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View Full Version : Jelena Jankovic News and Articles Thread, vol 2


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Wrekin
Jun 18th, 2009, 04:12 PM
^ Where did that quote come from?

It hardly supports a story of "Shocking: I'm going to retire" :scratch:

Snex
Jun 18th, 2009, 04:13 PM
Yeah - we have the usual "higher class" trashies like Hello and OK, but then there are some really cheap and trashy ones that are all "Shock, Horror... Bone in leg and toe on foot!"

Well, Press and Argus BFF :hug:

-Valérie-
Jun 18th, 2009, 04:16 PM
^ Where did that quote come from?

It hardly supports a story of "Shocking: I'm going to retire"

I don't know, i was wondering where it came from.

But, one thing is sure, she never said she wanted to retire. This statement would correct the bad transciption from earlier. SHe said she needs a break. She's been on the run for more than a year and half, anyone would need a break! :shrug:

~Kiera~
Jun 18th, 2009, 04:21 PM
The Argus is a local newspaper for the Brighton area. I don't think it's a trashy newspaper or anything. In fact, the only reference I can find to Jelena's comments are on the link below, so I'm assuming Press just made that particular statement up :shrug:

http://www.theargus.co.uk/search/4441834.Jankovic_left_to_ponder_future/

дalex
Jun 18th, 2009, 04:24 PM
^^^^ :bowdown: @ Janka's dramaqueeness!

I hope Rena gets her in the locker room!

-Valérie-
Jun 18th, 2009, 04:34 PM
The Argus is a local newspaper for the Brighton area. I don't think it's a trashy newspaper or anything. In fact, the only reference I can find to Jelena's comments are on the link below, so I'm assuming Press just made that particular statement up :shrug:

http://www.theargus.co.uk/search/4441834.Jankovic_left_to_ponder_future/

There are only reporting what has been said at the conference after the match, and the title is a little too much. She only meant what was undertood: VACATION. And she will see about that after Wimbledon.

But of course, if she wins Wimbledon, she might rethink the whole thing. :lol:

I know, no need to push it that far! :lol:

дalex
Jun 18th, 2009, 04:42 PM
The statement which NAJ posted is the one in which she says she has no plans to retire any time soon is from here (http://www.mtsmondo.com/sport/vesti/text.php?vest=138140). Google translation. (http://translate.google.com/translate?js=n&prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.mtsmondo.com%2Fsport%2Fvesti%2F text.php%3Fvest%3D138140&sl=sr&tl=en&history_state0=)

Translation by Alex:

The statements I made after my first round defeat in Eastbourne were wrongly interpreted. Then I said, before the media, that because of recent bad results I lost the motivation. As in life, in sport too, there are moments when you're (more or) less motivated, but this is just a phase that will pass. I think I'm on the right track to show my best in the future and that I have few more years of playing tennis and proving myself.

Obviously she heard that Press already had her retired after Wimbledon. But her words after loss to Chakvetatze were definitely a bit scary. She should be more careful about what she's saying. I mean I knew it all along that she'd be back in Stanford unless she's injured both arms and legs. She'd hate to pay fines and get mandatory zeros no matter how lost her motivation was, no? :lol:

-Valérie-
Jun 18th, 2009, 04:46 PM
Jelena Jankovic, the Drama Queen! :worship:

That prouve that she was mad after the match, and no matter how her motivation is low, she still care!

We can see the partern: at first, she is mad at her, and then, opps, before we know it, new excuses are added. Let's hope she really learn from that, take a few weeks off anyway, because i think she needs it and pick up where she left it and go back where she belongs... in the best.

~Kiera~
Jun 18th, 2009, 05:59 PM
Everyone has such high hopes for Jelena :hearts:

http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/tennis/wimbledon09/news/story?id=4262625

дalex
Jun 18th, 2009, 06:09 PM
I love how they were split 3-3 between JJ and Dinara as RG winners and now they're split between the same players, but now they're main candidates for early exit.

:lol:

-NAJ-
Jun 18th, 2009, 07:12 PM
Psychologist Bojan Gligorijevic, who is also a tennis coach with a Canadian licence, has also expressed his views on the current results of Serbian tennis players.

- “From the top of my head, I’d say Ana and Jelena are working well enough on all aspects of their game. They are technically excellent, physically they don’t have many problems – unlike Djokovic. They need to dedicate more attention to their games and to opposition analysis. What they lack is the ability to adjust their play depending on their opposition. The mental aspect is the job of the coaching staff, but I think they should be more committed when playing,” said Gligorijevic.

I agree with this. JJ had many tactics mistakes this year. She always hits balls on better side of opponent. It's crazy

btw she should start watching women tennis not just atp

~Kiera~
Jun 19th, 2009, 12:29 AM
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/tennis/article-1193990/Serbias-Jelena-Jankovic-keeping-appearances-grand-slam-Wimbledon-finish-sight.html

Jelena Jankovic keeping up appearances with a grand slam Wimbledon finish in sight

‘I can’t go in front of the TV cameras looking like this, with my hair and no make-up,’ she says as she gets ready to do a post-match interview in Paris.

‘We women, we worry about these things. We have to blow dry our hair and look our best.’

It’s hardly surprising Jankovic feels so strongly about making herself look good as it has very much been a year of keeping up appearances for the Serb.

She finished 2008 as the top-ranked player in the world, becoming only the ninth woman to achieve that, but there has been nothing but frustration since.

Instead of consolidating her position at the top of the game and going in search of a much-coveted first Grand Slam singles title, she has gone backwards, slipping to No 6 in the world, winning just one tournament and, crucially, not making it past the last 16 at the French or Australian Opens.

‘I didn’t feel much pressure being No 1, I just didn’t start the year in a good way,’ she admits.

‘I changed in the off-season. I did some different training and my goal was to begin 2009 better than I ended 2008, in which I won three tournaments in a row and played the final of the US Open, so I was playing really good tennis. I was also really fit physically and I began to dominate women’s tennis.

‘I did some very, very strong training, I added some muscle and it didn’t work out for me. I wasn’t used to my body being as big as that and I lost my movement, which was one of my biggest weapons. Little by little, my whole game started to break down and I started to lose my confidence. I then started to lose against players who I should have beaten.’

Jankovic lost to, among others, Kaia Kanepi (ranked 24 at the time), Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova (42) and Gisela Dulko (35) early in the year but it seemed she might have hit a turning point when she won the title in Marbella.

It turned out to be a false dawn as she fell at the quarter-final stage in her next three, bigger tournaments before crashing out in Paris to Sorana Cirstea, at a time when her side of the draw had opened up beautifully.

‘I won that title in Marbella and it was so important for me. To win a tournament gives you a lot of confidence. I played some good matches on clay and I wanted to do better than I did but, unfortunately, I won only won tournament. I wanted to win many more and I wanted to win Rome for the third time in a row.’

Jankovic was the first ever woman to get to No 1 without winning a Grand Slam, a slightly embarrassing statistic, and the 24-year-old now heads to Wimbledon determined to at least shed part of that albatross from her neck.

It’s hard to tell whether she will be particularly welcomed by the crowds at the All England Club, having hit the back pages for good and bad reasons in the last two years.

The Serb was one of the darlings of centre court in 2007 when she teamed up with Jamie Murray to win the mixed doubles title, their partnership capturing the imagination of a romance-hungry public who hoped there was something more to the pairing than a working relationship.

It wasn’t so and Jankovic also says that, despite the clamours for a repeat performance again this year, she and Jamie won’t be renewing their partnership.

‘No (we won’t). I just see him here in the players’ room and we say hi to each other. We sometimes speak a little bit but that’s all. The last time I played mixed doubles was with Jamie, when we won Wimbledon.

'Since then I haven’t played at all. I prefer singles and singles is what I play best.’

As popular as that mixed doubles run made her, it didn’t help her last year when, as No 2 seed, she complained about being put out on Court 18 - ‘I was almost playing in the parking lot’ - for her last 16 defeat by Tamarine Tanasugarn .

Her complaints did not go down well, particularly with a certain Roger Federer, who told Jankovic to stop moaning about where she was scheduled to play.

Despite that spat, Jankovic claims she was not unhappy to be out on Court 18 and won’t be making any special requests this year, providing a more conventional party line when asked about the incident.

‘I don’t think about that. I think it was a misunderstanding. I like playing on grass. Wimbledon has a huge tradition and it’s really beautiful to see all the players in white.’

But her spats with Federer haven’t ended there. Federer was among those to criticise the women’s game when Jankovic rose to No 1 without winning a Grand Slam and then laid into her compatriot Novak Djokovic when he retired from the Australian Open through injury.

‘I do not like to talk about players, I really prefer to focus on myself,’ said Jankovic.

‘Why should he even care? I don't like putting my nose in others’ business. Federer is a great champion, I don't want to get in a fight with him, but why does he care, I really don't understand. Why does he need to do that?’

The issue over the No 1 spot still irks her and she is adamant that Safina deserves her current top spot despite losing the three Grand Slam finals she has contested.

‘The best player is Dinara Safina. With or without a Grand Slam, she’s there. She didn’t buy this ranking, the ranking didn’t fall from the sky. It was the same for me.

'Being No 1 in the middle of the season is a great accomplishment, a great achievement but finishing the whole year, being the best player in the world for 2008 like I did is even bigger.

'There are many players who have won a Grand Slam and have never even come close to being No 1. They would love, just for a day, to be No 1 in the world. Nobody can take that away from you.’

They can’t take it away from her and if she ever needs to feel good herself after a defeat, all Jankovic has to do is take to the streets in Serbia, where she, alongside Djokovic and Ana Ivanovic, are national treasures.

Alex Kay Talks Tennis

‘The three of us can really motivate and inspire the younger generations. Tennis was never really popular but now it’s the No 1 sport in Serbia because we have done so well.

'People wake up at 3 or 4 in the morning to watch us play and a lot of kids are picking up rackets.

‘In Serbia, almost everybody knows you. You cannot go out of your house thinking you are anonymous. That’s why I have to make sure my hair is in order, it’s blow-dried and nicely combed.’

With that in mind, she will be hoping her hairy 2009 starts getting better at Wimbledon.

~Kiera~
Jun 19th, 2009, 01:10 PM
http://www.guardian.co.uk/sport/feedarticle/8566057

Strengths and weaknesses of top women contenders

LONDON, June 19 (Reuters) - A brief look at the strengths and weaknesses of the leading contenders for the women's title at Wimbledon which begins on Monday (prefix number denotes seeding):

3 - Venus Williams (U.S) - The defending champion will be hard to stop at the tournament that really sparks her A-game. She did not drop a set last year on the way to her fifth Wimbledon singles title, dominating opponents with the sheer force of her game. First serve is a huge weapon on grass while her baseline game keeps opponents on the back foot.

Moves like a gazelle, although mistakes can flow from her forehand on off-days.

2 - Serena Williams (U.S) - The twice former champion never lacks self-belief and inexperienced opponents can be overawed by her intimidatory demeanour on court.

Like her sister she can call on considerable serving firepower and is lethal off the ground when anything drops short. Began the year in style by winning the Australian Open, her 10th grand slam title but has only made one final since.

Endured a poor claycourt season with successive opening match defeats in Marbella, Rome and Madrid but Wimbledon's grass suits her game perfectly.

5 - Svetlana Kuznetsova (Russia) - A chat with Roger Federer at last year's Olympics seems to have worked wonders for Kuznetsova who has rediscovered her motivation.

A great mover, she is one of the best servers in the women's game and can volley too, although she does not venture forward as often as she should.

Her topspin forehand was perfect for French clay but not so suited to Wimbledon lawns where she has yet to get beyond the quarter-finals.

4 - Elena Dementieva (Russia) - A great ball striker whose precision groundstrokes can do real damage as she proved last year at Wimbledon by reaching the semi-finals and then going on to win the Olympic gold in Beijing.
Her serve used to be a weakness but has improved dramatically. Another great Russian athlete.

1 - Dinara Safina (Russia) - Like her brother she wears her heart firmly on her sleeve and there is usually no doubt as to what kind of mood she is in. A powerful baseliner, if rather one-dimensional, consistency is the key to her game.

She is a ferocious competitor although her movement can still be exposed by clever opponents. Will need her very best tennis to win her first grand slam title here.

6 - Jelena Jankovic (Serbia) - One of the best retrievers in the game and has a great tennis brain. What she lacks in power she more than makes up for with accuracy, although her game can be passive at times. Admitted this week that she is struggling for motivation so not many will be backing her.

13 - Ana Ivanovic (Serbia) - Hard to say whether the 2008 French Open champion is experiencing a blip or whether her game is in terminal decline. Has not won a title this year and her hard-hitting game continues to look fragile.

9 - Caroline Wozniacki (Denmark) - A big year for the 18-year-old Dane who has produced consistently good results to break into the top-10 for the first time. Has an exciting game with a sizzling double-handed backhand. A relative rookie on grass but tipped by none other than Wimbledon great Martina Navratilova as a dark horse.

~Kiera~
Jun 20th, 2009, 06:36 PM
http://tennisworld.typepad.com/thewrap/2009/06/fortnight-forecast-ladies-singles.html

Fortnight Forecast: Ladies Singles
Posted 06/19/2009 @ 8 :30 PM

Is there a women’s tournament happening at Wimbledon this year? You might be hard-pressed to say for sure at the moment, with all the pre-game attention that the men’s side has been garnering. But the WTA is in London as well, and while they haven’t watched their first seed and defending champion pull out and head home, their draw remains as vexingly nebulous as ever.

Dinara Safina is still at the top of that draw, but like Rafael Nadal, she comes to Wimbledon a wounded No. 1. Just when we thought the women had found someone to take the tour in hand, Safina suffered an 11th-hour meltdown in the final in Paris and proved again that there is no heiress apparent in sight.

Wimbledon, however, has been the most predictable of the women’s Slams in recent years, and is currently owned by one its long-established royals, Venus Williams. She’s just turned 29 and is coming in on the heels of another wretched French Open performance, but that hasn’t stopped her in the past. Do we dare pick anyone other than the Queen of All England?

First Quarter

Dinara Safina’s name fills the first line of the draw, but it looks shaky up there rather than intimidating. Besides the fact that she proclaimed herself a “chicken” in Paris, she has a 7-6 record at Wimbledon and has never been past the third round—there were tears during her defeat at the hands of Shahar Peer in 2008. Worse, Safina hasn’t been favored with a kind draw this year. Her conqueror at the French, Svetlana Kuznetsova, is in her quarter.

Between them there are a few other names of note: Mauresmo, Szavay, Vaidisova, Chakvetadze, Lisicki, and Caroline Wozniacki. Kuznetsova, meanwhile, is hard to judge at Wimbledon; her explosiveness should help her on grass, but she’s never been past the quarterfinals. Judging by her dismal opening-round loss at a tune-up event last week, the queen of all-flake may have trouble turning right around and turning it on for another major so quickly. But if she can avoid an immediate meltdown, she could play herself into the tournament. Still, I’ll take Wozniacki instead. She’s reached the final in Eastbourne this week and held her own on Centre Court last year. What she lacks in firepower she’s begun to make up for in level-headed resilience. That may never be enough to get her a Slam title, but semifinals should be in her grasp.

First-round match to watch: Wozniacki vs. former Wimbledon specialist Kimiko Date-Krumm

Semifinalist: Wozniacki

Second Quarter

The infamously independent-minded seeding committee at Wimbledon declined to move defending champion Venus Williams up from the No. 3 spot, which is a little surprising considering the disparity between her grass-court record and Safina’s. But on principle I don’t think the rankings should be messed with at all by the Slams, so I can’t say I disapprove. In any event, Williams has landed on the opposite side of the draw from her sister and in the vicinity of two fast-falling Serbs, Ana Ivanovic and Jelena Jankovic. This is obviously a good spot for Venus, who typically has to pull an early rabbit out of a hat on an outer court during the first week before she struts into Centre Court and dominates the second week. The first signs of danger might come against Kaia Kanepi or perhaps Carla Suarez Navarro; then from French semifinalist Sam Stosur or Ivanovic; and then from either Li Na, Agnieszka Radwanska, or, if she finds some semblance of her old form in a hurry, Jankovic. I’m not seeing any obvious reason to cross the Queen.

Wild card to watch: Alexa Glatch. The American has the heavy game for grass.

Semifinalist: Venus Williams

Third Quarter

Judging from the top two seeds, Zvonareva and Dementieva, you might term this the dead zone of the women’s draw. Vera has had a good year, but has been injured, and while Dementieva reached the semis at Wimbledon in 2008, she never comes across as a threat to go all the way—mainly because she never has. The vast spaces between those two players are filled by, among others, Marion Bartoli, a former finalist, and . . . um . . . Virginie Razzano? Hey, she’s a finalist in Eastbourne right now. Cibulkova? She’s 0-1 at Wimbledon, and do we really think she can reach two straight Slam semis? Golden oldies like Sesil Karatantcheva or Karolina Sprem?

The bottom line is: This is a very good spot for a sleeper to emerge. I just have no idea who it might be.

Player to hear: Michelle Larcher de Brito. The press and the local noise-pollution authorities will be out in full force for her first-rounder against Klara Zakapalova.

Semifinalist: Dementieva

Fourth Quarter

This, on the other hand, is a very lively zone. Serena Williams, Victoria Azarenka, Maria Sharapova, grass-lover Jie Zheng, Nadia Petrova, and even automatic Wimbledon round-of-16er Tamarine Tanasugarn reside here. I’m guessing Serena comes in motivated and a little more grounded than she was in Paris; Maria rips away with nothing to lose; Jie burrows her way to a fourth-round encounter with Serena; and Vika, while she has been hurt, does the same on the other side, where should would face her spiritual godmother, Sharapova. The sparks and shrieks should fly.

Sharapova, already the not-really-deserving beneficiary of a seeding upgrade, loves this place almost as much as the current champion. If she can avoid an upset out of the gates against Victoriya Kutuzova, who is playing well enough to have qualified, she could get on a Venus-like roll. Unfortunately for Sharapova, Serena Williams makes a habit of stopping her rolls dead in their tracks.

First-round match to watch: 15-year-old English wild card Laura Robson vs. Daniela Hantuchova. More press mayhem.

Semifinalist: Serena Williams

Semifinals: S. Williams d. Dementieva; V. Williams d. Wozniacki

Final: If it’s the sisters, I don’t see Serena allowing herself to play as indifferently and sloppily as she did last year. That match was a bitter pill for her to swallow, in part because she was ahead early and let it slip away, but even more so because on most other days she remains the superior player to Venus. And they both know it.

Champion: Serena Williams

***

Yes, I realize that I chose Venus, not Serena, in my Editor's Pick on the home page. I changed my mind.

I'm heading to Wimbledon this weekend and will be posting from there for the first week. (Pete Bodo takes over the second week.) I'll have a men's preview up Sunday. See you then.

~Kiera~
Jun 21st, 2009, 12:13 AM
http://www.guardian.co.uk/sport/2009/jun/21/steffi-graf-wimbledon-womens-tennis

Where has it all gone wrong for women's tennis?

Premature retirements and loss of form are robbing the women's game of the sort of great rivalries that have kept fans enthralled in years gone by

Steffi Graf sits court-side at Roland Garros looking more bemused than bewitched, more deflated than elated. Ten years before, in the French Open final, she had electrified the crowd with a stunning defeat of Martina Hingis, who, confronted by her opponent's resolute brilliance, had gone into psychological meltdown.

Now Graf is in the stands to present the trophy to the 2009 champion. Almost unbelievably, it is the first women's match she has watched in the flesh in the 10 years since she stopped playing, not long after dispatching Hingis, to go off and marry Andre Agassi. Little wonder, then, that she looks so troubled as she surveys an all-Russian final between the world No1 Dinara Safina and Svetlana Kuznetsova that has fewer peaks than a Dutch landscape.

"I found it really hard to watch," says Graf, before graciously trying to dampen any criticism of the players. "I know how it is out there when you get nervous and tight, and you can't show your potential – or even play close to your normal game."

Maybe, but in Graf's case big-title matches unfailingly brought the best out of her. It seemed to Graf a matter of honour that she should do credit to the office of top-ranked player in the world. In Paris, Safina's performance is grim. Kuznetsova has to play no more than moderately well to lift her first French Open title.

"That's for you to judge," Graf says, deflecting an attempt to finesse out of her whether she thinks women's tennis was better when she played than it is now. "I just don't watch it enough. I see them and I know their faces, but I haven't really gotten into their games."

Those who have "gotten into their games" are becoming increasingly dismayed. Something seems to have gone wrong with women's tennis, which, only a year ago, was in sufficiently good health – despite the retirement of Justine Henin while still world No1 – for these pages to celebrate its achievements. A big fashion photograph of Venus and Serena Williams, Maria Sharapova, Ana Ivanovic and Jelena Jankovic, five of the very personable stars at the top of the women's game, accompanied the article.

What happened next was quite a shock. Ivanovic, Jankovic and Sharapova, the top three seeds, were all eliminated before the quarter-finals at Wimbledon and it was left to the enigmatic Williams sisters to rescue the competition by staying the course until the final.

The performances that led to the exit of the leading three seeds were all abject, none more so than Sharapova's. She was humbled twice by Alla Kudryavtseva, a fellow Russian ranked 154 in the world – first on court and then in the interview room. "It's very pleasant to beat Maria," Kudryavtseva said, "because I don't like her outfit… it was a little too much of everything. It was one of my motivations to beat her." Hitting the fashion-conscious Sharapova in her dress sense was possibly more painful for the former champion than her defeat.

Come the US Open, seven weeks later, Sharapova was sidelined by a serious injury to her right shoulder, two tears in the rotator cuff, while Ivanovic was so out of sorts, having suffered from cysts in her right thumb, that she lost to a qualifier in the second round. Although Jankovic reached the final, where she lost in straight sets to Serena Williams, she too was starting to struggle to hold her place in the top five.

The decline continues. Twelve months on and the poster girls who were the top three seeds for Wimbledon are down the rankings at six (Jankovic), 13 (Ivanovic) and 59 (Sharapova), which has left the Williams sisters – Serena at two and Venus at three – surrounded in the top 10 by a bunch of east Europeans who are more front office than box office. The top spot in the rankings has changed eight times in a year.

Whatever anyone may say, the absence of an American successor to the Williamses – more than 50 places in the rankings separate Venus from the next US player, Bethanie Mattek-Sands – must be worrying for the tour's long-term wellbeing.

Graf is less reticent about commenting when it comes to the question of having star players to illuminate the women's game. "It always helps if you have a few names like Sharapova or the Williams sisters that people get used to seeing over a period of time," she says. "Fans enjoy their rivalries and like to live some of their dramas and their difficulties, and have time to get know them a little more intimately, a little more personally."

Now, though, there is real concern that Sharapova, despite the fact she is in the early stages of a comeback, may never again be the contender she once was. "The question is, will she ever be healthy?" Nick Bollettieri, her former coach, asked recently. "Once you get that shoulder injury, you're going to start changing the serve motion."

Chris Evert, who, like Graf, is a true former star of the women's game, is despondent about the prospects of a recovery of form by either Ivanovic or Jankovic. Ivanovic's game, Evert says, is streaky and she does not give the impression that she is ready to repeat her success at the 2008 French Open.

Jankovic, meanwhile, has come up with a dog-ate-my-homework excuse for her decline: she blames off-season conditioning for making her overly muscular and limiting her movement. This is the same Jankovic who, only last year, made light of playing 97 matches in 2007, saying: "It's the way you prepare, the way your body is."

An American tennis magazine responded to the disappointing women's event at last year's US Open by running a story that it flagged on its cover with the words: "Can the women's tour be fixed?" Inside, it did a mock-up of a wanted ad, which began: "Most successful women's sports league in history seeks motivated, fierce, supremely athletic competitor to lead it into the next decade… Camera-friendly smile preferred." It finished by inviting applicants to send a covering letter and resume to the Sony Ericsson WTA Tour.

The story itself was derisive, labelling the pretenders of the women's draw unworthy of a practice session with the Williams sisters, and was particularly scornful of Safina, who was within a few months of taking over as world No1. In losing to Serena Williams 6-3, 6-2 in the semi-final, Safina made 41 unforced errors. At the time, it did not matter so much that Safina's form wavered, but now she is officially the world's top player and still cannot give a good account of herself – and, by extension, the women's game – in high-profile matches such as the Paris final. This must be of some concern.

Graf, happily retired, may excuse Safina's shortcomings, but some of those still heavily involved are not so relaxed about it. "We all know who the real number one is," Serena Williams said during the Italian Open in Rome last month. "Quite frankly, I'm the best in the world." With 10 grand-slam titles, including this year's Australian Open, to Safina's big fat zero, Williams has a strong case – and one that must cause embarrassment to the governing body, the Women's Tennis Association.

It does not help the WTA that it is currently in a state of transition, with Larry Scott about to vacate his post as chairman and chief executive, having been hugely successful over the past six years in securing the organisation's financial stability. The plain old WTA became the Sony Ericsson WTA Tour under his stewardship, thanks to an $88m deal that remains in place until the end of next year. Also, since Scott took over, revenue and sponsorship have multiplied several-fold.

But investors tend to only like enterprises that guarantee substance, even when times are not as straitened as they are now, and, unless things buck up soon, some of those with high stakes in the women's tour may start to look to put their money elsewhere.

It does not help that men's tennis is in rude health at the moment, led by a quartet of outstanding players – Rafael Nadal, Roger Federer, Andy Murray and Novak Djokovic – whose keen rivalry is in marked contrast to the uneven fare currently being churned out by the women. Scott's defence of the game he is leaving sounds a little tired. "The top of the women's game and battle for No1 is as intriguing as it has ever been. There has never been more depth in terms of quality of play and the number of marketable stars in the game rivals any sport, bar none," he says.

One answer to catching up with the men may be for the WTA, having won the battle for its members to be granted equal prize-money, to press for them to do the same amount of work and play best-of-five-set matches in the grand slams. Opponents will groan that this is a recipe for more dross, but women have suffered from not having the longer form available to them.

The most memorable matches tend to be the protracted duels between the top men – but consider last year's Wimbledon singles finals. The Williams sisters had to stop after two robust sets, while Nadal and Federer kept going after the Spaniard had dominated two unremarkable sets. We all know what happened next – a match that on its own was enough to sustain the reputation of the men's game for years to come.

Disappointingly, but not altogether surprisingly, when the best-of-five suggestion was put to Ivanovic last week her immediate response was: "What – and drive us into oblivion?"

It was the sort of meek reaction that some may see as the reason Ivanovic has failed to build on the foundation of her early successes. It would almost certainly have gained her a stinging reply had she uttered it in the presence of Billie Jean King, the American champion of the rights of women's players, who advocated women playing five-set matches in the 1970s.

Women's tennis has been in the position it is now before and rebounded strongly. What is alarming this time is the number of players in their prime who are either retiring – Kim Clijsters may return, but she cannot reclaim some of the prime playing years she has passed up – or whose careers are stalling, as those of Jankovic and Ivanovic appear to be doing.

Women's tennis has the bounty – now it needs to find bounty hunters who have the resilience and star quality that Graf possessed.

~Kiera~
Jun 23rd, 2009, 04:25 PM
http://www.wimbledon.org/en_GB/news/interviews/2009-06-23/200906231245764203375.html?promo=personalization

Tuesday, 23 June 2009

Q. Given your lack of practice, were you happy with today's performance?

JELENA JANKOVIC: Yes. These kind of matches, you know, for sure I need. You know, I need to compete. I need to be in, you know, a little bit tougher situations just to get myself going.

I think I get a lot of confidence, you know, from passing these kind of rounds. And today was a tough round. I thought that my point played quite well. She was serving well and hitting the ball quite hard. And especially on grass, it gives you a hard time.

But I managed, you know, especially in the important moments to stay tough and to close the match out. You know, especially I was down I think 5‑2 or 5‑3 in the second, and I managed to, you know, raise a level up and come back and, you know, close the match out 7‑0 in the tiebreaker, which was very important for me.

Q. Would it be fair to say you weren't at ease with yourself?

JELENA JANKOVIC: Yeah, there comes a time when I'm a little bit disappointed with what I'm doing on the court, but those are the times when I need to push myself and just stay strong and stay positive out there, no matter what.

For sure, you're gonna make mistakes out there, but those are the times you need to stay positive and stay focused because it's very easy to lose your rhythm on grass and very easy to lose a couple games in a few minutes, you know, without even blinking.

So, you know, it's very important to stay focused from the first point till the last point in the match because grass game just goes very fast out there.

Q. You received some treatments after the first set. What was that for?

JELENA JANKOVIC: I had some blisters, you know, as well I had a broken toenail. So, you know, just change of surfaces and all these kind of things, you know, plays a huge toll on my feet.

Q. How is the toenail?

JELENA JANKOVIC: It's fine now. But, you know, sometimes it hurts in the match. It's normal, you know. But somehow from playing with these kind of things, I kind of got used to it.

Q. How would you assess your chances now, given the lack of practice and your form over the last six months, which by your own admittance hasn't been great?

JELENA JANKOVIC: I'm just going one match at a time. The most important thing is just enjoy my tennis, find that smile on the court when I'm competing, and play loose, you know, no matter what.

It's important not to be nervous, you know, not to think about the past, just think about the moment I'm in. Just go out there and have fun.

And then that's the time when I play great tennis, when things go, you know, in a good way for me. When I'm thinking, you know, making ‑‑ you know, when I'm disappointed and frustrated with myself, with the mistakes I make, then that is not good for me.

I need to be ‑‑ you know, get to that personality that I had before, which was very positive. And, like I showed, you know, my fighting spirit at 5‑2. I didn't give up. I just fought every point. I hung in there, even if you don't play your best tennis, be in the match, you know, and always believe you can win.

Q. Sounded very down downbeat after Eastbourne. I take it coming to the championships has rekindled your enthusiasm, one would hope?

JELENA JANKOVIC: Yeah, I think I'm more enthusiastic. And I'm more positive, as well. You have to look on the bright side, as well. There is, you know, periods where you're gonna be down and you're gonna be up. Life in general it happens like this. And especially for an athlete, you know, we have our lows and highs, especially when it comes to motivation.

And now in this moment I'm just trying to get my energy up on the court and just get, you know, that fighting spirit from the first point. You know, run after those balls and give my best and really give my maximum from the first point, not play with 20% or play halfway what I can.

I'm trying to get to that mode. This is the mode that gives me results. This is the way I play great tennis and, you know, I win a lot of matches.

Q. You mentioned recently you wanted to take a little break from tennis. Are you happy to be here now? Do you want the break to be put off for at least two more weeks?

JELENA JANKOVIC: No, I'm happy to be here. I'm just trying to play my tennis on grass, which I find is very, very difficult. Playing on grass gives me quite a hard time. It's nothing like on other surfaces, where I have time to prepare, where I have time to set up for my shots.

But I try to do the best that I can and try to stay low and try to fight, you know, until the end.

I'm not really thinking about the break. You know, of course, sometimes when you lose a match it's frustrating, which is normal. You know, nobody likes to lose. I don't think anybody's happy after a loss. And then it comes ‑‑ a lot of things come to your mind.

But, you know, after, the next day, when you really think about everything, you're just happy. I'm healthy. I can play good tennis. You know, I can go out on the court and enjoy. What more I can ask for?

And I still have many, many years of playing. I'm only 24 years old. I still have a lot of time to prove myself.

Q. Of course, you were looking glamorous at Cannes at the film festival. Do you ever have days where you think you want to do something totally different, like be a movie star, not a tennis player?

JELENA JANKOVIC: Yeah, it's nice, sometimes to get your mind off of tennis, you know, think about something else, do other activities. But it's important to have the right balance. You know, you cannot go over the limit doing other things that are not your job, that are not your priority.

My priority is, of course, my tennis, and then there are other things that I enjoy, as well, that make me happy. It's important to be happy in life. If you are only tennis, tennis, tennis all day long, after a while you might say, I cannot do this anymore.

That's why it's important to do, as well, other things that keep you satisfied. Then when you go on court, you're more happy and you feel more relaxed, as well.

Q. Do you think women's tennis might be more dramatic or entertaining if you played best‑of‑five sets?

JELENA JANKOVIC: I don't know. I think it's already dramatic and interesting even when we play, you know, two or three sets. You know, I think women's tennis is quite interesting, especially with the personalities that we have. You know, all those girls out there, they're really giving their best.

But when it comes to playing five sets, I think it's more ‑‑ it comes more to the fitness of the girls. You know, it depends who is the fittest of them all, who can hang in and play good tennis for five sets. It's not easy.

It's not easy to keep your level, you know, high, from the beginning till the end, play with the same intensity and the same effort. So that's why I think it comes to the fitness more than, you know, the other things.

Would be interesting. We can see.

Q. Why is Serbia having such a fantastic period in sport in so many different sports?

JELENA JANKOVIC: I think we're quite talented (laughter).

Q. But you grew up in war, your generation. You're having so many different sports.

JELENA JANKOVIC: Yeah, but we're just a talented nation. I don't know how to explain it. But we have, you know, the talent in us. We have that, you know, hunger. We are big fighters. We want to be the best that we can. We don't really accept, you know, second places. We want to be the first.

So I think with this kind of mentality, that's why we are quite successful in sports.

дalex
Jun 23rd, 2009, 04:30 PM
Nice one, Janka. :yeah:

Just play better and fight better from the first point!

Kampi
Jun 23rd, 2009, 06:06 PM
Thank you Sarah:wavey::D

This interview sounds nice and humbled, which is good I think.:)

~Kiera~
Jun 24th, 2009, 12:32 PM
http://tennisworld.typepad.com/thewrap/2009/06/w-character-studies.html

W: Character Studies
Posted 06/23/2009 @ 5 :45 PM

It's a storyteller's dream: Whatever type of character you like, the first week of a Grand Slam offers it to you. Wide-eyed up-and-comer, star in free fall, underachieving sure-shot—all three were out on the grounds on a hot Tuesday at Wimbledon. Here's a look at how each of them struggled, straggled, succeeded, and failed to make the best of their particular situations.

The Falling Star
"Come on, JJ, come on," urges Jelena Jankovic's mother with a rhythmic clap.

She's sitting forward, her shoulders pressed up against the wall at the back of the north side of Court 3. Her frosted hair and glinting sunglasses make her an unmistakable presence, though it's odd to hear her using her daughter's nickname to cheer her on, like any other fan.

It's 1:00 and the sun is at its peak. The view south runs in an invisible cone from the base of tennis courts at the club to the steeple of St. Mary's Church on the hill above. In between, trees alternate with white houses, and red-double-deckers run back and forth between them. A new bus has joined them this year, a yellow double-decker sponsored by Corona and topped with a giant plastic beer bottle. It's a jarring sight.

Whatever number it is currently assigned, this court is best known as the Graveyard of Champions. It's open to the elements—gusts of wind, blinding sun, attacks of noise—but high seeds are forced to venture out here nonetheless. The combination has produced dozens of stunning upsets; yesterday James Blake lost in the first round. As Tuesday begins, it seems like it could be Jankovic's turn.

After starting the year at No. 1, she has had a disastrous 2009. Her season bottomed out last week in Eastbourne, where lost in the first round and watched her ranking slip to No. 6. Jankovic's opponent today, Germany's Julia Georges, hits a heavier ball than she does. Her serve is strong enough to knock Jankovic a full step backward. From the first row of the press seats, it's easy to see JJ's fundamental flaw: Compared even to this journeywoman player, her shots have no heft. Her whippy strokes produce a light, pingy sound when she makes contact. When Georges gives Jankovic a short ball, she doesn't know what to do with it. Without pace coming in, she can't make it go out.

Jankovic begins to falter, and now it's her coach, Ricardo Sanchez—sitting well away from her mother—who does the urging. For anyone who thinks there is a lot of detailed instruction given during matches, here is what Sanchez says when Jankovic looks up to him after a changeover: "Go for it."

Somehow that advice doesn't help her turn things around. Early in the second set, Jankovic begins to spray balls. She's broken, and on the first point of the next game, she frames a forehand that ends up in the first row. Jankovic looks back at Sanchez. She keeps her eyes on him the entire time it takes her to cross the baseline. Typically, when she looks into the crowd, she's kvetching about an opponent's luck or a chair umpire's incompetence. This is different. This is a cold, silent, fearful stare. Every tennis player knows the look: Jankovic is beginning to panic. Sanchez doesn't say a word.

Georges sprints out to a 5-2 lead; the set is essentially over. Jankovic appears to be tanking the last game. But her shots begin to find the mark despite her intentions. She extends the set to a tiebreaker, goes up 3-0, and lofts up a lob that should be an easy putaway. Jankovic stops playing, but Georges mishits the sitter overhead long. Jankovic wins 7-0. After the last point, she turns to face her coach again. A broad smile has replaced the look of cold-eyed panic. The free fall is over for today.

At some point in their press conferences, every tennis player reverts to a litany of platitudes. Jankovic, while she can be funny, is no exception. Today she utters the most famous platitude of all: "I've got to take it one match at a time." For once, those words have significance. At this point JJ has to take every win she can get. More than that, like most of us, she knows that even a seemingly routine win in a tennis match often involves moments of desperate, soul-clutching, I-can't-breathe panic moments that are conveniently forgotten after the last ball is hit, but which every player knows can return at any point. Knowing that, who would want to take more than one match at a time?

The Not-So-Sure Shot
"I hear Gulbis is 15-1 against Murray," a man shouts to his friend with a laugh as he spots the Latvian setting up to serve. "Who'd take him?"

A year ago Ernests Gulbis was the young man of this moment. The 19-year-old played Rafael Nadal in the second round and took a set, the only one Nadal would lose until the final. That match took place on Court 1. Today Gulbis, who has struggled for the last 10 months and failed to build on what most observers say is Top 5 talent, has been assigned Court 6. It's the last in a row of outer courts with no bleachers. Fans come and go as they please, and say what they please.

Gulbis, a child of privilege who has had his motivation questioned, is out with the masses. After an early loss at the French Open, his ranking has fallen to No. 67, the lowest it has been since 2007. Despite his wiry explosiveness, he has reached a stage in his slump that every losing player knows well: Anything that can go wrong will go wrong. Whatever a player's talent may be, losing can often be a matter of building up a momentum of misfortune—in other words, one unlucky break seems to lead to another. And another.

Case in point: Up a set and a break against an overmatched opponent, Gulbis holds game point on his serve. He hits what he thinks is an ace and slaps the ball to the ball kid, believing the game is over. But his serve has been called a let. He double faults and eventually loses the game.

The crowds get bigger and the noise increases. Creaking food carts are hauled past. But Gulbis is calm; it's obvious he's a cut above his opponent. When he has time to set up, he hits his windmill two-hand backhand to the corners like it's batting practice. But for every buzzing winner he puts past his opponent, Gulbis does something to keep the match close. He gets ahead on his serve and double-faults. He has an open court for an easy forehand, but he sends it whistling wide. In the end, its Gulbis who gets the lucky break. Serving for the match at 5-4 in the third, his opponent commits a crucial unforced error. Gulbis, like Jankovic, has found the bottom for now. Sometimes talent is enough. Sometimes the wheel of good fortune spins in your direction.

Gulbis' tournament is starting to look like last year's: He plays Andy Murray in the second round on Thursday. It's been a bad season, but one win can turn your mindset 180 degrees. Gulbis is 0-2 against Murray, though after his match today he said brightly, "I think it’s going to be like a new match and the past won't count as much." Call it a good sign—Gulbis is living for tomorrow again.

Ag The Rookie
"Who's this girl?" a young man asks his friend as they walk past 19-year-old American Alexa Glatch on Court 6. "She's—" he stops as Glatch glides her racquet under an elegant two-handed drop shot that clears the net by an inch and bounces backward for a winner. "Jesus Christ, did you see that? Unbelievable hands!"

The kid had been about to remark on how big Glatch is. She is—6-feet and muscular, with a gait like her fellow Southern Californian Lindsay Davenport. She has followed Gulbis onto Court 6. The sun is low and casting long shadows now. Sunglasses aren't enough; spectators have to shade their eyes with their hands as well. Glatch has said she is looking forward to bringing her heavy-hitting game to grass. But early nerves affect her footwork—a chronic problem—and she loses the first set of her Wimbledon debut to Peng Shuai.

In the second, Glatch makes it look easy. There's a lot to her game. Mellow power—she appears to hit downhill to Peng. Variety—few if any women have the athleticism to hit a full-blooded slice forehand return and follow it to the net. A versatile serve—she has a biting hook to back up her flat one. And, as the kid said, very good hands. A drastic 2005 motorbike accident set Glatch's career back years, and she may never reach her early potential. But her game remains unlike any on the WTA tour.

It appears that Glatch will cruise to a win. She breaks, goes up 4-2, and has points for 5-2. Her friends on the sidelines sit back, texting and waiting happily for the inevitable. But out of nowhere, she can't finish. Peng shovels the ball down the middle of the court. Glatch, her footwork slowing again, hits from a wide-open stance and pops a ball long. She rushes a backhand into the tape. Up 4-3 in the third but down break point, she seizes up completely and sends her second serve on a violent downward arc to the bottom of the net. At no point does Glatch show the slightest emotion. Even her body language is unchanged.

On the final point, Glatch cuts under another perfect drop shot. Peng scrapes it up and hits a ball that appears to be heading well long. But Glatch reaches up with her racquet and it ticks off the top. Somehow, the match is over. It almost looks like she has lost the final point intentionally. Glatch strides laconically to the sidelines, gathers her racquets, and disappears into the blinding sun.

Glatch knows how to do everything on a tennis court. But that's just the start. Before players can win, they must learn all the ways they can lose. The young American is learning those ways as we speak. Now she must learn to forget them.

дalex
Jun 24th, 2009, 12:53 PM
Falling perhaps...but still a STAR! :hearts:

Very nice report from Steve.

~Kiera~
Jun 24th, 2009, 04:38 PM
http://www.wimbledon.org/media2/audio/Radio_Wimbledon_Day2_WrapUp.mp3

Right click and save target as. JJ starts at ~10:30.

~Kiera~
Jun 25th, 2009, 10:07 PM
http://www.wimbledon.org/en_GB/news/match_reports/2009-06-25/200906251245929281125.html

Jankovic win impresses spying eyes

Thursday, 25 June 2009

Written by Helen Gilbert

Jelena Jankovic booked her third round spot by breezing past Iveta Benesova 6-2, 6-4 in an evening match closely observed by Richard Williams, father and coach of her projected quarter-final opponent Venus Williams.

Of course, the No.6 seed will need to reach that stage first, having fallen at the fourth round stage three years running, but the Williams spying mission will have gleaned plenty of intelligence that Jankovic will not only be lining up against Venus but ready to give her a good match.

Her encounter against Benesova had promised to be a closer affair - with their head-to-head tally standing at 1-1 – but Jankovic got off to a quick start and never looked back.

The Serb notched up four break points in the opening game and converted the last with a sizzling forehand winner.

An astonishing service game followed in which the Serb proved herself to be the girl with golden serve. Two aces, followed by another two outstanding serves. Benesova could have had an entire dossier of forward intelligence at her fingertips and she wouldn't have been able to live with her opponent at that stage.

And that was all before Richard Williams arrived to cast his eye over proceedings. He would have had plenty to take note of as Jankovic upped her attacking play to claim the first set in 25 minutes.

Benesova recovered momentarily in the second and familiar Jankovic squeals echoed around the court.
But the former world number one was never in doubt, hitting only six unforced errors compared to her opponent’s 15 and firing off 16 winners.

Two more similar efforts in the upcoming rounds and she can pit her wits against Venus.

-NAJ-
Jun 25th, 2009, 10:12 PM
Richard Williams is watching JJ on every tournament lol

Tashi
Jun 25th, 2009, 10:55 PM
Richard Williams knows his tennis and he knows how dangerous JJ is when in form. Her game matches up so well against the Williams sisters. Keep it up JJ!:bounce:

дalex
Jun 26th, 2009, 10:18 AM
Are there any articles with JJ quotes? I'd really like to know why she was late for the match. :lol: Last night's press conference was a good one probably. :(

~Kiera~
Jun 26th, 2009, 03:13 PM
https://twitter.com/chrismbevan

Jelena Jankovic posing for pics on the press balcony with the ITF World Champion trophy. I got in the way.

дalex
Jun 26th, 2009, 03:15 PM
https://twitter.com/chrismbevan

Ooh, Janka making herself relevant again. Win them all Jecalina!

~Kiera~
Jun 26th, 2009, 05:02 PM
Are there any articles with JJ quotes? I'd really like to know why she was late for the match. :lol: Last night's press conference was a good one probably. :(

Perhaps this is why?

Q. You were about six minutes late out to the court today. Something go wrong? Couldn't get out there?

SERENA WILLIAMS: Well, I thought someone was gonna come get me. Then I figured, Well, maybe I just have to report. I didn't know what to do. So I was waiting, warming up. I was waiting and waiting.

Finally I was like, Okay, I think I'm just going to go out. I'm used to someone coming and saying, Okay, let's go.

Q. So you walked out there all on your own?

SERENA WILLIAMS: Yeah. I mean, security met me, but usually there's a person to escort the player. But I wasn't used to that, so...

RFS
Jun 26th, 2009, 05:43 PM
I have to say - I didn't see any security walking JJ onto court ... they obviously escorted her back though... weird if you ask me...

дalex
Jun 26th, 2009, 05:48 PM
What about this question? :lol:

Q. You were late on court. Jelena Jankovic was late for her match yesterday. Both of you look pretty perfect on court, your hair, you outfits. Does it take time you a long time to get ready? Does that affect how late you are on court sometimes?

SERENA WILLIAMS: Not at all. I mean, I gave that lifestyle up. I just put my hair in a headband and go out. I just didn't know I was supposed to walk out on my own.

~Kiera~
Jun 26th, 2009, 10:29 PM
http://www.novosti.rs/code/navigate.php?Id=13&status=jedna&vest=149371&title_add=Ne%C4%87u%20da%20%3Cbr%2F%3Ebudem%20robo t&kword_add=jelena%20jankovic%2C%20vimbldon

I will not
I robot

KRALJICE drama, as the English like to call Jelena Jankovic for its exciting and neizvesnih mečeva, but its nepredvidljivosti, now is not to justify this position. Said to be in luck, because after the "hiccup" in the first school, in the next round of "clear" the ground with Iveta Benešovom for just more than an hour. The two triumph Jelena confidence are strengthened, and these days in London Serbian teniserka not smile to his face. Contributes to the mood and cheerful atmosphere in the house Jankovic in Wimbledon.

- We rented a nice house in the vicinity of Vilidža. I will not say where exactly, but let him know that it lived a great champion. The end of a quiet and have privacy. Mind to me, for example, taking a picture of me as paparaci up trash or something like that. Thus, a lot of time spent in beautiful kutak offers in the yard, where there is a conservatory with lots of flowers. Mom and I often read books there, drink coffee and relax. It's good that it is there, because while it was not, brother and I, we have to dovijamo for the cleaning of food in the kitchen and we know how. Now finally we have something concrete to eat - the story Jelena smile.

* Did you sujeverni as a tennis player?

- I am not burdened by these things. For example, I know that Ivanisevic went At only one toilet in the same booth in the club. If it was busy, was in front and waited, not wishing to use any other, although the most-will be practically empty. Again, there are rituals that you do not like to change. Thus, the ball taking the right side of the field, though, when we do not go well obazirem to be excessive.

* Do you think that it was time to transfer you to the central ground for the third round Wimbledon?

- Irrelevant is where we play. Is that a parking lot, "Orandž park" or something third. I charged these things. It is important to laugh, because I am, that is my personality. The girl in the past few months was not the right Jelena. I'm glad to play again in the field, because I do not want to be like some girls who look like robots, despite all their wins - said Jelena.

Proud of Mlađan

* Do you expect to be in London with the boy Mlađan Janović?

- No, because it is busy work that deals with. In fact, Montenegro has recently won the World League, pobedivši Croats in the final. Now the preparations, also with the team for the World Cup. I am proud on him - says Jelena.

дalex
Jun 27th, 2009, 09:44 AM
http://www.sportinglife.com/tennis/wimbledon2009/news/story_get.cgi?STORY_NAME=wimbledon/09/06/27/WIMBLEDON_Women_Jankovic.html

LITTLE-KNOWN OUDIN A BIG THREAT

Former world number one Jelena Jankovic has been warned not to under-estimate little-known American Melanie Oudin in her third-round clash today.

The 17-year-old qualifier, who is ranked 124th in the world, beat Yaroslava Shvedova of Kazakhstan in the previous round after knocking out 29th seed Sybille Bammer, of Austria, on her Wimbledon debut.

That has already earned her a place in the top 100 and victory over Jankovic today would take her another step towards a potential quarter-final with compatriot Venus Williams, who has already become aware of an exciting talent.

Oudin defeated Argentina's Betina Jozami on a memorable Fed Cup debut earlier this year, much to the admiration of the older Williams sister.

"I've played with her in Fed Cup and she's a really pleasant girl," said Venus. "She is very hard working and determined.

"She has a lot of talent and played great in the first Fed Cup tie."

:unsure:

http://www.latimes.com/sports/la-sp-wimbledon-fyi27-2009jun27,0,2835362.story

Melanie Oudin (124) vs. Jelena Jankovic (6), Serbia A 17-year-old delight from Atlanta, Oudin has found her way to her first bout with a top-10 player. Hint: Jankovic is the one who tends to smile the whole time she's strafing you.

:drool:

~Kiera~
Jun 27th, 2009, 12:13 PM
http://www.sportinglife.com/tennis/wimbledon2009/news/story_get.cgi?STORY_NAME=wimbledon/09/06/27/WIMBLEDON_Women_Jankovic.html

:unsure:

Who "warned" her? :scratch: :p

дalex
Jun 27th, 2009, 03:39 PM
^ Apparently no one did. :D

Marilyn Monheaux
Jun 27th, 2009, 03:47 PM
^ Apparently no one did. :D

They tried, but she didn't listen:rolleyes:

~Kiera~
Jun 27th, 2009, 05:47 PM
http://www.wimbledon.org/en_GB/news/interviews/2009-06-27/200906271246120861468.html

J Jankovic - 27 June 2009
Saturday, 27 June 2009

Q. Can you tell us just how difficult conditions were for you.

JELENA JANKOVIC: Conditions were quite tough. It was very warm out there. But that was not, you know, my problem. After the first set, I felt really dizzy, and I thought that I was just gonna end up in the hospital. I started to shake. I was losing my ‑ how you say ‑ consciousness.

I didn't know. I was really gonna lose it, you know, to fall down and just, you know, probably go ‑‑ call the ambulance and leave the court. But I came back. Like I started to feel a little bit better.

But, you know, I was feeling quite weak. No power. I wasn't the same player. You know, I didn't have the power in the shots. I felt really tired and exhausted out there. It was very difficult for me to play in these kind of circumstances. That made me, as well, quite nervous.

Q. Do you think it was heat stroke or dehydration or what?

JELENA JANKOVIC: I don't know. It's as well some woman problems, as well. It's not easy being a woman, you know, sometimes. All these things happen. What can I do? I tried my best.

Q. Have you been struggling for a few days, or is it just today?

JELENA JANKOVIC: No, I felt okay, and then all of a sudden I won that first set. I felt, you know, I was like a ghost, you know, white in the face. Really, I didn't know where I was.

The physio came out and she asked me, Do you know like what is your name? I just saw blurry. I didn't know. It was really strange feeling. I was scared and I started to cry in this kind of situation.

But what can I do? These kind of things happen. Didn't have, you know, enough energy to hit the shots, to go after the shots, to do the right things. But I did the best that I could. And what can I do?

Q. Is that the first time your monthly cycle has affected you so dramatically like that?

JELENA JANKOVIC: No, I never had problem like that in the past. It was my first time experience, so...

Q. Your physical condition aside, what can you say about Oudin? She's 17, quite young.

JELENA JANKOVIC: She runs quite well, you know. She's, you know, a short girl, but she moves very well. She was running those balls down. You know, I had to play and I had to hit. That was what made me tired.

And, you know, normally, playing on grass, you know, I would go for my first serves, but I just didn't have, you know, enough power. The speed of the serves and of my shots, the pace of the ball was quite low. I didn't have enough power and energy to hit those shots.

You know, she made me run and she made me hit a lot of balls every point, and I just couldn't do it. It was too much for me. Especially that third set, you know, physically I was really, really, really exhausted and didn't have enough energy to stay in the match and win it at the end.

Q. She's still very young, but can you tell us what you think her potential is?

JELENA JANKOVIC: No, it's tough to say. But, you know, from what I have seen, you know, she can play if you let her play. But she cannot hurt you with anything. She doesn't have any weapons, you know, from what I've seen.

You know, I played with half pace. I served, you know, like almost my first serve was like a second serve and all those kind of things. But if I had a little bit more ‑‑ if I felt a little bit more fresh at the end of that second set, I could have won in two sets.

But I just was ‑‑ the more I ‑‑ the longer I stayed on court the worse and worse I felt, and that was not good for me. I know my chance was to win that second set, but unfortunately didn't happen, and then everything went in her favor.

Q. Except for her movement?

JELENA JANKOVIC: She's a consistent and quite solid player. She doesn't make so many mistakes. But she doesn't do anything either, so it's like she's depending kind of on you. And, as well, it's another story when she's young and she has nothing to lose, no pressure. You know, even when it's an important moment, she can just go for it.

And nobody's expecting her to win, so it's just a bonus if she does well. But if she loses, you know, nobody will tell her anything.

So it's a different, you know, situation for those kind of players. And then for players like me, which you're expected to win, you have pressure on yourself, you have expectations, as well. She just goes out there to enjoy it and give her best.

Q. Last year Serbian tennis was very much on the up with Novak winning a Grand Slam, Ana, you getting to a Grand Slam final, finishing the year No. 1. What has happened this year, particularly in your case?

JELENA JANKOVIC: You know, in my case a lot of things have happened. You know, it's not so easy. I had great results last year and the year before. I finished No. 3, and last year I finished No. 1. I had, you know, quite consistent results, and I played quite a lot.

You know, my goal was to start 2009 even better, to be fitter, to be stronger, to bring my tennis game to the next level. But, you know, I started the year in a very bad way. I felt so slow. I added some muscle, as well. I had maybe seven kilos more than I have now maybe. It didn't really give me results. I didn't feel comfortable on the court.

Especially when you don't move well, you don't have the balance to hit the balls, you're never on the position, and it's difficult to stay in the game. And especially those girls hit the ball very fast, you know, the game has become much, much stronger than before, and movement is very important, reaction, first step, and all these kind of things.

And, you know, then the confidence goes down a little bit, as well. As well, some personal problems. All these things, when you add them together, it doesn't give good results.

But, you know, I'm just trying to stay positive and trying to get it back to the position where I can play good tennis and compete and have fun out there.

Q. Did injuries play a big part in your problems?

JELENA JANKOVIC: Yeah, I had as well some injuries. So many things that, you know, at the end of the day don't give you a positive result. But, you know, now it's coming the part where I like to play. I like to play on hard courts, and some of the tournaments where I like to go and places where I like to go.

So I will try to prepare the best that I can, and hopefully start to play some good tennis again.

Q. Of the disappointments you felt and the physical problems you've had on the court, how would you compare today with all the rest?

JELENA JANKOVIC: What do you mean with all the rest?

Q. Other problems that you've had on the court, when you've either had an injury or sick or had a disappointment, how would you compare today?

JELENA JANKOVIC: I don't know. But, you know, every time you lose, it's of course disappointing. Nobody likes to lose. It's tough to accept losses, but you just have to try to learn, you know, from the losses. And I think from losses you learn much more be when you're winning.

To be honest, I played quite well in that second round against Benesova. I felt quite happy that I was coming back, that my game was starting to get together. I was quite pleased. And then today I just came out and just didn't feel really good.

All these things with the health, you know, didn't turn out to be a good day for me. But what can you do?

Kampi
Jun 27th, 2009, 05:54 PM
Thank you Sarah:wavey::kiss:


Well, this doesn't sound good.:sad: It seems she had some real health problems out there.:eek::hug:

ms_nut
Jun 27th, 2009, 05:55 PM
Q. Is that the first time your monthly cycle has affected you so dramatically like that?

JELENA JANKOVIC: No, I never had problem like that in the past. It was my first time experience, so...

:aparty: let's celebrate.. at least she's reached Menarche

дalex
Jun 27th, 2009, 05:55 PM
Oh my Jelena. You could have just said you played at 20% or junior tennis or any other excuse from the Serena book!

:tape:

And that's not nice what she said about Oudin especially considering the w/ue ratio for both players. :tape:

At least she sounds positive for the rest of the season.

Marilyn Monheaux
Jun 27th, 2009, 06:01 PM
^^Thanks!

Q. Can you tell us just how difficult conditions were for you.

JELENA JANKOVIC: Conditions were quite tough. It was very warm out there. But that was not, you know, my problem. After the first set, I felt really dizzy, and I thought that I was just gonna end up in the hospital. I started to shake. I was losing my ‑ how you say ‑ consciousness.

:scared:

Q. Do you think it was heat stroke or dehydration or what?

JELENA JANKOVIC: I don't know. It's as well some woman problems, as well. It's not easy being a woman, you know, sometimes. All these things happen. What can I do? I tried my best. :hug:

Q. Have you been struggling for a few days, or is it just today?

JELENA JANKOVIC: No, I felt okay, and then all of a sudden I won that first set. I felt, you know, I was like a ghost, you know, white in the face. Really, I didn't know where I was.

The physio came out and she asked me, Do you know like what is your name? I just saw blurry. I didn't know. It was really strange feeling. I was scared and I started to cry in this kind of situation.
This is really scary! Why on earth did she continue:sad:


Q. She's still very young, but can you tell us what you think her potential is?

JELENA JANKOVIC: No, it's tough to say. But, you know, from what I have seen, you know, she can play if you let her play. But she cannot hurt you with anything. She doesn't have any weapons, you know, from what I've seen. :weirdo: Did we see the same match?

Q. Except for her movement?

JELENA JANKOVIC: She's a consistent and quite solid player. She doesn't make so many mistakes.(40+) But she doesn't do anything either(38 winners), so it's like she's depending kind of on you. And, as well, it's another story when she's young and she has nothing to lose, no pressure. You know, even when it's an important moment, she can just go for it.

-Valérie-
Jun 27th, 2009, 06:08 PM
She didn't stop and came really close to win. Although, she was obviously feeling weak, and there were obviously something wrong.

Of course, JJ couldn't establish her game so, the American establish hers and i think the young rookie played a very good match. BUt, it could have been quite different, indeed, if jj would have played like she did against Benesova. :shrug:

дalex
Jun 27th, 2009, 06:12 PM
^ Yeah, but Jelena has no consistency this season except for that she's always losing (Marbella being the exception). Here, she played two awful matches and one great one. What were the other good matches from her this season? Lisicki in Stuttgart, Paris was OK too, I guess... Not much else. :shrug:

-Valérie-
Jun 27th, 2009, 06:31 PM
^ Yeah, but Jelena has no consistency this season except for that she's always losing (Marbella being the exception). Here, she played two awful matches and one great one. What were the other good matches from her this season? Lisicki in Stuttgart, Paris was OK too, I guess... Not much else. :shrug:


It is a tough season for the Serbian for sure, i can't deny that. :sad: With those few good matches, she proves us that the great player is still within her, but, yes, indeed, this consistency that made her so popular for the past 2 years is hard to find now. And it all has to do with her form and her confidence.

As for the reasons she gave today, i guess she just run out of excuses. I mean, i do understand the woman things, it does affect me, A LOT... (lucky for her i wasn't pmssing today :lol:), but really, maybe she should have given more credit to Oudin... If this little player wouldn't have been that consistent (what JJ totally lack off today with reason but :confused:) she would have won despite the woman problems. :shrug:

~Kiera~
Jun 27th, 2009, 07:13 PM
nGt9jAkWie4

Don't be such a sore loser, Jelena :o

дalex
Jun 27th, 2009, 07:13 PM
Jelena so deserved this:

http://www.tennisforum.com/showthread.php?t=383560

:inlove:

Optima
Jun 27th, 2009, 07:17 PM
And, my post comes back to bite me in the ass :rolls:

Marilyn Monheaux
Jun 27th, 2009, 07:19 PM
JJ's illness must have killed her brain:sad:

дalex
Jun 27th, 2009, 07:21 PM
And, my post comes back to bite me in the ass :rolls:

That's so typical of JJ, though... You just NEVER know what comes next... Again, except for the losses.

-NAJ-
Jun 27th, 2009, 07:23 PM
It tells that she still care.

terjw
Jun 27th, 2009, 07:50 PM
I thought the problem she had at the end of the 1st set was contributing to the way she played. But as pointed out - it's not just this match although it was the worst I've seen her. I haven't watched her much this year but every time I have - she's lost.

On her comments on Oudin: There's a fine line between on the one hand being honest and saying it how you see it - and on the other hand just coming across as a sore loser. I love that Jelena tells things exactly the way she sees it. She doesn't put up a front. But I don't really like that "She doesn't have any weapons, you know, from what I've seen" and "She doesn't make so many mistakes. But she doesn't do anything either".

She was asked a straight question about what Oudin's potential is. I'd have preferred it if Jelena had said something along the lines of - She had a good match against me when I had my problems and had no energy. We need to see if she can get more wins and play well and win against players playing better than I was able to do today to see how good she could be.

It's a fine line - although Jelena wouldn;'t be Jelena if she'd said "Oh I think she could be the greatest thing since sliced bread" when she doesn't believe it. Still telling Jelena to be more diplomatic when she's down on herself :tape:. But she did give a nice smile and handshake at the net. And I know she's not really a sore loser.

MaBaker
Jun 27th, 2009, 10:07 PM
JELENA JANKOVIC: I don't know. It's as well some woman problems, as well. It's not easy being a woman, you know, sometimes. All these things happen. What can I do? I tried my best.
It's not easy being your fan, you know, all the time.


Thankfully, she didn't mention Michael Jackson. I'm not kidding.

maya-serbia
Jun 27th, 2009, 10:55 PM
JJ's illness must have killed her brain:sad:


Which brain? :lol:

RFS
Jun 28th, 2009, 07:30 AM
I thought the problem she had at the end of the 1st set was contributing to the way she played. But as pointed out - it's not just this match although it was the worst I've seen her. I haven't watched her much this year but every time I have - she's lost.

On her comments on Oudin: There's a fine line between on the one hand being honest and saying it how you see it - and on the other hand just coming across as a sore loser. I love that Jelena tells things exactly the way she sees it. She doesn't put up a front. But I don't really like that "She doesn't have any weapons, you know, from what I've seen" and "She doesn't make so many mistakes. But she doesn't do anything either".

She was asked a straight question about what Oudin's potential is. I'd have preferred it if Jelena had said something along the lines of - She had a good match against me when I had my problems and had no energy. We need to see if she can get more wins and play well and win against players playing better than I was able to do today to see how good she could be.

It's a fine line - although Jelena wouldn;'t be Jelena if she'd said "Oh I think she could be the greatest thing since sliced bread" when she doesn't believe it. Still telling Jelena to be more diplomatic when she's down on herself :tape:. But she did give a nice smile and handshake at the net. And I know she's not really a sore loser.

To be honest Melanie doesn't have any real weapons... yet. Blog coming ... Oudin's strength is she's an awesome retriever and JJ couldn't pick up any cheap points on her new improved serve this time. The rallies were greulling, but... Oudin was just scrambling about returning, and returning, and returning... but she stays at the back largely trading groundies forever and a day.

When she adds more to her game... she's going to be scarily awesome...

ayliya
Jun 28th, 2009, 04:07 PM
New York Times article - more on JJ's "ungraciousness" -- also looks like the writer didn't believe JJ's reason for the medical timeouts. Man, that unfortunate presser has a life of its own!

June 28, 2009
SPORTS OF THE TIMES
Oudin’s Odyssey to Fourth Round Stirs American Optimism

By HARVEY ARATON
Wimbledon, England

It never takes very long here to be reminded how much of a catty-to-carnivore’s world women’s tennis has become since the days when Chris Evert and Martina Navratilova would share bagels before going out to Centre Court to settle another championship fortnight.

For me, that moment occurred upon arrival at the credential desk early Saturday afternoon, when an American junior girl, also checking in, commented to her coach how much makeup her young countrywoman appeared to be wearing during a match against the former world No. 1 Jelena Jankovic.

Frankly, from the picture on the small wall-mounted television, I couldn’t tell if Melanie Oudin, 17, was red-cheeked from blush or from the beating she was giving Jankovic at balmy Wimbledon after dropping the first set. But seeing how exhausted and exasperated Jankovic looked, I hustled to Court 3 to watch Oudin grow stronger on the way to a 6-7 (8), 7-5, 6-2 victory that distracted the tournament from its usual middle-weekend preoccupations to ask, “Who’s she?”

A home-schooled qualifier, to begin with. And an American not named Williams in the fourth round, though she and her Zimbabwe-born coach, Brian Devilliers, had bought plane tickets home to Atlanta for 3 p.m. Saturday.

As fate and a steady forehand would have it, this was also about the time Oudin (pronounced oo-DAN) was adding $80,000 to her minuscule career earnings that she recently dipped into to buy a five-year-old Toyota 4Runner.

Devilliers said his charge had promised to buy him a Porsche when the purses get U-Haul big, but that would assume the defeat of Jankovic, the No. 6 seed, has signaled the emergence of the first American women’s player to take seriously since the Williams sisters authored the greatest sibling story in sports.

Asked about her earliest memories of watching Wimbledon at her family home in Marietta, Ga., Oudin said: “Yes, when I was, like, 7, when I started playing tennis, I saw Venus and Serena Williams playing here and I was, like, Mom, I really want to play there one day.”

That was a decade ago, when Venus and Serena were teenagers turning tennis’s developmental and demographic rules upside down. We all know about the Eastern European tennis revolution since, but how can a country as large as the United States not have produced a single player over that period who made you think, she’s got next?

Considering that Andy Roddick is the only remaining American man, there must be an indictment waiting to be served, somewhere, especially when considering the fragility of many of the top-ranked women. For example, Svetlana Kuznetsova, who blew Dinara Safina out in the French Open final, was humbled on Saturday by someone named Sabine Lisicki of Germany, 6-2, 7-5.

As for Jankovic, she — like Safina, the top seed here — has managed to be No. 1 without winning a Grand Slam tournament. No wonder Venus and Serena Williams have been able to retreat from maximum commitment only to reinvent themselves at the majors.

The last time I was here, two years ago, their mother, Oracene Price, called the American drought behind Venus and Serena almost statistically unfathomable, while poking the United States Tennis Association for not knowing where, exactly, to look for Grand Slam contenders.

Devilliers, who trains Oudin at the Riverside Club in Atlanta, doesn’t want to believe that is the case, if only because Oudin is an undersize 5 feet 6 inches in this generation of Big Babe Tennis.

“It annoys me when people say let’s get the other athletes playing the sport,” he said, without explaining who the others are. “That’s nonsense. We’ve got plenty of talented American kids.”

After losing, Jankovic was ungraciously moved to suggest that Oudin isn’t one of them. As I said, the women do not quite reach the model comportment level of Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal.

Jankovic’s excuse was that she was wobbly from the heat — she required two medical timeouts — and the cyclical nature of “some woman problems.”

She said of Oudin: “She can play if you let her play. But she cannot hurt you with anything. She doesn’t have any weapons, you know, from what I have seen.”

It wasn’t what we saw. Oudin did hit winners from either wing and even mixed in a few deft volleys. The serve needs work before anyone compares it to her idol’s, the retired Justine Henin (for their similar stature).

In Oudin’s defense, Devilliers cited her mobility, endurance and especially her mental toughness. He advised her to pretend she was playing back home against her boyfriend, Austin Smith, or her twin, Catherine, who attends high school and is planning to play in college. By the third set, she was in against a shadow of Jankovic’s former top-ranked self.

Now Oudin’s parents have to fly here to join the half-dozen Riverside Club members forming her private cheering section. Some French journalists have joined in, making note of her father’s French descent, prompting Oudin to say, “I’m totally American, for sure.”

Is she America’s next sure thing? Let’s not go there. But someone has got to start somewhere.

E-mail: hjaraton@nytimes.com

Tashi
Jun 28th, 2009, 05:13 PM
Ah JJ, pure class.:o

I agree with Rozzie, Melanie's gonna be a really good player.

Snex
Jun 28th, 2009, 08:24 PM
OMG! Somebody wrote here two or three months ago that one young American tennis player said that JJ is her role model. Wasn't that Oudin? Can anybody remember?

-Valérie-
Jun 28th, 2009, 08:27 PM
I don't know. I still that JJ could have give her credit about the fact that the young Oudin never gave up and was consistant enough to win the match.

But from my point of view, yes, she played well, but let's be honest, JJ was totaly out of her game and despite that, she could have win. If Oudin would have slow down a little but, JJ would have win anyway.

Of course, Oudin seem like a promissing player, who at 17, as certainly a lot of work to do and beating JJ was certainly a boost of confidence. But let's be honest, if JJ was her favorite player, Oudin knew damn too well that JJ was not the usual JJ.

I hope our Serbian player will be back better than before. This is all becoming too dramatic, and JJ belong to the top 3, but she isn't that player at the moment. Hopefully, we've seen a glipse of her against Benesova and she will find a way to be able to play Kung Fu tennis soon.

JadeFox
Jun 28th, 2009, 08:42 PM
OMG! Somebody wrote here two or three months ago that one young American tennis player said that JJ is her role model. Wasn't that Oudin? Can anybody remember?

Yes indeed she was the one who said that.

Not JJ's classiest moment but I'll blame that on "women's troubles". :p

Snex
Jun 28th, 2009, 08:51 PM
Yes indeed she was the one who said that.

Not JJ's classiest moment but I'll blame that on "women's troubles". :p

:speakles: :o :tape: :hysteric:

Jelenaaaaaaaaaa!!!!! You're such a BITCH!!!!!!!!!!!
:fiery:

I was proud to be Jelena's supporter. :awww: Now I'm ashamed. :sad:

~Kiera~
Jun 28th, 2009, 08:59 PM
I was proud to be Jelena's supporter. :awww: Now I'm ashamed. :sad:

You'll get used to it :hug: ;)

JadeFox
Jun 28th, 2009, 09:32 PM
:speakles: :o :tape: :hysteric:

Jelenaaaaaaaaaa!!!!! You're such a BITCH!!!!!!!!!!!
:fiery:

I was proud to be Jelena's supporter. :awww: Now I'm ashamed. :sad:

Wait a minute. You mean you didn't feel shame before? :lol:


You'll get used to it :hug: ;)

Indeed you will Snezana. Consider Jelena our Chuck Bass. :p

oneandonly
Jun 28th, 2009, 09:48 PM
Indeed you will Snezana. Consider Jelena our Chuck Bass. :p
Great comparison :lol:

Cilla
Jun 28th, 2009, 10:26 PM
Wait a minute. You mean you didn't feel shame before? :lol:
:sobbing: :rolls:

Snex
Jun 28th, 2009, 11:28 PM
Wait a minute. You mean you didn't feel shame before? :lol:

I felt shame first time I surfed through GM. :o I had no idea that she has so many haters. :shrug: I was wondering how can somebody hate a girl with Jelena's smile. :confused: Of course, people read her interviews and hate her arrogance, and they know that her smile is just the surface. :shrug:

Well, I don't support her because she's a bitch. I already know that. :o I support her because she's so weak, sick, miserable, yet she reached the top of the world. I am just shocked that she said such things for that girl whose role model she is. To be honest, Jelena also has no special weapons, and that girl is the new JJ (after Caroverrated). Oudin beat her with consistency, speed, fight, which were the only JJ's weapons (before she lost them somewhere :shrug:).

:o

MaBaker
Jun 28th, 2009, 11:46 PM
Wait a minute. You mean you didn't feel shame before? :lol:

:spit: Mean.

JadeFox
Jun 29th, 2009, 12:18 AM
I felt shame first time I surfed through GM. :o I had no idea that she has so many haters. :shrug: I was wondering how can somebody hate a girl with Jelena's smile. :confused: Of course, people read her interviews and hate her arrogance, and they know that her smile is just the surface. :shrug:

Well, I don't support her because she's a bitch. I already know that. :o I support her because she's so weak, sick, miserable, yet she reached the top of the world. I am just shocked that she said such things for that girl whose role model she is. To be honest, Jelena also has no special weapons, and that girl is the new JJ (after Caroverrated). Oudin beat her with consistency, speed, fight, which were the only JJ's weapons (before she lost them somewhere :shrug:).

:o

Awww. :hug:

If Oudin is the new JJ, then look at it this way: You've already experience the heartbreak before. Now you're more prepared! :yeah:


:spit: Mean.

Ha! Look who's talking! :p

ms_nut
Jun 29th, 2009, 02:52 AM
I felt shame first time I surfed through GM. :o I had no idea that she has so many haters. :shrug: I was wondering how can somebody hate a girl with Jelena's smile. :confused: Of course, people read her interviews and hate her arrogance, and they know that her smile is just the surface. :shrug:

Well, I don't support her because she's a bitch. I already know that. :o I support her because she's so weak, sick, miserable, yet she reached the top of the world. I am just shocked that she said such things for that girl whose role model she is. To be honest, Jelena also has no special weapons, and that girl is the new JJ (after Caroverrated). Oudin beat her with consistency, speed, fight, which were the only JJ's weapons (before she lost them somewhere :shrug:).

:o

:hug: Oh Sneki.. don't feel bad.. most of the haters will join her bandwagon once she starts beating other players they hate more like the Williams'...pay no attention to them.. they are like flies.. they come and go in cycles.

I know it's easy to be pissed at her right now.. but i think it's more like she's upset she didn't do much more to beat Oudin.. she was two points away from winning the match and missed it. She really shouldn't have said anything bad about Oudin who admires her, but she will learn, i hope..:tape::tape: you shouldn't speak your mind entirely, you must be diplomatic.. everyone makes mistakes. Even Tracy Austin said that about Graf. She said "Oh, Graf is nothing special.. we have hundreds of girls better than her in the US..:tape::help::lol: and look what happened.

JJ sucks right now, but she has several weapons.. her speed, her BH DTL, her fighting spirit,fitness and return game. She didn't have any of these firing the other day.. hopefully she'll work on it and change things around soon.

дalex
Jun 29th, 2009, 09:43 AM
Well, I don't support her because she's a bitch. I already know that. :o

:rolleyes:

~Kiera~
Jul 1st, 2009, 01:20 AM
http://www.herald.ie/entertainment/around-town/im-the-father-of-jackos-youngest-child-blanket-says-76yearold-tycoon-1797925.html

Meet the Irish woman tending to the stars at Wimbledon

By Geraldine Gittens

Tuesday June 30 2009

An Irish physiotherapist has landed her dream job by tending to the needs of this year's women tennis stars at Wimbledon.

Elaine Brady (29) is working with some of biggest names in women's tennis including the Williams sisters, Maria Sharapova and Dinara Safina.

"They all come into the training room at the one time. So you'd have the likes of Sharapova, Ivanovich, and the Williams sisters all walking around," said Elaine, who is originally from Silversprings Road, Clonmel, Co Tipperary.

"You get to know them because you'd meet them many times during the year. They're very friendly, and they're always laughing and joking, which makes my job a lot easier. Of course they're quite serious on court though."

Elaine's day at Wimbledon starts at 12pm with a meeting -- and she and her team could be working until as late as 10.30pm.

"When players are distressed about an injury we work to reassure them and get appropriate doctors and scans.

Upsetting

"If a player has an injury which requires that they be withdrawn from court, it's always upsetting and especially at Wimbledon because it's such a famous event. On TV yesterday, people would have seen that Ivanovich was quite upset."

She added: "We're always very conscious of the players' physical and emotional space. We want to make sure that they're emotionally okay, because that can have an effect on how they are physically as well.

"Basically we start at 12, when we have an injury meeting where we go through all the players and all the injuries they have and what to watch out for."

Yet Elaine said that while she is dealing with the top players in the world, they don't always talk tennis -- and she has bonded personally with some of them.

"We enquire about how things are going off-court as well and if they've any news. We don't keep it too professional.

"I get on with Jelena Jankovic because she's a lot of fun she's always full of banter," Elaine added.

Elaine is one of seven physios working at Wimbledon and she occasionally appears on television when the players call the "trainer" to court to deal with a problem.

When not the envy of thousands for her Wimbledon role, Elaine is based in St Petersburg, Florida, where she has her dream job of working with the WTA Tour.

"I don't play as much as I'd like to, but it was always something I was interested in, I always kept in touch with tennis. To get the job I had two phone interviews and I had a five-day working interview in a tournament in England," she revealed.

"It's a great opportunity for me to get to travel the world and work with the best athletes in the world."

Elaine trained as a physiotherapist at the University of Liverpool and completed her Masters at the University of Middlesex outside London.

She was a senior physio at the Mater Hospital, as well as working at a sports injuries clinic in Dublin's O'Connell Street, before securing the full-time post with the Sony Ericsson WTA Tour two years ago.

RFS
Jul 1st, 2009, 06:39 AM
I felt shame first time I surfed through GM. :o I had no idea that she has so many haters. :shrug: I was wondering how can somebody hate a girl with Jelena's smile. :confused: Of course, people read her interviews and hate her arrogance, and they know that her smile is just the surface. :shrug:

Well, I don't support her because she's a bitch. I already know that. :o I support her because she's so weak, sick, miserable, yet she reached the top of the world. I am just shocked that she said such things for that girl whose role model she is. To be honest, Jelena also has no special weapons, and that girl is the new JJ (after Caroverrated). Oudin beat her with consistency, speed, fight, which were the only JJ's weapons (before she lost them somewhere :shrug:).

:o

Lord you are brave... GM just baffles me - people who seem to be totally crazy! They make even my harsh comments about our glittery goat seem all fluffy-bunnified and positive :lol:

Brena
Jul 1st, 2009, 09:15 AM
I am just shocked that she said such things for that girl whose role model she is. To be honest, Jelena also has no special weapons, and that girl is the new JJ (after Caroverrated). Oudin beat her with consistency, speed, fight, which were the only JJ's weapons (before she lost them somewhere :shrug:).

:o

I'm not shocked - JJ says what she really thinks (however, whether her opinion is right or not is another thing :tape:). JJ is vain and thinks the world of herself and I'm sure she honestly didn't think much of Oudin's game. So, which is worse: arrogance or hypocrisy (if she praised Oudin without really meaning that only to gain points with the fans?) :shrug:
What she is guilty of, though, is her self-centeredness which prevents her from feeling for a young, hopeful player who needs encouragement. She should have said something nice for Oudin's sake. But I guess she's a bit too selfish to have thought of that.

-NAJ-
Jul 1st, 2009, 11:03 AM
After London JJ went to Montenegro. She and Mladjan spent few days together in Kolasin -(little place in Montenegro)
http://www.pressonline.rs/page/stories/sr.html?view=story&id=70781&sectionId=44

The best Serbian tennis player Jelena Jankovic comforted after premature elimination from the search for Wimbledon in the bosom of your guys Mlađan Janovića, which was last weekend, as there Montenegrin media, visited Kolasin and the nearby monastery Ćirilovac!
http://www.pressonline.rs/admin/image.jpg?imageId=43601&thumb=1

Jelena Jankovic and Mlađan Janović met during the Olympic Games in Beijing in 2008. and then try to spend every free moment together, of course, how their duties allow. Media najavljivali and even marriage, but our teniserka denied such information. Also, administration kotorskog club Primorac, which is Janović performed last season, was suspended At Mlađan because the more time spent with my girlfriend, but in practice, but the Montenegrin representatives then said to have regular medical excuse that he was ill , optuživši in this administration that is not paid off zaostala debt.

short stay ourtennis player and Montenegro water polo team in the "small town" Kolasin has caused great excitement among the local citizens! However, the visit was so discretely organized, is to see a few people, not including a taxi driver who was driving, as well as in the present monastery, which is often known to flush and footballer Mateja Kežman Dejan Tomasevic and basketball player.

Soon after the defeat in the third school of England Open Championships Jelena Jankovic left southwestern London and is directed to Montenegro, where it is waiting Mlađan Janović, who is currently with the team preparing for the upcoming World Championships in Rome.

Occur as rare eyewitnesses, in the week about 14 hours of black jeep "Pors Cayenne" kotorskih registration stopped on the parking lot in front of kolašinskog hotel "Bianca", and it was out and Jelena Mlađan. On the other side of the parking, but was waiting jeep taxi associations, "the glory lux," which is a two sport classes odvezao to the above-mentioned monastery, or 13 km away from Kolasin. Crnogorski sports daily "Arena", there is time to Ćirilovca lasted about 40 minutes and that Jankovic and Janović sitting on the back seat. The newspaper states that "a quiet talk and asked the driver to enhance the music, so that even the taxi driver could not hear what is love a pair of talk.

Ćirilovcu visit lasted about an hour, and the marina has been in the porti sačekao father Jojilo, or leaders monastery. Soon thereafter, in the monastery and entered the Montenegrin water-polo players, but he, according to sources "Arena", held only a few minutes.
http://www.pressonline.rs/admin/image.jpg?imageId=43602&thumb=1
Golupčići ... Mlađan and Jelena

After you have visited one of the monastery in the environment, which has become known by that the particles are kept him in the cross on which Jesus Christ was crucified, and Jelena Mlađan off the taxi back to Kolasin. In the parking lot of hotel "Bianca" again moves in Janovićev skupoceni "Pors", to then, through kolašinskog main square and street Mojkovačke Take in an unknown direction ...

Two love athletes, however, did not have much time available, due to the water polo Savona expected continuation of the preparation team, and Jelena Jankovic in the way the United States, and training hard for the second part of the season.

-NAJ-
Jul 1st, 2009, 11:20 AM
I found cover of sports daily "Arena" in Montenegro
http://www.arenacg.net/naslovne/892.jpg

Online download http://www.arenacg.net/download.php?broj=892

-NAJ-
Jul 2nd, 2009, 12:35 PM
The Best TV Commercial – JJ with Aqua Viva
| 02.07.2009.

http://img407.imageshack.us/img407/2563/99v.th.jpg (http://img407.imageshack.us/img407/2563/99v.jpg)
Marketing agency Communis has won the first award for TV commercial "Aqua Viva - Jelena Jankovic" in category sport TVC on just finished I Belgrade FICTS Federation Internationale Cinema Television Sportifs.
Aco Boskovic, TV commercial producer has won the award – the statue of Belgrade victory.

Sports and Olympism Fund, Serbian Olympic Committee and Yugoslav Cinotheque were organizers of this Festival, which took place under patronage of International Federation of Cinema Television Sportifs (sport movies and tv). The partner of the festival was Serbian Association of Sports Journalists.
from jj web site

allrounder
Jul 4th, 2009, 01:49 AM
I wonder if JJ's lack of motivation for tennis is reflected by the lack of updates on her blog this year?

At her peak last year she was blogging regularly like every week or two and now we're lucky if we get one over a period of a couple of months.

ChriS.
Jul 5th, 2009, 12:00 PM
I wonder if JJ's lack of motivation for tennis is reflected by the lack of updates on her blog this year?

At her peak last year she was blogging regularly like every week or two and now we're lucky if we get one over a period of a couple of months.Yes, I agree. Not worth checking her web site these days and she even took the dates off her Fan Book because her fans lost their motivation too!

~Kiera~
Jul 5th, 2009, 10:18 PM
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2009/writers/jon_wertheim/07/05/wimbledon.thoughts/?eref=sihpT1

Roger Federer's historic win and more thoughts from Wimbledon

Some scattered thoughts on a historic Wimbledon ...

• Hats off to your "summer double winner," your all-time men's Slam winner, and new No.1, Roger Federer. Who would have thought we'd have a men's final end 9-7 in the fifth set one year, and then have it go 14 games longer the year thereafter? Federer d. Roddick, 5-7, 7-6. 7-6, 6-3. 16-14. What's this sport serving up next?

• Andy Roddick needed to play a virtually perfect match to beat Federer and he nearly did. You hope he remembers this event for the hundred right reasons; not one backhand volley or some unfortunate mishits in the 30th game of the fifth set. Who witnessed Roddick's performance over the last two weeks and weeks and didn't come away with a heightened respect for the guy?

• Want to stump your friends? Tell them to name an athlete alive today with better fighting instincts than your 2009 women's champ, Serena Williams, who defeated her sister in the final. Think she elevates her game at the right times? Over the last 10 months she won only three titles: the U.S. Open, Australian Open and Wimbledon.

• Congrats to Venus Williams, who looked unstoppable against six non-familial opponents. Yes, the head-to-heads couldn't be closer (Serena now leads 11-10) but Big Sis clearly has the harder time with the emotions and the general weirdness that attend playing against a sibling.

• So now we know: the best way to ensure brilliant weather is to spend $200 million on a retractable roof.

• That sound you heard last Friday -- or later if you live in one of those pre-industrial countries where they tape-delay sports broasdcasts? It was some air leaving the tournament as Andy Murray went down in defeat to Roddick, thus ending the chance of a British hope of winning the title. Still, I give Murray a lot of credit for the way he handled ridiculous levels of attention/pressure. Andy Murray: U.S. Open champ. You heard it here first.

• You are Elena Dementieva. You are thinking to yourself which of the following? A) My serve isn't so bad after all and I came within a point of toppling the mighty Serena Williams at Wimbledon. B) I played about as well as I can play and I still couldn't topple the mighty Serena Williams at Wimbledon.

• Venus Williams, to her great credit, bent over backwards to defend the honor of Dinara Safina and the women's game. (Her sister, not so much.) But let's be honest with ourselves: when you're the top seed at a Grand Slam -- even against Venus, even on a surface you, puzzlingly, admit on your own Web site you despise -- you simply cannot allow yourself to lose 6-1, 6-0.

• Here's hoping Rafael Nadal never makes the acquaintance of Dr. James Andrews. As it stands, the tournament was able to overcome Nadal's absence. But it's much more fun when he's in the draw.

• Daniel Nestor and Nenad Zimonjic win the doubles again, beating the Bryan brothers, Bob and Mike, in the finals. Props to pops.
11-20

• As if their level of domination weren't high enough in singles, Venus and Serena Williams teamed together to take the doubles crown. Without dropping a set.

• Andrey Kuznetsov of Russia won the boys, beating American Jordan Cox in the final. Noppawan Lertcheewakarn of Thailand upset top-seeded Kristina Mladenovic of France to win the girls

• How's this for a reflex volley?

Q: You can get arrested in this country for having Rick Astley on your iPod.

Andy Roddick: You can get arrested in my country for lying under oath.

• For the second straight major, the eight men's quarterfinalists were from eight different countries.

• What to make of Novak Djokovic? He plays lights-out tennis for the first four rounds. Then he comes up against Tommy Haas for the second time in three weeks and not only loses, but cites his own nervousness as a factor.

• Nice to see the "Old balls, please" crowd -- Lleyton Hewitt, Tommy Haas and Juan Carlos Ferrero -- doing well. It must be heartening for the younger player to see that you can recover from some pretty hardcore injuries and surgeries and still be a factor. And (Goran Ivanisevic notwithstanding) it's hard to recall a more well-played wild card designation than JCF, who reached the quarters.

• One Ivo Karlovic = fun. A tour full of Ivo Karlovices = deadly.

• Raise your hand -- above your head if your shoulder permits -- if you're officially concerned about Maria Sharapova. I suspect her results this summer will tell us a lot about where this train is headed.

• Dear Jelena Jankovic: We admire your movement-based game. We like your candor and abundant personality. But the melodrama is veering into self-parody territory. After the loss to Melanie Oudin: "The physio came out and she asked me, 'Do you know like what is your name?' I just saw blurry. I didn't know. It was really strange feeling. I was scared and I started to cry in this kind of situation." You didn't know your name and yet you kept playing? Really?

• Britton's got talent. We came away impressed with Devin Britton, the NCAA champ, and Alex Domijan (Baby Ivo) who both possess top-50 potential. Playing serve-and-volley tennis, Britton lost to yet another American, Jordan Cox, in the semis, 16-14 in the third.
21-30

• Plenty to like about Oudin, the Atlantan who reached the round of 16 and, frankly, could have beaten Aggie Radwanska, hereinafter known as A-Rad. Oudin is downright petite by WTA standards, but didn't get outhit much. On the contrary, she lost a lot of points by setting herself up masterfully and then blowing the execution on the put-way shot.

• How about a hand for the USTA development? While the LTA was getting hammered for the ritual shortcomings of the British players, Americans were making strides. Oudin beating a former No. 1 was the big news. Jesse Levine reaching Round 3, Alexa Glatch continuing to make progress (and sloppy few games at the end prevented her from getting out of the first round), and three Americans making the quarters of the boys draw.

• Having said that, maybe the take-away is that we overreact. The American players flame out in the French Open? American tennis is dead! The USTA wastes millions! When will these complacent brats learn to embrace clay? Wait, Jesse Levine wins two matches and Melanie Oudin wins three at Wimbledon? American tennis is back!

• Some media notes. I love the line "clickfest at Wimbledon," to describe the pre-finals coverage on NBC. The bad news is that NBC's embargo and tape- delayed coverage generated immense ill will (and bad press) for the network. If you really would rather air Rachel Ray reruns than broadcast live tennis, why even bid on it? The good news: the savvy viewer can find live feeds on-line and it's only going to get easier watch live broadcasts in the future. Two points that ought to be made, though: 1) Name me another sporting event with an unsure starting times. I'm told if the AELTC would say "match X will begin at time Y," NBC would consider live coverage. 2) NBC's broadcast quality is exceptional. The John McEnroe/Ted Robison/Mary Carillo team is exceptional. It's the decision-makers in Rockefeller Center that cause the trouble We'll ask it again: where's Jack Donaghy?

• Let's make a deal: I promise not to smoke. Now how about you promise to stop showing me those fatty deposits in the dude's neck? I'm just trying to watch some tennis here, OK? Don't need the 30-second version of a "scared straight" After-School Special.

• With the possible exception of Michael Jackson, no one got more air time on the BBC last week than Tracy Austin. Nice mix of knowledge and unvarnished, tell-it-is-like-it-is commentary. Which network will step up and hire her for the U.S. Open? And while we're at it, who's going to hire Jeff Tarango to do his wacky podcast?

• Sadly, we hear that Jennifer Capriati is out of the Superstars competition with an exacerbation of her shoulder injury. (Or maybe she really injured it throttling her agent for putting her on this show. Note to Boomer Esiason: you're better than this.):

Whatever, sadly, it doesn't bode well for a return to tennis.

• Most strained tie-in goes to the BBC's (otherwise quite good) Sue Barker who remarked "how fitting" it would be if Roger Federer played the first match under the roof. Why? Because Federer "has become known in recent years as the King of Wimbledon ... and this is the day after of the death of the King of Pop." O-K.

• Tennis Channel continues to get better with each event. (Look for Jimmy Connors to join the team for the U.S. Open coverage.) Maybe this will convince Cablevision et al finally to get on board with the distribution.

• Anyone else notice that ING "numbers" are substantially smaller than last year's? Recession, I guess.
31-40

• Best new crowd innovation: "The wave" in slow motion.

The fans perfected this on Court Three last week.

• Mohamed Lahyani was the chair umpire for Dudi Sela's third round win over Tommy Robredo. At one point Lahyani admonished some of Sela's fans to pipe down. As one scribe put it: "I thought it was rather interesting that when Mohamed held up his hand, the Israelis quieted."

• In every other sports, teams kill themselves in order to secure "home court advantage." In tennis? Murray Mania is perceived as unendurable pressure; and one after the other, players have expressed a preference to "fly under the radar."

• Could this be right? Andy Murray didn't serve and volley once in his loss to Roddick?

• There's an APB out for Donald Young.

• Nice to see Ana Ivanovic get back to winning. Nothing earth-shattering but a second week showing in a Slam is a step forward. Then she gets stomped by Venus for set and retires with a thigh injury. She will, however, be back in August.

• The Kim Clijsters comeback tour begins in Cincinnati. And her new manager is John Dolan, who helped many of us when he worked for the WTA Tour. Good luck to him.

• Favorite accessory? No, not the Federer gold lame man-purse, which really cuts against the everyman image he worked so hard to cultivate. We're going with the Jelena Jankovic "JJ" bag. We work on the assumption it was stolen from neither Jamea Jackson nor Joachim Johansson. Or, for that matter, Jermaine Jackson.

• Buy your Sabine Lisicki stock now. Not the prettiest game -- Justine Henin, we miss you more with each passing day -- but she might own the biggest serve in the game.

• Disappointing to see young Grigor Dimitrov win the first set of his first match and then retire. We all know the rules of engagement when it comes to hype but "more talent than Federer at that age," is high praise.
41-50

• Two of you noted that during an early round doubles match, Amelie Mauresmo whipped out a can of hairspray during one of the changeovers. While Svetlana Kuznetsova sprayed her hair with it, Amelie brushed it. As Alison of Amherest, N.Y., put it: "It was a little odd watching two Grand Slam winners play beauty shop on court. But the umpire didn't seem to mind."

• Most underrated story: the Indian-Pakistani doubles team of Prakash Amritraj and Aisam-ul Haq Qureshi, won a few matches. Qureshi has now played with an Indian and an Israeli at Wimbledon. Small steps. But steps nonetheless.

• Larry Scott officially stepped down at WTA CEO to begin as PAC-10 commissioner. Pick your poison: try to lure sponsors to women's tennis while fighting a grim global economy and the perception that your product is diminished. Or deal with the USC athletic department.

• Here's Scott on the WTA ranking system: "The one place it doesn't stir a debate is in the locker room. The players believe in that ranking system. They believe the ranking is right. And I have not had one player come up to me and say, 'How can Dinara Safina be No. 1 in the world?'"

• Here's Serena Williams -- who apparently spends little time in aforementioned locker room -- on the same subject:

"I think if you hold three Grand Slam titles maybe you should be No. 1, but not on the WTA Tour obviously, so. ... You know, my motivation is maybe just to win another Grand Slam and stay No. 2, I guess (laughter). ... That's just shocking. But whatever. It is what it is. I'd rather definitely be No. 2 and hold three Grand Slams in the past year than be No. 1 and not have any. "

• Here's Serena again: "I feel like I've had a pretty consistent year, though, you know." Come again? You've won "only" two tournaments in 2009, but they've both been majors. And sandwiched between them was a four-match losing streak. What exactly constitutes an inconsistent year?

• Monica Seles will be inducted in the Hall of Fame next week, one candidate we can all agree is worthy of enshrinement.

• Not far from Wimbledon, in a London conference room, Richard Gasquet was pleading his case over his drug suspension. And keep an eye on this: Martina Hingis' ban lapses in October, a day or so after her 29th birthday.

• Mercifully, the grunting "controversy" was muted by the second day of play.

• Sam Querrey wins best tweet award: "on my return home from my close 5 set loss, i was struck, yet again, by a drunk vagrant in wimbledon village, this time in the gut."

ON THAT NOTE, HAVE A GREAT WEEK EVERYONE!

дalex
Jul 5th, 2009, 10:40 PM
• Dear Jelena Jankovic: We admire your movement-based game. We like your candor and abundant personality. But the melodrama is veering into self-parody territory. After the loss to Melanie Oudin: "The physio came out and she asked me, 'Do you know like what is your name?' I just saw blurry. I didn't know. It was really strange feeling. I was scared and I started to cry in this kind of situation." You didn't know your name and yet you kept playing? Really?

:haha:

She forgets... I'm sure she remembered her name at some point.


• Favorite accessory? No, not the Federer gold lame man-purse, which really cuts against the everyman image he worked so hard to cultivate. We're going with the Jelena Jankovic "JJ" bag. We work on the assumption it was stolen from neither Jamea Jackson nor Joachim Johansson. Or, for that matter, Jermaine Jackson.

And people say Jelena is irrelevant! Pftttt..

Brena
Jul 5th, 2009, 11:09 PM
You are Elena Dementieva. You are thinking to yourself which of the following? A) My serve isn't so bad after all and I came within a point of toppling the mighty Serena Williams at Wimbledon. B) I played about as well as I can play and I still couldn't topple the mighty Serena Williams at Wimbledon.

Yes, she's most certainly obssessing about mighty Serena.:weirdo:
I am Elena Dementieva and I am thinking ''I've got millions of dollars on my bank account. What shall I spend them on?''


Buy your Sabine Lisicki stock now. Not the prettiest game -- Justine Henin, we miss you more with each passing day -- but she might own the biggest serve in the game.

Indeedy. :sobbing:

~Kiera~
Jul 8th, 2009, 09:21 PM
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2009/writers/jon_wertheim/07/08/federer.mail/1.html

I'm not sure if you have answered this before: The entourage of both players are seated in the same box at Wimbledon. Why? Who decides which group sits in front of the other? I think this could always present an awkward situation for both sides.
-- Ramil Medina, Singapore

• As a rule, the higher seed gets to pick, hence the Federer posse gets the front row. I know that at the U.S. Open, American players get the choice box, a policy that, shall we say, displeased Jelena Jankovic's mom last year.

~Kiera~
Jul 8th, 2009, 10:25 PM
From tennis reporters.net

AI and JJ: Which Serbian is in worse shape, Ana Ivanovic or Jelena Jankovic? Ivanovic appears more determined to start putting up huge results again, while Jankovic is just tossing out excuses as to why she underachieving. Watch them closely during the US Open Series. Whoever puts up better results will be a factor at the Open and whichever woman continues to fade will likely be headed to a first round exit. By tthe way, for those of you who don't know, Jankovic's mom calls her daughter "JJ." Weird.

~Kiera~
Jul 14th, 2009, 08:53 PM
http://www.svet.rs/clanak/jelena-jankovi%C4%87-u-dubai-bez-de%C4%8Dka

Jelena Jankovic: The Dubai without guys!

After a short stay in Montenegro, along with boyfriend Mlađan Janović and visit the monastery Ćirilovac, Jelena Jankovic has traveled to Dubai. With mamom Snezana boraviće ten days of this attractive location, where it will be sent to his house in Miami to prepare for future tournaments by America.

Mlađan, this time could not Dragoje to make their society because of the preparations with the Montenegro national water polo team for the upcoming World Cup. JJ has given vent to itself and, zamaskirana cap and large glasses, enjoyed on the hotel beach ispijajući cocktail, and evening hours reserved for shopping the boutiques prestigious brands in the world that our teniserka leaving thousands of euros.

http://img27.imageshack.us/img27/4580/jjprva.jpg

http://img27.imageshack.us/img27/4060/jelena.jpg

Snex
Jul 14th, 2009, 08:57 PM
could not Dragoje to make their society :confused:

:rolls:

дalex
Jul 14th, 2009, 09:02 PM
Amaze find Sarah!

:lol: @ the pics. Looks like she's all by herself at the beach. That's not fun.

Who spotted her? I don't think I'd recognize her with all that disguise. :lol:

Brena
Jul 14th, 2009, 09:02 PM
^oh, great, now she's turned to alcoholism out of despair :sobbing:

~Kiera~
Jul 14th, 2009, 09:37 PM
^oh, great, now she's turned to alcoholism out of despair :sobbing:

She's just copying her fans ;)

~Kiera~
Jul 14th, 2009, 09:58 PM
http://www.svet.rs/clanak/mla%C4%91-janovi%C4%87-i-jelena-jankovi%C4%87-48-sati-bez-tenisa

http://img196.imageshack.us/img196/3081/hotel20avala0.jpg

As soon as the pročulo to Jelena Jankovic law in London, where she was eliminated at Wimbledon in the third round by Melanie Oudin, came in Kolasin, where they were during the preparation of our water polo team before departure at the World Championships in Rome, zavladalo is the excitement among the locals this city. However, only rarely have the opportunity to see Jelena and her boyfriend Mlađan Janovića, because the visits this town was very well organized and discrete. Since the early unplanned leave Wimbledon, Jelena has her free time, and last week came to Kolasin, where it is sačekao Mlađan. Until Saturday, he and his teammates from the team was preparing in the city, and is probably due to the decision and fell to the find. However, in Kolašin is not long retained, just as the trip lasted Ćirilovac the monastery, and then the Janovićevim "Pors Cayenne" referred to Budva. Rarely eyewitnesses from Kolasin say that sports classes are not the mood for photography and dijeljenje autograph. A similar situation was in Budva. Even fans who have found the reception not managed to get the autograph for the memories. Since the apartment is situated in the hotel "Avala", golupčići to have disappeared. Two days, no one saw them come from the rooms, and unofficially we learn that requested them not disturbing. Only on Tuesday afternoon, Mlađan bag with room left for training, but already after less than two hours back in the "love nest". The third day of stay in the Coast of Montenegro was, as we learn, booked to go to Kotor Mlađanov home and meet with relatives. After cjelodnevnog family gatherings with famous water polo, a couple in love again enjoy the "Avalinom" apartment, which, as you have entered, quietly left the third of July.

Although not a lot of time available, due to the water polo "Savona" expected continuation of the preparation team, and teniserka time in the United States, and training hard for the second part of the season, and Jelena Mlađan and the five days that were available to the maximum used. Only two or three times to exit from the room, not like or with whom to communicate, or to any disturbing, so it is easy to assume that they are fully dedicated to one another. As to the best srbijanska teniserka announced that it will be some time withdrawn from the tennis, it is not impossible that Jelena and Mlađan the hotel room "worked" on Prinove, which could be reason to pause Jankovićkinog the tennis courts.

MaBaker
Jul 14th, 2009, 10:10 PM
^Svet ? Really ? You are so very strange :tears:

дalex
Jul 14th, 2009, 10:18 PM
^Svet ? Really ? You are so very strange :tears:

Don't be such a classless trash. Be grateful we got some info on Jelena.

:)

Snex
Jul 14th, 2009, 10:25 PM
We already read this article. :rolleyes:

MaBaker
Jul 14th, 2009, 10:25 PM
Don't be such a classless trash. Be grateful we got some info on Jelena.

:)
.l. :)

Brena
Jul 14th, 2009, 10:34 PM
Don't be such a classless trash. Be grateful we got some info on Jelena.

:)

.l. :)

Did you hit him with a cue when you went to play billiards that day, Ma?

дalex
Jul 14th, 2009, 10:37 PM
We already read this article. :rolleyes:

We didn't. :rolleyes:

.l. :)

rbay :)

Did you hit him with a cue when you went to play billiards that day, Ma?

ban

MaBaker
Jul 14th, 2009, 10:41 PM
Did you hit him with a cue when you went to play billiards that day, Ma?
No. I will regret that for the rest of my life.

Wrekin
Jul 15th, 2009, 04:09 PM
^ What's all this tetchiness? :lol:

Two days, no one saw them come from the rooms, and unofficially we learn that requested them not disturbing. Only on Tuesday afternoon, Mlađan bag with room left for training, but already after less than two hours back in the "love nest".
Only two or three times to exit from the room, not like or with whom to communicate, or to any disturbing, so it is easy to assume that they are fully dedicated to one another

Poor lambs must be exhausted

Snex
Jul 15th, 2009, 05:22 PM
We didn't. :rolleyes:


:rolleyes: Of course we did:

http://www.tennisforum.com/showpost.php?p=15993517&postcount=3085, http://www.pressonline.rs/page/stories/sr.html?view=story&id=70781&sectionId=44

http://www.tennisforum.com/showpost.php?p=15993579&postcount=3086, http://www.arenacg.net/download.php?broj=892

This is just the same information. :shrug:

дalex
Jul 15th, 2009, 05:56 PM
:rolleyes: Of course we did:

It's not the same. For example, we didn't know the bit Wrekin quoted. http://www.buzzjack.com/forums/style_emoticons/default/kink.gif

Snex
Jul 15th, 2009, 06:45 PM
It's not the same. For example, we didn't know the bit Wrekin quoted. http://www.buzzjack.com/forums/style_emoticons/default/kink.gif

Well, it was just getting into details, and disgusting. Unfortunately, celebrities have no privacy. :shrug: Like we don't know what 2 young people do... :rolleyes: They could also have written something about the colour of the pillows and sheets. :(

-NAJ-
Jul 15th, 2009, 06:51 PM
We need new blog from JJ :(

-Valérie-
Jul 15th, 2009, 07:06 PM
We need new blog from JJ :(

WEll, JJ doesn't care much about the rest of the world at the moment. Like we all would if we were in love! :shrug: But eventually, we would go back to work... :rolleyes:

So, let's hope this little "detour" in the arms of love will bring her motivation and dedication to her sport for the rest of the year. :)

Snex
Jul 15th, 2009, 07:11 PM
WEll, JJ doesn't care much about the rest of the world at the moment. Like we all would if we were in love! :shrug: But eventually, we would go back to work... :rolleyes:

So, let's hope this little "detour" in the arms of love will bring her motivation and dedication to her sport for the rest of the year. :)

I think that this little "detour" in the arms of love will bring her something else... :tape:

Valérie, she already spent all her ammunition in tennis. She can't do more than she already did. She's done, as a tennis player. :shrug:

spiritedenergy
Jul 15th, 2009, 07:16 PM
http://www.svet.rs/clanak/mla%C4%91-janovi%C4%87-i-jelena-jankovi%C4%87-48-sati-bez-tenisa

They make them look like they spent all their time in the room and are just slightly guessing doing what, like she "she worked on her tennis", "love nest", "apartment"...:lol:

Snex
Jul 15th, 2009, 07:21 PM
They make them look like they spent all their time in the room and are just slightly guessing doing what, like she "she worked on her tennis", "love nest", "apartment"...:lol:

Yes. The most entertaining is author's conclusion that they were probably making a baby. :rolls:

дalex
Jul 15th, 2009, 07:22 PM
She's done, as a tennis player. :shrug:

:rolleyes:

They make them look like they spent all their time in the room and are just slightly guessing doing what, like she "she worked on her tennis", "love nest", "apartment"...:lol:

Svet's articles are always subtle...;)

-Valérie-
Jul 15th, 2009, 07:24 PM
I think that this little "detour" in the arms of love will bring her something else... :tape: :

You are thinking of what exactly? not a baby ???

Valérie, she already spent all her ammunition in tennis. She can't do more than she already did. She's done, as a tennis player. :shrug:

You've been following her for quite while, so, we know that she doesn't play as good as she is suppose to play, as she can play, and i think she still can go back there. Only, it will take hard work... And the real question is, does she feel for it? :shrug:

I would say, at the moment probably not! :bigcry: But i am still convince that she will be back. She still has a couple of great years of tennis in front of her, and if she doesn't waste them, she might surprise us.

Ok, i fell she might waste a little more of it, but, well, new year, new beginning!

Snex
Jul 15th, 2009, 07:24 PM
:rolleyes:

Alex, the time will prove me right. ;) I behave the same way like JJ when I'm sick and tired of something. And not only me. :) She shows the signs of being tired. :shrug:

spiritedenergy
Jul 15th, 2009, 07:25 PM
Yes. The most entertaining is author's conclusion that they were probably making a baby. :rolls:

That's what it means?:spit:

:rolleyes:

Svet's articles are always subtle...;)

Yes very subtle... like a sexy shop where I live is called Discreet Boutique :lol:

Snex
Jul 15th, 2009, 07:27 PM
You are thinking of what exactly? not a baby ???



You've been following her for quite while, so, we know that she doesn't play as good as she is suppose to play, as she can play, and i think she still can go back there. Only, it will take hard work... And the real question is, does she feel for it? :shrug:

I would say, at the moment probably not! :bigcry: But i am still convince that she will be back. She still has a couple of great years of tennis in front of her, and if she doesn't waste them, she might surprise us.

Ok, i fell she might waste a little more of it, but, well, new year, new beginning!

Oh, I don't know what to think anymore. We'll see what she'll do in the US Open Series, but I don't think that she'll be motivated till the end of this year. She acts like that, like somebody who's bored. :shrug:

-Valérie-
Jul 15th, 2009, 07:28 PM
Alex, the time will prove me right. ;) I behave the same way like JJ when I'm sick and tired of something. And not only me. :) She shows the signs of being tired. :shrug:

Yes, i guess, i agree with that. BUt i still think that she will be back, after some rest, after finding herself again.

spiritedenergy
Jul 15th, 2009, 07:29 PM
Oh, I don't know what to think anymore. We'll see what she'll do in the US Open Series, but I don't think that she'll be motivated till the end of this year. She acts like that, like somebody who's bored. :shrug:

I think it's very normal, she can't be concentrated on tennis constantly (only robots like Graf could), but she'll be back;)

дalex
Jul 15th, 2009, 07:33 PM
Yes, in the article they said that Jelena's been talking about taking a break from tennis and that maybe it's because she wants Mladjo's baby. :lol:

Alex, the time will prove me right. ;)

Noted. Can we now just wait and see if it happens? :lol:

-Valérie-
Jul 15th, 2009, 07:34 PM
Oh, I don't know what to think anymore. We'll see what she'll do in the US Open Series, but I don't think that she'll be motivated till the end of this year. She acts like that, like somebody who's bored. :shrug:

Maybe more tired? This year has been very rough.. When you start doing something with, as a goal, being the best, and failed miserably, it is very hard on the mind and soul. She has to recollect the pieces and put them together and see if she want to do it, and how?:

I think at the moment, she is just ignoring it. It is hard to face the reality sometime. Love is blind, so, if he is a great guy, he will find the right words to make her believe in herself again because he wants what best for her...

Okay, okay, life is not like a america soap opera i know! :lol: But i can hope, can't I ? shrug:

-Valérie-
Jul 15th, 2009, 07:38 PM
I think it's very normal, she can't be concentrated on tennis constantly (only robots like Graf could), but she'll be back;)

Hey hey hey, i am a fan of Graf and she is far away from being a robot. :(

Wrekin
Jul 15th, 2009, 08:08 PM
She shows the signs of being tired. :shrug:

She's not really tired as such. Tiredness doesn't last more than a week when you're 23. And she hasn't had to play much tennis in the last 6 months :rolleyes:.

She's just 'tired' of it all going wrong when she had such high hopes in the off season. She wouldn't be tired if she was doing well. Meanwhile she's discovering it's far more exciting being rich and in love.

Who knows which way it's going to go from here. Perhaps she'll get bored with holing up in hotel rooms :angel:

Snex
Jul 15th, 2009, 08:14 PM
Hey hey hey, i am a fan of Graf and she is far away from being a robot. :(

Of course she was a robot. :)

If I'd have to choose either love or sport, I would always choose love. :o However, if I am a professional tennis player who reached #1 spot and never won a GS title, I would be more than motivated to do that, and my sweetheart would be required to support me until I achieve that. :( :rocker2: (poor man) :awww: OTOH, I would also support my sweetheart if the situation would be vice versa. :angel: :shrug:

Snex
Jul 15th, 2009, 08:48 PM
She's not really tired as such. Tiredness doesn't last more than a week when you're 23. And she hasn't had to play much tennis in the last 6 months :rolleyes:.

She's just 'tired' of it all going wrong when she had such high hopes in the off season. She wouldn't be tired if she was doing well. Meanwhile she's discovering it's far more exciting being rich and in love.

Who knows which way it's going to go from here. Perhaps she'll get bored with holing up in hotel rooms :angel:

:rolls: Yes, you're right. The fact is that she played so much in last 3 years, and she's really tired of tennis. Additionally, she screwed up this whole season with those preparations, and she's disappointed now. I watched her eyes when she played this year and I disliked what I saw. I saw the question in her eyes "WTF I'm doing here on this court when I'm young, rich and in love? Why I have to run for all these balls? I'd like to be at some other place, ffs!". :awww:

Janko Tipsarevic said once, when he was in Jelena's age (last year), "Sometimes during the match I wish I'm playing some game on my PC". :lol: Such thoughts lead to defeats. I guess Jelena also allows similar thoughts to cross her mind during her matches.

We'll see what she'll do, but she may not make a break because she signed 3 year contracts with Anta and IMG and got so much $$$. She must play 2.5 years constantly in order to fulfil her part of these contracts. It means: no babies before she's 26 or 27. :shrug:

I suppose that she's afraid that Mladjo could find some young and attractive Italian girl while she's absent from his life, so she could lose him. Maybe she's even ready for pregnancy in order to save him for herself. Who knows what's in her :weirdo: head. But if he find another girl it will mean that he was not good for her and that he didn't deserve her. :shrug: I think that she should be brave and try him.

дalex
Jul 15th, 2009, 09:47 PM
^ Who needs Svet articles when we got you Sneki? :lol:

-NAJ-
Jul 15th, 2009, 10:06 PM
Ma please ban Snezana:lol:

Snex
Jul 15th, 2009, 10:23 PM
^ Who needs Svet articles when we got you Sneki? :lol:

:shrug:

Ma please ban Snezana:lol:

:(

Jelena already told me to leave her alone, and if you all ban me what will I do? :awww: I would join then a water polo forum. :lol:

дalex
Jul 15th, 2009, 10:57 PM
I would join then a water polo forum. :lol:

:rolls:

Ma please ban Snezana:lol:

Didn't you post some pics of an actor from some soap opera? If you like those, you should enjoy Sneki's posts too. Like this one: :lol:

I suppose that she's afraid that Mladjo could find some young and attractive Italian girl while she's absent from his life, so she could lose him. Maybe she's even ready for pregnancy in order to save him for herself.

:drama:

Snex
Jul 15th, 2009, 11:07 PM
:drama:

Don't you think that such thoughts make mess in her head? I'm deeply convinced that she thinks a lot about these things. She's ready to save that relationship at all costs. We'll see how the situation will develop. :)

дalex
Jul 15th, 2009, 11:25 PM
We'll see how the situation will develop. :)

Or you can tell us right now... You seem to know these things.

http://www.clipartof.com/images/emoticons/xsmall2/1974_eating_popcorn.gif

Snex
Jul 15th, 2009, 11:37 PM
Or you can tell us right now... You seem to know these things.

http://www.clipartof.com/images/emoticons/xsmall2/1974_eating_popcorn.gif

I know personally many ladies who made fools of themselves running after some men. As I wrote, we'll see how the situation will develop. Come on Alex, she lost her mind for that guy, I can already recognize such things. If he's the main goal of her life I wish her to get him and be happy. :shrug:

-Valérie-
Jul 16th, 2009, 12:10 AM
Well, Don't you think our discussion is going a little too far. But that it is what we like to do, don't we?

None of us knows Jelena so, all this is pure speculation. We could all go on and on with what we think, and some may be right, but, we all have to wait and see.

But i do think she is a tennis player and the flame will eventually come back. We've said it already, if her boyfriend loves her, he'll know what to say. And if he doesn't love and leave her for another girl, nothing can't really stop it, even if she spend countless nights AND days seducing him.

Love is blind! And if it has to end, well, let it end soon, this year is already crap anyway. BUt i just hope for the best for JJ and that one, she'll bounced back in tennis and second, if Mladjo is an honest guy and just hope for the best for her to!

Snex
Jul 16th, 2009, 08:52 AM
Val, we're just trying to keep ~ ♥ JJ ♥ ~ alive during this season break. :lol:

RFS
Jul 16th, 2009, 10:18 AM
Val, we're just trying to keep ~ ♥ JJ ♥ ~ alive during this season break. :lol:

:yeah: and hilarious stuff...

Edit: I think we've ALL known friends who's dropped off the face of the earth when a new guy comes along!

Mind you - I seem to be saddled with the pain in the ARSE friend of a friend, who I would just LOVE to drop off the face of the earth...! :devil:

I want to go HOME!!!!!!!
(well at least to my friend's place for dinner!)

Foon_JJ
Jul 23rd, 2009, 10:37 AM
"Clearly, women's tennis is better than men's tennis. There's no comparison. I mean, I'm on the tour. We have great personalities like Jelena (Jankovic) on the tour. I mean, it's way cattier, so it's way more exciting to watch."
~ Serena Williams defended women's tennis.

Earlier this week, Jankovic confessed that she paid more attention to men's tennis.
"To be honest, I'm watching only men's tennis on TV," Jankovic said earlier this week.

"I don't really watch too much women's."

"That's why many times when I play against them, you know, many times I don't know my opponent."

"I think men's tennis is much more advanced than women's, and if I can try to learn some things and try to add that to my game would be a good advantage."

http://www.hcfoo.com/2009/06/serena-williams-thinks-wta-is-better.html

P.S sorry, maybe posted in wrong place :p

Kampi
Jul 23rd, 2009, 06:01 PM
"Clearly, women's tennis is better than men's tennis. There's no comparison. I mean, I'm on the tour. We have great personalities like Jelena (Jankovic) on the tour. I mean, it's way cattier, so it's way more exciting to watch."
~ Serena Williams defended women's tennis.

Earlier this week, Jankovic confessed that she paid more attention to men's tennis.
"To be honest, I'm watching only men's tennis on TV," Jankovic said earlier this week.

"I don't really watch too much women's."

"That's why many times when I play against them, you know, many times I don't know my opponent."

"I think men's tennis is much more advanced than women's, and if I can try to learn some things and try to add that to my game would be a good advantage."

http://www.hcfoo.com/2009/06/serena-williams-thinks-wta-is-better.html

P.S sorry, maybe posted in wrong place :p

Hi Katherine:wavey::D
Don't worry......we only know something....it is about time for our Jelena to step on the court again. Thank god her next event will start next week.:)

GO JJ:bounce:

Foon_JJ
Jul 23rd, 2009, 06:13 PM
Hi Katherine:wavey::D
Don't worry......we only know something....it is about time for our Jelena to step on the court again. Thank god her next event will start next week.:)

GO JJ:bounce:

Yes, I can't wait for the draw on tomorrow :) Wish her luck in all US Open Series :hearts:

rucolo
Jul 24th, 2009, 10:41 PM
"Clearly, women's tennis is better than men's tennis. There's no comparison. I mean, I'm on the tour. We have great personalities like Jelena (Jankovic) on the tour. I mean, it's way cattier, so it's way more exciting to watch." Serena Williams defended women's tennis.

Earlier this week, Jankovic confessed that she paid more attention to men's tennis.
"To be honest, I'm watching only men's tennis on TV," Jankovic said earlier this week.

"I don't really watch too much women's."

"That's why many times when I play against them, you know, many times I don't know my opponent."
...


Serena is sooo right.:worship:
She is such a nice girl. We Jelena fans must like Serena!:hearts:
US Open Final 2008 was dream Final.:drool:

Jelena:rolleyes:
Watch more women`s tennis!:weirdo:
You should support WTA!

дalex
Jul 29th, 2009, 08:21 AM
http://www.mercurynews.com/breakingnews/ci_12934934

Jelena Jankovic, the fourth seed, had no problem against qualifier Angela Haynes, winning 6-3, 6-1.

"The court is playing really fast, and I needed to just keep my focus," Jankovic said. "I served well, and I tried to return the best that I can. It was good for my first match."

http://www.usatoday.com/sports/tennis/2009-07-28-serena-rankings_N.htm

Serena back in action, but she's still ranked No. 2 behind Safina

STANFORD, Calif. — "Shhhh," hushed Serena Williams when asked about the rankings system in women's tennis that seems askew with public perception. "They already think I'm No. 1."

The computer, however, says otherwise.

Despite winning three of the last four majors, No. 2 Williams sits behind Dinara Safina of Russia by a substantial 1,742 points. Safina supplanted Williams atop the rankings in April but has never won a Grand Slam title.

That rankings dissonance continued to spark debate at the Bank of the West Classic here as Williams geared up for her first event since winning a third Wimbledon title.

Since beating older sister Venus Williams 7-6 (7-3), 6-2 at the All-England Club on July 4, Williams has been inundated with a slew of off-court demands.

She appeared on The Late Show with David Letterman, visited with President Obama and his family at the White House and peddled skincare products on the Home Shopping Network.

"It's been a whirlwind," Williams said. "I've had no me time. I'm considering writing an email to my team that I'm disappearing next week."

The multitasking, multiple Grand Slam champ has not been so busy that she wasn't tempted to jump out of her car and hit the courts when she passed by the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in Flushing Meadows, N.Y., on her way from the airport after arriving from London.

"I think that attitude will stay," Williams said of defending her U.S. Open crown. "I'm getting antsy. I can already feel the New York crowd and see myself in the locker room. I'm definitely ready."

Williams, who turns 28 in September, says she doesn't feel much different from when she last dominated women's tennis in 2002-03 and won four consecutive majors, the self-described "Serena Slam."

"I feel like I know how to make the right decisions," she said of her maturity and experience, "but I always knew how to win."

Williams, the top seed here, reiterated that she doesn't care where she's ranked as long she adds to her total of 11 majors — seventh best in history.

"I can't take the (top ranking) with me, but I can take the titles," said the reigning U.S. Open, Australian Open and Wimbledon champ.

Williams' dominance at Slams has been offset by lackluster performances in regular Sony Ericsson WTA Tour events. She is 0-11 since winning at Charleston in April of last year.

"Maybe I can win a few more smaller tournaments and maybe the ranking will come, but my main goal right now is focusing on the Slams," she said.

If Williams is mildly rankled by the rolling, 52-week ranking system, WTA officials are confident it reflects reality.

"The tour believes it is a fair and accurate representation of a player's performance over the last 12 months," WTA spokesman Andrew Walker says. "It takes into account the tour's most important events along with consistency across those events."

The ranking system isn't merely a matter of pride. It determines entry to events and seedings for top players, which can help them navigate their way to the trophy.

For the public, the discrepancy is often hard to reconcile.

"It is confusing," says third-ranked Venus Williams, who sits on the WTA Player Council but is not on its ranking committee. Asked if the majors should be weighted more heavily than regular tour events, she said: "At this point it kind of seems that way."

Serbia's Jelena Jankovic, another Slam-less former No. 1, conceded that Safina's 2-9 record against Serena and Venus Williams undermines her position.

"If you want to be the best one out there, with or without a Grand Slam, you've got to be beating them," says No. 6 Jankovic, who is 8-8 against the Williams sisters.

But she also says the system also rightly rewards consistency.

Otherwise, "We shouldn't play all these other tournaments and make it just these four (majors) during the year," Jankovic says.

Optima
Jul 29th, 2009, 08:37 AM
:rolleyes:

Wrekin
Jul 29th, 2009, 08:59 AM
This 'who's the real #1' thing has got a whole lot worse under Dinara's tenureship. Poor girl, she'll have a nervous breakdown.

Meanwhile JJ defends her own achievement and still sideswipes Dinara. It's getting real catty out there.

~Kiera~
Jul 29th, 2009, 06:03 PM
http://www.bankofthewestclassic.com/matchupdatecalendar/2009_Bank_of_the_West_Classic/Player_Quotes_July_28th.htm

Jelena Jankovic Quotes During Post-Match Interview

On fear in tennis…

Never. You cannot have fear. If you have fear you will be done. You have to go out there and believe in yourself and know that you can win those matches.”

On today’s match….

“I played well today and am happy with my win.”

On staying in shape…

“I do my fitness of course. My fitness now is based on everything that I do with my tennis and my movement on the court and the way I hit the ball. I have to be quick and flexible.”

Tashi
Jul 29th, 2009, 06:11 PM
Seriously JJ, stop being a bitch. :o Unless it's directed at someone who deserves it. :p

Love, Tashi :kiss:

дalex
Jul 29th, 2009, 07:55 PM
Seriously JJ, stop being a bitch. :o Unless it's directed at someone who deserves it. :p

You gotta love how she tried to make herself look like a better #1 'cos she has a better h2h against Williamses. I thought that was hilarious.

But I agree that Dinara doesn't deserve this. Especially not from JJ. Then again, Jelena supported Dinara A LOT in her pressies this year.

Tashi
Jul 29th, 2009, 08:25 PM
The effort is commendable and hilarious. I love JJ and anything she does I'll find the bright side of but this one kinda irks me cuz I love Dina too. She's gone through so much because of this. Even more than JJ did so I don't like to see anyone try to put her down. Not even the Glitter Queen.

ChriS.
Jul 29th, 2009, 11:06 PM
You gotta love how she tried to make herself look like a better #1 'cos she has a better h2h against Williamses. I thought that was hilarious.

But I agree that Dinara doesn't deserve this. Especially not from JJ. Then again, Jelena supported Dinara A LOT in her pressies this year.Yes, JJ is a very clever girl.

дalex
Jul 30th, 2009, 10:34 AM
http://in.reuters.com/article/worldOfSport/idINIndia-41413020090730?sp=true

Serena bides her time waiting for top spot

By Matthew Cronin

STANFORD, California (Reuters) - Serena Williams has won three of the last four grand slam titles but is still number two in the world, behind Dinara Safina, who has won none of the big four events of tennis.

Such are the intricacies of the WTA Tour rankings system that Safina can be fairly confident about keeping her seat at the top of the ladder at least until the U.S. Open.

Not that Williams is complaining. "I'm happy with my results and winning Wimbledon," the American said going into this week's Stanford Classic where she is the top seed.

"I guess I needed to win Rome and Madrid and I could have done better at the French. But I can't complain."

Safina's successes have come outside the grand-slam events and last weekend the Russian won her third title of the year, in Portoroz, Slovenia.

Her lack of head-to-head success against Williams, and sister Venus, however, make her unworthy of the world number one ranking, says Jelena Jankovic.

"I think I'm the best player and I should always think like that but if I had to pick someone after me, I'd pick Serena," said Jankovic, who was the 2008 year-end number one and is now sixth. "Serena moves well, is strong and more complete.

"To be number one, you should be complete and if you are number one you have to be beating the Williams sisters," Jankovic told Reuters.

DIPLOMATIC VENUS

"I'm one of the rare players who has a positive record against the Williams sisters. Safina has beaten...them twice. If you want to be number one, you have to be up there with them."

Safina, who is not playing at Stanford, has lost six of seven encounters with Serena. Against older sister Venus, the world number three, she has lost three times in four meetings.

Serbian Jankovic has the upper hand against Venus Williams, with five wins and four losses, and has beaten Serena three times in seven matches.

Venus was diplomatic when asked whether her sister, who holds a total of 11 grand slam titles, or Safina deserved the top ranking more. "Both players have their results and know their results and we shouldn't put one player down and one player up," she said. "They both did their best."

WTA Tour officials said Safina's ranking was safe at least until mid-August and it would take an extraordinary run by Williams and a miserable stretch by Safina for the American to overtake her by the U.S. Open, which starts on Aug. 31.

Rankings are computed weekly on a cumulative points total over the previous 52 weeks, with higher-tier tournaments offering more points.

Going into the Stanford Classic, Serena was 1,742 points behind Safina. To jump to the top she would have to win here and go most of the way through, if not win, the premier events at Cincinnati and the Canadian Open next month.

INJURY PROBLEMS

Beijing Olympic silver medallist Safina, who is defending points from 2008 titles she won at Los Angeles and the Canadian Open, would also have to lose early.

Part of the reason for the disparity between the two women is that, despite her grand-slam success, Serena, who had a run of knee and thigh injuries, pulled out of premier tournaments at Indian Wells and Charleston in March and April, receiving zero points in her ranking total.

Between Miami at the end of March, when she reached the final, and the French Open which started in late May and where she lost to Svetlana Kuznetsova in the quarter-finals, Williams played only three matches at four tournaments, earning seven ranking points.

For her part, Safina reached the final in Stuttgart and won back-to-back titles in Rome and Madrid, earning 2,120 ranking points. Plus, she reached the finals of the Australian Open and the French Open, as well as the semi-finals of Wimbledon.

Elena Dementieva spoke up for her fellow Russian. "We were working a lot on our ranking system during the past years and it's better," the world number four said.

"The ranking system has improved and I think you get a lot of points by winning a grand slam, so it's really weird to see a number one without winning a grand slam. It's very unique but give Dinara credit; she was winning so many (other) tournaments. She deserved to get this number one position, but I'm sure if Serena continues to play like that she will get that position very soon."

(Editing by Clare Fallon)

Oh my...Jelena! http://www.buzzjack.com/forums/style_emoticons/default/kink.gif Didn't know Matt Cronin was writing for reuters.

This article is worthy of GM. I hope someone will find it and post it there. :lol:

Edit. MATT, Jelena would never say "unworthy". I'm pretty sure of that. So stop stirring shit!

Snex
Jul 30th, 2009, 11:06 AM
"I think I'm the best player and I should always think like that but if I had to pick someone after me, I'd pick Serena,"

:rolls:

How can you be the best player when you have negative score against Dinara? ;) Serena is definitely the best. :o

There is one thing that bothers me. Those journalists never (intentionally) mention in their articles that Serena is 28, while Dinara is 5 years younger and JJ is 4 years younger. They still have enough time to decorate their #1 positions with some GS titles. It is understood that Serena will be more injured in her age than Dinara or JJ, and these 2 can play more than Serena. Their rankings are the results of their achievements. Serena is dedicated only to slams, but that's not enough. Winning 2 premiers brings 2000 points, which is equal to GS title. WS are old fashioned players, fully committed only at grand slams, and they play other tournaments just for the practicing purposes. Good that WTA changed that. :worship: If you want to be a professional tennis player you must play FFS!!! Man it up Rena if you can, and stop complaining!!! If you can't play due to injuries then retire! :shrug:

~Kiera~
Jul 30th, 2009, 11:53 AM
^^ Jelena :o

https://twitter.com/TennisReporters

Oh and Jankovic's dad is traveling with her for the first time in a long time. Her mom recovering from surgery

Wrekin
Jul 30th, 2009, 01:35 PM
"I think I'm the best player and I should always think like that

Actually that is a perfectly justifiable view to have, especially when you've been #1 and have a decent H2H against the others.

It's just another way of saying you have to believe in yourself or there's no point in going on the court, which I think JJ has also said quite recently. A winner's attitude.

But she doesn't quite say it the way she should. And she shouldn't be coaxed into criticisng Dinara, even if it's true :lol:


Edit. MATT, Jelena would never say "unworthy". I'm pretty sure of that

That's why it's in 'reported speech' rather than direct quotes. It's acceptable to use your own words to summarise something that is elaborated on in a different or more roundabout way in the quotes that follow (within reason). Trust me, I'm a journalist :angel:

RFS
Jul 30th, 2009, 02:03 PM
And we all know that sometimes JJ's delivery... is... ummm.... bluntworthy!
(hence: do you mean to think things, but say them out loud instead?)

louisa.
Jul 30th, 2009, 02:13 PM
^^ Jelena :o

https://twitter.com/TennisReporters

Oh and Jankovic's dad is traveling with her for the first time in a long time. Her mom recovering from surgery

:eek: Surgery?! Sneki :hug: Get well soon :awww:

Tashi
Jul 30th, 2009, 04:22 PM
You don't have to put someone else down to make yourself look good. :o

I still love you though.:kiss:

Get well soon Sneki! We need you to knock some sense into your daughter.

ChriS.
Jul 30th, 2009, 08:38 PM
Someone should tell JJ to keep her mouth shut and concentrate on winning a couple of matches before she starts lecturing others on who is the best.

terjw
Jul 30th, 2009, 11:32 PM
Nuaghty to Safina and puts herself in the best light. She's got a nerve of course but somehow I can't help but love her even more when she's naughty like this. :hearts:

Foon_JJ
Jul 31st, 2009, 09:25 AM
Jankovic, Williams sisters reach quarterfinals

STANFORD, Calif. (AP)—With both Serena and Venus Williams reaching the quarterfinals of the $700,000 Bank of the West Classic on Thursday, Serbia’s Jelena Jankovic may have felt a little bit overlooked and left out.

Jankovic, seeded fourth and ranked No. 6, joined the Williams sisters with a 2-6, 6-2, 6-4 victory over Germany’s Sabine Lisicki, giving the Stanford event one of its most prestigious quarterfinal matchups.

Wimbledon champion Serena Williams advanced after beating Hungary’s Melinda Czink 6-3, 7-6 (7) and Venus Williams got by qualifier Alla Kudryavseva, 6-3, 7-5, setting up an evening showdown with former world No. 1 Maria Sharapova, who continues her comeback from right shoulder surgery.

Eighth-seeded Marion Bartoli of France advanced with a 7-5, 6-4 victory over qualifier Melanie Oudin and will meet Jankovic.

“There should be a lot of good tennis,” Bartoli said. “I always beat Jankovic so who do you think I want to play?”

Jankovic answered back.

“She talks like she’s Serena Williams,” Jankovic said. “Who is she? She’s just another player on the tour.”

As for her match, Jankovic had a difficult time in the first set adjusting to the fading light.

“It took me awhile to adjust to the shadows,” she said. “I haven’t played at night for a while and it was tough to see where the ball was going at times. I felt rusty out there. I need the matches; I need to compete.”

Lisicki had seven aces but also committed 11 double faults and managed to put her first serve in play about half the time.

“My philosophy is the more tennis I play the better I play,” Jankovic said.

Serena Williams, seeded first and ranked No. 2, has won nine straight matches and 13 of 14 overall. She next plays Australia’s Samantha Stosur.

“It should be a good match,” Williams said. “She’s improved tons; leaps and bounds. I’ve been a little bit off this whole week. I hope I can get back on.”

Williams finished with 10 aces Thursday and brushed past her opponent in the first set. Czink, a left-hander, played a stronger second set in forcing Williams to a tiebreaker in a match that lasted nearly two hours.

“She served well, toward the end especially,” Williams said. “I could have returned better, but it was still good practice.”

Williams adjusted to a shorter toss on her serve at the beginning of the match because of a bright noon sun.

“It only affected four or five games but those games could be crucial,” Williams said. “I made some key errors so it was good I ended up winning.”

Venus Williams, seeded second and ranked No. 3, joined her younger sister in the quarterfinals, needing just over an hour to get by Kudryavseva.

“I’m excited. I love playing against her and it’s been a while,” Sharapova said Wednesday. “It’s great to come back and have the chance to play against a great player like Venus, who is at the top of her game right now.”

Sharapova has won three of the five previous meetings, the last a three-set win in 2007 at Miami. Williams’ only two wins have come at Wimbledon in 2005 and 2007.

“My key is to execute my game as best I can,” Williams said. “There’s no secret to that. I feel like it will be a good matchup for me. I always enjoy playing against Maria.”

MaBaker
Jul 31st, 2009, 10:08 AM
:spit:
“There should be a lot of good tennis,” Bartoli said. “I always beat Jankovic so who do you think I want to play?”
“She talks like she’s Serena Williams,” Jankovic said. “Who is she? She’s just another player on the tour.”
That's my girl :worship: :inlove: Beat the crap out of her tonight :kiss:

дalex
Jul 31st, 2009, 10:22 AM
Nice... Now you have to win this, Jelena!

дalex
Jul 31st, 2009, 10:35 AM
^ I just saw that in GM. Matt Cronin is gonna be pissed if that's subscribers only article. :lol:

Jelena! :speakles:

Adje!!!!!

MaBaker
Jul 31st, 2009, 10:35 AM
Jankovic added with a smile, “Bartoli is going to get it tomorrow.”
Jankobitch is back and I adore her :sobbing:

ce
Jul 31st, 2009, 10:37 AM
:hearts:
:hearts:
:haha: this is why i love wta more :hearts:
AJDE Jelena you have to crash her tomorrow :D

дalex
Jul 31st, 2009, 11:01 AM
Jelena sounds very positive and motivated for the rest of the season (read the rest of Matt Cronin's article). That's nice to hear for a change.

Hello old Jeca, bye bye grumpiness! :inlove:

~Kiera~
Jul 31st, 2009, 11:34 AM
http://blog.douglasrobson.com/2009/07/30/stanford-tidbits.aspx?ref=rss

Dementieva Calls Out Jankovic’s Criticism of Roadmap

On Sunday, Jelena Jankovic, of all people, groused about the new roadmap keeping her out of events she wants to play. Without going into all the details, suffice it to say that based on the re-jiggered player commitments, it is possible that some top players are prevented from competing everywhere they want. Coming from Jankovic, who never saw a tournament she didn’t want to enter, it was a little ironic. That was not lost on elegant Russian Elena Dementieva. Asked about Jankovic’s complaints the other day, the fourth-ranked player laughed: “I don’t know what to say. It looks like she’s playing every single week, more than anyone else. If she can play two tournaments in a week, she will do this.”

She's played less tournaments than you, Demented :o :lol:

Marilyn Monheaux
Jul 31st, 2009, 11:40 AM
Demented:o
http://i296.photobucket.com/albums/mm170/MeSuhsie/har%20har/Blair-animations-blair-waldorf-2273.gif

As for the Bartoli catfight thingy:

You go girl! The JankobitchGOAT is back in full force:drool:
Can't wait for her to unleash her claws tonight and tore Bartoli into pieces:armed:

дalex
Jul 31st, 2009, 11:44 AM
^ I feel like starting a GM thread. :sobbing:

Catty Elena! :speakles:

What's with these bitches being so rude to Jeca?

Marilyn Monheaux
Jul 31st, 2009, 11:58 AM
Do it!:fiery:

Those girls are just being jealous:ras:

Just Do It
Jul 31st, 2009, 12:03 PM
Finally :sobbing:

MaBaker
Jul 31st, 2009, 12:35 PM
http://blog.douglasrobson.com/2009/07/30/stanford-tidbits.aspx?ref=rss
She's played less tournaments than you, Demented :o :lol:
What on earth , Elena :haha: I like the bitchfest going on with Jeja :inlove: Definitely brings back motivation.

Hashim.
Jul 31st, 2009, 12:40 PM
OMG:rolls: c'mon JJ:armed:

louisa.
Jul 31st, 2009, 02:37 PM
:haha: :worship: That's my girl :inlove:

дalex
Jul 31st, 2009, 02:44 PM
From GM:

I was at the Richard Branson party before Wimbledon in 2008, and Jelena and Serena were there, and Serena saw Jelena leaving and said "Jelena, you can't leave! I haven't gotten a chance to hang out with your mom yet!" :lol:

:lol: if it's true. Sneki is such a star! :bowdown: Hope her health is ok. :hug:

olivero
Jul 31st, 2009, 03:19 PM
Jankobitching :hearts:

ChriS.
Jul 31st, 2009, 04:27 PM
I told JJ she should keep quiet, now all my other favourites (Elena, Marion) are out to get her! I hope JJ kills that bitch Marion. I still love Elena though.

дalex
Jul 31st, 2009, 04:50 PM
I told JJ she should keep quiet, now all my other favourites (Elena, Marion) are out to get her! I hope JJ kills that bitch Marion. I still love Elena though.

And Jelena is out to get them back. Our girl is fearless. If she can confront with Goaterer then she sure as hell can do the same with Marions and Elenas of the world. :lol:

Love it! I just hope she can win tonight or else everything she said will be classified as another massive FAIL. And our girl knows failure better than almost everyone on the tour. :lol:

дalex
Aug 1st, 2009, 09:47 AM
http://www.mercurynews.com/peninsula/ci_12972233

Bartoli, ranked No. 15, beat Jankovic for the fourth straight time and improved to 10-3 against her.

"The first time I played her she beat me very easily," Bartoli said. "She ran me all over the court and physically wore me down. Once I worked myself into better shape, I was able to run much better."

Jankovic, who lost two match points in the second set, said she could still take some positive out of the loss.

"In the third set I was physically drained and didn't have enough energy to finish the match," she said. "But I played quite well in the first set and I can analyze what was good and where I can improve."

Just stay positive Jelena! I mean the level she was producing for an hour and a half was really outstanding, I thought.

RFS
Aug 1st, 2009, 10:50 AM
well at least she recognises that she's not 3-setter fit (although I think we could have told her that)... but very frustrating loss in a very frustrating year.

Where is she next?

дalex
Aug 1st, 2009, 12:09 PM
Where is she next?

Week of rest and practice (I hope) and then Cincinnati & Toronto back to back, I think.

allrounder
Aug 1st, 2009, 01:01 PM
Yes despite the result i was quite encouraged by the way JJ played for the first set and a half. When she gets match fit to play consistently over 3 sets she should get back to the challenging for titles again because her serve has improved a fair bit and she's started being more aggressive again. There can't be too many time's she's hit 39 winners and lost. Her standard dropping off in the 3rd was understandable after she had a fairly long match with Sabine the day before and after months break just gone.

дalex
Aug 1st, 2009, 01:41 PM
So, Jelena had 39 winners. What about the UEs? And what were Marion's stats?

allrounder
Aug 1st, 2009, 02:11 PM
So, Jelena had 39 winners. What about the UEs? And what were Marion's stats?
JJ's were 39W/46UE, i can't remember Bartoli's exact stats but her winners were in the mid 20's with slightly less UE

Foon_JJ
Aug 1st, 2009, 02:41 PM
http://img38.imageshack.us/img38/7301/19447765.jpg

дalex
Aug 1st, 2009, 02:44 PM
That's too many errors obviously. I remember she had 15 winners and sth like 13 UEs (includes 5 DFs) in the first set. I'm sure she had 18 winners and 18 errors in the second set. That would mean she had only 6 winners and 15 UEs in the third set. I guess that tells us the true story. I still think Jelena should get everything together in time for US Open. It would help having a really good result in either Cincy or Toronto.

ms_nut
Aug 1st, 2009, 03:12 PM
^ Yes, there were a lot of positives in the 1st two sets.. the loss only hurts more.. because it was complicated by the catty remarks by both players.. If JJ can consistently serve well throughout a tournament over a period of 3 sets, then she has a good chance of doing well in the next few tournaments.

To win a slam, you have to improve your weakness.In JJ's case it's her serve. Sveta worked on her mental game and BH and won RG, Ana worked on her fitness and won it last year...as did Sharapova on her fitness to win AO '08.

Foon_JJ
Aug 5th, 2009, 04:02 PM
05.08.2009.

Hello everyone :)

http://www.jj-jelenajankovic.com/slikeblog/68_1m.jpg

I'm in California right now! I'm not able to compete in LA because of the calendar changes this year, but I'm training here this week. I'm really enjoying my time here and looking forward to the rest of the summer tournaments. Little by little, I'm hoping to start looking like the player who finished No.1 in the world last year.

After Wimbledon I took two weeks off from tennis. I really wanted to clear my mind and recharge my batteries, so I would be nice and fresh for the second half of the season. I wanted to forget what happened in the first half. I was feeling really burnt out. I didn't even touch my racquet. It must have worked, because I'm already feeling much better now! The first time I stepped back onto the court I could feel it. I was light on my feet and happy to run after every ball. That's what I hoped for, that the will and desire would be back. The smile is back too. I'm more disciplined on and off the court, my eating is better, and I can't wait to continue like this.


After the break, I went to Bollettieri's in Florida for about 10 days and trained in the heat. It was so hard, but really worth it. I needed those conditions to prepare for my upcoming tournaments. My first tournament back was in Stanford last week and I feel like I was playing really well. I had fun playing those matches. I had a tough loss against Bartoli in the quarterfinals, but I definitely had my chances. I even had two match points. There were some really bad calls that went against me, and a few shots I'd hit the line but have to replay the point. What is done is done, though. I need to think about getting better now, and the first set I played in that match was probably my best set so far this year, so that's encouraging. I did a lot of things right, I just need to work on cleaning up the other areas of my game. There's no better time to do it other than right now, with my favorite tournaments coming up. I love playing the summer hardcourt tournaments. They suit my game and my personality.

My dad is travelling with me this week. He was with me in Florida and in Stanford, and he'll be with me here and in Cincinnati next week, too. He's really helping me out. It's nice to have my dad here because he rarely comes to tournaments. He always stays at home! I know it's difficult for him to watch my matches :) My mom is back at home recovering from surgery, and she's doing much, much better. I'm so happy she's doing well. Hopefully she'll be able to come to New York to watch me play. She'll need to be at 100% though - it's tough for parents to watch their kids' matches!

One thing that has been quite different is my eating. I used to like drinking so much Coke. I have such a sweet tooth ;) I had to have chocolate every day. I had to! Luckily for me, I have a good metabolism, so it didn't really bother my weight much, but when it comes to having energy and eating the right things, it wasn't good at all. I've now stopped drinking Coke - I haven't had any since Wimbledon! Instead of that it's water, maybe lemonade. I've stopped eating the sweets, too. People have been telling me I look more fit now. I was thinking why, and it's because I cut those things out... Everyone has something they like that isn't good for them, and I was one of those people! I would sometimes eat hamburgers... Here in California I like those In & Out Burgers... Now since my break I've changed completely though. I want to pay attention to all of these little things. Eating right, sleeping right, training right and knowing my limits; eventually they all make a huge difference.

http://www.jj-jelenajankovic.com/slikeblog/68_5m.jpg

Anyway... that's all for now. Thanks for your support, as always! Hopefully you're all doing well and I will talk to you all again very soon :)

JJ

schorsch
Aug 5th, 2009, 04:21 PM
thx :D

Foon_JJ
Aug 5th, 2009, 04:25 PM
^ you're welcome. I'm sorry that if I posted in wrong place :P

-Valérie-
Aug 5th, 2009, 04:39 PM
Nice to year from her in her own words. This looks all positive. I hope what she feels is what she really tells. Maybe we can hope for a great end of the season after all.

Presence of her father seems to have a positive effect, hoping that Mama will be back in top shape soon. And if JJ wants to ease the pression, we all know she can play great tennis.

Nice pics! We recognized this shirt and white pants from the Glasses shopping!!!

RFS
Aug 5th, 2009, 04:44 PM
FINALLY! Would like to hear more on Kung Fu Panda and his serving. Watching him and Ricky S in the flash over Wimbledon was friggin' hilarious!

дalex
Aug 5th, 2009, 05:07 PM
Jelena, honey-pie, you always look fit to me. :drool:

No seriously, I can only tell she's not fit when she goes all huffing & puffing late in her matches. And she's definitely not fully fit yet! I'm glad that she's been training at Bollettieri's and that she sounds really dedicated to looking out for every single thing that can help her be old Jeca and, why not, even better. I'm exciting!

Watching him and Ricky S in the flash over Wimbledon was friggin' hilarious!

I dunno where Kung Fu Master is but in Stanford it was all about Senhor Sanchez and Papa Jankovic chatting casually courtside. Once Jelena looked in their direction and when she saw no one was looking back she just turned towards the ballboy and asked for the balls. She didn't look pleased. :hug: But those two looked very pleased with the way she was playing for 1.5 sets.

Kampi
Aug 5th, 2009, 05:41 PM
Yeah, finally Jecalina baby.;)

Wrekin
Aug 5th, 2009, 07:53 PM
I used to like drinking so much Coke. I have such a sweet tooth I had to have chocolate every day. I had to! Luckily for me, I have a good metabolism, so it didn't really bother my weight much, but when it comes to having energy and eating the right things, it wasn't good at all. I've now stopped drinking Coke - I haven't had any since Wimbledon! Instead of that it's water, maybe lemonade. I've stopped eating the sweets, too.


My, she means business :lol:

Optima
Aug 5th, 2009, 07:58 PM
It's really exciting she's positive about everything, even after that Bartoli lost. She knows she can reach that fall 08 level again.

~Kiera~
Aug 5th, 2009, 09:08 PM
How can anyone have a diet like that and be an athlete? :lol:

http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/LatestNews/Read/0,,12781~1744360,00.html

NEW YORK, NY, USA - Sony Ericsson WTA Tour stars Venus Williams, Ana Ivanovic and Jelena Jankovic have been nominated for the prestigious 2009 Jefferson Award for Outstanding Public Service by an Athlete. The award is presented by All Stars Helping Kids, a national non-profit founded by National Football League Hall-of-Famer Ronnie Lott.

Fans are able to vote for the winner on the All Stars Helping Kids website and by text messaging Venus STAR44 to 55333, Ana STAR22 to 5533, and Jelena STAR23 to 55333 on any phone that supports text messaging within the United States. Voting will conclude on November 15 when the 10 "Dream Team" finalists will be chosen.

Williams has been an Ambassador of Gender Equality for the UNESCO-Tour Gender Equity Program since 2006. Through this role, Williams spearheaded the campaign for equal prize money, which saw enormous success in February 2007 when Wimbledon and Roland Garros both agreed to award equal prize money to all competitors in all rounds. See Williams discuss her UNESCO role on International Women's Day 2008 here.

Ivanovic and Jankovic have both been actively involved with UNICEF for several years, and both are UNICEF National Ambassadors to Serbia. Ivanovic was named an Ambassador in August of 2007, and since then has launched a line of limited edition adidas t-shirts, the sales of which benefited the United Nations Children's Fund. Additionally, her personal donations have enabled 16 schools in Serbia to join the "School without Violence" program, which is funded exclusively with locally raised funds.

Jankovic, who was named a UNICEF ambassador in December 2007, has advocated for the most vulnerable children in China, including those affected by the Sichuan earthquake and by HIV/AIDS.

"UNICEF supports programs in China to help change attitudes that discriminate against girls and in doing so, helps girls realize their dreams," Jankovic said at a "Champions for Children" gala event.

Williams, Ivanovic and Jankovic join an impressive list of nominees this year, including basketball star Steve Nash, retired women's soccer player Mia Hamm, and beach volleyball player Kerri Walsh. They hope to join an incredibly impressive list of past winners, including Oprah Winfrey, American Senator Ted Kennedy, and Bill & Melinda Gates.

All Stars Helping Kids was founded by Lott in 1989 with the goal of promoting a safe, healthy, rigorous learning environment for disadvantaged kids in low-income communities. All Stars achieves this mission by pooling the resources of athletes, corporations and individuals to support high-performing academic and physical enrichment programs.

The Jefferson Awards for Public Service is a prestigious national recognition system honoring community and public service in America. Established in 1972 by Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, American Senator Robert Taft, Jr. and Sam Beard to establish a Nobel Prize for public service, today, the Jefferson Awards' primary purpose is to serve as a "Call to Action for Volunteers" in local communities.

allrounder
Aug 5th, 2009, 11:28 PM
From Coke to Lemonade, the odd burger and no more chocolate every day - JJ's slowly getting healthier in her diet. :lol:

Her metabolism is definitely better than Bartoli's that is for sure!

Does anyone know what the stomach operation was for that Sneki had? i've heard a lot this year about her being ill but have never actually known what the actual illness was :confused:

louisa.
Aug 6th, 2009, 01:26 PM
in n out burgers :rolls:
epicness. JJ :worship: so good to hear from her again :hearts:

louisa.
Aug 6th, 2009, 10:29 PM
It's a fast food joint in america

http://www.in-n-out.com/default.asp

schorsch
Aug 7th, 2009, 05:00 AM
Masha mentioned them once, too :haha:

JadeFox
Aug 7th, 2009, 07:15 PM
As a fellow chocoholic I will not judge JJ's love for the sweet stuff.

That said, time to crank up the fitness routine JJ!

дalex
Aug 11th, 2009, 09:46 AM
http://news.cincinnati.com/article/20090810/SPT/308100097/1062/Jankovic+leaner++meaner+

Jankovic leaner, meaner
W&S women's notebook

By Shannon Russell • srussell@enquirer.com • August 10, 2009

After finishing last year as the world’s No. 1 women’s tennis player, Serbian Jelena Jankovic decided to improve her physique with a new fitness regimen.

If she could excel so well with her lean figure, why not ramp up her training and add more power to her game? That was Jankovic’s motivation when she incorporated heavier weights and more running into her schedule.

Fifteen pounds of muscle later, she realized the plan had backfired.

“I was much heavier on the court, and I lost my speed,” Jankovic said. “I felt stronger but I lost my agility, and that’s one of the most important things in tennis.”
Jankovic dropped her opener at Indian Wells in March and bowed out of the first round of Eastbourne in June. When she realized her exercise plan was flawed, she quickly revamped it.

About a month ago, Jankovic returned to lighter weights and focused on agility-improving drills. She cut out Coke and chocolate, her favorite indulgences. She incorporated freshly-squeezed lemonade and grapefruit juice into her diet and found, in a short time, that she had more energy than she’d had in weeks.

After shedding the weight, Jankovic took her streamlined figure for a spin at Stanford in July. She advanced to the quarterfinals as a No. 4 seed and lost to eventual champion Marion Bartoli.

Now Jankovic – the Western & Southern Financial Group Women’s Open’s fifth seed, and the World. No. 5 – is eager to see how she’ll fare here in the new Premier Five stop.

“I feel like I’m moving much better and my game is coming together,” Jankovic said. “I just hope every match I can be the old Jelena, the No. 1 player in the world.”

Not exactly what I had expected from the "greatest interview at the round table". :shrug:
(the author of the article is the same person who posted that comment on twitter)

Jelena on Clijsters' comeback.
http://www.nytimes.com/reuters/2009/08/10/sports/sports-us-tennis-women-cincinnati-clijsters.html

Former world number one Jelena Jankovic said it would be nice to have Clijsters back in the locker-room.

"It's always nice to see a well-known face come back again," said the Serbian.

"She was a great athlete and one of the best movers on tour. If she could be number one before, she can do it again."

-Valérie-
Aug 11th, 2009, 06:11 PM
Same old same old, this is the story we've been hearing since the beginning of the year but, it seems like a normal explanation. The truth is the truth, hard to deny it when it is the cause of what we can call "a fall".

Glad to hear she started training again with lighter weights though, she needs to improve her stamina to keep her motivation for a whole match because she started really well against Bartoli. If she could have just hang on little longer...

I have high hope for Cincinnati but let's see what this stabilization of her system will bright this week.

~Kiera~
Aug 12th, 2009, 08:07 PM
http://uk.reuters.com/article/idUKTRE57B4XZ20090812?sp=true

Fifth seed Jelena Jankovic advanced with a 7-6 6-3 victory over Russian Maria Kirilenko in a match including 13 breaks of serve.

"I didn't serve very well and I got a bit lucky at the end of the first set but I am happy I was able to win," the Serb said. "Hopefully I will get better from here."

Brena
Aug 12th, 2009, 08:21 PM
"I didn't serve very well..''

Oh, don't be too hard on yourself, JJ.


:smash:

дalex
Aug 12th, 2009, 08:34 PM
Oh, don't be too hard on yourself, JJ.

:rolls:

OTOH, Kirilenko was serving wonderfully...Played the best match of her career...and there you go 7-6 6-3 for the GOAT of all goats.

Brena
Aug 12th, 2009, 08:40 PM
OTOH, Kirilenko was serving wonderfully...Played the best match of her career...and there you go 7-6 6-3 for the GOAT of all goats.

It's not poor Jeca's fault she always gets to play these future number ones!

дalex
Aug 12th, 2009, 08:41 PM
It's not poor Jeca's fault she always gets to play these future number ones!

:haha:

Stop it, you're killing me!

~Kiera~
Aug 12th, 2009, 10:35 PM
http://twitter.com/olerafa

Jelena: " I had to wake up at 7 a.m. ... and that was difficult for me!"

You should probably stop going to bed at 3am then :p

Roookie
Aug 13th, 2009, 04:33 AM
^^ That explains it all :zzz:. And I was getting worried...

Night match tomorrow. :woohoo:

дalex
Aug 13th, 2009, 01:39 PM
From few days ago, Aug 10th. Seems like Jeca and Sexlana are still good friends no matter what we all read last year. :scratch:

http://cincinnati.com/blogs/tennis/2009/08/10/warm-up-on-court-9/
Warm-up on Court 9

Earlier today, fans had a treat when Jelena Jankovic and Svetlana Kuznetsova warmed up together.

Later, Jelena said she didn’t know how many times they had played actual matches together, “because I’ve been playing for years. I’m 24 years old now, but you repeat week after week, and you forget. But a lot of times we practice together, and we have matches against each other and she’s a fun girl to be around. She’s funny, she’s entertaining and a good personality.”

http://cincinnati.com/blogs/tennis/files/2009/08/monday-tennis-players-and-fans-004-150x150.jpg http://cincinnati.com/blogs/tennis/files/2009/08/monday-tennis-players-and-fans-008-150x150.jpg

Scenes from the tournament...

http://cincinnati.com/blogs/tennis/files/2009/08/monday-tennis-players-and-fans-005-300x225.jpg

Krista Braun, 13, of Kansas City, watches Jelena Jankovic warm up with Kuznetsova


From yesterday...Our Nutty is famous, Jeca mentioned him during her press conference. :lol:

http://cincinnati.com/blogs/tennis/2009/08/12/the-interview-room/#more-98
The interview room

http://cincinnati.com/blogs/tennis/files/2009/08/wednesday-tennis-players-and-fans-013-300x225.jpg

After winning their respective matches today on Center Court, Jelena Jankovic and Kim Clijsters spoke to the press immediately afterward. Both ladies are making a comeback, Jankovic after ending 2008 as No. 1; Clijsters after taking two years off to start a family.

Jelena spoke graciously to a very small group after winning over Kirilenko in two sets 7-6, 6-3.Growing up in Belgrade, she has said that Monica Seles was one of her idols. Would she like to think of herself as a role model, now that she has risen to the top?

“I don’t know. It would be nice if I can be a role model for some of the younger kids,” she said, noting with amazement that she sees them wearing T-shirts with her picture on it and ‘No. 1 fan of Jelena.’

“It’s nice if you an inspire and motivate anyone in any manner. Especially coming from Serbia and a place where tennis wasn’t popular and I didn’t have anybody to look up to and how far I have made it, it’s a really good accomplishment,” she said. “You know, I try my best to be a good role model for young kids and to be a good example. If I can do it, why can’t they not do it?”

What advice would she give to aspiring tennis players?

“The most important thing is they have to enjoy their sport and play with passion, because accomplishments don’t come without passion. You’ve got to enjoy (it) and have fun, and don’t put pressure on yourself,” she said.

“A lot of people from outside, they put pressure on their kids, on the players. But we, ourselves, are the ones who are putting the most pressure on ourselves because we want to do well and prove ourself and win,” she added. “That’s something that you need to let go and just focus and just try out there to play your best tennis.”

Fun fact about Jelena: She gave up serious studies in piano at age 9 to take up her tennis racquet.

Clijsters, who is here with 31-year-old husband and pro basketball player Brian Lynch, and little Jada, answered questions in English and in Flemish. She won in two sets, 6-2, 7-5, over Patty Schnyder. She said she was happy with her play, and glad to have won in two, so she can save up her energy to play Svetlana Kuznetsova next.

schorsch
Aug 13th, 2009, 02:25 PM
nutty makes the news :lol: congrats :p

ms_nut
Aug 13th, 2009, 05:28 PM
:bounce: I've hit it big....

:o it almost makes me want to go today to cheer her on.. On grandstand you get so close to the players..:sad:..
OTOH, i might not get to see her lose.:devil:

дalex
Aug 13th, 2009, 05:37 PM
http://www.asapsports.com/show_interview.php?id=58382

August 12, 2009

Jelena Jankovic

CINCINNATI, OHIO

J. JANKOVIC/M. Kirilenko
7-6, 6-3

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. Looked like a pretty tough match that you had to fight through out there today. Was it tougher than you expected?
JELENA JANKOVIC: It was a tough match, especially it's first round. First match for me, it's never easy. It takes time to get used to the conditions, you know, to playing you know matches again.
You know, I had trouble holding my serve, especially in that first set. I was returning well, but I wasn't putting many first serves in, and kept playing with the second serve almost throughout the whole first set. It gave me a lot of trouble, but I managed to win the first set.
In the second set it was a little bit better, but I have to improve on that. Hopefully I will be better in my next match.

Q. How important was it that you won the first set?
JELENA JANKOVIC: It was important. It's quite humid out there, and it's not easy to stay on court for many hours. You don't want to play three sets if you don't need to play three sets. You want to save as much energy as possible.
You know, I was glad that I was able to get that first set. It was very important.

Q. What are you expecting from Azarenka tomorrow?
JELENA JANKOVIC: I don't know. I haven't played against her in a long time. Last time was -- I don't remember. Maybe -- who knows. Maybe two years ago or something like that at Australian Open. It was the last time we played.
She hits, you know, the ball very hard. She, you know, goes for her shots. You know, I have to go out there and play my game. I just have to try to be -- to improve with each match and try to lift up my game. Then we'll see how everything will go for me.

Q. You were stretching outside the player's lounge. Could you elaborate on that? Any reason?
JELENA JANKOVIC: No. It's just important to run a little bit and get your muscles loose and then stretch. It's important, otherwise you need to play, you know, every day. You want to keep your body in shape and flexible as well. You don't want to be tight out there. Then injuries can come and all the rest.

Q. What would it mean to you to play deep into this tournament?
JELENA JANKOVIC: It would mean a lot to me. It would be really good for my confidence. I want to go deep in the tournament. I was the No. 1 player in the world, and I want to start winning big tournaments again.
I just need to start finding my game and start playing better and better and better. But the more I play, the better I get. The more matches I play, my game just keeps getting better and improving each time.
So I'm a player who needs a lot of matches. I'm not a player who likes to practice all the time and not play, play once a month or something. This is not for me. I'm a player who wants to compete and who likes the challenge and likes to be out there fighting for every point.

Q. Do you remember what it was like when you were No. 1, like the type of player you were and how close you are to getting back there?
JELENA JANKOVIC: Yeah, there are still things I can improve on, especially the confidence. Especially, you know, being in those situations every day and handling those situations when it's important times of the match.
You need to -- those are the times when you need to play your best tennis and lift up your game. These things you get from playing quite a lot, and that's what I used to do before. I never used to give free points away when it was important times.
So I just to have try little by little to get better. So I hope -- I think I'm on the right track. I just have to be positive and have to look optimistic and just work hard to get better as a player.

Q. Tomorrow is just a third-round match, but it's two top 10 players. Does it feel like a big match?
JELENA JANKOVIC: You know, I take every match as a big match. You don't want to underestimate anybody. All the players here are good players and everybody knows how to play.
So you go out there and you try to play your best tennis. You always have to, every time, doesn't matter who you play, you want to be focused 100% and you want to go out there and give your maximum. Doesn't matter who it is out there, who you're playing against.

Q. You said that Monica Seles was one of your idols growing up. Would you like to think of yourself as a role model now that you've risen to the top? What advice would you give to younger aspiring tennis player?
JELENA JANKOVIC: I don't know. It would be nice if I can be a role model for some of the younger kids. I see a lot of fans, you know, they wear T-shirts with my picture on it, you know, with, "No. 1 fan of Jelena." You know, it's really amazing.
It's nice if you can inspire and motivate anybody in any manner. Especially coming from Serbia and a place where tennis wasn't popular and I didn't have anybody to look up to and how far I have made it, it's a really good accomplishment.
You know, I try my best to be, you know, a good role model for young kids and to be a good example. If I can do it, why can't they not do it?
The most important thing is they have to enjoy their sport and play with passion, because accomplishments don't come without passion. You got to enjoy and have fun and don't put pressure on yourself. These are the worst things.
You know, a lot of people from outside, they put pressure on their kids, on the players. But, you know, we, ourselves, are the ones who are putting the most pressure on ourselves because we want to do well and prove ourself and win.
That's something that you need to let go and just focus and just try out there to play your best tennis.

Q. How can you help but put pressure on yourself, though?
JELENA JANKOVIC: Because you care. You're not there trying to prove anything to anybody. You're playing because you want to play and you want to win. You want to do your best, and you know that you can win. This is why you're putting pressure, because you care. You care a lot.
If I didn't care, I would go out there and go like you're going to a picnic or going to have a vacation. You're loose and relaxed. You want to do well, and that's why you're a little bit tense.
But you need to learn how to take care of those situations where you can just let go of those emotions and just go out there and try to play the best that you can. Think about the points and how you need to construct the points. Don't think about everything else. Just focus one point at a time.

End of FastScripts

Nina.
Aug 13th, 2009, 07:23 PM
:bounce: I've hit it big....

:o it almost makes me want to go today to cheer her on.. On grandstand you get so close to the players..:sad:..
OTOH, i might not get to see her lose.:devil:

congrats :lol:

-Valérie-
Aug 13th, 2009, 08:12 PM
That interview is nothing new.. Keep the positive attitude JJ, but bring the consistent game again, that would be fantastic to say: She is back!!!

Just Do It
Aug 13th, 2009, 08:32 PM
http://twitter.com/olerafa



You should probably stop going to bed at 3am then :p

Oh, yeah, it must be that.

Foon_JJ
Aug 13th, 2009, 09:46 PM
Is there any link for watching JJ?

rucolo
Aug 14th, 2009, 06:39 PM
Such a cute blog entry from Jelena!:hearts:
And 2 great pics!
I also have a sweet tooth!:lol:

Thanks for the nice interview.:)

дalex
Aug 15th, 2009, 12:02 PM
Some quotes from JJ after yesterdays match. Dunno where they found these...

http://www.mtsmondo.com/sport/vesti/text.php?vest=143954
http://www6.b92.net/sport/tenis/vesti.php?yyyy=2009&mm=08&dd=15&nav_id=376407

"She beat some good players in this tournament and she played very well", said Jelena about Sybille Bammer.

"However, I went into this match knowing that I had big lead in h2h, 7-1. I know how I should play against her. It was very important for me to start well and not let her find her rhythm. She's a great athlete, likes to play long points and I didn't allow her to play that game. I tried to move her around the court a lot and dictate the points whenever possible."

"It's gonna be a tough match for sure", said Jelena about her next match against Dementieva.

"She's in great form this year and we always have tough matches. I will focus on going onto the court to play my best tennis. I need to play well tactically and give my best in order to win."

~Kiera~
Aug 15th, 2009, 07:18 PM
Post match interview

J. JANKOVIC/S. Bammer
6-0, 6-3

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. I guess you couldn't have expected such a lopsided first set, especially after she had upset Serena yesterday.

JELENA JANKOVIC: Yeah, she did defeat a lot of good players in this tournament. For sure she was playing well.

But I had a good score against her coming into this match. I knew how to play against her, and for me it was important to start strong and to, you know, put my game out there, not let her play what she likes the best.

Q. What is it that she likes to do best?

JELENA JANKOVIC: She's a good athlete, and she can rally and she can play. She likes to play all those long points and wear you out completely. I didn't let her do that.

I tried to move her around and tried to dictate the points as much as I could, and that's what I did.

Q. How much the match tomorrow? You get Elena. What do you expect tomorrow?

JELENA JANKOVIC: It will be for sure a difficult match. She has been playing very well this year. We had, you know, tough matches in the past. I think I won the last I don't know how many times.

It will be difficult for sure, but I just have to just go out there and try to play the best that I can, and we will see how things will go for me.

Q. What did you do well tonight?

JELENA JANKOVIC: I was very solid from the beginning. I didn't make so many errors and didn't give her anything. I was very focused, you know, just from the start. I knew that she likes to play the long points. If I get into that it can get very difficult out there.

I didn't want to do that. I just tried to move her and not to give her the balls where she likes to hit them. She likes to block your balls. The harder you hit, the harder she likes to bring those balls back. She can be very dangerous.

I'm very happy I was able to get through this match.

Foon_JJ
Aug 16th, 2009, 04:22 AM
http://sports.yahoo.com/ten/news?slug=ap-cincinnati&prov=ap&type=lgns

Jankovic’s ragged 7-6, (2), 0-6, 7-6 (6) win over Elena Dementieva took 2 hours, 46 minutes in the evening.

The fifth-seeded Jankovic blew three match points in the third set, setting up the tiebreaker, then fell behind 6-2 before pulling it out. There were 13 service breaks and 25 double faults in the match.

Dementieva, the No. 4 seed, had eight double faults in the first set. She got her serve under control and dominated the second set, only to relapse. She was broken twice in the third set on double faults.

Up 5-4, Jankovic squandered three straight match points, allowing Dementieva to pull even. They broke each other’s serve to send it to the tiebreaker, where Dementieva got up 6-2, blew four match points, then double-faulted to put it back in Jankovic’s hands.

“I don’t believe I won this match,” Jankovic said.

дalex
Aug 16th, 2009, 12:44 PM
http://www.tennisgrandstand.com/archives/4700
Safina Breezes Past Pennetta In Cincinnati; Jankovic Saves Four Match Points

http://www.tennisgrandstand.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/08/jelena-jankovic.jpg

World No. 1 Dinara Safina cruised into her eighth final of 2009 with a convincing win over No. 14 seed Flavia Pennetta of Italy, 6-2, 6-0, in 56 minutes on Saturday afternoon at the Western & Southern Financial Group Women’s Open in Cincinnati. With the victory, Safina snapped Pennetta’s career-best 15 match winning streak that started several weeks ago during her title run in Palermo, followed by winning the championship last week in Los Angeles.

“I think she was playing very great, very good,” said Pennetta following her defeat.

From start to finish, Safina showed she was in complete control, placing her shots perfectly and being very steady on serve.

“I was feeling very good and confident,” said Safina, who has won titles this season in Rome, Madrid and Portoroz. “I think it was a good performance by my side.”

Pennetta, who knocked Venus Williams earlier in the week, looked exhausted and not at 100 percent with her fitness due to the fact that she has played 11 matches in the last two weeks and the Cincinnati temperatures were in the 90 degree range.

“I was a little bit tired, of course, but I didn’t lose for that,” said Pennetta, who will crack the Top 10 on Monday, becoming the first Italian to accomplish that feat.

Safina hit three aces and five double faults, while winning 23 of 29 first serve points. The Italian had a bad serving performance, hitting three doubles faults and winning just 10 of 22 first serve points and 4 of 21 second serve points. Safina broke Pennetta’s serve on six of seven opportunities, while Pennetta only broke serve once.

In a thrilling night session match that determined Safina’s opponent for the championship match, No. 5 seed Jelena Jankovic edged past No. 4 seed Elena Dementieva, 7-6(2), 0-6, 7-6(6), in two hours and 46 minutes.

The match was filled with drama throughout, as Jankovic pulled out the opening set by winning in a tiebreak before having a slight hiccup, as Dementieva won the set at love in convincing fashion.

“Second set I got so tired,” said Jankovic, who will be trying to win her second title of the year, having already won in Marbella, Spain.

The third set kept fans on the edge of their seats, as Jankovic jumped out to an early 2-0 lead. After Dementieva broke serve in the sixth game of the final set to level the match at 3-all, no player would hold their serve the rest of the match.

“There was so many ups and down throughout the match,” said Jankovic, who reached No. 1 in the rankings in 2008.

The Serbian held three match points on her serve at 5-4, 40-love, allowing Dementieva to even the match at 5-all. Dementieva immediately had her serve broken before she would break Jankovic’s serve for a second straight time, as the Serbian tried to win the match out on her serve.

Dementieva quickly got ahead 6-2 in the final set tiebreak but could not convert on any of the four match points. Jankovic tensely closed out the match on her serve and jumped up in excitement.

“I just gave everything I had,” said Jankovic, who improves to 7-3 lifetime against Dementieva.

Jankovic hit three aces and eight double faults compared to four aces and 17 double faults by Dementieva. Jankovic broke serve on six occasions, while Dementieva broke Jankovic’s serve nine times.

The championship match between Safina and Jankovic will begin at 4pm and will be televised on ESPN2. Safina leads the series 3-2, winning the last two times on hard courts last summer in Los Angeles and at the Beijing Olympics.

дalex
Aug 16th, 2009, 12:50 PM
http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/LatestNews/Read/0,,12781~1756651,00.html
"I really don't know how I pulled it out. It's really amazing," Jankovic said. "There were so many ups and downs throughout the match. I thought I was going to win at 5-4, and then all of a sudden she was going for broke on those points. It was tough for me to accept I lost that game, but then I just refocused and played the best I could. When it got to 6-2 in the tie-break I just said to myself, 'I know I can win. I just have to take it one point at a time.'

"It has been a while since I played the final of a big tournament, and it's good to be back."

дalex
Aug 16th, 2009, 02:59 PM
Interview:
http://www.asapsports.com/show_interview.php?id=58521

August 15, 2009

Jelena Jankovic

CINCINNATI, OHIO

J. JANKOVIC/E. Dementieva
7-6, 0-6, 7-6

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. How did you pull that out?
JELENA JANKOVIC: You know, be to be honest, I really don't know. It's really amazing. I couldn't believe, you know, that I was able to win this match at the end.
There was so many ups and down throughout the match. I had I don't know, 5-4 and three match points on my serve, and I thought I was gonna win right there. And then all of a sudden, she was going for broke on those points and she took her chances. It was tough for me to except that I lost that game.
But then I just tried to refocus again and play the best that I can even though I was really tired and it was tough and we were there for three hours. Then all of a sudden I got into a situation down 6-2 in the tiebreak, and I just said to myself, you know, I have been in these kind of situations in the past. I know I can win. I just have to go one point at a time and move the best as I can, even if I have to move on my hands or whatever I had to do.
I just gave everything I had. It was really tough. To be honest, I don't know how I was able to win those points and win the tiebreak. It's a really unbelievable win for me in such a tough match. It was tough mentally and physically for both of us.

Q. Were you cramping? I saw you bending over a lot.
JELENA JANKOVIC: I was tight. My legs were hurting, everything was hurting. It was a three-hour match, and I haven't played many matches this year. It's not the same practicing -- you can practice eight hours, but when you're under pressure and when you're competing, it takes much more energy out of you. I felt that. I cannot lie about that.
But I tried to make myself think that I'm still fresh and I still have, you know, energy to keep going and keep going and keep going. Here I am. I came out as a winner. It's a really huge win for me and great for my confidence.
It's been a while since I played a final of a big tournament, and it's good to be back.

Q. Looked like almost several different matches tonight. What happened in the second set?
JELENA JANKOVIC: Second set I got so tired. You know, I tried my best in the first set, and it look a lot of energy out of me. Second set I fell completely flat. I said to myself, you know, I have no chance to win that second set. She was playing really well. She was going for her shots, and I didn't have enough energy. I was hitting everything short and I let her dictate the play.
I said, I'm just going to just try to gain as much energy as possible and start in a good way in the third. That's what I did. I started attacking right away and giving everything I had. You know, I kept going, going, going. Really, really took so much out of me mentally and physically.
I cannot believe -- there were so many things going on out there. It was unbelievable that I was able to win this. She was in much better form coming into this match, you know, but I had a good score against her in the past. She has had the better year this year, so obviously she was the favorite.
But, you know, I was the No. 1 player last year, and, you know, sometimes I can come up and give it a good go.

Q. Does this result, the way you won, make up for a lot of disappointing results you've had?
JELENA JANKOVIC: Yeah, it's nice to make up for this. It's been a while. I've been waiting for this. You know, I had all these problems as well. You know, my mother was sick and she had surgery. I had so many distractions outside of the court.
I wasn't able to -- I'm quite an emotional person, and I wasn't able to focus. It took a lot out of me. My tennis was going down and I didn't enjoy it. I didn't enjoy those battles like I did today, even though sometimes I played not so well and then I played well.
You know, I still enjoyed the whole situation. I was out there and believing that I can do it and I had fun. That's the most important thing.
Now I'm enjoying and enjoying the challenge. I'm happy that I have this opportunity to play matches again. I love competing, and that's what I'm here for. It's been a while since I been deep in the competition. This is what I want, and this is where I belong. I hope that I can continue like this.

Q. Given your fatigue level, what did you tell yourself mentally at the end of the second set? You got bageled, basically. How did you get back into it in the third set?
JELENA JANKOVIC: I told you at the end of that second set, I said to myself, you know, I didn't want to run so much for some of shots. I didn't want to try my best. I said, Okay, I'm just gonna let it go and try to feel better for the beginning of the third.
Then I started -- you know, I lifted my game a little bit and got a bit more energy. Then I didn't want to, you know, try so hard if I didn't have energy. Then I would be completely dead and then I would ruin everything and I wouldn't be able to do anything.
So I kind of did -- that's how I managed. It was difficult. It was not easy to run side to side and play all the long points. It's so humid. Elena played so well. She's an unbelievable athlete and makes you play all the shots and doesn't give you easy points. You have to earn everything.
You know, I'm really happy that I was able to beat her tonight?

Q. Looking at the match tomorrow, I mean, you have a very short recovery time. What do you have to do to win tomorrow?
JELENA JANKOVIC: That will be a little bit disadvantage. Safina played today at 1:00 and had the whole day to rest. I finished late tonight. I will do my best to recover. I will try, you know, my best to play well tomorrow.

Q. Will you take fluids or something like that?
JELENA JANKOVIC: Yeah, we'll do everything possible. We'll see how I will be tomorrow. It will be a difficult match. It's a tough opponent. We'll see how things go. Anything can happen.

Q. How is your mother's health right now?
JELENA JANKOVIC: She's doing good. Thank you. She had surgery after Wimbledon and she's recovering. Hopefully she will come in New York, so I'm really happy about that. You know, I can enjoy my tennis. I'm happy for my mom. There's nothing more important than health.

Q. What was the difference today? Was it just you were the last person standing? Did you feel maybe more fit than Dementieva?
JELENA JANKOVIC: What do you mean, at the end?

Q. Because it was a very tough, long match. What was the difference in the match?
JELENA JANKOVIC: There was very little. The difference was few points here and there. It was unbelievable. You know, you couldn't decide. It was -- I don't know how I was able to win. I thought she felt more fit than I was. I was struggling with my -- you know, I was struggling with fatigue.
I was giving my best trying not to think about that and trying to think in the present and play each point one point at a time and fight and give ever atom of my power.
You know, it was difficult. I thought that she had enough energy, but it was very tough mentally to handle the whole situation. It's not easy.

Q. Can you say what kind of sickness your mother had?
JELENA JANKOVIC: It's better not to talk about this now. I'm just so happy I won my match.

Q. Do you feel like that person who was No. 1 at the beginning of year, that that was forever ago? I mean, there are probably people that don't even remember that.
JELENA JANKOVIC: Yeah, but it's been a while since I played well. Last time was at the end of last year when I played finals at the Open and won three big tournaments in the row and was beating all the top players at a lot of big tournaments. All these things happened, and my game completely dropped down. It was difficult to accept that.
All of the players were favorites against me, even though I had a positive score against them. When I saw -- it gave me kind of a little bit of motivation, to be honest. I know I can do it. I know I can play well and bring some good tennis out there. I know I'm a good athlete. It's just a matter of believing in myself and doing what I can do best.
I showed tonight I was able to handle the situation and come out as a winner, even though it was tough and a lot of ups and downs.

Q. Were you happy with the way you served?
JELENA JANKOVIC: No. There was a lot of things I could have done better. I didn't serve so well. I didn't put many first serves in and made a lot of double faults. There are so many things I have to improve. There is -- it's not always gonna be perfect.
But still, in those situations when things are not going the way you want them to go, you still have to figure out a way to get through. Doesn't matter how. Do whatever you can do. Try to find a way to win. I was able to do that tonight.

Q. You said that at the end you were telling yourself that, I feel fresh, I feel fresh.
JELENA JANKOVIC: Yeah.

Q. How did you convince yourself when that you body is telling you otherwise?
JELENA JANKOVIC: Well, you know, the way it works, whatever you tell to yourself, your body follows. I mean, how you say it in -- (from translation) power of suggestion. Whatever you say to yourself -- if you say to yourself, I'm so nervous I can't go anymore, you're gonna be even worse. You got to keep feeding your mind with positive things and words and just keep pushing yourself to the limits.
I just kept going and going and said, Jelena, keep going, keep going. I didn't want to think too far. 6-2 and I didn't want to think, I'm going down. I'm gonna lose. I took one point at a time, and that's the way I managed to win this match.

Q. In your career, would you rank this match as being one of the toughest?
JELENA JANKOVIC: One of the toughest, for sure. You know, it was tough mentally and physically, especially in this time of the year, you know. I been looking for this kind of matches. For my confidence it's really unbelievable. It's a good comeback for me. It's good to get in this group again, you know, be with the top players again and compete with them hopefully week in and week out. That's what I want. That's my goal for now.

Q. You mentioned that you haven't been playing that much this year. That has taken a little bit of that confidence. How will you see yourself looking ahead to the US Open? Are you prepared for that? Are you prepared to be a Grand Slam champion?
JELENA JANKOVIC: After Wimbledon, I completely, you know, rested my mind. I wanted to forget everything what happened in that first half of the season. I wanted to clear my mind and be -- start the second half of the season with a fresh mind and ready to play.
I changed a lot of things. I changed -- my body changed as well. I lost some weight and became more lean, which at this beginning of year I had 15 pounds more weight than usual. That gave my trouble and I felt awkward on court.
There's lots of things that I have changed. I'm much more positive now and enjoying every practice and every match. I'm trying my best to improve every day. You know, there is things I would like to get better at and work on certain shots, but with the positive mind, I think you can achieve anything.
The most important is I'm enjoying. I'm playing with passion, which -- and with a smile on my face. That's what I needed. I been missing that for a while. I wasn't the same player.

Q. How does pulling through a tough match tonight help you tomorrow?
JELENA JANKOVIC: Tomorrow it's gonna be another match. Soon as I step on the court tomorrow, I will forget everything that has happened in this tournament. I just have to focus on what I can do to play against Safina. That's all. There is nothing else. I gotta try my best. Nobody is unbeatable out there.

Q. During the break after Wimbledon, how much did you follow the tour?
JELENA JANKOVIC: I didn't really follow. To be honest, when I'm out, on vacation or not playing tennis, I don't really watch women's tennis, or even men's matches. I just want to stay out of tennis and recharge the batteries and think about something else other than hitting balls and all these things that go long with tennis.

Q. Shop?
JELENA JANKOVIC: Shopping, beach, whatever. Taking care of my mother as well.

End of FastScripts

~Kiera~
Aug 17th, 2009, 01:53 AM
http://uk.reuters.com/article/idUKSP43025220090817?sp=true

Victorious Jankovic 'happy to be back' after title win
Mon Aug 17, 2009 1:18am BST

By Simon Cambers

CINCINNATI, Ohio, Aug 16 (Reuters) - A smiling Jelena Jankovic said she was "happy to be back" after she beat world number one Dinara Safina 6-4 6-2 in the final of the Cincinnati Open on Sunday.

The Serbian, who ended last year ranked number one but who struggled in the first half of 2009, outplayed the error-prone Russian to claim her second title of the year.

"It's a good win for me, I'm happy that I'm back," said Jankovic, who will climb to number four in the rankings after her efforts in Cincinnati.

"I'm really pleased that I was able to play well today and beat the top player in the world.

"I got quite a few good wins under my belt this week, which is very good for my confidence coming into the U.S. Open.

"I'm back in this group of (top) players and hopefully I can keep my form up."

After ending 2008 as the world's top-ranked player, Jankovic added 7kgs of muscle to her frame after changing her training regime.

The decision, however, backfired as she said she felt too heavy and the extra weight had affected her movement, one of her key attributes.

With her confidence dropping, Jankovic was also burdened with an illness to her mother, which took its affect on her usually sunny disposition.

With her mother on the mend, Jankovic appears to be back to normal and her results in Cincinnati reflect her better mood.

"Because I have not been playing very well this first half of the season, I said to myself, 'I'm going to begin'," she said.

"This is my time to come back. I love playing on hard courts. I'm moving very well again and my game is coming back.

"I'm positive. I'm out there with a smile on my face, and I bring some, how do you say, interesting things into tennis again.

"Every match I got better and better and at the end, I won the title.

"It's a big title and it's been a while since I have done this. Hopefully I can continue with the consistent results."

~Kiera~
Aug 17th, 2009, 02:01 AM
http://www.usatoday.com/sports/tennis/2009-08-16-cincinnati-open-finals_N.htm#uslPageReturn

Jankovic upsets top-ranked Safina for Cincinnati title

MASON, Ohio (AP) — Jelena Jankovic beat top-ranked Dinara Safina 6-4, 6-2 on Sunday to win the Cincinnati Open and put herself back among the contenders for the U.S. Open title.

"My smile is back and I'm having fun playing the matches," the Serbian player said. "This is what I missed. I missed this for maybe seven months this year."

It was a day of grins after some very tough months.

The $2 million Western & Southern Financial Group Women's Open was only Jankovic's second title of the year, the opposite of what she'd expected. Jankovic moved up to No. 1 last August, held the top spot for a 18 weeks, then went about revamping her game in the offseason. She put on 15 pounds of muscle, looking for more power.

When she got back to tournament play, she felt slow and stiff. She faded out of the top group. She was distracted when her mother, Snezana, became ill and needed surgery. The rock-bottom moment came at Wimbledon, where 17-year-old qualifier Melanie Oudin beat her in the third round.

She took a month off to help her mother get through surgery and overhaul her approach to tennis. She cut chocolate and cola from her diet. She went back to playing her style from 2008.

On Sunday, it all came together again. She'll move up a spot to No. 4 when next week's rankings come out.

"I'm happy that I'm back," she said. "I'm back in this group of (top) players."

No one expected much from her Sunday, when she walked onto heat-baked center court still feeling the effects of one of the most draining matches she's ever played. She needed 2 hours, 46 minutes to beat Elena Dementieva in the semifinals on Saturday night.

Jankovic couldn't believe she won that match. Down 6-2 in the third-set tiebreaker, she took some risks and pulled it out. She wondered how much she'd have left for the final.

Just enough.

"I wanted to make myself believe that 'You're not tired, I feel fresh, I'm ready to play,"' she said. "That's how I felt in the match, actually. When I woke up this morning I felt really sore, especially after going to sleep at 2 a.m."

Safina was fresher, but Jankovic was sharper.

The 24-year-old Serb barely made a mistake while taking a tight first set — only nine unforced errors. She showed she was up to the challenge by breaking Safina to go up 2-1, then holding serve the rest of the way. Jankovic darted from sideline to sideline chasing down shots, getting whatever Safina hit her way.

"I was just a little bit off today, I would say," Safina said. "I don't know. I was feeling very confident stepping into the court, and then I was just totally off. My legs were not moving anywhere, and I was just not doing the things that I was supposed to on the court and I let her dictate."

Jankovic broke Safina's serve in the first and third games for a 3-0 lead and establish control of the match.

Before accepting the crystal trophy, Jankovic walked over to the stands and embraced her father, Veselin. Her mother used to accompany her on the tour, but is back home in Serbia recovering from the operation. Her father has been the sometimes reluctant fill-in.

"I dedicate this win to her," Jankovic said, referring to her mother. "I wanted to make her happy. It's important. But my dad — you know, it's tough for him to watch. He gets really nervous out there. It's tough watching your kid."

~Kiera~
Aug 17th, 2009, 02:02 AM
http://news.cincinnati.com/article/20090816/COL03/308160024/1082/SPT/Our+town+hosts+tennis++best

Our town hosts tennis' best

TENNISVILLE – The world’s best arrived just before 4 Sunday afternoon, a couple of tennis courts apart. As Roger Federer practiced on Court 5, Dinara Safina was on Center Court, playing for a title. The last time something like this happened around here, it was October 1990 and Billy Bates was scoring on Joe Oliver’s single down the third base line.
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You don’t have to know a ground stroke from a ground ball to get the significance of Sunday. Flyover Town was back in the game, if only for a day.

I’ve spent a lot of words over the years boosting the Western & Southern Financial Group Masters. It’s the best-run sporting event we have, and it continues to set the standard. Meantime, everything else we’ve done here has disappeared.

We used to have the LPGA tournament, a women’s golf major. We had a men’s Senior Tour tournament. We hosted March Madness. We’ve had the women’s Final Four. Twenty-one years ago, the baseball All-Star Game was at Riverfront Stadium. Pittsburgh – Pittsburgh! – has had the stars twice since.

We made an effort to land the Olympics that drew worldwide laughter. At least that part of the world that bothered to notice.

Only the tennis remains.

This event used to be nothing more than a fun week for the men to prep for the U.S. Open. “Cincinnati’’ had the same hardcourt surface as Flushing Meadows, without the media madness and general rabble of New York. Players would ride The Beast, play some free golf, absorb the local goodwill and cash a quick check.

Twenty years ago, after losing in the finals to Mats Wilander, Stefan Edberg admitted he didn’t know how many sets he was playing. Halfway through the third (and final) set, Edberg approached the chair umpire to ask. That’s what this event meant then.

It’s still a prep for the Open. Only now, it’s serious. It’s a big deal.

Jelena Jankovic thanked God after she beat Safina in the women’s final Sunday. Her father came from Serbia to watch. He sat in the front row behind the baseline. After her 6-4, 6-2 win, he unfurled a Serbian flag. Jankovic stood on tiptoes to give him a hug. Later, a European photographer informed her that her father had met “some Serbs from Chicago” and they “went to the bar.”

This doesn’t happen at a Reds game.

For some reason, locals have adopted Jankovic. They wore T-shirts bearing her picture to Sunday’s final. Of playing here, Jankovic said, “So many fans, I remember their faces. I have a lot of support. And those rollercoasters …”

Meanwhile, Safina took solace from playing well here all week, until Sunday. The world’s No.1 is a grinder. She doesn’t have the big game or the big-game mentality of Serena or Venus Williams. But she plays it out, every match, all the time.

Serena denigrated Safina’s top ranking recently, saying, “Dinara did a great job to get to number one. She won Rome and Madrid.’’ Yet both Williams sisters checked out of this event Thursday, each losing in straight sets and playing so poorly, you wondered how much they cared. Safina cared.

“This is a sport that you compete the whole year. I compete every day,” she said.

Jankovic was simply better Sunday. She kept Safina moving and behind the baseline all day. “I was always on the stretch, never on the ball’’ was how Safina described it. Jankovic rallied from an exhausting three-set semifinal Saturday night, even as she awoke Sunday with sore legs and on short sleep. “I wanted to make myself believe I’m not tired,” she explained. “To beat the number one in the world, it’s amazing.”

The men take over today. They were here Sunday, Federer and Rafael Nadal and James Blake, practicing on the outer courts, in front of packed stands. Andy Roddick arrives today. For another week, we are known for something greater than Triple-A baseball and a football team full of reality TV stars.

Best in the world is here another week. A little something to be proud about.

дalex
Aug 17th, 2009, 10:49 AM
http://origin-www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/LatestNews/Read/0,,12781~1757245,00.html

Jelena Back On Top in Cincy

CINCINNATI, OH, USA - Jelena Jankovic made a triumphant return to the winner's circle on Sunday afternoon, beating world No.1 Dinara Safina in straight sets to win the prestigious Western & Southern Financial Group Women's Open title in Cincinnati. Cincinnati: Final Highlights

Jankovic, the No.5 seed at the $2-million, Premier-level tournament, did not have the smoothest path to the final, winning tight two-setters against Maria Kirilenko and Victoria Azarenka in the early rounds and, on Saturday night, prevailing in a marathon against No.4 seed Elena Dementieva, 76(2) 06 76(6), saving four match points down 6-2 in the tie-break before advancing.

Although the rest of her matches were fairly routine, No.1 seed Safina pulled off her own Houdini act earlier on in the week, beating Roberta Vinci in her opening match, 26 75 64, but not before trailing 62 30 and 62 53. By the time the semifinals rolled around the Russian was on fire however, snapping No.14 seed Flavia Pennetta's winning streak at 15 matches with a 62 60 drubbing.

Safina had won her last two meetings with Jankovic, both on hardcourts and both last year, but this time it was Jankovic who came out on top, grabbing the lone break of the first set in the third game of the match then building a 3-0 lead in the second set and never looking back. It was her second Sony Ericsson WTA Tour singles title of the year. Highlights: Jankovic vs. Safina

"When I did the interview before the match, Pam Shriver asked me how I felt today after such a tough one last night. I said I wanted to believe I wasn't tired, that I'm fresh and ready to play," Jankovic said. "I was feeling sore this morning, but when I went on the court I felt fine. I'm really pleased I was able to play well and beat the No.1 player in the world. This is very good for my confidence going into Toronto and the US Open." Interview: Jelena Jankovic

Jankovic also collected her first ever win over a reigning world No.1.

Safina was playing her eighth final of the season and is now 3-5 in those. She is now 12-12 lifetime in finals.

"I was very confident stepping onto the court, but then I was just totally off," Safina said. "There were a few moments were I was starting to get into the match, but she was using some good shots and hitting very close to the lines, also down the lines. She played some great tennis today."

Dinara :bowdown:

дalex
Aug 17th, 2009, 11:01 AM
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/17/sports/tennis/17tennis.html

Jankovic, Recently No. 1, Bests Successor in Final

MASON, Ohio — Six fans spelled out their allegiance Sunday afternoon at the final of the Western & Southern Financial Group Women’s Open, wearing white T-shirts that spelled J-E-L-E-N-A.

Their favorite player, Jelena Jankovic, was on her way to winning the first set against the world No. 1, Dinara Safina, when the woman wearing the “L” cast off her shirt to reveal a tank top that was more fitting for the searing heat.

There would be no “L” for Jankovic, either. Neutralizing Safina’s firepower with angled shots and a blazing backhand, Jankovic cruised to a 6-4, 6-2 victory at the Lindner Family Tennis Center.

It was literally the difference between night and day for Jankovic, who needed 2 hours 46 minutes to dispatch Elena Dementieva in a Saturday semifinal that ended around 10 p.m. She made it harder on herself by wasting three match points on her serve and building a 2-6 deficit in the third-set tie breaker before eking out a 7-6 (2), 0-6, 7-6 (6) victory.

Jankovic’s victory against Safina was the first of her career against a current No. 1 and was made all the sweeter by the fact that Jankovic held the top spot at the start of the year. She had fallen to No. 5 but will move to No. 4 after her showing here.

After the match, she scoured the stands for her father, Veselin. When she saw him leaning over the front railing on the north side of Center Court, she lumbered over on her leaden legs and stretched on to her tiptoes to hug him.

It was a rare tournament appearance for Veselin, who was standing in for his wife, Snezana, who is Jankovic’s faithful sidekick on the WTA Tour. Snezana was home in Serbia recovering from surgery, and Jankovic dedicated this win, her first against a quality field in nearly a year, to her mother.

“I wanted to make her happy,” she said. “It’s important. But my dad, you know, it’s tough for him to watch. He gets really nervous out there.” At her postmatch news conference, a photographer informed Jankovic that her father had been seen at a bar on the grounds toasting her victory.

She laughed. “Probably to relax a little bit,” she said, adding, “Nothing wrong with that.”

Jankovic’s personality is sunnier than the frilly yellow tennis outfit she wore. In that respect, she resembles her mother, whose motto is, “If you are not positive, how will you survive?” Jankovic smiles frequently on the court, even in the tensest of moments, of which there were relatively few Sunday.

“There were a few moments like I was starting to get into the match,” Safina said, “and she was, of course, using some good shots and hitting very close to the lines and down the lines. She played some great tennis today.”

In contrast to Sunday, when Jankovic held the crowd in her sway from the start, there were fans in the south bleachers during her semifinal who were distracted by a man who materialized, seemingly out of the thick air. He appeared to be walking on the clouds beyond the stadium. In fact, the man, Nik Wallenda, was negotiating a steel cable 262 feet above the ground.

For 25 minutes he walked the tightrope, moving 800 feet to a safe perch on the replica Eiffel Tower at Kings Island amusement park. The juxtaposition of Wallenda’s walking and Jankovic’s and Dementieva’s whaling on the tennis ball was apt. It was a fine line between winning and losing that match.

After nearly three hours, what separated Jankovic from Dementieva was not discernible on the stat sheet, which showed the players combining for 25 double faults and 92 unforced errors. The difference had less to do with one unforced error or a single winner than it did an ounce of determination.

In the end, Jankovic’s will to win was just a bit stronger. That has been the part of her game that has been noticeably absent, her mind-set switching at some point this year from playing each point as if it were her last to playing each match as if there were always next week.

“I had so many distractions outside off the court,” Jankovic said. “I’m quite an emotional person, and I wasn’t able to focus. It took a lot out of me.”

As her mother’s health improved, so did Jankovic’s focus. She declined to say what is ailing her mother but said she was doing well. “She had surgery after Wimbledon and she’s recovering,” Jankovic said, adding: “You know, I can enjoy my tennis. I’m happy for my mom.”

At the United States Open last year, Jankovic produced her best result in a Grand Slam event, losing in the final to Serena Williams in straight sets. She won three events in the fall, in Beijing, Stuttgart and Moscow, to add heft to her top ranking.

With her victory Sunday, Jankovic moved into a tie for first with Flavia Pennetta for the bonus that goes to the winner of the summer hardcourt season.

Two weeks before the United States Open, Jankovic can see shades of her top-ranked self.

:hearts:

ElusiveChanteuse
Aug 17th, 2009, 11:53 AM
:inlove: JJ :rocker2:

schorsch
Aug 17th, 2009, 12:58 PM
August 16, 2009

Jelena Jankovic

CINCINNATI, OHIO

J. JANKOVIC/D. Safina
6-4, 6-2

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. How is it that you looked like the fresher player out there today?
JELENA JANKOVIC: You know, I just -- you know, when I did the interview before the match and Pam Shriver was asking me, How you feel today after such a tough one last night? I just said that I wanted to make myself believe that you're not tired. I feel fresh. I'm ready to play.
That's how I felt today in the match, actually. When I woke up in morning I felt really sore, especially after going to sleep at 2:00 a.m. You know, when I went on court I just felt fine. My legs were a little bit tight and I got a little bit pain in my quad. I was sore in my certain parts of my body, which was normal because yesterday's match was -- it took a lot out of me and it's been a while since I played this tough matches against the top players.
But I'm really pleased that I was able to play well today and beat the No. 1 player in the world, and yesterday beat Elena Dementieva. I got quite a few good wins under my felt belt this week, which is very good for my confidence coming into Toronto, and especially US Open.
You know, I'm very happy with my performance.

Q. When's the last time you felt this good about how you were playing?
JELENA JANKOVIC: Last year. It's been a while. You know, I finished last year No. 1 in the world. You know, when I won my last big tournament it was in Moscow last year at the end of the year. I won three tournaments in a row, big ones, beating the top players.
You know, I won this year in Marbella, but that was like, you know, compared to the Tier 1 events and all the big events and playing against the No. 1 in the world and all these top 10 girls.
So good win for me. I'm happy that I'm back. I'm back in the, you know, in this group of players, and hopefully I can keep my form up.

Q. Did you know who the people were that spelled out your name in the T-shirts in the stands? I didn't know if they were near where your dad was.
JELENA JANKOVIC: No.

Q. What do you make of those people that obviously like you enough to come wearing T-shirts with your name?
JELENA JANKOVIC: Yeah, throughout this week I had a lot of fans. There were so many people. They had my T-shirt with my picture on it. You know, I had also some fans, you know, No. 1, Jelena. They're my biggest fans.
It's really nice. I appreciate my fans, and I take my time to sign autographs and take pictures with them. They been supporting me throughout the whole week. For me, it means a lot to me, especially in important moments. Especially yesterday when I was down. I heard all these supportive words from the crowd all over the place.
It really pushes you on. It's important, you know, to have these kind of fans. I really appreciate that. It means a lot to me.

Q. She really dominated everyone else she played this week. Why were you able to almost turn the tables on her?
JELENA JANKOVIC: You know, this match was really the ex-No. 1 in the world with the current No. 1 in the world. I came out, and I wanted to play the best that I could play under those conditions. Today was very hot. Especially I didn't know -- my only concern was I didn't know how I was gonna feel during the match because my legs -- if I was gonna be able to move throughout the whole match and be able to be on the ball and try to get the first strike.
I played really smart. I played really with the intelligence. I didn't want to get into the power game, what she does. I really opened up the court and didn't let her play her game. I really put my game out there. I opened those angles and opened the court and waited for the shots that I know I can hit and what I do best.
Really pleased with my performance. The wind and all the conditions, it was not easy, but I handled the whole situation very well.

Q. Was your dad a stand-in for your mom, or does he usually try to come to a few of your matches?
JELENA JANKOVIC: No, my dad, actually it's been really a while since he has been -- since he has watched me play. You know, my mom usually travels with me, but my mom had surgery after Wimbledon, so she's recovering.
You know, I dedicate this win to her. I wanted to make her happy. It's important. But my dad, you know, it's tough for him to watch. He gets really nervous out there. It's tough watching your kid. I understand him. My mother is more used to those kind of things because she travel with me since I was a little girl.
But my dad has helped me a lot. He knows my tennis very well, and I've readjusted some of the things just before coming into this tournament. I work a lot on, you know, doing the right things, playing and improving some of the shots. There is still many things I would like to get better at. I will work hard to improve, but it's been really big improvement so far.
Because I haven't been playing very well this first half of the season, I said to myself, I'm gonna begin. This is my time to come back. I love playing on hardcourts. I'm moving very well again and my game is coming back and I'm positive. I'm out there with a smile on my face, and I bring some, you know, how do you say, some interesting things into tennis again.
You know, it's nice for me to be back.

Q. That was a very sweet moment when you went over and hugged your dad.
JELENA JANKOVIC: Yeah.

Q. For him, you can imagine how nervous he was for you, to be able to share that with your dad.
JELENA JANKOVIC: Yeah, for sure to be able to share these kind of moments with your parents, doesn't matter who it is, my dad or my mom. My mom watched on TV, so she was really happy for that. It's always amazing. I really appreciate my family. My family and my parents have been with me through the good and the bad times. I really appreciate their support.
You know, watching me play and going through all the things that I went through, it's not really easy. For me to win this week, it's really great and brings a lot of joy.

Q. Which was more difficult for you, with Azarenka or Dementieva?
JELENA JANKOVIC: You cannot compare it. Each match is individual. Individual, different players, different styles of game.
I cannot compare. I tried my best each match. You know, some matches I played better than the others. Some worse than the others. You cannot expect yourself to play your best tennis every time.
Also, some games, the way they play doesn't really suit you, so it gives you a lot more trouble.
But I figured out my way, you know, to win those matches. It didn't matter who it was on the other side. Yesterday was unbelievable match. You know, 6-2 I was down in the tiebreaker, and I was able to win 8-6. Today beating the No. 1 player in the world, it's amazing as well. She has been in great form and she played very well this year.
You know, for me to win against her, it gives me a lot of confidence. So I hope that I can just keep getting better and better. Like I said in the beginning of the week when I won my first round, the more I play the better I get and the more dangerous I get.
So I keep getting and getting better and better and my level of play was going up and up. So really happy and satisfied.

Q. Have you been in contact with your mom since the match ended?
JELENA JANKOVIC: Every day I'm calling her a couple times a day. It's just sometimes a problem with the time difference, because last night she was -- because there was no, how do you say, there was no coverage. It was on Tennis Channel but not in Europe, so she was watching the live score. And she couldn't watch. You know, she was on the computer live score, and she couldn't believe it, what was happening.
She said, you want me to have a heart attack watching these scores? What are you doing to your mother? But, what can I do? I don't want to do that, but I'm just trying to win. That was it. It's nice.
You know, at the end of the day, the most important thing is to be happy and to give your best here on the court. Sometimes you're gonna win and sometimes you're gonna lose. You got to try hard and give your best, and whatever your best is on that certain day, that's it.

Q. Where is your mom now?
JELENA JANKOVIC: In Serbia at home.

Q. With respect to playing a long match the night before and then coming back playing midday, were you looking to do anything different? With respect to your physical condition, did you know that you had to do some things different, that you didn't have a lot of gas in the tank today?
JELENA JANKOVIC: No, like I said, it was all mental because I didn't want to make myself believe I was tired. My legs are hurting me now. I cannot wait to get a massage. I just didn't want to tell to myself that I'm tired and I don't have enough energy. I just said to myself, I'm feeling good and I'm excited about playing today's final. I'm playing against the No. 1 in the world. I just gotta go out there and try to play the best that I can.
I came out tactically very well-prepared. I was playing really smart. That's what I did. It was all up in the mind. You know, that was all.
I didn't think I had issues with my fatigue or whatever there was. It was really hot out there. There's no doubt about that. But I just focused one point at a time and played my tennis.

Q. How long have you been waiting for a result like this? You said at Stanford you felt like you were playing well and didn't come together there.
JELENA JANKOVIC: Yeah, you know, when I was playing in Stanford, you know, I felt like my game was coming back, but I was still a little bit rusty. After Wimbledon I haven't played for a month, so I needed some matches and to just get into that rhythm again.
I was a little bit unlucky against Bartoli, and then she ended up winning the tournament. But I had the chance to win in two sets. Unfortunately, got some strange calls and some, you know, strange things happened over there.
You know, I lost that match, but I didn't put myself down. I just analyze what I had to do and I went to practice right after that. I worked on my game. I worked on certain things and I came out here, you know, really optimistic. I want to enjoy my tennis and I want to play.
You know, every match I got better and better. At the end, I won the title. It's a big title, and it's been a while since I have done this. Hopefully I can continue with the consistent results.

Q. After winning three tournaments last fall, there would be a lot of people who would think, whatever I'm doing is right. Yet you went and tried to add more muscle. What were you thinking?
JELENA JANKOVIC: No, I didn't want to add muscle. I never wanted to do that. It's the coaches, you know. I did some different training, and the work-outs that I did added muscle to my body.
It was 15 pounds more muscle than I have now. Maybe you can cannot tell the difference. You probably can. Because I was much bigger in my shoulders and legs. But I felt so much slower. It was so difficult for me to move. I did not feel my strokes.
Then some other problems with my mother's health and, you know, it's difficult. It was difficult for me to concentrate, and it affected me a lot in many ways. You know, I changed and readjusted the way I trained. I started thinking much more positive and started eating right as well.
You know, I used to drink Coke. I drank Coke and I ate chocolate. But generally I have a good metabolism and I don't really gain weight. Doesn't make a difference if I eat chocolate or not.
But you got to take care of all these little things to have energy and feel good. All of us have certain things that are not good that we like to eat. Nobody is perfect. You cannot take care and you just eat everything right.
But now I'm doing this and I'm feeling good. All these little things at the end give a good result. But the most important, I'm having -- my smile is back and I'm having fun, you know, playing the matches. I love competing and being out there. This is what I missed. I missed this for maybe seven months this year. I missed being in these kind of situations and being in big crowds and having the support and being in tough situations.
At the end, coming out as a winner, it gives a great -- it's great satisfaction. This is what the sport is all about.

Q. Is there anything that sets this event apart for you, besides today obviously?
JELENA JANKOVIC: You know, it's amazing. I've been here maybe three years ago or something. There's so many fans that I remember. It's amazing. I remember their faces, and, you know, I have a lot of support.
You know, I really like that a lot. You know, all these roller coasters and all of these things. I haven't had a chance to go this week. I was focused on my job finally.

Q. Your first service game, it went to deuce three times. She had a breakpoint. Did you almost feel that set the tone, because if you would have lost that and then maybe it gives her confidence to be more aggressive?
JELENA JANKOVIC: You can always tell. You can always say if, if. If I did this or she did that, you never know what can happen.
In the beginning, when I played those first two games, I felt a little bit slow. I felt a little bit flat. Took me a little bit of time, you know, five or ten minutes, to warm up, to get into the match, and to start feeling the ball.
It was a little bit windy, and so I needed to move my feet and really be dynamic and play with energy.
After, right after those two games, I started to feel good again. Then I just kind of cruised through and was getting better and better and did my job in a big way.

Q. You asked for the trainer twice in the match. Was it just stiffness, or beginning of the cramps?
JELENA JANKOVIC: You know, I have a little bit of pain in my quad because it's -- maybe I even have a strain. I'm not sure about that. I will see the trainer. I had some pain, and I had to call because when I was banging I felt it quite a lot.
But it's not something that's abnormal, because I played a lot of tennis this week. It's been a while since I have done that. You can practice eight hours a day, but playing the match with a pressure and intensity, it's completely different. Takes way more energy out of you.

Q. Do you empathize with Dinara because of the No. 1 situation, not having won a Slam?
JELENA JANKOVIC: No, I respect everybody. I respect every player. You cannot -- she's the current No. 1 in the world. You cannot take away her results. What she has done, she deserves all of that. Being No. 1 in the world is not easy to do, even if it's for a week or however time it is.
Not many people can say that they were the No. 1 player in the world. No matter what profession you are, it's a huge accomplishment.

Q. But do you feel a little bit more of a bond or something with her?
JELENA JANKOVIC: No, I don't feel -- you know, no bond to anybody. You know, I mean, we are all individuals. We all have different results, different goals, different, you know, ambitions.
You know, I respect her a lot as a player, and what she has done, it's great. Nobody can tell her anything, you know. With a Grand Slam or no Grand Slam, she's still the No. 1 player in the world, and nobody can take it away from her in this moment.
Maybe somebody else will during -- it's still not the end of the year. But for right now, she's the player. She has had the best results this year so far, so all the credit to her.

Q. How much your coach contributed to your victory today? Was it his idea to play the way you played?
JELENA JANKOVIC: My dad contributed a lot to this. You know, he has -- he knows the way I played since I was a little girl. Just he hasn't traveled with me so much. He knows, and he was telling me before -- you know, after Wimbledon I took a little break.
My dad came out and saw me play, and he goes, Jelena, this has nothing to do with your backhand. I don't know what you have been doing, but this is not your shot.
I mean, you know. And then you know the funny part was Nick Bollettieri's, he was like, You're not bending enough. You're not doing this or that. I see my shoes. I used to have always hole in my shoes because I was bending and I always ripped my shoelaces because I was bending so much on certain shots, especially the backhand and the way I hit my backhand down the line. It was my biggest weapon. This is the way I was hurting my opponents.
Then I start and I see my laces are ripped again and all of those things, and it's amazing. I started to change some of my technique and get back to the shot, to the way I was playing and the way I felt the rhythm.
Little by little, it was coming back. I was feeling it, feeling it, feeling, feeling, and especially couple times there was some great shots that I was able to hit and my game is coming back together.

Q. They told me he went to the bar.
JELENA JANKOVIC: Who, my dad.

Q. Yes.
JELENA JANKOVIC: I don't know, probably to relax a little bit. To celebrate. Nothing wrong with that.


(Dinara: http://www.asapsports.com/show_interview.php?id=58540)
:p

дalex
Aug 17th, 2009, 01:01 PM
Beaten by Schorsch...What goes around, comes around, I guess...:lol:

Here's the link for JJ's interview...
http://www.asapsports.com/show_interview.php?id=58541


Dinara's interview. (http://www.asapsports.com/show_interview.php?id=58540)

MaBaker
Aug 17th, 2009, 01:35 PM
Q. How much your coach contributed to your victory today? Was it his idea to play the way you played?
JELENA JANKOVIC: My dad contributed a lot to this. You know, he has -- he knows the way I played since I was a little girl. Just he hasn't traveled with me so much. He knows, and he was telling me before -- you know, after Wimbledon I took a little break.
My dad came out and saw me play, and he goes, Jelena, this has nothing to do with your backhand. I don't know what you have been doing, but this is not your shot.
I mean, you know. And then you know the funny part was Nick Bollettieri's, he was like, You're not bending enough. You're not doing this or that. I see my shoes. I used to have always hole in my shoes because I was bending and I always ripped my shoelaces because I was bending so much on certain shots, especially the backhand and the way I hit my backhand down the line. It was my biggest weapon. This is the way I was hurting my opponents.
Then I start and I see my laces are ripped again and all of those things, and it's amazing. I started to change some of my technique and get back to the shot, to the way I was playing and the way I felt the rhythm.
Little by little, it was coming back. I was feeling it, feeling it, feeling, feeling, and especially couple times there was some great shots that I was able to hit and my game is coming back together.
Is she ignoring Ricardo ?

allrounder
Aug 17th, 2009, 01:52 PM
That was what i thought too as soon as i read that. I like the way she completely passes on the opportunity to compliment Ricardo :lol:

Ellery
Aug 17th, 2009, 02:07 PM
:rolls: That's my girl :inlove:

дalex
Aug 17th, 2009, 02:59 PM
Is she ignoring Ricardo ?

Jelena...

http://i39.tinypic.com/34ysdw1.gif

Senhor Sanchez deserves a mention!

~Kiera~
Aug 17th, 2009, 04:40 PM
http://www.sportinglife.com/tennis/news/story_get.cgi?STORY_NAME=tennis/09/08/14/manual_130039.html

WHO'S GOT THEIR EYE IN?

By Andy Schooler

There's little doubt that electronic line calling in tennis has been well received by fans and, in the main, the players.

But how good are the competitors at using the challenge system that the Hawk-eye technology now provides?

Roger Federer was an early critic of Hawk-eye and soon became well known for his erroneous challenges. But is that reputation fair? And is Dinara Safina's position as world number one reflected in her ability to challenge calls?

Given the US Open is just around the corner and that controversy at the 2004 tournament was largely responsible for the system being introduced, I decided to find out, using the available statistics during the first half of the season (that's up to and including Wimbledon).

The WTA Tour were most helpful and provided stats for all their tournaments which used the system in 2009. The ATP Tour could not do the same but I was still able to gain a similar-sized sample by using the stats from the Grand Slams - Australian Open and Wimbledon - where the men play best-of-five sets to the women's three.

Starting with the men and it seems Federer's reputation isn't particularly valid these days.

Looking at the world's top 10, he's easily punching his weight with a success rate of 36 per cent - which compares favourably with the tour average of 31.

With Nikolay Davydenko ignored for statistical purposes (he made just two challenges, an unreliable sample), Federer's accuracy puts him fourth of the nine remaining top-10ers.

But it's Novak Djokovic who has his eye in most when it comes to challenging - 13 out of his 28 challenges were correct - a success rate of 46 per cent.

And for those of you wondering where Andy Murray's game can improve, his percentage of 25 gives you an answer.

Outside the top 10, of those players who had at least 10 challenges, Robin Soderling led the way with the Swede correctly calling exactly half of his 10.

And the worst? That dubious honour falls to Michael Llodra. Not once in seven challenges did the decision go his way.

The table below shows how well the world's top 10 performed on the Hawk-eye system:

http://img44.imageshack.us/img44/6169/52746362.jpg

# At least 10 challenges were needed to qualify so Nikolay Davydenko is not included.

Moving on to the women's top 10 and I can reveal Serena Williams rules the roost, pretty much as she does on the tour as a whole.

Serena successfully challenged 44 per cent of the time, winning eight of her 18 contests with the officials.

However, it doesn't appear to be a skill that runs in the family - sister Venus was down at a lowly 21 per cent and managed to reach the Wimbledon final without making a single correct challenge in SW19.

World number one Dinara Safina - easily the most prolific challenger of the tour, making a total of 73 in our study period - comes in with a 36 per cent success rate.

Away from the top 10, China's Shuai Peng just topped Serena's efforts, winning five of 11 challenges - 45 per cent.

The booby prize goes to Agnieszka Radwanska, all eight of her challenges being wrong.

The table below shows how well the world's top 10 performed on the Hawk-eye system:

http://img524.imageshack.us/img524/8310/96753993.jpg

# At least 10 challenges were needed to qualify so Nadia Petrova is not included.

A check of the tour averages shows the women slightly better than their male counterparts when it comes to challenging, although the majority of the WTA's top 10 were well below the tour's average as a whole.

-Valérie-
Aug 17th, 2009, 04:46 PM
That's interesting, even more interesting to see that Jelena has the second best rate. :lol: She made progress in that department to, so it seems.

Optima
Aug 17th, 2009, 06:59 PM
Reading that interview...just confirms why I love her so much, and while I'll always be with her through the good, bad, and the shitastic.

MaBaker
Aug 17th, 2009, 07:53 PM
Senhor Sanchez deserves a mention!
Indeed. After all, he's one of her biggest fans :hug:

RFS
Aug 17th, 2009, 08:01 PM
how on the ever-loving earth did JJ come out with such good stats for HawkEye? that girl is as blind as a fucking bat!

Brena
Aug 17th, 2009, 08:35 PM
That was what i thought too as soon as i read that. I like the way she completely passes on the opportunity to compliment Ricardo :lol:

She's back to her arrogant, self-centered self. :inlove:

how on the ever-loving earth did JJ come out with such good stats for HawkEye? that girl is as blind as a fucking bat!

No idea. It seems that a slumping JJ is better at challenges than a slumping one. :shrug:

-Valérie-
Aug 17th, 2009, 08:40 PM
Everybody can improve, i'd say! And she will prouve it to you again, on other department, by having a very good end in 2009.

~Kiera~
Aug 18th, 2009, 01:46 AM
http://www.google.com/hostednews/canadianpress/article/ALeqM5hnCkpb-iH2ThFN_KKKtDlBF6GyXA

Serbian star Jankovic likens WTA players' grunts to women giving birth

By James Bisson (CP) – 17 minutes ago

TORONTO — Jelena Jankovic can be forgiven for occasionally mistaking the tennis court for a hospital delivery room.

The Serbian sensation, seeded fifth at this week's US$2-million Rogers Cup event at Rexall Centre, says she can't understand why some players on the WTA Tour can practise in near-silence, then unleash ear-splitting shrieks during their matches. Jankovic wouldn't name names, but it was clear she's irked by the tactic.

"I've seen some cases where I would be practising next to a girl who is quiet in the session, and then she would go out to play a match and she would be grunting and screaming like she's giving birth to a child," Jankovic joked. "It's amazing.

"I don't know the reasons why they're doing it . . . it's good to breathe when you're hitting the ball, but to a certain volume. You shouldn't be (heard) from miles away. I think that goes over the limit."

Second-seeded American Serena Williams said she would never use grunts or shrieks to gain an advantage on an opponent - and she hoped others felt the same.

"I'm a straight shooter, I'm a straight player, and I'm always a great competitor," said Williams. "I don't use any below-the-belt tactics, so I would like to believe that people that I play don't use it, either.

"I can't imagine that someone would say 'I'm going to grunt to distract someone else."'

Jankovic, who admitted the grunts can be distracting, prided herself on being one of the quieter players on the tour.

"I don't grunt," said Jankovic. "I barely even breathe."

-Valérie-
Aug 18th, 2009, 03:12 AM
I do think Serena Williams do it on purpose... sometimes... It is just too obvious. And we know a little Serena, pff...

downunderfan
Aug 18th, 2009, 06:12 AM
"I barely even breathe."

:lol: You, Superwoman!

дalex
Aug 18th, 2009, 07:08 AM
Jelena :rolls:... Barely breathe... Damn we missed you, babe! :hearts:

дalex
Aug 18th, 2009, 10:28 AM
http://www.thestar.com/sports/tennis/article/682417

ROGERS CUP
TheStar.com | Tennis | Dinara Safina and Serena Williams's court debate

Both players believe they're No.1 and at opposite sides of draw could prove it in T.O.
Aug 18, 2009 04:30 AM
Kevin McGran
Sports Reporter

Dinara Safina offers a direct, almost curt, answer when the subject to who the best female player in the world is.

"I'm No.1 in the world and I don't care about anything else," said the Russian yesterday after a practice session in preparation for the Rogers Cup at the Rexall Centre.

Of course, American Serena Williams has a different opinion. Williams believes she is the best.

"I think every lady on the tour should believe that," says Williams. "If they don't then they're doing the wrong job.

"I was always taught to believe I'm the best, no matter what I'm doing – playing tennis or designing clothes, or making food. I think once you have that attitude, it can propel you to be the best."

Safina is, of course, the top ranked woman, a testament to season-long consistency. But she's never won a Grand Slam event. Williams, ranked second, has the higher profile wins. She has won three of the past four Grand Slams, but hasn't done well otherwise.

"I've been consistent two or three times this year," she said to a handful of chuckles. "Hopefully I can be more consistent."

If there's a non-grand slam tournament that could sort this mess out, it's this week's Rogers Cup, with Safina and Serena on opposite sides of the draw. It also has the strongest field of any of the non-Grand Slam events, with all 10 of the top 10 in attendance –19 of the top 20– including nine current or former world No.1s.

"It's an amazing field," said Vera Zvonareva, the seventh seed here. "It's like a Grand Slam, but a smaller draw. It's going to be a tough tournament to win."

It hasn't always been thus for the Rogers Cup. Generally, it's been plagued by last-minute withdrawals from the stars, usually because they don't want to risk injury so close to the U.S. Open.

But the WTA has changed things this year, paring the schedule in a way that makes the Toronto stop more attractive.

Also, the recession has reduced the out-of-tour exhibitions that might have drawn some top names, making Toronto's $350,000 winner's purse more attractive.

There's also the direct approach.

"Basically if you don't come, you can get fined," said Serena Williams, who was last in Toronto in 2005. "I've always wanted to come here. I always tend to get injured. And it's close to the Open."

Williams was eliminated early last week in Cincinnati. Safina made it to the final but lost Sunday to Serbia's Jelena Jankovic.

"She's ranked No.1 in the world and you can't take that away from her," said Jankovic, herself former No. 1. "But the year is not over.

"We'll see how the year-end ranking will be. There's a big difference finishing the year No.1 and being No.1 during the year. It's a huge accomplishment to finish it No.1, like I did in 2008. It was a dream come true for me. Maybe I can do it this year, or Serena."

Some have criticized women's tennis for failing to produce dominant players, the way men's tennis has Roger Federer. But legend Martina Navratilova believes that's a strength, not a weakness.

"Going into any slam, or any tournament, you don't know who's going to win," said Navratilova. "Now with Kim (Clijsters) coming back and (Maria) Sharapova back, you never know who's going to win.

"You know who the favourite is," Navratalova added, pointing to Serena Williams. "But she's got her work cut out."

-Valérie-
Aug 18th, 2009, 01:40 PM
Serena is talking a way too much, somehow, she is going to be taught a lesson of humility. Although, she is right for one thing: you gotta believe you are the best to achieve good results.

But i do think that Safina is working really hard and a #1 ranking can't be achieve just like that (not playing the number of tournament required), the most consistent certainly deserve that ranking. And Jelena certainly deserved it last year because she had great results all year long.

The year is not over, Jeca said it herself (she is back to the confidence mode, i like it), but i do think that the US open will say a lot about who is going to finish #1 and i don't think Serena will keep her title there. I am not sure yet who is going to win, but neither of the Williams sister or SAfina will held the trophy. To be continued...

terjw
Aug 18th, 2009, 08:47 PM
"She's ranked No.1 in the world and you can't take that away from her," said Jankovic, herself former No. 1. "But the year is not over.

"We'll see how the year-end ranking will be. There's a big difference finishing the year No.1 and being No.1 during the year. It's a huge accomplishment to finish it No.1, like I did in 2008. It was a dream come true for me. Maybe I can do it this year, or Serena."



I'm not really keen on these little remarks by Jelena sort of saying "my #1 is better than your #1". To be fair - she's constantly asked about this all the time and of course she should be proud of herself and of course she's not going to say the right things all the time. I still love her and that she says what she thinks from the heart. But I wish she wouldn't make these little put-down remarks.

I don't agree with Jelena at all when she says there's a big difference between ending the year #1 and being #1 during the year. It's a rolling 12 months so it's purely arbitrary what people like to make of the end of year. But the rules and what you've got to do to get to #1 are the same whether in January, June or November. So you haven't got to do better to get #1 at the end of year compared to any other time.

I think getting to #1 the way she did it at the end of last year with those three successive wins was much more satisfying than the way she sort of backed into it earlier. So I do think her #1 at the end of last year was much better than her brief earlier #1 from that point of view.

Bruno71
Aug 18th, 2009, 10:45 PM
I'm not really keen on these little remarks by Jelena sort of saying "my #1 is better than your #1". To be fair - she's constantly asked about this all the time and of course she should be proud of herself and of course she's not going to say the right things all the time. I still love her and that she says what she thinks from the heart. But I wish she wouldn't make these little put-down remarks.

I don't agree with Jelena at all when she says there's a big difference between ending the year #1 and being #1 during the year. It's a rolling 12 months so it's purely arbitrary what people like to make of the end of year. But the rules and what you've got to do to get to #1 are the same whether in January, June or November. So you haven't got to do better to get #1 at the end of year compared to any other time.

I think getting to #1 the way she did it at the end of last year with those three successive wins was much more satisfying than the way she sort of backed into it earlier. So I do think her #1 at the end of last year was much better than her brief earlier #1 from that point of view.


Jelena's still a work in progress when it comes to diplomacy, and the shaky results show almost every time she's asked about another player. She wants to kiss Serena's ass so she ends up slamming Dinara in the process. She wants to believe in herself and that she's superior to most other players, and ends up pissing off Bartoli into a 4 match winning streak against her. I think she's made some progress, but she should probably think about what she says a little bit more before she says it.

Foon_JJ
Aug 20th, 2009, 08:53 AM
JANKOVIC AND DEMENTIEVA WIN WITH EASE

http://www.rogerscup.com/women/images/jankovicWednesday.jpg

August 19, 2009

High seeds Jelena Jankovic and Elena Dementieva were both straight-sets winners on Wednesday. Jankovic, who was crowned champion in Cincinnati last week, handled Patty Schnyder of Switzerland 7-5, 6-4. The 24-year-old is tied for the lead in the Olympus US Open Series and has recently looked every bit like the dominant player she was during 2008.

Dementieva also had no trouble advancing, eliminating Japan's Ai Sugiyama 6-3, 6-2 and holding all but one service game. The world No. 4 will now meet Israel's Shahar Peer in the third round and knows it was important to end her match in two sets.

"It saves some energy for the next round," said Dementieva. "If you're trying to go all the way, it's really important. This is key."

http://www.rogerscup.com/women/english/currentNews.php?id=JANKOVICANDDEMENTIEVAWINWITHEAS E

дalex
Aug 20th, 2009, 11:38 AM
Little blog about yesterday match from a Serbian living in Toronto...
http://blogsvettenisa.blogspot.com/

The old smile, the old Jelena and another victory.

In a match in which there wasn't any doubt about who would be the eventual winner, we saw a tough competitor in Patty Schnyder. She was as good as Jelena in keeping the ball in play, adding a few of her trademark "expected but unexpected drop shots". The match was played in scorching heat, and if there wasn't for a slight breeze, ufff, it would have been unbearable. I found a seat behind Ricardo Sanchez and Mladjan Janovic; I was able to read (Ricardo's) notes...Hmmm, if I knew any Spanish I'd become a good coach perhaps. Many times the eyes of young Mladjan (srb. mladjan = young man) met those of his girlfriend in yellow dress; perhaps it was the biggest support she needed, while after an error from Jelena, Ricardo suggested something and Jelena kind of told him off abruptly. I didn't see that in the notes. It was a happy end, and Jelena gave me exactly what I asked for when I shouted: "Ajde Jelena, give us one good smile!".

дalex
Aug 22nd, 2009, 08:28 AM
http://www.nationalpost.com/sports/story.html?id=1918314

Jankovic falls to Kleybanova in epic battle

TORONTO -- John McEnroe would be proud.

In a quarter-final that lasted more than three hours, Jelena Jankovic and Alisa Kleybanova disputed a combined 21 calls on Friday night and argued with the chair umpire and linesmen on the way to one of the longest and highly contentious matches in Rogers Cup history.

Though a video replay proved that Jankovic was correct on seven of her 13 challenges - Kleybanova was correct on two of eight - Kleybanova won the battle of the bad calls.

The Russian, who is ranked 37th in the world, defeated the fifth-seeded Jankovic 6-7, 7-6, 6-2. With the win, she will play Russia's Maria Sharapova in Saturday's semi-finals. Sharapova beat Poland's Agnieszka Radwanska 6-2, 7-6 at match that ended well after midnight local time.

"It was a lot of bad calls from the referee," said Jankovic. "And then I didn't really trust many of those calls."

Coming off a tournament win at Cincinnati last week, as well as a three-set win against Kim Clijsters on Thursday, the 24-year-old Jankovic once again had to work for every point. The first set went to a tiebreak, where Jankovic quickly found herself down 5-1. But with the score 6-3, she fought off three set points and took the set.

Along the way, she successfully challenged four incorrect calls.

"If I didn't challenge, I would have lost the first set. Those challenges saved me," said Jankovic, who actually disputed that one of her serves had fallen in. "My serve was so much out and then [the chair umpire] didn't say anything and I challenged my serve to be out. I mean, I never seen that before. That was really ridiculous. I didn't know what was happening."

It may have been coincidental, but it was worth noting that the chair umpire moved a linesman from his post at the service box to the baseline to start the second set. Not that the change in location improved anything.

With the instant replay proving Jankovic and Kleybanova correct 43% of the time, the two players appeared to dispute every ball that came within an inch of hitting the out-of-bounds line. The only time they sat silent and let the linesmen do their job was when they ran out of allotted challenges.

"After so many mistakes, it gets really frustrating," said Jankovic. "Every time there is a close ball, you're in doubt.

"There were so many bad calls and they were right in front of the umpire and they didn't see them. Then you have to use the challenges and in the end you have none, because it's so close and the referee should at least tell you, but there was so many mistakes."

When Jankovic was not disagreeing with the linesmen or the chair umpire, she was contesting Kleybanova. Jankovic fought off nine set points - five in the first; five in second as the marathon match wore on and on.

In the process, the crowd started to cheer on her underdog opponent.

With the second-set also reaching a tiebreak, Kleybanova finally managed to close out Jankovic to tie the match 1-1. She then broke Jankovic three times in the third to win the third set 6-2 and put an end to a match that lasted three hours and 13 minutes -- just 17 minutes of the Rogers Cup record.

"Physically, I don't think I felt tired," said Kleybanova. "It was a really mental game today. When you have so many important points and every point that you play is so tough that you have to give it 100%, it really kills your brain."

I thought she was worse at those challenges. I guess because some of them were ridiculous.

http://www.google.com/hostednews/canadianpress/article/ALeqM5iIBGrvENRlkoV-duZSmQiQemVkmQ

Jankovic rips umpire for missed calls in Rogers Cup loss to Kleybanova

(CP) – 1 hour ago

TORONTO — A long night at the Rogers Cup was made even longer by a miffed Jelena Jankovic.

The fifth-seeded Serb dropped a 6-7 (6), 7-6 (7), 6-2 decision to unranked Alisa Kleybanova of Russia in the quarter-finals of the US$2-million WTA Tour event, a match that took more than three hours to complete and featured dozens of shot challenges. Those challenges, Jankovic contended after the match, were necessary due to a number of missed calls by Raffaella Seri of Italy.

"It was a lot of bad calls from the referee," said Jankovic. "Especially at this level, they shouldn't be making these kinds of mistakes. This was a little bit too much."

Jankovic had a legitimate beef. At one point, she hit a serve nearly a foot long, but it was called in. The umpire chose not to overrule, so Jankovic decided to challenge the call.

"There were balls that were so out, and she wouldn't call it," said Jankovic. "My serve was so much out, and she didn't say anything, and then I challenged for my serve to be out. I've never seen that before.

"That was really ridiculous. I didn't know what was happening."

Jankovic said the litany of missed calls forced her to use her challenges, which helped her win the first set but left her without any at the end of the second set.

"I didn't really trust many of those calls," said Jankovic. "I challenged in the first set, and I was right. Otherwise, if I didn't challenge, I would have lost that first set for sure. Those challenges saved me.

"It was so many bad calls, and it was exactly in front of the umpires, and they wouldn't see."

Kleybanova agreed that some of the calls were suspect, but defended the umpire and line crew.

"It was really difficult," said Kleybanova. "We played so many close points, and we played some balls so close to the lines that it was tough for a human eye to catch the exact spot of the ball.

"It was all about the electronic calling today. It was difficult also for me to see some balls."

Jankovic was having none of that.

"After so many mistakes, it gets really frustrating. Every time there's a close ball, next to the line, you're in doubt. Should you challenge or should you not?

"What can you do, you know? This is (over). I tried my best."

Bruno71
Aug 22nd, 2009, 08:48 AM
I agree with Alisa, most of those wrong calls were touching the line or just barely in or out.

Kampi
Aug 22nd, 2009, 09:55 AM
Who was the umpire?

дalex
Aug 22nd, 2009, 11:55 AM
http://www.torontosun.com/sports/othersports/2009/08/22/10560421-sun.html

Uncomfortable with 'theatre' silence

Uniformed volunteers at the Rogers Cup shush the crowd when the noise level rises, but some players welcome it, especially in multicultural Toronto with so many national favourites here.

"We are not in the theatre," declared Serbian Jelena Jankovic of traditional tennis etiquette. "You need to get the crowd to enjoy it. People like to see nice personalities, good athletes and good tennis.

"They motivate you and give you energy at certain points of the match when you need the push."

Serbian and Russian flags have been visible at the Rexall Centre this week and players are often greeted by their old-world first names.

"It's not a big distraction," insisted Russian Elena Dementieva. "I like to play the Federation Cup and the Olympics where people are allowed to express themselves.

"Tennis was the only sport where you had to be very quiet. People should come and enjoy the atmosphere. They have to be allowed to scream and to cheer."

Foon_JJ
Aug 22nd, 2009, 12:56 PM
Who was the umpire?

Raffaella Seri from Italy.

Old pic:
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3430/3308490209_7eb517b81f.jpg

terjw
Aug 22nd, 2009, 02:41 PM
I agree with Alisa, most of those wrong calls were touching the line or just barely in or out.

I think so too. You just can't go blaming the linesmen for those. In particular - the challenge that "saved" the 1st set in one of those SPs she saved. Jelena served a second serve in the 1st set TB that would probably have been called out by any linesman. Jelena challenged and it was on the line width wise and painted the outside of the line length wise. Yes it saved her the 1st set. But she was actually very very lucky.

She is an emotional person. And WYSIWYG if you are a Jelena fan. In her more reflective moments - she will say she wishes she wasn't like that and could control her emotions. Right now she's still furious. If she could only channel all that emotion and pent up frustration on her own game - she might not have needed to be in a situation she needed to make a desperate challenge to save her. Because the line calls were not the reason she lost last night.

дalex
Aug 22nd, 2009, 04:23 PM
Full interview...
http://www.asapsports.com/show_interview.php?id=58647

Jelena Jankovic

TORONTO, ONTARIO

A. KLEYBANOVA/J. Jankovic
6-7, 7-6, 6-2

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. You just won one week ago. Is that reason that probably you didn't have enough power to make final game and you were just in front of winning tonight?
JELENA JANKOVIC: Yeah, I played a lot of matches, you know. I won the tournament last week. Especially yesterday I had a really tough match. I finished at 1:00 in the morning, and by the time we got to the hotel and everything, I went to sleep at 4:00 in the morning.
So I didn't have much time to recover, and obviously I was tired, you know. My body wasn't as fresh, you know, as in the beginning, you know, when I played in Cincinnati.
But I tried my best, you know. I had my chances. I needed a little bit more power, you know, to finish the match. You know, I saved, you know, the tiebreaker in the first set and won that, and then, you know, I had a match point in the second set in the tiebreaker, but she hit that really slow second serve, and I didn't expect it, you know. I was too far back. I didn't use that chance. I had one chance. I had a match point, and I didn't take it.
In the third, I was exhausted. My energy and everything went down, and you know, she took advantage of that.

Q. Can you talk a bit about the challenges? There were an unusual high number of challenges tonight.
JELENA JANKOVIC: Yeah, I mean, it was a lot of bad calls from the referee, and then, you know, I was -- I didn't really trust so many of those calls because I challenged -- especially in the first set, and I was right. Otherwise if I didn't challenge, I would have lost that first set for sure.
Those challenges saved me. There were so many bad calls. It was exactly in front of the umpire, and then they wouldn't see. Then you have to use the challenges, and then at the end you have none because it's so close, and the referee should at least tell you.
But it was so many mistakes. But what can you do? I mean, you cannot control that, and I can't do nothing about it.

Q. What would you like the chair umpire to do in a case like that?
JELENA JANKOVIC: Yeah, you know, okay, when the balls are -- if it's very little touching the line, okay, I can understand that. But there were balls like they were so much out and then she wouldn't call it. You know, even that let, you know.
Also, one time I served the ball, my serve was so much out, and then she didn't say anything, and then I challenged for my serve to be out. I mean, I never seen that before. That was really, really -- I didn't know what was happening. Then after so many mistakes, it gets really frustrating that you start -- like every time it's a close ball next to the line, you're in doubt. Should you challenge, should you not?
Then I was a little bit, you know, overusing because I was not really sure because I didn't have any trust in the umpire.
But anyway, you know, what can you do, you know? This is gone, and I tried my best, you know, today. I really had, you know, played with all my energy the little that I had left, and you know, she was more fast than me and she took it as an advantage and won the match.

Q. In the second set you were visibly upset with the umpire and you approached her. What did you say to her?
JELENA JANKOVIC: I don't know.

Q. Can you tell us what you said to her?
JELENA JANKOVIC: I have no idea, you know. Of course it's frustrating, because sometimes you hit a good serve, and then your opponent doesn't even return the ball, just barely touches it, or you hit a good shot and it's on the line and your opponent didn't really have a chance to make it in the court, and then you have to -- they make a mistake, and then you have to repeat the point that you already won. Then you end up losing the point.
It's so frustrating because you should have been -- you know, it's tough to accept. But this is the way it is. I mean, you cannot -- you cannot think about that, you know, too much. If it gets in your head, you really -- you forget how to play, because all you're thinking is about all of these things.
But, you know, it should be -- you know, especially in this kind of, you know, level, they shouldn't be making these kind of mistakes. This was a little bit too much, especially that serve, you know. That I never seen before in my life where I missed so much. It was like this much out, and she would be like, No, no, your serve was good.
I'm challenging my serve to be out against myself, you know, because she didn't see it.

Q. Can you talk about your opponent a bit tonight and what was so difficult in her game for you to handle?
JELENA JANKOVIC: Yeah, you know, it was difficult, you know, for me, to be honest. The way she plays was tough, because she hits those shots, you know, so low and so flat. It gave me a lot of difficulties to play my game.
I wasn't able to attack, and it was -- then she as well had those really -- she found some angles which I wasn't expecting. I would pull her out of the court, and all of a sudden she would hit the line and I don't know how she came up with some of the shots.
I never played against her. I didn't know her game that well, and you know, it took me some time, you know, to see how she's playing, what she's doing.
As well, the physical part, you know, I wasn't on top of my game. I was tired, and I didn't have power. You know, I had a lot of ups and downs with myself fighting on my own, trying to stay in there and be strong and do the job, get the job done. But unfortunately I didn't do it.

Q. Is it easy to let this loss go before the US Open? Are you still feeling confident?
JELENA JANKOVIC: Yeah, I'm still feeling confident. I won a tournament last week, beat a lot of top 10 players. Here I had also good wins. You know, yesterday's match was for me almost like a final. I played really good, and my opponent -- you know, Kim played really great tennis.
These kind of matches, you know, I'm happy about, that I'm able to bring some good tennis and do the right things and then at the end be able to win. I fought hard and all of these things. I went to sleep at 4:00 in the morning. You know, it's a long drive to the hotel, and all of a sudden you can't relax after such a tough thing. It was difficult for me.
So, you know, I'm not a machine. I played quite a lot, and it's been a while since I played so many matches, so it took a toll on me, but what can I do? I really gave everything that I had today, and unfortunately it wasn't enough.

Q. I saw your trademark backhand down the line yesterday, last night, and this night I saw a lot of your forehands crosscourt, much more than I would expect from you. I thought you would have more forehand down the line. It didn't happen. You got a lot from Kim last night, too, you got a lot of shots that you would hardly handle. It happened tonight again. So what do you think about that tactic, about having a little bit more forehands down the line?
JELENA JANKOVIC: Yeah, there are so many things that, you know, tactically you can do different, but the way my opponent was hitting the ball today, you know, it was really difficult. It's a really tough ball.
It's like I almost had to pitch it up. You know, it stays low and it kind of skids. So it was difficult for me to change direction for some reason. You know, it was difficult, you know. I never played against her, and so I didn't know what to expect. But next time I will be more aware, more alert, and I will know what I need to do.

Q. She really has a low body, and she picks up the low balls easy.
JELENA JANKOVIC: And also, it was difficult for me sometimes to read. She would come up with some shots, and it would like hit the line from really -- I don't know for how does she come up with these kind of --

Q. Like the backhand short crosscourt?
JELENA JANKOVIC: Short cross -- it would go so flat. I don't know. But this is the way she plays, and you know, as well, what does she have to lose? Nothing. So you can --

Q. She played great.
JELENA JANKOVIC: -- play more freely and you can go for your shots, and then, you know, they went in sometimes. She won, and I lost.
But anyway, I'm happy with these two weeks. You know, I did very well, and in this moment I'm No. 1 in the race, in this US Open series, so what can I ask more? This will be even a good chance for me to rest a little bit and to recover and train one week before I play the US Open, which is my main goal for this moment.

End of FastScripts

Alisa's interview. (http://www.asapsports.com/show_interview.php?id=58648)

Q. Jelena said you were able to beat her by finding the angles and keeping the ball low. Would you agree with that?
ALISA KLEYBANOVA: Well, today my goal in the match, it was to try to play the game which is not, you know -- to try to play my game and not to let her to play her game, because we definitely have different style of tennis.
For me, it was very important to play as fast as possible and really to get her off-balance and to give the rhythm to her that she's not feeling comfortable with.
So I think I managed to do it, because I don't -- I mean, some points she didn't look very comfortable playing the points out, and I think I did a good job really playing fast and low without letting her having too much time to prepare, because she's a really smart player. I think also physically she's maybe one of the best players on tour, you know, running around the court and placing the balls out there. She's doing amazing job.
So for me, it was very important to play fast so she doesn't have time to do all the tactical things. I'm happy about what I did.