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View Full Version : Can you correctly pronounce "Zheng Jie,Yan ZI, Sun Tiantian,Peng Shuai"?


Lin Lin
Jul 2nd, 2008, 08:41 AM
"Li Na" is almost the same as english, I am curious about that how many people can correctly pronounce a Chinese name?:confused:;)

Personlly, I find it's very funny that a foreigner pronounces the names, some pronunciations and accent are really weird actually.:lol:

Try now please, whether you can read them.;););)

lavigne41
Jul 2nd, 2008, 08:44 AM
In a word...no. :lol:

I've been trying my hardest to pronounce Zheng Jie during her last few matches, but alas, it cannot be done. :p

Kim's_fan_4ever
Jul 2nd, 2008, 08:48 AM
No problems here, as a matter of fact, I have no problems with pronouncing foreign names at all :)

InsideOut.
Jul 2nd, 2008, 08:49 AM
Easy as pie :)

Lin Lin
Jul 2nd, 2008, 08:52 AM
Easy as pie :)

It seems you are in HK, of course you can :cool:

Lin Lin
Jul 2nd, 2008, 08:56 AM
:o
I must admit that I have a bit difficulty to pronounce some foreign names, especially Russian names and some eastern european names.:o

lympyisthebest
Jul 2nd, 2008, 08:56 AM
Yes i can :cool:

matthias
Jul 2nd, 2008, 08:59 AM
No, because i´m not a chinese

tennisbear7
Jul 2nd, 2008, 08:59 AM
Zheng Jee-eh.

Yun Zi.

Malva
Jul 2nd, 2008, 09:00 AM
郑洁 (simplified) 鄭潔 (traditional) Zhèng Jié (Romanization)
晏紫 Yàn Zǐ
孙甜甜 Sūn Tiántián
彭帅 Péng Shuài

Yes, I can.

azdaja
Jul 2nd, 2008, 09:03 AM
i learned chinese for a year, so yes i can pronounce chinese names correctly.

Lin Lin
Jul 2nd, 2008, 09:04 AM
郑洁 (simplified) 鄭潔 (traditional) Zhng Ji (Romanization)
晏紫 Yàn Zǐ
孙甜甜 Sūn Tintin
彭帅 Png Shui

Yes, I can.
Wow!! I guess you might be a Chinese major student:eek:

Mynarco
Jul 2nd, 2008, 09:07 AM
When I watched wimbledon live, the commentator kept pronouncing Zheng Jie as Zheng Ji

Malva
Jul 2nd, 2008, 09:14 AM
Wow!! I guess you might be a Chinese major student:eek:

Not at all. But years ago I took a year of Chinese at the University of California, and later I was even continuing in a class on Classical Chinese.

Alas, I forgot nearly all the characters... Still, I keep an impressive collection of books on Chinese language, literature, history, and material culture.

I especially treasure the poetry of the Tang period, archaic bronze sculpture, and Chinese ceramic, especially of the Sung period.

Lin Lin
Jul 2nd, 2008, 09:14 AM
When I watched wimbledon live, the commentator kept pronouncing Zheng Jie as Zheng Ji

Anyway,it's so great for him/her that he/she can pronounce "Zheng",which I believe even some Chinese people can not correctly pronounce ,because there is a very similar, but different, pronunciation of "Zhen".:)

ZeroSOFInfinity
Jul 2nd, 2008, 09:18 AM
Shouldn't be a problem... one of my main speaking languages is Chinese ;)

Lin Lin
Jul 2nd, 2008, 09:20 AM
Not at all. But years ago I took a year of Chinese at the University of California, and later I was even continuing in a class on Classical Chinese.

Alas, I forgot nearly all the characters... Still, I keep an impressive collection of books on Chinese language, literature, history, and material culture.

I especially treasure the poetry of the Tang period, archaic bronze sculpture, and Chinese ceramic, especially of the Sung period.


It's awesome that a foreigner can recite a Tang dynasty's poetry:eek::eek:

You should spell it as "Song" period.:)

Droolv
Jul 2nd, 2008, 09:25 AM
Yes, all but Tiantian Sun :scared:

Malva
Jul 2nd, 2008, 09:26 AM
It's awesome that a foreigner can recite a Tang dynasty's poetry:eek::eek:

You should spell it as "Song" period.:)

I know, but the terminology standard in Art monographs is based on an older romanization scheme (I believe Wade-Giles).

mariahdg
Jul 2nd, 2008, 09:39 AM
Not at all. But years ago I took a year of Chinese at the University of California, and later I was even continuing in a class on Classical Chinese.

Alas, I forgot nearly all the characters... Still, I keep an impressive collection of books on Chinese language, literature, history, and material culture.

I especially treasure the poetry of the Tang period, archaic bronze sculpture, and Chinese ceramic, especially of the Sung period.
:D I especially like Li qingzhao's poetries:angel:

Malva
Jul 2nd, 2008, 09:52 AM
:D I especially like Li qingzhao's poetries:angel:

Li Qingzhao? I am not familiar with her work. She belongs to the later, Song Dynasty, period.

InsideOut.
Jul 2nd, 2008, 09:52 AM
I know, but the terminology standard in Art monographs is based on an older romanization scheme (I believe Wade-Giles).

You really know a huge lot. :eek:

InsideOut.
Jul 2nd, 2008, 09:55 AM
Li Qingzhao? I am not familiar with her work. She belongs to the later, Song Dynasty, period.

You're right, and I am not THE biggest fan of her work, most of them are so sad. :sad:

mariahdg
Jul 2nd, 2008, 10:02 AM
Li Qingzhao? I am not familiar with her work. She belongs to the later, Song Dynasty, period.

:confused: Don't you talk about song period

Kworb
Jul 2nd, 2008, 10:33 AM
I also pronounced it like "Zhng" but then the umpire pronounced it more like "Zhang" :o

Keadz
Jul 2nd, 2008, 10:35 AM
She told the interviewer at the end of the match yesterday how her name was meant to be pronounced. I would have never guessed anything like it.

From my vast knowledge of Chinese I believe Peng sounds more like Pung? I have no idea, but that's something i recall for some reason.

Anyway, I like all the Chinese players so it doesn't matter :)

Привет
Jul 2nd, 2008, 10:44 AM
Chinese language isn't my thing, but I do know that the 'zh' is not pronounced like a 'z'.

John Newcombe persisting with 'Zeng' was driving me insane. It's really not that hard to make a 'j' sound instead of a 'z' sound. That's probably not entirely accurate but 'Jeng' is a lot closer than 'Zeng'.

gumoll
Jul 2nd, 2008, 10:44 AM
I never know what I should say first?

Jie or Zheng?
Na or Li?

:confused:

Привет
Jul 2nd, 2008, 10:49 AM
Surname is always first with Chinese names.

So it's Zheng Jie and Li Na.

I used to always forget whether Na's surname was Li or Na. :lol:

eck
Jul 2nd, 2008, 10:54 AM
Yes. ;)

Malva
Jul 2nd, 2008, 11:01 AM
Surname is always first with Chinese names.

So it's Zheng Jie and Li Na.

I used to always forget whether Na's surname was Li or Na. :lol:

Right.

In case of Li Na (李娜, Lǐ N) it helps to know that there are very few last names in China (famous '400 names'), and 李 (Lǐ) is one of the most common ones whereas I am not aware of any last name pronounced 'Na')

Привет
Jul 2nd, 2008, 11:05 AM
Right.

In case of Li Na (李娜, Lǐ N) it helps to know that there are very few last names in China (famous '400 names'), and 李 (Lǐ) is one of the most common ones whereas I am not aware of any last name pronounced 'Na')

Well there you go. :)

gumoll
Jul 2nd, 2008, 11:07 AM
wow Thanks :)

gumoll
Jul 2nd, 2008, 11:08 AM
btw in polish "lina" is rope

tim2502
Jul 2nd, 2008, 12:19 PM
It's easy to me.:lol:
I'm a Taiwanese. :D

Chan Yung-Jan and Chuang chia-Jung are more difficult.

ElusiveChanteuse
Jul 2nd, 2008, 12:30 PM
Easy as ABC.:p

mariahdg
Jul 2nd, 2008, 12:32 PM
It's easy to me.:lol:
I'm a Taiwanese. :D

Chan Yung-Jan and Chuang chia-Jung are more difficult.

Taiwan Tongyong Romanization is difficult for me too:lol:

azdaja
Jul 2nd, 2008, 01:21 PM
From my vast knowledge of Chinese I believe Peng sounds more like Pung?
the 'e' in zheng and peng is more like the -er ending in bbc english (like in the word sister), so it's more like "perng" or "cherng". and 'ie' in jie is like 'ye' in yes.

i'd say cherng jyeh would be the closest english approximation.

but chinese has many consonants that don't exist in english. the 'zh' in chinese is similar to the english 'ch' as in chair, but it's retroflex. the endings -eng and -ie is as described, but the 'j' in jie is not like the english 'j'. it's actually like 'ts', but pronounced with the middle of the tongue, not with the tongue tip.

supergrunt
Jul 2nd, 2008, 01:27 PM
No :o .

Malva
Jul 2nd, 2008, 01:46 PM
but chinese has many consonants that don't exist in english. the 'zh' in english is similar to the english 'ch' as in chair, but it's retroflex. the endings -eng and -ie is as described, but the 'j' in jie is not like the english 'j'. it's actually like 'ts', but pronounced with the middle of the tongue, not with the tongue tip.

Are you sure you are not confusing the consonants? The consonant represented in Pinyin Romanization by `zh' is not retroflex (unless my memory totally fails me).

azdaja
Jul 2nd, 2008, 01:58 PM
Are you sure you are not confusing the consonants? The consonant represented in Pinyin Romanization by `zh' is not retroflex (unless my memory totally fails me).
well, i've always pronounced it as retroflex so i was sure i learned it consciously like that back in the day, but i checked the wikipedia article on pinyin and they say zh is unaspirated retroflex affricate ;)

serenus_2k8
Jul 2nd, 2008, 02:12 PM
WTF! :lol:

I think its understandable that people cant pronounce the names because we dont get words anything like the chinese names. Its like when an Asian person tried to speak english their prononciation and accent can sound crazy, so I dont see the point of this thread :confused:

Malva
Jul 2nd, 2008, 02:16 PM
well, i've always pronounced it as retroflex so i was sure i learned it consciously like that back in the day, but i checked the wikipedia article on pinyin and they say zh is unaspirated retroflex affricate ;)

You are right, even though I was thinking of `zh' primarily in terms of its being an affricate, so if you said in your post that `zh' was a retroflex affricate, I wouldn't be checking whether you meant what you wrote.

I meant, of course, another retroflex, which I personally find to be the most remarkable of the Mandarin consonantal system. It is transliterated as `r', or `j', depending on the romanization scheme.

InsideOut.
Jul 2nd, 2008, 02:20 PM
Right.

In case of Li Na (李娜, Lǐ N) it helps to know that there are very few last names in China (famous '400 names'), and 李 (Lǐ) is one of the most common ones whereas I am not aware of any last name pronounced 'Na')

I just checked and there are about 6000 (one source has 5730 and another has 6363) while another source cites 11969 surnames, of which 5313 are single-character while others are multi-characters, obviously including the surnames of smaller ethnic groups.;)

brent-o
Jul 2nd, 2008, 02:29 PM
Surname is always first with Chinese names.

So it's Zheng Jie and Li Na.

I used to always forget whether Na's surname was Li or Na. :lol:

Oh my god, me too! I used to just always call her Li Na all the time to avoid making the distinction.

lympyisthebest
Jul 2nd, 2008, 02:33 PM
It's easier for foreigners to pronounce it in Mandarin. If they tried pronouncing it in Cantonese :tape: :tape:

InsideOut.
Jul 2nd, 2008, 02:36 PM
It's easier for foreigners to pronounce it in Mandarin. If they tried pronouncing it in Cantonese :tape: :tape:

Easy :lol:

lympyisthebest
Jul 2nd, 2008, 02:39 PM
Easy :lol:

It's easy for us, cos we're native speakers :lol:

Malva
Jul 2nd, 2008, 02:46 PM
I just checked and there are about 6000 (one source has 5730 and another has 6363) while another source cites 11969 surnames, of which 5313 are single-character while others are multi-characters, obviously including the surnames of smaller ethnic groups.;)

So you haven't heard of the `400 names' classic? How strange... I thought that was part of traditional Chinese education.

InsideOut.
Jul 2nd, 2008, 02:48 PM
So you haven't heard of `400 names'? How strange... I thought that was part of traditional Chinese education.

I've heard of it, yes, and I know it too, (though I can't recite it :)) but just pointing out that there are actually about 6000 surnames. Of course the 400 surnames are the most common in the Song Dynasty when they were compiled.

azdaja
Jul 2nd, 2008, 02:48 PM
I meant, of course, another retroflex, which I personally find to be the most remarkable of the Mandarin consonantal system. It is transliterated as `r', or `j', depending on the romanization scheme.
of course, but zh, ch and sh are also retroflex ;) actually r and sh are often both said to be retroflex fricatives, but r is more weird than that :unsure:

Malva
Jul 2nd, 2008, 03:09 PM
I've heard of it, yes, and I know it too, (though I can't recite it :)) but just pointing out that there are actually about 6000 surnames. Of course the 400 surnames are the most common in the Song Dynasty when they were compiled.

I am not so naive as to suppose that in modern day state of China there are exactly 400 last names in use. I was talking about Chinese last name tradition which differs significantly from other cultures.

Elldee
Jul 2nd, 2008, 03:11 PM
I don't know how to pronounce Tiantian.

InsideOut.
Jul 2nd, 2008, 03:13 PM
I don't know how to pronounce Tiantian.

It's easier in Cantonese. Just say "teem-teem". Don't bother witht he accent. :lol:

azdaja
Jul 2nd, 2008, 03:15 PM
I don't know how to pronounce Tiantian.
tyan-tyan.

lympyisthebest
Jul 2nd, 2008, 03:21 PM
I don't know how to pronounce Tiantian.


It's easier in Cantonese. Just say "teem-teem". Don't bother witht he accent. :lol:


tyan-tyan.

Yeah, that's how you would say it in Cantonese and Mandarin respectively. It means Sweet Sweet. :hearts:

InsideOut.
Jul 2nd, 2008, 03:22 PM
^as in the taste of course. :)

lympyisthebest
Jul 2nd, 2008, 03:25 PM
^as in the taste of course. :)

Naturally. :angel:

zhaoyihong
Jul 2nd, 2008, 06:51 PM
i learned chinese for a year, so yes i can pronounce chinese names correctly.

加油,More power to your elbow!

Welcome to China!!!

njnetswill
Jul 2nd, 2008, 07:01 PM
Is Yan Zi pronounced the same way as the bird? I think yan zi in Mandarin can also be "swallow"? (The bird, not the thing you do with your mouth)

zhaoyihong
Jul 2nd, 2008, 07:39 PM
no
swallow just means yan zi in china
not the pronunciation like swallow

mariahdg
Jul 3rd, 2008, 03:30 AM
Is Yan Zi pronounced the same way as the bird? I think yan zi in Mandarin can also be "swallow"? (The bird, not the thing you do with your mouth)

yes, Yan Zi and swallow(bird) have same pronunciation in Chinese. :rolls:

Lin Lin
Jul 3rd, 2008, 05:19 AM
Yanzi (I mean the swallow) is an auspicious animal in China,actually, I love this bird very much:):):):)

Lefty.
Jul 3rd, 2008, 05:30 AM
I speak Mandarin so no problem. :D

I think Taiwanese names are a little more difficult because they don't sound like what they look in English. :lol:

Danči Dementia
Jul 3rd, 2008, 05:32 AM
yes, Yan Zi and swallow(bird) have same pronunciation in Chinese. :rolls:

:lol::lol:
I can only pronunce the Sun T:lol:

Lin Lin
Jul 3rd, 2008, 06:02 AM
Try this:Maliya Shalabowa,this is the Chinese name of Maria Sharapova.

Weinasi Weilianmusi for Venus Williams

Yilianna Demendiyewa for Elena Dementieva

Jiasiding Haining for Justine Henin