think I just got a bit more defensive.” It’s been a great year for Wozniacki, and we’ll see her again soon. But the final lesson—figuring out how to wrap up a big win—will have to wait for another day.

An hour or so later, it’s more humid and crowded in the big stadium. It isn’t quite as windy, and many spectators flip fans back and forth in front of them. Roger Federer, the man they’re here to see, looks the same as he always does. No. 1 or No. 2, he’ll always have the physical nonchalance of the born athlete. He bounces the ball through his legs before he serves. After he holds, he takes a ball out of his pocket and smacks it all the way across the court. It flies right into a ball boy’s hands on a fly.

At the same time, Federer is jumpy, a little agitated. Throughout his match with Radek Stepanek, he erupts periodically with guttural cries of either exhortation or celebration. These aren’t messages to his opponent or to himself; they come out seemingly at random and point to unseen emotions that Federer bottles up most of the time. He doesn’t orchestrate his desire to spur himself on the way Rafael Nadal does. Federer loves to compete, but he’s never been cagey about how he does it.

Always suspicious of gimmicks and change for change’s sake, Federer stays loose and lets his talent, his ball-striking skills, his speed, his instincts, do the work. Rather than pump his fist as he walks to the sideline, he inspects his fingernail and starts to chew it. His system doesn’t fail him often, and it works against Stepanek. The Czech beat Federer in Rome, but he had to walk a very high wire to do it. He served exceptionally well and used his low-margin-for-error strokes—his technique looks almost primitive compared to Federer’s—to move the former No. 1 around before finishing points at net. Stepanek did all that and still only won in two tiebreakers.

One of the tour’s resident characters, Stepanek is decked out today in appropriately wacky (i.e. ugly), angular blue and white. But that’s as colorful as he gets. Federer keeps him on a short leash, allowing him no opportunities to indulge in his customary screeches and awkward fist pumps. The wire is too high this time. Stepanek’s flat forehands skid wide, his volleys find the tape, and his opponent shuts even the smallest windows of opportunity with his serve.

There’s a curious quiet in the stadium as Federer does his work. I’ve heard it before when he plays, and it may be because his method of victory is often not obvious. Nadal grinds his opponents down; Federer kills them with a thousand subtle and surprising cuts (or slices). In the second set, he comes back from 40-15 down to break Stepanek. On one point, he anticipates a serve, comes over his backhand return, and forces a volley error. Then, at break point, he comes under his backhand return and chips it low and crosscourt. Stepanek has to stretch. His volley hits the tape and he’s broken. Federer hasn’t done this with raw power or anything spectacular. He’s done it with intelligent—or perhaps instinctive—shot selection, something that’s not easy for an audience to get revved up about.

Either way, Federer never looks back, and when he relaxes, it looks like old times. Now we get the spectacular. We get the short-hop backhand pass. We get the topspin lob winner. We get the full-stretch backhand return into the corner. And we get a few down the line slice backhands, the shot that half the world has tried to get him to use against Nadal. It works. But even as he’s pummeling Stepanek into submission, Federer does it quietly. By which I mean that his strokes, even when they scream past their opponent, never sound like they’ve been hit hard, the way Marat Safin’s or Fernando Gonzalez’s—or even Richard Gasquet’s—do. As I said, he leaves the gimmicks for the other guys.

It feels like old times in Federer’s press conference as well. He’s confident but not overjoyed—he acts like he’s been there and expects to be there again. He says he made fewer errors because he played a littler safer due to the wind. He says he thought Stepanek “played really great in Rome.” Translation: He treed. He says he never got too down over the summer: “I always had sort of a good spirit. I was in practice and never really down, because this is when you feel it most, when you go out on the practice court and you wonder what you need to change. I never really felt I had that.” It sounds like an honest answer. And he thinks he can get back to where he was with one fell swoop. “If I were to win a big tournament, you know, right away I have the invincibility factor again.” It doesn’t sound like wishful thinking.

Federer is not out for blood, Jimmy Connors style, he’s not following anyone to the ends of the earth. That would be beneath him. He may have bottomed out, playing-wise, over the summer, but the Olympics seem to have made him feel like a winner again—that, after all, he’s still Roger Federer. He’s been in a jesting mood in New York and has enjoyed the crowd support. I suspect that deep down, while he acknowledges Nadal’s achievement in reaching No. 1, he’s never stopped thinking of himself as the best player in the world, and that that world will be set right someday. Maybe, with a little luck, someday soon.

~Kiera~
Sep 1st, 2008, 10:37 AM
http://www.********************/fedjj_083108.html

No Longer Understated
Federer, Jankovic Rising; Dementieva, Roddick Rocking
By Matthew Cronin, ********************

FROM THE US OPEN –Neither Roger Federer nor Jelena Jankovic are substantial favorites to win the US Open, but after mostly sterling performances on Sunday, they kick-served notice that cannot be ignored.

It is no foregone conclusion than defending champion Federer will lose his title this year and that he's incapable of driving for five straight. It is also not scratched in stone that Jankovic cannot overcome her own mental warts and counterpunch her way to the title, given how fast and smooth she is form the baseline. There are a number of obstacles ahead for both players, but even a B-plus level Federer will reach the semifinals, and a B-level Jankovic should be able to also.

Federer threw a 6-3, 6-3, 6-2 masterpiece on the error-filled Radek Stepanek, while Jankovic found her form in the last two sets of a 3-6, 6-2, 6-1 win over Caroline Wozniacki in the fourth round with a victory. Federer committed only a handful of unforced errors, as his kept his forehand under control until he felt comfortable giving it a full swing, switched the pace and spin on his backhand, served terrific and pushed Stepanek at the net.

"At the end of the day, what counts is winning the tournament. You forget all the unforced errors you made," said Federer. “If I were to win a big tournament again, one of those slams right away, I have the invincibility factor again, which is great for me. I don't try to impress anybody in the early rounds I was that close in Wimbledon, you know, so I hope to go a step further and win it this time. That would definitely help for momentum for the rest of the year.”

Federer has a terrific draw and will face Igor Andreev in the next round, who has suddenly found a hard court game and upset Fernando Verdasco 6-2, 6-4, 6-4. Fed hasn’t convinced that many folks that he has the goods this season to best a Novak Djokovic in the semis, or Rafael Nadal in the finals, but he has also hasn’t played up to his level yet, which is extremely high Should he catch fire again, and match the wizardry he displayed in New York last year, then he still has just as many weapons – if not more – than anyone else on hardcourts. The key for Federer is to truly believe in himself and as well as he played on Sunday, there’s still some lingering doubt in his voice. But he does a fine job of talking himself up.

“ I always bounced back right away when things were not looking that good, and same thing after Wimbledon,” he said. “Maybe I was a little bit disappointed but the buzz was bigger about the great match we just played, so I couldn't really look at this match and be completely disappointed. And then went through maybe the summer didn't win a whole lot of matches, but I won the Olympic gold in doubles. So I guess I always had sort of a good spirit. I was working out hard. I was in practice and never really down, because this is, I think, when you feel it most, when you go out on the practice court and you wonder what you want to do or change, and I never really felt I had that. That's a good thing, and I think that's why I'm always very, very positive, still, right now.”

For the first time since Paris, Jankovic really looked like she belonged as a Slam contender. She ran circles around Wozniacki in the last two sets, and was leaping into her shots without hesitating on her bad knee. She was leaning forward with snarl. Her mediocre serve continues to plague her, but she reacts quickly to strong service returns and can turn around points on a dime. Her depth off both wings as well as her sharp angles are more than troublesome, they are the stuff that champions are made of. It’s all about whether she’ll give herself a real chance to win. On Sunday, she didn’t complain about being hurt or out of shape, but spoke to her rising form. She had to be forced into it, but like Federer, applauded her chances.

“It's little by little every day I feel that I'm getting better and better,” she said. “Physically wise, I feel that I'm moving much better. My condition is getting better and better. I'm feeling the shots a lot better than I did, especially in the beginning of the tournament in the first few rounds. So that is my goal, to keep improving day by day and try to get my game together again. I think I'm on the right track. I look forward to my next match.”

That will be against Sybille Bammer, who won (according to new edition of Bud Collins Tennis Encyclopedia) the longest match in US Open women’s history, besting the 2003 Henin-Capriati Classic. The lefty Bammer survived Marion Bartoli 7-6, 0-6, 6-4 in three hours and five minutes, becoming the first mother to reach a Slam quarter since Laura Arraya Gildemeister at 1991 Wimbledon. Tina’s mom will attempt to become the first Austrian woman to ever reach a Slam semi, but she’ll be hard pressed after that exhausting win. Jankovic has a good record against her and claims she knows her game inside and out. Plus, she knows it’s time to shine a major.“I want to win a Grand Slam," said Jankovic, who has yet to reach a major final. Of course, by winning a grand slam I will regain the number one ranking again, and that is something I want really bad. I will try my best to achieve that…. I'm trying to do my best to bring my game to the next level. I go one step at a time, and the most important thing is that, I believe in myself, and I really want to do it.”

It’s more than probable that Jankovic will face Elena Dementieva in the semis, who played a near perfect match in battering Na Li 6-4, 6-1. She might not have missed three forehands and was daring Li to stay in crosscourt rallies with her and Li could never answer the call. Other than her curious decision to only try and hit kick serves into the ad court (her flat serve down the T into the deuce court hit 110 mph), there was little to quibble about.

“ I feel pretty comfortable playing against her, and, well, maybe because she give me a good, chance to attack her, be always ahead of her. So I just feel like the whole game was pretty solid, maybe not my service. I struggled just a little bit, especially in my first set, but it feels much better in the second.”

Dementieva wasn’t as thrilled with her level as one observer was, asking with a laugh if he “wanted to feel her [post Beijing physical ] pain.” She’ll face Patty Schnyder, who has had a nice run too and beat Katarina Srebotnik 4-6, 6-3, 6-3. It’s hard to see the Swiss being consistent enough to scare the red hot Elena, who is here with her longtime boyfriend, hockey player Max Afinogenov.

Back to the bottom of the men’s draw, where Andy Roddick was super-solid in beating Italian Andreas Seppi 6-2, 7-5, 7-6. Roddick will face the winner of the Fernando Gonzalez-Jarkko Nieminen contest.
Qualifier Gilles Muller became the first player from Luxembourg to reach the fourth round of Slam when he survived Nicolas Almagro 6-7, 3-6, 7-6, 7-6, 7-5. He’ll play the quiet fifth seed Nikolay Davydenko who beat Dmitry Tursunov 6-2, 7-6, 6-3…BTW on Bartoli: she said she caught a stomach virus yesterday ad couldn’t keep anything down and was advised not to continue by the trainer because she had a very weak pulse…. Tommy Robredo played a fine match in besting the still rusty Jo-Wilfried Tsonga 7-6(2), 6-2, 6-3.

Quote of the Day Goes to Roddick on Federer’s year: “The guy has only made two Grand Slam finals this year. I would love his bad year. I would love it. It would be great. I'd be really happy with right now. I guess at a certain point, the guy has the best four year run ever, and we're all sitting here in shock that it's not the best five year run ever. We have to use a little bit of perspective here as far as how good he's been. I've said it before, and I think he's said it, he's created a little bit of a monster for himself, and I remember reading a lot of stuff after, you know, Tsonga beats Nadal in Australia, and everyone's like, okay. It was Djokovic for two months and you guys were like, going off, and then Nadal now and you guys are all jacked up. You got to give it some time. One big result and he's just clicked in. I think if you have to hear about anything every day you start thinking about it a little bit, and maybe that's where he's at.”

~Kiera~
Sep 1st, 2008, 12:05 PM
http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/sport/2008/0901/1220180159137_pf.html

Final path opening up as Jankovic gathers strength
STEVE BIERLEY at Flushing Meadows

Mon, Sep 01, 2008

TENNIS US OPEN CHAMPIONSHIPS: WITH JUSTINE Henin, last year's US Open champion, retiring in May at the ripe old age of 25, Maria Sharapova missing injured and Serbia's Ana Ivanovic, the number one seed, losing in the second round here last week, next Saturday's final is beckoning strongly for Jelena Jankovic, the most talented woman in the top 10 not to have so far reached a grand slam singles final.

The 23-year-old has the ability and brain to win a slam event but she has come to a juddering halt four times in the semi-final stage, at Roland Garros (twice), Melbourne and Flushing Meadows.

She is a beautiful mover, and hits the ball with considerable power, but her slight frame has frayed at the edges during the second weeks.

To this end she has taken on the services of the American trainer Pat Etcheberry, who helped Henin overcome her physical disadvantages.

The main problem for Jankovic is she gets drawn into so many long matches during the first week that she often has little left when the real crunch comes.

This pattern has continued here, although there were signs yesterday she is beginning to manage the stresses and strains a little better.

Denmark's Caroline Wozniacki had won the New Haven warm-up tournament just before the US Open - "the biggest win of my career" - and represented a distinct threat to the world number two.

The potency of the teenager's challenge was quickly evident and she duly took the opening set, hitting through the ball in awkward, windy conditions with freedom.

The 18-year-old Dane was a junior Wimbledon champion two years ago and has climbed into the top 20 this year. She is likely to make a big impact in the coming years - but not on this occasion, when Jankovic finally brought her experience to bear.

The Serbian steadied her early waywardness, forcing Wozniacki into more and more mistakes to win 3-6, 6-2, 6-1.

"I have been working very hard on my fitness and I think I am now ready to make it to my first slam final," said Jankovic, clearly overjoyed and relieved to reach the quarter-finals, where she will play the winner of the match between Sybille Bammer of Austria and Marion Bartoli of France.

Champion Roger Federer moved smoothly into the fourth round of the men's singles with a hassle-free 6-3, 6-3, 6-2 win over the 28th seed, Radek Stepanek.

The Swiss second seed, chasing his fifth successive US Open crown but his first grand slam title of the year, served superbly as he breezed past the Czech to reach the last 16.

Stepanek beat Federer in Rome in May but the Swiss was on his game from the start, particularly on serve, frequently leaving the 29-year-old hitting air on his returns.

The Czech stayed with Federer in the second set until 3-3 but the second seed then pulled away to set up a meeting with the Spaniard Fernando Verdasco or the Russian Igor Andreev.

Fifth seed Nikolay Davydenko continued his ride with a 6-2, 7-6, 6-3 third-round win over his fellow Russian Dmitry Tursunov.

The 26th seeded Tursunov stretched him to a tiebreak in the second but Davydenko won it 7-3. He claimed an early break in the third to go 3-1 ahead and closed it off efficiently.

Serving for the match at 5-3, the 27-year-old slugged it out from the baseline during the long rallies and kept up the pressure until Tursunov made the first error.

"I need to control the baseline, which is what I did today," Davydenko, who has yet to drop a set in the tournament, said in a courtside interview.

Davydenko, who has been a semi-finalist in New York for the last two years, could run into the four-time champion Federer in the quarter-finals.

The Russian will next face either Nicolas Almagro of Spain or Gilles Muller of Luxembourg.

Jamie Murray, who won the 2007 Wimbledon mixed doubles title with Jankovic, reached the third round here with his naturalised American partner Liezel Huber, taking less than 90 minutes to defeat the Czech pair Kveta Peschke and Pavel Vizner 7-5, 6-3.

Murray and Huber made the semi-finals here last year.

Kampi
Sep 1st, 2008, 04:04 PM
Thx a lot Sarah:wavey::worship::D

Ian Aberdon
Sep 1st, 2008, 06:37 PM
Thanks Sarah, normality on WTF is restored!! :lol:

Not sure about JJ's MENTAL WARTS though!!! :eek:

дalex
Sep 2nd, 2008, 09:38 AM
http://www.novosti.rs/code/navigate.php?Id=13&status=jedna&vest=127706&datum=2008-09-02

Jankovic: I want to win the title

With each point she's getting closer to winning her first Grand Slam title, with each match she's closer to #1 ranking. Jelena spent only a week as the #1 player in the world, but that feeling is an extra incentive for every shot she plays at the USO. Serbian #2 is very close to assuming the throne again and taking it away from Ana Ivanovic. And she could do it by winning the last of the "big four" tournaments.

"I really want this title", Jelena is slowly becoming aware of how fairly open her path to the final is. "Winning the trophy in New York would also mean winning the #1 spot. It would mean I had to take it myself and deserve it. I'm ready for a big result."

Before the competition in "Big Apple" started, the expectations were low.

"I didn't know what to expect cos I've been struggling with injuries for a long time. I don't have any problem at the moment and with each day I'm feeling better. I'm lifting my level of play with each match and I'm feeling very good physically", Jankovic sounds content.

Solid play is making her feel more confident before deciding matches take place. Serbian tennis player had little trouble in staging a comeback after losing the first set to Caroline Wozniacki.

"I was completely calm. I knew that I'd win if only I improved on some bad things from the first set. As soon as I started to play more aggressively and when I got used to windy conditions, everything was under control", our player sounds confident and will play against Austrian Sybille Bammer on Tuesday. If there are no surprises Jelena's last hurdle in her race to her first Grand Slam final will be the winner of the match between Dementieva and Schnyder.

The Williams sisters and Dinara Safina will fight it out on the other side of the draw.

дalex
Sep 2nd, 2008, 10:53 AM
Matt Cronin's Day 9 Analysis
http://www.usopen.org/en_US/news/articles/2008-09-01/200809011220321340201.html

2-JELENA JANKOVIC V. 29-SYBILLE BAMMER

It's hard to see how Bammer is going to win this match post her record-setting, three-hour and five-minute win over Marion Bartoli. The mom has been no doubt inspiring, but she has to be tapped, and she enters this match with a 1-6 record against JJ. The Serbian has started to peak, has beaten her four straight times on hardcourts and isn't bothered by the Austrian's lefty spins. Bammer is going to have to come out firing early and never back off because she's not going to last three sets with the faster and, frankly, more talented Jankovic. She'll be unable to do it, and JJ will advance in a cakewalk.

5-ELENA DEMENTIEVA V. 15-PATTY SCHNYDER

Do you like rivalries? How about this one between the 26-year-old Russian and the 29-year-old Swiss, which stands at 9-7 for Dementieva? It's an intriguing veteran's clash between a tricky lefty (Schnyder) and assiduous righty (Dementieva). They've played twice at the Slams, with Schnyder taking their Australian Open battle and Dementieva winning here in 2005. Dementieva has won their last three matches, including two this year at Dubai and Charleston.

It's really not that tough of a call, even though the Swiss has been clicking in Flushing, stepping in with her heavily-topspinned forehand, keeping her backhand deep and twisting her serve into the corners. Dementieva is playing at an extremely high level, perhaps the best stretch of her career. Schnyder is going to have to try to penetrate her backhand because the Russian is dominating off her forehand side. Plus, the Swiss must take some big cuts at Dementieva's second serves, which haven't been too weak this tournament but are very attackable from the ad court. But Schnyder can be hit through, and Dementieva is so deep in her zone that she will find the corners quickly and often. Dementieva will win in straight sets and then face Jankovic, which might end up being the match of the tournament.

Brena
Sep 2nd, 2008, 11:05 AM
Well, I know Demented will beat Patty (oh, Demented, did you really have to find form NOW after a decade of being a nut? :rolleyes::lol:), but I wish all these people would stop jinxing JJ! :scared:

Wrekin
Sep 2nd, 2008, 11:26 AM
Well, I know Demented will beat Patty (oh, Demented, did you really have to find form NOW after a decade of being a nut? :rolleyes::lol:), but I wish all these people would stop jinxing JJ! :scared:

Don't worry, JJ is jinxing herself :tape:

"I really want this title. Winning the trophy in New York would also mean winning the #1 spot. It would mean I had to take it myself and deserve it. I'm ready for a big result."

Cilla
Sep 2nd, 2008, 11:34 AM
I don't expect Patty to win, but it'd nice is she didn't choke/tank for once :tape:

I'm not sure I remember a time where "JJ" and "cakewalk" have been used in the same sentence :rolls:

Brena
Sep 2nd, 2008, 11:40 AM
Don't worry, JJ is jinxing herself :tape:

Shut up, JJ, shut the trap! :smash::lol:

Ian Aberdon
Sep 2nd, 2008, 11:52 AM
I could understand the words "Bartoli" & "cakewalk" in the same sentence...:devil:

дalex
Sep 2nd, 2008, 12:22 PM
A-ha! Guess who's the player that used the hawk-eye system the most during USO. Surprise surprise - it's our girl! :inlove:

Rank Player Challenges Overturned % Overturned
1 Ai Sugiyama 1 1 100%
1 Elena Vesnina 1 1 100%
1 Flavia Pennetta 1 1 100%
1 Ekaterina Makarova 1 1 100%
1 Alona Bondarenko 1 1 100%
6 Elena Dementieva 4 3 75%
6 Nathalie Dechy 4 3 75%
8 Ana Ivanovic 3 2 66.67%
8 Svetlana Kuznetsova 3 2 66.67%
10 Caroline Wozniacki 10 6 60%
11 Amelie Mauresmo 4 2 50%
11 Roberta Vinci 2 1 50%
11 Samantha Stosur 2 1 50%
11 Vera Dushevina 2 1 50%
11 Sorana Cirstea 2 1 50%
11 Serena Williams 2 1 50%
17 Dinara Safina 12 4 33.33%
17 Lindsay Davenport 6 2 33.33%
17 Akgul Amanmuradova 3 1 33.33%
20 Jelena Jankovic 13 4 30.77%
21 Marion Bartoli 7 2 28.57%
22 Jie Zheng 4 1 25%
22 Julie Coin 4 1 25%
24 Sybille Bammer 6 1 16.67%
25 Anna-Lena Groenefeld 3 0 0%
25 Coco Vandeweghe 3 0 0%
25 Aleksandra Wozniak 2 0 0%
25 Sofia Arvidsson 2 0 0%
25 Anne Keothavong 2 0 0%
25 Kristie Ahn 2 0 0%
25 Anna Chakvetadze 1 0 0%
25 Alisa Kleybanova 1 0 0%
25 Agnieszka Radwanska 1 0 0%
25 Katarina Srebotnik 1 0 0%
25 Rossana De Los Rios 1 0 0%
25 Severine Bremond 1 0 0%
25 Timea Bacsinszky 1 0 0%

Hashim.
Sep 2nd, 2008, 12:30 PM
JJ:spit:

limedrops
Sep 2nd, 2008, 12:34 PM
At least she uses her challenges, it's there for a reason, better than arguing with an umpire and losing your focus, ask John McEnroe. And after a long rally a review gives her a bit of time to settle down.

Cilla
Sep 2nd, 2008, 01:49 PM
I loved it last year when JJ kept on with the challenges & getting them horribly wrong, when she finally ran out & that dude in the crowd yelled: "Thank god!"

:haha:

Brena
Sep 2nd, 2008, 02:20 PM
:haha:

Well, what else can she do when all those evil umpires are out to get her? :rolls:

P.S. The entry list for the Kremlin Cup seems to be out - and JJ's name is on it. (there's a thread in the GM)

Optima
Sep 2nd, 2008, 02:26 PM
JJ winning Moscow would be :hearts:

дalex
Sep 2nd, 2008, 03:31 PM
It's surprising she's entered Moscow. I don't think she ever played there.
I don't like her fall schedule, too many tourneys!

Bruno71
Sep 2nd, 2008, 07:16 PM
JJ won't win in a cakewalk if she expects Sybille to come out and not play aggressively, as it seemed she did in last year's 4th round. Come on, JJ, let's put up here!

Just Do It
Sep 2nd, 2008, 07:35 PM
A-ha! Guess who's the player that used the hawk-eye system the most during USO. Surprise surprise - it's our girl! :inlove:

Rank Player Challenges Overturned % Overturned
1 Ai Sugiyama 1 1 100%
1 Elena Vesnina 1 1 100%
1 Flavia Pennetta 1 1 100%
1 Ekaterina Makarova 1 1 100%
1 Alona Bondarenko 1 1 100%
6 Elena Dementieva 4 3 75%
6 Nathalie Dechy 4 3 75%
8 Ana Ivanovic 3 2 66.67%
8 Svetlana Kuznetsova 3 2 66.67%
10 Caroline Wozniacki 10 6 60%
11 Amelie Mauresmo 4 2 50%
11 Roberta Vinci 2 1 50%
11 Samantha Stosur 2 1 50%
11 Vera Dushevina 2 1 50%
11 Sorana Cirstea 2 1 50%
11 Serena Williams 2 1 50%
17 Dinara Safina 12 4 33.33%
17 Lindsay Davenport 6 2 33.33%
17 Akgul Amanmuradova 3 1 33.33%
20 Jelena Jankovic 13 4 30.77%
21 Marion Bartoli 7 2 28.57%
22 Jie Zheng 4 1 25%
22 Julie Coin 4 1 25%
24 Sybille Bammer 6 1 16.67%
25 Anna-Lena Groenefeld 3 0 0%
25 Coco Vandeweghe 3 0 0%
25 Aleksandra Wozniak 2 0 0%
25 Sofia Arvidsson 2 0 0%
25 Anne Keothavong 2 0 0%
25 Kristie Ahn 2 0 0%
25 Anna Chakvetadze 1 0 0%
25 Alisa Kleybanova 1 0 0%
25 Agnieszka Radwanska 1 0 0%
25 Katarina Srebotnik 1 0 0%
25 Rossana De Los Rios 1 0 0%
25 Severine Bremond 1 0 0%
25 Timea Bacsinszky 1 0 0%

:haha:

terjw
Sep 2nd, 2008, 09:16 PM
A-ha! Guess who's the player that used the hawk-eye system the most during USO. Surprise surprise - it's our girl! :inlove:


I know - I was going to post something on that. That's a stat our girl comes out miles on top. No-one else even close. And I mean she's got a staggering 30% of them right! It's good and adds to the drama. And if that's the case - you simply have got to have Jelena there at the centre. :lol:

Actually looking at who is second - the players she plays against usually come out next highest in challenges. It's like they reckon if Jelena's going to make all these challenges then I'm going to do it as well. So Caro is #2 in the list. Actually Caro would probably be #1 if she'd been playing on a court with hawkeye in her previous match. She had some dreadful linecalls or so she thought anyway - and was having a right go at the chair umpire. Who does she think she is? JJ mark 2?

~Kiera~
Sep 3rd, 2008, 02:45 AM
http://afp.google.com/article/ALeqM5g676Ljo3YlW7ICl5_gsbso20VR3Q

Jankovic books US Open semi showdown with Dementieva
41 minutes ago

NEW YORK (AFP) — Serbian second seed Jelena Jankovic, seeking her first trip to a Grand Slam final, advanced to the US Open semi-finals Tuesday with a 6-1, 6-4 victory over Austrian Sybille Bammer.

Jankovic advanced in 90 minutes to a semi-final matchup against Olympic champion Elena Dementieva, the Russian fifth seed seeking her first Grand Slam title.

Jankovic owns a 4-3 career edge over Dementieva, who ousted Swiss 15th seed Patty Schynder 6-2, 6-3.

"It will be a really tough one but I have beaten her before," Jankovic said. "I will really try my best and hopefully I can make my first Grand Slam final."

One of them will have the chance for a breakthrought title and the world number one ranking Saturday night in the year's last major championship.

"Against someone like her, she is going to play everything back," Dementieva said. "You can't play on the baseline. You really have to go on the court and create something. That's what I would like to do."

By reaching her fifth career Slam semi-final, Jankovic ensured that someone will replace Serbia's Ana Ivanovic atop the WTA rankings. Top seed Ivanovic lost to French qualifier Julie Coin in the second round.

Jankovic, who spent one debut week atop the rankings last month, blitzed Bammer to take the first set in 33 minutes, then traded six breaks with the lefthander, the last from the Austrian to deny Jankovic serving for the set.

But Jankovic finished off the match with a break to sent Bammer home empty handed in her first Slam quarter-final.

Bammer was the first mother to advance to the final eight in a Grand Slam singles tournament since 1991 when Peru's Laura Gildemeister reached the Wimbledon quarter-finals. Bammer gave birth to daughter Tina in 2001.

Dementieva took just 76 minutes to book her fourth trip to the Flushing Meadows final four.

"I'm very pleased with the way I was playing," Dementieva said. "I was going very positive, very aggressive the whole way and I was very happy about that. Everything clicked in and it feels good. I'm very confident."

Dementieva, who has won 11 matches in a row and 16 of her past 18, would become the new world number one if she can take her first Grand Slam title. But she said she must still raise her game despite not losing a set at the Open.

"I need to play better in my next match. I have to improve my game if I want to go through to the final," Dementieva said.

"I'm not playing at my best. I really feel there are some very powerful players out there and I need to provide something else. I can improve my serve. I'm so far from being perfect."

Dementieva was a US Open semi-final loser in 2000 and 2005 but reached the final here in 2004, losing to compatriot Svetlana Kuznetsova after having taken the runner-up spot at Roland Garros that year in her only other Slam final.

This year Dementieva has reached the French Open quarter-finals, Wimbledon semi-finals and taken Beijing gold and is among four women with a chance to be number one on Monday. But still she hungers to improve.

"I want to attack more. I want to be more aggressive on the court. You can't play defensive if you want to be number one," Dementieva said.

"The most consistent player is Jelena Jankovic for the moment. There is no number one, a real number one. Maybe the competition is too tough. It's wide open for a few players."

Dementieva, who also won in Dubai this year, improved to 10-7 lifetime against Schynder with her fourth victory in a row over the Swiss veteran, who at 29 was the oldest women in the last eight.

"It's never easy against Patty but I was pleased with the way I played," Dementieva said. "The serve was the key. It was very successful."

Dementieva connected on 80 percent of her first serves and won 30 of 39 points when doing so compared to just 2 of 10 on second serves.

"I played well at times but I could never get ahead," Schnyder said.

redsonja
Sep 3rd, 2008, 03:13 AM
Tonight's press conference:

Q. First of all, just, you know, congratulations. It was a great performance tonight. Do you feel really happy about the way you played the match?

JELENA JANKOVIC: I'm happy about winning in two sets. I feel that every day I'm better and better. I'm moving a lot better. I'm feeling my shots a lot better.

I think that is the most important thing for me right now. I'm just here to play one match at a time, and so I'm happy to be in the semifinals again.


Q. You talked about some issues with conditioning, and I know a couple of matches ago you had some leg cramps coming off...

JELENA JANKOVIC: Yes, in the beginning of the week. And you probably can see the difference that, you know, I was not moving as well. I was really struggling. I was, you know, getting tired quite quickly, but I have been working with the Pat Etcheberry quite a lot. Every day I feel that I'm just little by little I'm getting stronger. I'm getting firmer.

I'm not doing the exercises that make me tired. It just helps me to tone my muscles, and really, you know, we do a lot of exercises for agility, a little bit of strength. Not too much that it's going to make me tired for my match.

So it's just enough. And I feel that every day I'm seeing the difference, I'm seeing the progress, which is the most important thing.

So right now, I have two days off, which will help me to recover even more, and then do some more work and hopefully I will be ready and try my best for in semifinal.


Q. How hard is it when you come into a tournament, you know, you're in a two‑week tournament, and you're not feeling 100% to actually gain strength and a sense of good conditioning?

JELENA JANKOVIC: Yes, it's not important how you start. Of course, it's important how you start, but it's not important if you're maybe struggling in the beginning, but it's important how you end the tournament. So if every match if you're feeling you're gaining your confidence back, you're really finding your game little by little, you're feeling a lot more comfortable on the court, and I'm kind of gaining my concept of the game. I'm really getting informed little by little.

And in the beginning of the tournament, I was really not feeling that great, because I wasn't able to practice. I was injured at Olympics and throughout most of the year. So, you know, of course I couldn't expect for myself to be at the top of my game and in top shape.

But I'm willing to work hard and trying to get better every day, and I'm really happy how I'm doing, how I'm progressing, how I'm developing.

So that is, for me, very satisfying.


Q. To have the match moved over to Louis Armstrong, does that make any difference to you?

JELENA JANKOVIC: No, I was actually happy to be playing on Louis Armstrong, because we would have to wait a long time for Federer to finish. He was in the fifth set, and they told me that they needed an hour at least to clean the court, and prepare for night session. So all these people from the day session needed to go out, and then all these people who had a ticket for night match, they need to get in.

So in order to do that, you need at least an hour, because you need to get all these 20,000 people out and put them back in.

So I would probably go and play my match around this time, and so I'm happy to ‑‑ I didn't have a problem going to Armstrong and playing my match there, and I got my job done. That is the most important thing.


Q. In the next match, you've played Elena a number of times. Sort of mixed results with Elena. She's coming in obviously very confident from her Olympic victory and has managed in straight sets, hasn't lost a set yet, actually. How tough a challenge do you think she's going to present to you?

JELENA JANKOVIC: She's a tough player. She's very solid. She moves great. It will be a tough match, for sure, but I will try my best. I have beaten her I don't know how many times, and I think I've beaten her here two years ago in the quarterfinals. So it will be another experience, and I was really ‑‑ I would love to make another step forward and reach my first final of a Grand Slam, and then play on Saturday.

So I will try really my best, and hopefully I can do it.


Q. And of course she is certainly one of the players that's made a pretty good case for reaching that No. 1 position you've held before. I've asked you this earlier in the week, but we're getting to the point where you could retain that No. 1 ranking, especially, with a victory here.

JELENA JANKOVIC: Yeah, it would be nice to regain the No. 1 ranking, but I'm here to ‑‑ I'm here playing the Grand Slam, and my goal is to win a Grand Slam. That's what I'm really focusing on, and I'm here to play really one match at a time, really go out there and really try my best, try to fight until the end and just, you know, do whatever it takes to win all these matches.

So this is what I really want, and this is what I came here to do. US Open is one of my favorites. It's quite exciting to be here. I would love to do something special here.

You know, we will see what will happen on Friday and hopefully it will be my day.


Q. Only two sets tonight. Your mother wasn't as nervous as the last few matches?

JELENA JANKOVIC: I don't know. I think she's always nervous. I think it's normal for a parent to be nervous, sitting in the box and watching their kid play.

I think it's always harder to be sitting there than, you know, playing itself. You don't know how the player is feeling, you don't know what is going on in the player's mind and when you're playing, you know what you're doing. But when you're sitting out there, it's quite a lot of stress.

I really understand her. I know it's quite tough. I'm happy to win in two sets, so I didn't give her a lot of trouble.

Brena
Sep 3rd, 2008, 06:59 AM
Yes, it's not important how you start. Of course, it's important how you start, but it's not important if you're maybe struggling in the beginning, but it's important how you end the tournament.

It is! It's not! It is, but it's not! :rolls:

I think it's always harder to be sitting there than, you know, playing itself. You don't know how the player is feeling, you don't know what is going on in the player's mind and when you're playing, you know what you're doing.

No, I really don't, especially if the said player is you, JJ. :lol:

JadeFox
Sep 3rd, 2008, 08:04 AM
It is! It's not! It is, but it's not! :rolls:


As funny as her explanations are:lol: she does have a point. In a Slam it's how you finish that's important.

Bruno71
Sep 3rd, 2008, 08:08 AM
As funny as her explanations are:lol: she does have a point. In a Slam it's how you finish that's important.

I hope she gets important once and for all :lol:

Ian Aberdon
Sep 3rd, 2008, 09:39 AM
WELL DONE JJ !!!!!!!!!!! :inlove:

ce
Sep 3rd, 2008, 09:57 AM
JJ :hearts:

Ian Aberdon
Sep 3rd, 2008, 12:38 PM
Actually it's important to go into a tourney not too injured, just a little bit injured, as if you're too injured then you cannot perform to your best advantage. Then as you progress you get less & less injured so that you come to a point if you go deep that you can play hardly injured at all, although if you are still slightly injured then you have something to fight for. So, to be injured or not to be injured...what is the question??? :lol:

дalex
Sep 3rd, 2008, 12:51 PM
^ :haha:

RFS
Sep 3rd, 2008, 01:06 PM
^^ :haha:

Wayn77
Sep 3rd, 2008, 01:27 PM
Interview with Jelena Jankovic

Tues 2 September

http://www.usopen.org/en_US/news/interviews/2008-09-02/200809021220410945539.html

Brena
Sep 3rd, 2008, 06:58 PM
^^^^ :haha: Rich...

Ian Aberdon
Sep 3rd, 2008, 07:14 PM
Thing is guys, I can ACTUALLY imagine her saying it!! :lol:

Ian Aberdon
Sep 3rd, 2008, 07:16 PM
You mean she DID say it??!! :eek: :lol:

Brena
Sep 3rd, 2008, 07:51 PM
:lol:

JJ is so cute in that interview :inlove: She looks somehow... serious and poised. :unsure:

limedrops
Sep 3rd, 2008, 10:44 PM
There's a really great JJ article at USO.Org
http://www.usopen.org/en_US/news/articles/2008-09-03/200809031220456369570.html

Brena
Sep 4th, 2008, 08:21 AM
This is not exactly a piece of news, but it is JJ-related:
I was standing by the coffee machine a couple of minutes ago waiting for my cup of poison when I overheard a conversation between two journalists from the nearby office (this is a news agency)who were bitching about JJ, Ana and Novak not granting them any interviews for ages. I couldn't hear their words very well (despite straining my ears to the maximum :lol:), but one of them (a woman) was almost yelling angrily that (one of them or all of them) have no manners whatsoever because they are not forthcoming enough with the press (or rather, with this lady), and by the sound of her voice it seems she thinks they deserve to be shot (at least) for that. (I mean, hey, they certainly can't have anything better to do than to suck up to journalists :rolleyes: )
One thing I learnt at this lousy job: journalists are the greatest scum on earth. :o

дalex
Sep 4th, 2008, 11:29 AM
There's a really great JJ article at USO.Org
http://www.usopen.org/en_US/news/articles/2008-09-03/200809031220456369570.html

Very nice. And I like the comments below the article. :hearts:

This is not exactly a piece of news.......
I was standing by the coffee machine ..............

Damn them! Why didn't you kick their asses? :armed:

дalex
Sep 4th, 2008, 11:10 PM
http://www.usopen.org/en_US/news/articles/2008-09-04/200809041220568596024.html
Matt Cronin's Day 12 Analysis
Thursday, September 4, 2008
By Matt Cronin

2-JELENA JANKOVIC V. 5-ELENA DEMENTIEVA

Which Elena is your favorite flava'? The blonde or the brunette? The Russian or Serbian? The Olympic gold medalist or former No.1? The extrovert or the introvert, the Bollettieri or Spartak Club product, the one who favors her two-handed backhand or the one who prefers leaping forehands?

It's tough call, no?

Jelena Jankovic leads the rivalry with Elena Dementieva 4-3, and Jankovic has won their two meetings at the Slams--at the 2004 Australian Open, which was a stunning upset at the time given that JJ was a virtual nobody back then, and at the 2006 US Open, Jankovic's breakout tournament when she tore apart the Russian in the quarters 6-2, 6-1 and had eventual champ Justine Henin on the ropes before choking in the semis.

But Dementieva out-hit the Serbian the last time they played in Berlin and has been in top form during the past month, while Jankovic has struggled with injuries and confidence. Give Jankovic this: she came into the tournament constantly complaining about being out of shape but still has managed to reach the semis. Like her countryman Novak Djokovic, she seems more comfortable competing when she's distracted by physical ailments. Even though she's only 23, she's a much more experienced player now and almost never hits herself out of a match.

Dementieva is more prone to do so, but at age 26 and full of confidence after her Olympic run, she hasn't done so since Wimbledon. She's an extremely consistent big-hitter from the baseline when her head is in the right place and she's never been as comfortable in her own skin than she is now.

Jankovic can certainly win this match and will surely take a set, but she has to commit to more that just counterpunching, which she has in some of their previous contests, but has only done so for two sets here. If she cuts loose on her wondrous backhand, attacks Dementieva's second serves and stays steady from her forehand side, she's capable of making the Russian feel her presence and pulling through.

But Dementieva's level off the ground, returning serve and even with her now-underrated first serve (to the deuce court, mostly) has been so high that it's very difficult to see anyone but Serena Williams stopping her in New York. If Dementieva is going to lose this match, it will be because she's incapable of sustaining her confidence for more than three weeks at a time. But she knows she's in substantially better form than JJ is, and will pull through in three delightful end-to-end sets.

~Kiera~
Sep 5th, 2008, 01:08 AM
http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/tennis/usopen08/columns/story?columnist=garber_greg&id=3569928

Jankovic, Dementieva aching to win first career Grand Slam title

By Greg Garber
ESPN.com

NEW YORK -- There is a consensus developing at the U.S. Open that the winner of Friday's second semifinal match between Serena Williams and Dinara Safina ultimately will become champion.

Serena, fresh off her straight-sets victory over sister Venus on Wednesday night, has won the title here twice -- that's two more than any of the other players in the final four has. Safina, who reached the French Open and Olympic finals, has had a breakthrough year.

But look beyond that marquee match, and you have a fascinating undercard matchup between Elena Dementieva and Jelena Jankovic. There is much at stake for them; in some ways, this is a career referendum.

A title here would give either woman the world -- her first Grand Slam title and the WTA's No. 1 ranking. How's that for heady stuff?

"It would be nice to regain the No 1 ranking," Jankovic said, "but I'm playing here to win a Grand Slam, and my goal is to win a Grand Slam. That's what I'm really focusing on."

This is all possible because the women's draw has opened up in extraordinary fashion. At the beginning of the year, you would have penciled in defending champion Justine Henin and 2006 champion Maria Sharapova among the favorites. Ditto for 2004 champion Svetlana Kuznetsova, No. 1-ranked Ana Ivanovic and two-time champion Venus Williams. Well, guess what? None of them reached the semifinals; retirement, injury and the inspired play of others have sent them all to the sideline.

For Dementieva, 26, this might be her best, last opportunity to score a major. The famously fragile Russian is loose and playing with house money after winning the gold medal at the Beijing Olympics.

It was, Dementieva said, the biggest victory of her career, although some people would argue that Olympic tennis is not a significant résumé item.

"In Russia, if you stop anyone on the street and ask what is a Grand Slam, I don't think many people can tell you what it is," Dementieva said. "But everyone knows [the] Olympic Games. There is nothing bigger. There is nothing more important than Olympic Games for an athlete, for a sportsperson."

Dementieva has been to two major finals, at Roland Garros and at the U.S. Open in 2004. She did not show well in Paris, losing to Anasatasia Myskina, then in New York to another fellow Russian, Svetlana Kuznetsova. Dementieva, who has a particularly sunny disposition, took it well -- too well?

"People just come to me and say, 'Oh, I'm happy for you. You're always losing in the final. It's so great that you finally win something big,'" Dementieva said.

"But I never thought about this in that way. I was thinking it was a great experience in French Open, U.S Open. I didn't think it's such a bad result to be in the final of a Grand Slam. I think I was very patient during my career. I was working a lot, and I was very positive. I was able to go through and be a stronger player."

Jankovic, at 23, is three years younger. Still, she aches to win here. Jankovic is feeling the pressure a bit because her two fellow Serbs, Novak Djokovic and Ivanovic, both won their first career Grand Slam titles this season, in Australia and Paris. There is an ominous piece of history, too.

When Jankovic became the No. 1-ranked player, for a single week, she also became the only No. 1 player -- among the 18 since the current rankings system was installed in 1975 -- not to own a major.

Wait, there's more. Jankovic, despite her talent, has never, ever even played in a Grand Slam final. She has been to five semifinals, including three of four this year. Jankovic lost to eventual champions Sharapova in Melbourne and Ivanovic at the French Open.

This is why Dementieva says, "I think probably the most consistent player is Jelena Jankovic for the moment."

That may be, but Dementieva has been the most efficient so far here. Like Serena Williams, she has won all 10 of her sets, but she also has spent a total of 15 fewer minutes on the court, averaging a tidy 74 minutes per match.

Moreover, Dementieva's usually inconsistent serve, with some help from former pro Harold Solomon, has become a weapon. She is among the top 10 statistical leaders here in service games won (81.4 percent) and break points saved (70.4 percent). Contrast this with Jankovic's numbers of 77.4 percent and 53.8 percent, respectively.

Dementieva has always had terrific groundstrokes. If she had been fortunate enough to have a similarly reliable serve through the years, she already might have two or three majors. With everything working, Dementieva will be a tough out.

"It will be a tough match, for sure," Jankovic said. "I think I've beaten her here two years ago in the quarterfinals [6-2, 6-1]. So it will be another experience, and I would love to make another step forward and reach my first final of a Grand Slam and then play on Saturday.

"We will see what will happen on Friday, and hopefully it will be my day."

Greg Garber is a senior writer for ESPN.com.

~Kiera~
Sep 5th, 2008, 09:07 PM
http://ap.google.com/article/ALeqM5iJ9B5p2n1Aysj0mmFc-LCzQunJYwD930PLI00

Jankovic beats Dementieva at Open for 1st GS final
By HOWARD FENDRICH – 22 minutes ago

NEW YORK (AP) — Jelena Jankovic is finally a Grand Slam finalist.

Overcoming a slow start, Jankovic used fantastic defense and steady groundstrokes to beat Olympic gold medalist Elena Dementieva 6-4, 6-4 Friday in the U.S. Open semifinals.

"As you can see, I have tears in my eyes," Jankovic told the crowd during an on-court interview. "I'm a little bit emotional to be in the final."

Jankovic lost eight of the first nine points and fell behind 2-0 and 4-2. But as Dementieva became more tentative and more erratic, Jankovic reeled off five consecutive games to claim the first set and a 1-0 edge in the second.

Jankovic also trailed by a break at 3-2 in the second set, before coming back again. She got plenty of help — 42 of the 66 points Jankovic won came from unforced errors by the fifth-seeded Dementieva.

The second-seeded Jankovic entered the match with an 0-4 career record in major semifinals, including losses at this year's Australian Open and French Open. But she kept tracking down balls, running along the baseline and stretching her racket, extending points until the fifth-seeded Dementieva missed.

Several times, Jankovic wound up doing the splits at the end of a point.

"Elena is a great champion, a great player, and she was running me down everywhere," Jankovic said. "I tried as hard as I could to get the balls back."

She'll face two-time U.S. Open champion Serena Williams or Dinara Safina in the title match.

Jankovic and Dementieva — the runner-up at the U.S. Open and French Open in 2004 — are probably the two best women's tennis players without a Grand Slam championship. Both have a history of coming up jittery in the late stages of majors.

But they engaged in an entertaining match Friday, despite swirling wind that sent the U.S. flag above the scoreboard at one end of Arthur Ashe Stadium rippling loudly and an early afternoon sun that sent the temperature into the 80s.

Back and forth they would hit, swatting powerfully from the baseline, with the shot count often topping 20 on a single point.

That was partly due to good movement by both, but Jankovic in particular.

Ian Aberdon
Sep 5th, 2008, 09:11 PM
Jelena :hug:

Kampi
Sep 5th, 2008, 09:14 PM
Thx Sarah:wavey::kiss::worship:

So fast:D....we have a final, yessssssssssssssss:bounce::bounce::bounce:

Hashim.
Sep 5th, 2008, 09:15 PM
thanks:d

~Kiera~
Sep 5th, 2008, 09:30 PM
http://www.guardian.co.uk/sport/feedarticle/7777842

Jankovic reaches first U.S. Open finalReuters, Friday September 5 2008
By Simon Cambers

NEW YORK, Sept 5 (Reuters) - Serbian Jelena Jankovic battled into the final of the U.S. Open with a 6-4 6-4 victory over fifth seed Elena Dementieva in a blustery encounter on Friday.

The second seed came from behind in both sets to reach her first grand slam final, where she will play American fourth seed Serena Williams or sixth seed Dinara Safina of Russia.

"As you can see I have tears in my eyes, I am little bit emotional to be in the final," Jankovic said in a courtside interview. "I played something like five semi-finals so to be in the final of a grand slam for the first time, I'm thrilled."

Olympic champion Dementieva, the 2004 runner-up, broke in the first game and holding the advantage to 4-2 only for Jankovic to win four straight games to take the set. The Russian again surged ahead in the second, but after a series of breaks, Jankovic snatched the vital break in the 10th game to seal her place in the final.

Dementieva had reached the semi-finals at Wimbledon in July and was in the ascendancy early on.

Jankovic, though, was scrapping for every ball and some brilliant retrieving helped her to break back for 4-4.

The wind was causing both players all sorts of problems and Jankovic took advantage of a host of errors from Dementieva to hold and then break again to take the set.

Dementieva showed her fighting spirit by breaking serve to lead 2-1 in the second. Jankovic hit back immediately and the players then traded another break as the set reached 4-4.

The Serbian held serve in the ninth game to force Dementieva to serve to stay in the match but the Russian could not manage it and her 42nd unforced error of the match sealed Jankovic's place in the final for the first time.

"I was really fighting. It was very very windy, and Elena is a great champion and a great player, she was running me everywhere so I was just trying to run them down and get the balls back.

"I'm just really happy, happy to be in the final."

дalex
Sep 5th, 2008, 09:45 PM
Q. How frustrating is it when she steps away when you're about to serve?

ELENA DEMENTIEVA: (laughter.)

I don't know what to say. It has to be frustrated. No, that's okay.

Stupid journalists! :shout:
After they are done with Nole, they're going after JJ. At least they haven't picked up on this topic and it ended with this (unnecessary) question.

redsonja
Sep 5th, 2008, 09:52 PM
Well, of course they were going to ask. Did you think they would leave it alone? :lol: As long as that's all it is, I don't mind. :)

~Kiera~
Sep 5th, 2008, 10:08 PM
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/sport/tennis/article4688054.ece

Jelena Jankovic displays substance and style in her passage to final

Neil Harman

If Jelena Jankovic is to win her first grand-slam title today, let no one doubt that she has earned it. It has taken her more than ten hours to win six matches and the last of them, against Elena Dementieva yesterday, was a lot less taxing than she tends to make these things.

Jankovic defeated the Olympic gold medal-winner from Russia 6-4, 6-4, recovering from a break down in both sets and rarely has there been a player with more luxuriant lip-gloss than the 23-year-old from Serbia.

Jankovic and Dementieva are girls who left their teens behind long ago and yet still go everywhere with their mothers. The happy-go-lucky Snezana Jankovic is as conscious of her appearance as her daughter; it seems every time the cameras focus on her, she is rearranging her hair.

There will be plenty to look good for today, when Jankovic meets either Serena Williams, the American, or Dinara Safina, of Russia, in the final. Dementieva was forlorn, for she had enough opportunities, but was undone by Jankovic’s consistency, her better use of the HawkEye challenge system and, on the first set point in the opening set, engineering of a delay that put the Russian off her stroke.

Just as Dementieva stepped up to serve, Jankovic asked for her towel. It could have been construed as games-manship and when Dementieva looked up a second time to serve, Jankovic raised a hand, for what reason we know not. In the second set, having edged ahead again, Dementieva had a short forehand to lead 4-2, but she fluffed it and let out a piercing scream. The final point of the match was another horrendous forehand miss.

Jankovic’s fellow Serb, Novak Djokovic, is enjoying a far more serious tournament. He is through to his second US Open semi-final today, where he faces Roger Federer, the world No 2 from Switzerland, in a rerun of the final in 2007. Having been the jester a year ago, the Serb is finding the audiences tougher this time.

This may be because the 21-year-old is intense to the point of being fit to burst. When he looks as if he is tired, the crowd think he is faking it. He cannot win, except that he does.

His 6-2, 6-3, 3-6, 7-6 victory over Andy Roddick in the quarter-finals on Thursday was a case in point. Roddick was asked before the match about Djokovic’s perceived litany of injuries. The American said: “I’ve got to feel good, he’s got about 16 injuries, back and hip, cramp, bird flu, anthrax, Sars [severe acute respiratory syndrome].” Initially, Djokovic did not see the funny side. His humour is better now.

~Kiera~
Sep 5th, 2008, 10:20 PM
http://www.usopen.org/en_US/news/interviews/2008-09-05/200809051220652703164.html

Jelena Jankovic
Friday, September 5, 2008

Q. What were you going to get a degree in when you almost made a mistake by going back to university?

JELENA JANKOVIC: I don't know. I'm not really thinking about that at the moment, you know.

I didn't actually know what I wanted to study in the beginning. I'm only in the second year, and in the third year I would really choose what I want to study. But now I am focused on tennis. Little by little.

Q. Of course you are. What do you think it would have been?

JELENA JANKOVIC: I don't know. Off the court, I really love acting.

Q. You're pretty good at that.

JELENA JANKOVIC: Sure. I don't know. (laughter.)

I don't know. We'll see.

Q. In all your tries to get past the semifinal, what was the difference today?

JELENA JANKOVIC: You know, actually, to be honest, this has been the first set Grand Slam that I don't have any injuries, that I don't have any issues bothering me.

It really takes off ‑‑ it really took me ‑‑ you know, I wasn't thinking about, you know, tennis. I was thinking, Oh, my God, this is hurting. This is bothering me. So I was really struggling and really not playing my tennis and not thinking about my game.

And now, first time, you know, this year, Grand Slam, I'm healthy and, you know, I really want to do well. I'm really focused, I really believe in myself, and I'm really going one match at a time.

I'm really trying my best out there, and so I'm motivated. So I'm happy to be in the final for the first time.

Q. That was a battle of mental strength today and you won it.

JELENA JANKOVIC: Yeah, mentally, I feel I'm a lot stronger, because I really believe in myself. I really want to do this, and, you know, I think it's about time for me to make that step forward to break that barrier and go a long way.

I want to win a Grand Slam, and this is why I came here. Not having injuries, not having some problems, is giving me a good opportunity to be here, so I'm really thankful for that.

Q. In a strange way, have your physical problems helped you build mental strength in the sense that you know that you can battle through that so you could also battle through...

JELENA JANKOVIC: No, but throughout the year I had all these different kinds of injuries, because due to ‑‑ I didn't prepare well enough in the beginning of the year. Actually, in the preseason I didn't prepare.

So I started with a lot of injuries. It was like a chain, going from one injury to another. I had some kind of bacteria for like three or four months where I was blowing my nose the whole time and I couldn't breathe and all these problems.

So of course when you're having some things like that it's tough to be at the top of your level and really play your tennis. You're really struggling with many things.

And now, you know, to knock on wood, you know, it's a miracle, for me to be here and to be healthy and to enjoy my tennis.

As you could see, I'm really fighting out there. I'm really never giving up. I'm really there until the last point. No matter what, I'm going to really, until I ‑‑ until the last point I'm going to be there and I'm going to try my best.

This is what has helped me propel through this tournament and helped me until now to come into the final.

Q. Can you take us through the injuries from the very beginning?

JELENA JANKOVIC: It's a long story. It's going to be a long story.

Q. Abbreviated version.

JELENA JANKOVIC: Oh, my God. Actually, it all started in exhibition in Hopman Cup. I injured my glut muscle. I don't know how you call that.

Q. Back side.

JELENA JANKOVIC: Yeah, in the back. Yeah.

Then I had a back pain in Australian Open. Then I had ‑‑ I don't know what I played afterwards. Then I got sick in Indian Wells really bad and was sick for three or four months. I had some bacteria that they couldn't ‑‑ they didn't know how to get rid of it, and so my nose was running the whole time. It was really bad in my throat and it was hard for me to breathe.

Then French Open I had problem with my arm, you know. My arm was like swollen, and since the second round of the tournament I was struggling.

In Wimbledon, I made some movement and I had a tear in my meniscus where they told me I went to have surgery and I'm not going to play for a while. I recovered in three weeks, but it really took me a long time, you know, to come back.

It was amazing how my knee got weaker. Through Olympics and LA and Montreal I was really out of shape. I couldn't move. I was not fast enough. I was just ‑‑ it was hard for me.

And then finally now I'm really working hard, you know, with my coach, with my fitness coach, really, you know, taking care of every little detail. Even the food I'm eating, I'm really taking care of everything, because all these little things are going to make a big difference, especially for me.

So these things are starting to pay off, and I'm really being disciplined in the moment. I'm really listening to everything. I'm really eager, you know. I'm really motivated to do the right things and to win a Grand Slam.

I'm really happy to be in the final, and tomorrow is another day. Hopefully I can give my best in the last match with her.

Q. I'm sure you heard about the possibility of a lot of rain tomorrow. Would you rather have the extra day if you push it back to Sunday?

JELENA JANKOVIC: For me it doesn't matter. Just whenever I play, I'm going to play. I'm going to be there. I'm going to try my best, and that's all I care about, even if it's tomorrow or next day or in a week. I'm going to go out there and compete.

Q. If you play Serena Williams, how does your history against her where you've split six matches, you've split the two matches this year, all the...

JELENA JANKOVIC: This year we are 1‑1. I beat her at the Australian Open; she beat me in Miami in three sets. So it will be a tough match. She's a powerful player. She loves to play here at the Open, but so do I. I love being here. I love the atmosphere.

It's going to be an interesting match if she wins, but I don't know what is happening now with Safina. She's also in great form and doing really well the last couple of months. So whoever it will be, it will be a difficult opponent.

But I will go out there and do my best.

Q. What has been the difference when you've played Serena since you've split those matches? What has been the key when you've played against her?

JELENA JANKOVIC: What do you mean? When I have won?

Q. When you've won or when you've lost, what's been the difference?

JELENA JANKOVIC: Overall, she's, I think, the strongest player on the tour, together with her sister. Nobody has the power that they have.

We cannot compare. At least I cannot compare to any of them, you know, with their strength. They're great athletes, really. I'm a little athlete. They move really well. They hit the ball so hard.

So if you want to really win when they're in form, you really have to be on the top of your level and you really have to go for every shot and really have to run a lot.

So it will be difficult, but it's doable.

Q. Having spent so much time at Nick's, do you regard the United States as sort of a second country?

JELENA JANKOVIC: Yeah, I have a house here in America, and I love spending time here. You know, when the tournaments are in America I'm here, and when the tournaments are in Europe I go back home to Serbia. So it's like a second home.

Q. When Novak struggles with hostile crowds, and of course he had an issue with that last night, how important is it for you to be loved out there on court?

JELENA JANKOVIC: I don't know how important it is to be loved, but I'm being myself. You know, I say everything that I feel to say, and, you know, it comes out naturally.

So, you know, different players, you know, they have different personalities. People may like them; some people may not like them. Of course when you play a crowd favorite, when you play an American here at the Open, the majority of people will be against you, which is normal, which is understandable.

Because if I played in Serbia, of course, the crowd would be on my side. So when you play, for example like Djokovic played against Roddick, it was, you know, very ‑‑ you could understand that, you know, 90% of the crowd was for Roddick.

But, you know, then with the issue between them, you know, with the injuries and the things they had, you know, I cannot comment on that because it's not my thing.

I try to ‑‑ I can say what I do. I don't like to comment on other people's, you know, comments or whatever they had.

Q. Did you see the on‑court interview?

JELENA JANKOVIC: I did, and I saw that ‑‑ you know, it was ‑‑ they booed him. They didn't really appreciate what he said.

But, you know, from my opinion, he just defended himself, because, you know, when Roddick said that he was ‑‑ you know, he took all these timeouts and all these injuries ‑‑ you know, in a way I didn't think it was nice to say all of these things, even though maybe he had injuries.

Whatever he had, I don't think it's nice to say, because you don't know for a fact what this guy has, what kind of issues. But at the end of the day, from my opinion, most important this is to win. This is what counts, and this is the one who goes forward.

The one who went into the semifinal was Djokovic. All these things that he has done or didn't do, that doesn't matter. It's the winner that counts.

Q. What were those guys in the balcony shouting? They were for you. I mean, it was sort of like a cheering squad.

JELENA JANKOVIC: Oh, the one from upstairs?

Q. Yeah, upstairs.

JELENA JANKOVIC: They kept saying, Jelena, we love you, and all these things, cheering, you know, in kind of a ‑‑ I don't know, like a poem, you know, rhyming.

Q. When she pushed at you today, you responded well, no nerves. You played offense when you had to. Defense, you got past this stage. Grand Slam final you've never experienced, so just talk about how you think you're going to hold up.

JELENA JANKOVIC: Yeah, it will be just like another match. I didn't make ‑‑ for me, at least, doesn't make a difference, semifinal or final.

I want to go out there the same like I've been doing the last, you know, couple of matches. I want to go out there and really, from the first point, be there and really be focused.

You know, come out with a game plan and know what I have to do to win and just fight. You know, I have to believe in myself. I know that I can do it, and that is what matters.

Q. If you play Serena, the winner will be No. 1 in the world as far as I understand. If you play Safina, even if you lose, you are going to be No. 1 in the world. Does it make a difference? And also, you lost to Safina three times out of four, and you are even with Serena.

JELENA JANKOVIC: I lost to her the last two times.

Q. Yes.

JELENA JANKOVIC: I didn't lose last three.

Q. Three out of four. Three out of five.

JELENA JANKOVIC: Since when? Since when I've lost to her so many times? I don't...

Q. Anyway, doesn't matter. Not so important. Would you prefer to play to Serena because you're on even...

JELENA JANKOVIC: I don't know. It doesn't matter, because I'm improving. I lost to Safina when I was just coming back from an injury. I was really ‑‑ if you could watch the matches that I played in Olympics or Montreal, it was really hard for me, you know, to move, to go from one side to another.

I had no reaction. I had no ‑‑ I was really, my game was kind of falling apart. I was really struggling. When you're not, you know, there, it's ‑‑ and I lost in three sets in those circumstances.

Now that I feel much stronger, I'm still, you know, very, very far from my limit for my full potential, but I feel that I'm getting better. I feel that I'm moving faster. I feel I'm a little bit stronger. I feel I can hold my ground.

When I played against Safina, for example in the Olympics, every time she hit hard I was falling back. I couldn't stand my ground. She was overpowering me.

And now I feel that, you know, I can stand there, and I can, you know, hit back to back with whoever it is on the other side. So that is something that is giving me a lot more confidence and a lot more belief when I go into my next match.

So I hope that, you know, I can do and give really 100%, and hopefully I can do it. I don't know. We'll see.

Q. When you were at Bollettieri's, you were a little kid.

JELENA JANKOVIC: I'm still a little kid. (laughter.)

Q. Okay, kid.

JELENA JANKOVIC: For you. (laughter.) I didn't say anything in a bad way.

Q. When you're having those battles on the back locals with Sharapova and all those people, did you ever think, I can't do this. It's just too tough.

JELENA JANKOVIC: Tennis, you mean?

Q. Yeah, yeah.

JELENA JANKOVIC: I don't know. Tennis, in the beginning I never really took it too seriously. Tennis was, for me, I really loved the sport, I really loved to play and compete, but as a young girl I never knew that I was going to make it.

I never knew that, you know, this is something I really want to do, that I'm going to become a professional. Because how many people, especially coming from Serbia, we didn't have a tradition in tennis.

Not many people ‑‑ nobody made it from that country, so I didn't have anybody to look up to. I didn't know, you know, how far I can go, what is my potential, what is my limit and all this.

People were telling me I'm talented, you know, I'm going to about be this and that, but you never know. So in the beginning, for me it was most important to go to school but then, you know, to play tennis.

Then when I became No. 1 junior in the world and won Australian Open juniors, that's when I started thinking I'm going professional and really maybe trying my best. When I finished high school I started to train a little bit more, and that's when I wanted to make that transition into the professional level. You know, here I am. I came a long way.

Q. You just said you were just a little kid, and obviously you love still to joke and have fun. So many players on the circuit start as teenagers. They're happy, they're bubbly, but slowly they get more serious.

JELENA JANKOVIC: That's not the case with me.

Q. How important is it for you for you to have...

JELENA JANKOVIC: It's important to be yourself and to really have fun out there. Our life is not easy, and traveling everywhere, traveling around the world, and really being away from your country, being away from the family, from the people you love and from your friends, it's hard, you know, sometimes, to take everything.

If you don't enjoy yourself, you don't enjoy competing, you know, of course, we have a lot of pressure, we go out there, we really try our best, we really compete at our hardest. But when we step off the court, we're real people and we're human beings. We try to ‑‑ at least I try to enjoy myself. I try to laugh. I try to have a good time.

I'm young, so why not? When am I going to have fun? When I'm ‑‑ now is the time. For example, the driver, when he was driving me back home he told me, You know, you made my day. You laugh a lot. All these players, you know, they complain about traffic all the time.

And I said, you know, I don't complain about traffic. All I want is to get home. I'm really tired. We started making some jokes. He said, Thank you for making my day. You really lighten up, you know, even this car.

And I said, You know, I don't know what it is. I'm just laughing. I have a good time. And he said, Is this because you're No. 1 or No. 2 in the world?

And I said, No, I was laughing when I was 1,000 in the world, but maybe a little bit more now that I'm No. 1 or No. 2.

Q. Do you think it's too bad that Novak has stopped pretty much doing these imitations which brought so much fun to so many people?

JELENA JANKOVIC: I don't know. That's his thing to do, you know. He loves imitating. I don't know why he stopped it. Maybe some of the players were complaining they didn't like, you know, his imitations. They didn't like him, you know, maybe making fun of some other people.

In his own individual way, in a positive way, you know, it's not ‑‑ when you're imitating something it's just for fun. I don't think people could get offended by that. But, you know, that's his thing. I can ask him, you know, to keep doing it. Why you stopping? The people like it.

Q. Were you ever concerned today when she started the match quite aggressively?

JELENA JANKOVIC: Yeah, I mean, the match is not over until it's over. Until the end you are out there competing. You're playing every point. So until it's finished, you never know what's going to happen.

Q. What about the weather conditions? Did they affect your game at all today?

JELENA JANKOVIC: It was hard for both of us, especially from one side the wind was very strong. So you keep hitting as hard as you can and the ball doesn't go anywhere. From the other side, you hit a little bit and the ball flies. It was difficult, but it was the same condition for both players.

Q. Are you concerned that it's the same conditions for tomorrow or the day after?

JELENA JANKOVIC: It's okay, you know. We're getting used to it, because the whole two weeks the weather has been like this. You have to really try your best. The most important thing is to move your feet and be on every ball.

FastScripts by ASAP Sports

redsonja
Sep 5th, 2008, 10:35 PM
That is like the longest press conference in history. :lol: Love the part about still being a little kid. :)

Dementieva was forlorn, for she had enough opportunities, but was undone by Jankovic’s consistency, her better use of the HawkEye challenge system...

Her what??!!

Brena
Sep 5th, 2008, 10:37 PM
Sarah :worship: as always

Jankovic and Dementieva are girls who left their teens behind long ago and yet still go everywhere with their mothers

:lol: Yeah, that's a Slavic syndrome. Our mothers just won't leave us alone. :rolleyes: :lol:

Marilyn Monheaux
Sep 5th, 2008, 10:40 PM
Dementieva was forlorn, for she had enough opportunities, but was undone by Jankovic’s consistency, her better use of the HawkEye challenge system...

They've got te be kidding :lol:

JJ vs Serena again! Oh my god, I'm sooooo excited!!! :bounce:
I can't wait for it to start!!!

Let's pray the wheather won't mess this up:o
No wind, no rain and I'll be happy:)

дalex
Sep 5th, 2008, 10:41 PM
Great interview and seriously the longest JJ ever gave. :lol:

Tashi
Sep 5th, 2008, 10:43 PM
Longest interview ever. But that's what happens when you're in Grand Slam final baby!!:bounce: And JJ hilarious as always.:hug:

Bruno71
Sep 5th, 2008, 11:12 PM
I love how every little thing that JJ does is gamesmanship now. She got a time violation for it, get over it crappy media shit-for-brains :rolleyes:

Brena
Sep 5th, 2008, 11:16 PM
I love how every little thing that JJ does is gamesmanship now. She got a time violation for it, get over it crappy media shit-for-brains :rolleyes:

Morons. And this is just :weirdo: :


Off the court, I really love acting.

Q. You're pretty good at that.

Fortunately, I think JJ didn't even get what they were hinting at. :lol:

Bruno71
Sep 5th, 2008, 11:20 PM
Fortunately, I think JJ didn't even get what they were hinting at. :lol:

That's why she's such a great actress...she plays dumb so effectively :)

Brena
Sep 5th, 2008, 11:25 PM
That's why she's such a great actress...she plays dumb so effectively :)

Think so? And I've always considered her a naive soul... Naughty, JJ! (now, out-act Serena!) :lol:

дalex
Sep 5th, 2008, 11:32 PM
Whether she acts it or not I already said once I didn't mind if she were a bit stupid. :)
I wonder if Serena will have another "I feel violated" moment when she inevitably loses to JJ (a far superior player :lol:) in the final?

"All my life I had to fight...." :hearts:

JadeFox
Sep 5th, 2008, 11:39 PM
I love how every little thing that JJ does is gamesmanship now. She got a time violation for it, get over it crappy media shit-for-brains :rolleyes:

They can just kiss my big black behind. Reporters, fans, etc. have been writing Jelena off for almost the entire year.

From what I seen on GM the bitterness seems to stem from the fact that Jelena is now, without a doubt, THE most consistent player on tour. And has overall the best results in Slams. Other players had winning streaks, won bigger titles, and gotten more press. But they also have been unable to keep it up, either to injuries(Masha:hug:), being headcases(Safina, Elena, and to an extent Serena and Venus) or both (Ana:hug:).

Win or lose tommorow night, Jelena has done herself proud, not only at the US Open, but for the whole year. And that's with an 1001 injuries.:lol:

Bruno71
Sep 6th, 2008, 12:27 AM
They can just kiss my big black behind. Reporters, fans, etc. have been writing Jelena off for almost the entire year.

From what I seen on GM the bitterness seems to stem from the fact that Jelena is now, without a doubt, THE most consistent player on tour. And has overall the best results in Slams. Other players had winning streaks, won bigger titles, and gotten more press. But they also have been unable to keep it up, either to injuries(Masha:hug:), being headcases(Safina, Elena, and to an extent Serena and Venus) or both (Ana:hug:).

Win or lose tommorow night, Jelena has done herself proud, not only at the US Open, but for the whole year. And that's with an 1001 injuries.:lol:

Too many reps handed out today. Can't good rep. :o

~Kiera~
Sep 6th, 2008, 01:06 AM
http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/tennis/usopen08/columns/story?columnist=ford_bonnie_d&id=3571776

Theatrics not missing for U.S. Open finalists

By Bonnie D. Ford
ESPN.com

NEW YORK -- They say the neon lights are bright on Broadway, but the pair of charismatic performers who will try to upstage one another in the U.S. Open women's championship this weekend can handle the glare.

Serena Williams, the first American to play in the women's final since she won it six years ago, and Jelena Jankovic of Serbia, who reached her first Grand Slam final after four semifinal losses, are natural thespians. Williams has tried her hand at acting and Jankovic said she probably would have gravitated toward studying drama had she quit tennis during a low point in her career two years ago.

The second-seeded Jankovic has had enough of being an understudy watching from the wings while her countrywoman, Ana Ivanovic, went to three Grand Slam finals and won this year's French Open.

"I really want to do this, and, you know, I think it's about time for me to make that step forward to break that barrier and go a long way,'' said Jankovic, 23.

"I want to win a Grand Slam, and this is why I came here. Not having injuries, not having some problems, is giving me a good opportunity to be here, so I'm really thankful for that.''

It's hard to imagine two more expressive athletes. An ecstatic Williams jumped up and down Saturday, pumping her fist, to celebrate a 6-3, 6-2 defeat of Russia's Dinara Safina that cooled off the woman who has been this summer's hottest hard-court player. Jankovic's soulful eyes filled up with tears on court seconds after winning a war of nerves against another Russian, Olympic gold medalist Elena Dementieva, 6-4, 6-4.

Jankovic smiles between points, does splits that would tear a normal person in half and warbles theatrically in the low alto range when she's hurting, which has been often this season. At a reporter's request, she took several minutes in her postmatch interview to list her 2008 season ailments, which have included a strained gluteus muscle, back problems, a lengthy sinus infection and a torn meniscus.

No one can look more fierce or more glum -- or scream as bloodcurdlingly -- in the midst of a match than Williams, who hates losing and loves winning with equal passion.

"I'm going to be No. 1 sooner or later, trust me,'' she declared after getting the best of her sister Venus in an emotional and extraordinarily well-played quarterfinal.

That bold resolve wasn't on display after the Safina match; Williams, already in preparatory mode, wasn't in the mood to share her innermost thoughts.

"I don't feel expected to win,'' she said in subdued tones. "I feel expected to show up and, you know, do the best that I can do, and I feel like I have nothing to lose. I'm going against someone that's ranked higher than me. She has a lot of pressure to win her first Grand Slam, and I'm just enjoying every moment.

The No. 1 ranking, along with $1.5 million in prize money, is on the line in the final, which is scheduled for Saturday night but may be shifted to Sunday afternoon if the remnants of Hurricane Hannah hit the Northeast as expected.

Jelena Jankovic would be the third different Serbian player to win a Grand Slam if she can muscle her way past Serena Williams.
If the fourrth-seeded Williams ascends to the throne, she'll reclaim a position she last occupied in August of 2003. No other woman has regained the No. 1 ranking after such a long absence. Jankovic, on the other hand, was No. 1 for a week last month, but she backed into the position due to the odd deck-shuffling that's been going on since Justine Henin's retirement earlier this year.

Neither woman will be able to sing and dance her way through the next match. Jankovic will need all of her brilliant defensive skills to deal with Williams' fearsome serve and groundstrokes. Last time they played, in the final of the Sony Ericsson Open in Miami, the Serbian admitted she was so intimidated by Williams' power and game face that she tried not to look at her across the net.

"Oh my God,'' Jankovic said then when she was asked what it was like to watch Williams wind up to smash an overhead. "Just hit a winner, but away from me. I don't want that ball near my body or anywhere else.''

But Jankovic has weapons too. She's patient, tenacious as a terrier, and used to extricating herself from seemingly doomed situations. Her ability to retrieve balls and extend rallies often goads other players into making mistakes. It took Williams eight match points to close out their final in Miami.

Jankovic's accomplishment completed the Serbian Slam. All three of the players who took the tennis world by storm last season -- Novak Djokovic, Ivanovic and Jankovic  have now reached Grand Slam finals.

Ivanovic was the pioneer, a finalist at the 2007 French Open and the 2008 Australian Open before capturing the title at Roland Garros. Djokovic absorbed a defeat by Roger Federer at the 2007 U.S. Open, but won on his next try at the Australian.

Bonnie D. Ford covers tennis and Olympic sports for ESPN.com. She can be reached at bonniedford@aol.com.

Tashi
Sep 6th, 2008, 02:34 AM
does splits that would tear a normal person in half

:haha:

Bruno71
Sep 6th, 2008, 05:37 AM
Bud Collins has picked JJ to beat Serena tomorrow. With his track record, that should surely wrap up the trophy for Serena :(

redsonja
Sep 6th, 2008, 05:51 AM
Fucking Bud Collins.

Do you think there's a loophole where it doesn't count if they don't actually play tomorrow? :p

JadeFox
Sep 6th, 2008, 07:22 AM
Dammit Bud! Why not Serena man?:(

RFS
Sep 6th, 2008, 07:22 AM
Is that the irritating old buffer who calls her Jelly?

Bruno71
Sep 6th, 2008, 07:40 AM
Yes he picked JELLY to win. My heart sunk :sad:

RFS
Sep 6th, 2008, 08:06 AM
Strange... BBC news are saying they're playing tomorrow (i.e. Sunday) but the USO Webby still shows tonight.
I'm with sonj... if it does get postponed to tomorrow... can that nullify Bud's predictions?

Brena
Sep 6th, 2008, 08:33 AM
Never mind Bud - I just read Dinara's post-match interview, and learnt that Serena has some rather irksome problems:

she also had some wind problems

:rolls:

дalex
Sep 6th, 2008, 09:39 AM
^:lol:

Don't worry about Bud, he just loves JJ so much that he had to pick her. :shrug:
Wasn't he right predicting Venus to win Wimbledon?

Wayn77
Sep 6th, 2008, 10:26 AM
International Herald Tribune
(The Global Edition of The New York Times)

Jankovic, Williams reach US Open final
The Associated Press
Published: September 6, 2008


NEW YORK: Jelena Jankovic made it to her first grand-slam final and Serena Williams ended the five-year drought of American women in the U.S. Open decider as they won their semifinals in straight sets Friday.

Both overcame Russian opponents: Jankovic beat Elena Dementieva 6-4, 6-4 while Williams downed Dinara Safina 6-3, 6-2.

It will be Williams' 12th Grand Slam final, and Jankovic's first, and in addition to the silver trophy at stake, the winner will rise to No. 1 in the rankings next week.

"Overall, she's the strongest player on the tour, together with her sister," said the second-seeded Jankovic. "Nobody has the power that they have. We cannot compare."

The final is scheduled for Saturday night, but forecasts of rain prompted tournament organizers to announce contingency plans that could include postponing the match until Sunday.


"I'm ready to play tomorrow. Hopefully we can," Williams said. "If not, I'll be ready for Sunday, Monday, Tuesday — doesn't matter."

It will be Williams' first appearance in a U.S. Open final since she won it in 2002, and no American had made it since. It is also nine years since her first final at Flushing Meadow, which she won as 17-year-old.

"I just am excited to still be here," Williams said, "and, 10 years later, still putting up a major fight."

She got off to a shaky start against Safina. Broken in her first service game, Williams fell behind 2-0, but won seven of the next eight games, eventually doing a much better job than Safina of dealing with a gusty wind.

Safina wound up with 41 unforced errors, and repeatedly rolled her eyes, shook her head or shouted at herself in English or Russian, much the way her brother and former U.S. Open champion Marat Safin does. After hitting her fifth double-fault of the match she yelled, "I hate the wind!" Two points after that, Safina pushed a backhand long and Williams broke to lead 2-1 in the second set.

"I was behaving like a really spoiled girl," Safina said.

The whipping air played havoc with serve tosses — the women combined for 11 double-faults — and all manner of other strokes. The U.S. flag at one end of Arthur Ashe Stadium rippled so loudly that Safina turned to glare at it before one serve.

"I thought, 'OK, if it's so windy, then I'm not going to go for so many winners," said Williams, who didn't produce her first winning forehand until the match was 30 minutes old.

Down 2-1 in the first set, Williams broke Safina, but needed three break points to do it. The American then broke to a 5-3 lead when Safina put a forehand into the net, and a similar miscue ended the set in the next game.

Safina didn't go quietly, breaking at love to tie the second at 1-1. It was in the next game, that Williams charged onto a drop shot and hit a groundstroke straight into the Russian.

Safina said that upset her, but she also acknowledged, "It's all in the rules. I can only be angry with myself for hitting a bad drop shot."

When they spoke after the match, Williams said: "I didn't mean it, OK?"

"I was, you know, nearly mortified that I hit her," Williams said later.

Jankovic lost eight of the first nine points and fell behind 2-0 and 4-2. But as Dementieva became more tentative and more erratic, Jankovic reeled off five consecutive games to claim the first set and a 1-0 edge in the second.

Jankovic also trailed by a break at 3-2 in the second set, before coming back again. She got plenty of help — 42 of the 66 points the Serb won came from unforced errors by the fifth-seeded Dementieva.

Jankovic entered the match with an 0-4 record in grand slam semifinals, including losses at this year's Australian Open and French Open. But she kept tracking down balls, running the baseline and stretching her racket, extending points until Dementieva missed.

Dementieva had a golden opportunity to take control of the match when she led 4-2 in the first set and was up 0-30 on Jankovic's serve. Two more points, and Dementieva would have served for the set.

Instead, Dementieva missed three service returns and Jankovic's backhand winner ended a 21-stroke point and the game. Dementieva began the next game by double-faulting, and eventually was broken.

"Mentally, I feel I'm a lot stronger, because I really believe in myself. I really want to do this, and it's about time for me to make that step forward to break that barrier," Jankovic said. "I want to win a Grand Slam, and this is why I came here."

Ian Aberdon
Sep 6th, 2008, 10:49 AM
I'm sure Dinara would be relieved to hear Serena was nearly mortified!! :lol: