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StephenUK
Jun 1st, 2008, 04:21 AM
Is this the most successful slam so far for Eastern Europe?

13 of the last 16 are from Eastern Europe

5 Russians (Sharapova, Kuznetsova, Dementieva, Safina and Zvonareva)
2 Serbs (Ivanovic, Jankovic)
2 Czechs (Kvitova, Cetkovska)
1 Pole (Radwanska)
1 Estonian (Kanepi)
1 Belarussian (Azarenka)
1 Slovenian (Srebotnik)

The other 3 survivors are also Europeans: Pennetta (Italy), Suarez Navarro (Spain) and Schnyder (Switzerland).

I presume that this is a record for Eastern Europe in a slam and quite frankly, I can't think of the last time that all 16 fourth round players were European, can you?

kris719
Jun 1st, 2008, 04:25 AM
I was noticing the same thing. Pretty cool.

wild.river
Jun 1st, 2008, 04:25 AM
they should all share the title :o
nice catch.

tequila
Jun 1st, 2008, 04:31 AM
Sharapova is an Asian-born Russian, not European ;)

drgray
Jun 1st, 2008, 04:36 AM
Sharapova is an Asian-born Russian, not European ;)

Yeah, russia is technically in Asia...

CCCP1
Jun 1st, 2008, 05:46 AM
wow ajde davai pojdme eastern eastern europe

faboozadoo15
Jun 1st, 2008, 05:48 AM
Too bad Agi couldn't notch one up for Hungary. :sad: She'll have her chances though.

Julian
Jun 1st, 2008, 06:00 AM
wow is all i can say
start of a new era??

kwilliams
Jun 1st, 2008, 06:08 AM
Woah. How great for European tennis and no players from the old European tennis superpowers, Germany, France and Britain.

Shvedbarilescu
Jun 1st, 2008, 09:01 AM
13 is a lot. I think that is pretty indicative of what we will see in the future too. I suspect we will probably see an average of 10 to 12 players from East/Central Europe in the final 16 pretty regularly from here on in. Personally, I'm cool with that. :)

A'DAM
Jun 1st, 2008, 10:02 AM
Impressive ;)

The Kaz
Jun 1st, 2008, 10:18 AM
When will Australia get its chance again?! :sobbing:

ivanban
Jun 1st, 2008, 11:20 AM
why is it important to point out "ex-communist" :confused:

iamme
Jun 1st, 2008, 11:36 AM
Hungary isn't easter european country..I think Czech Republic and Polland aren't either..

mckyle.
Jun 1st, 2008, 11:38 AM
Hungary isn't easter european country..I think Czech Republic and Polland aren't either..

He's referring to the Eastern Bloc

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eastern_bloc

iamme
Jun 1st, 2008, 11:58 AM
He's referring to the Eastern Bloc

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eastern_bloc
pfff. yeah.then a rest of Germany too.hehh.
.but Slovenia really isn't:lol:

StephenUK
Jun 1st, 2008, 01:23 PM
why is it important to point out "ex-communist" :confused:

It does make a difference because in many of the Communist countries, tennis was not encouraged as an individual professional sport with extensive travel commitments and non-Olympic up to 1988, although there were players who were able to reach the top of tennis even under this system, especially from ex-Czechoslovakia. It is also relevant in showing how the balance of power of tennis in Europe has shifted eastwards as there are many fewer tennis players from the west.
For whatever reason, the end of Communism in these countries has brought about a huge growth in tennis, especially in the former Soviet Union countries and an amazing array of top talent has emerged from this.

lola-b.
Jun 1st, 2008, 02:05 PM
Yeah, russia is technically in Asia...

But only from the 60th degree of longitude on. Until the Ural Mountains, it is officially European ;)

FORZA SARITA
Jun 1st, 2008, 02:07 PM
Slovenia isn't an ex communist country:confused:

Lunatiq
Jun 1st, 2008, 02:10 PM
why is it important to point out "ex-communist" :confused:


I don't like it too. Eastern Europe that's it. Who cares about history...?? Not we:)...so...

incognito
Jun 1st, 2008, 02:35 PM
He's referring to the Eastern Bloc

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eastern_bloc
As you can see on the map, Serbia was not part of the Eastern Bloc and being situated in the Balkan peninsula it's usually referred to as a southern European country, not eastern European...

Julian
Jun 1st, 2008, 04:25 PM
either way European tennis is booming!!
Come on Australia, Britain, USA, Spain, and Germany!
And ill bet the Asians will fare better at Wimbledon.

tequila
Jun 1st, 2008, 06:09 PM
Just say slavic Europe. :shrug:

CCCP1
Jun 2nd, 2008, 07:14 AM
lol yes slavic works much better

TTomek
Jun 2nd, 2008, 07:21 AM
Poland is not in Eastern Europe

and I also don't like the "ex-communist" :o

please remove it :rolleyes:

switz
Jun 2nd, 2008, 08:08 AM
Slovenia isn't an ex communist country:confused:

not USSR communist but it was part of Yugoslavia until 1991 so it does have a communist past. I know a man whose family owned one of the biggest hotels in Ljubljana and it was taken from them by the communists.

Dexter
Jun 2nd, 2008, 08:11 AM
To be called an Eastern European annoys the sh!t out of me. The geographical CENTRE of Poland is in Poland. Slavic Europe is a more proper name.

StephenUK
Jun 2nd, 2008, 09:02 AM
To be called an Eastern European annoys the sh!t out of me. The geographical CENTRE of Poland is in Poland. Slavic Europe is a more proper name.

I am not talking about 'Eastern Europe' in the modern sense but in terms of the countries that were Communist from 1945-90, so please do not get upset, even if it is part of your history that you do not wish to remember, it is there. If you think my comments are annoying, you should read just about every newspaper and listen to every news report from the US, UK etc and you would hear nothing different. I was just trying to contrast the situation in these countries now to what it was like under Communism and noting how many players have come from these former Communist countries, I did not want to get in a political argument.

Of course, the situation has changed radically since 1990 and things like EU and NATO membership are much more relevant nowadays, which puts Poland more in the western orbit than before. You would no doubt also argue that Poland, Hungary and Bohemia, for instance, as Catholic countries using the Latin alphabet historically have belonged in the western orbit for most of the last 1000 years, contrasted with the Orthodox, Cyrillic alphabet-using countries like Russia, Bulgaria and Serbia; though this division would also put Greece in the eastern orbit.

By the way, Slovenia was part of Yugoslavia and used to be Communist, even though Tito's regime was not part of the Warsaw Pact. It did have an effect on the development of tennis in all these countries, which is what I am talking about.

Calling it Slavic Europe is only going to raise another storm because Estonians, Hungarians and Albanians are not Slavs, for instance.

So, what is your explanation for the rise in Polish women's tennis in recent years - the only player I can think of from years ago was Iwona Kuczynska - do you remember her?

Dexter
Jun 2nd, 2008, 09:10 AM
Well all I want to say that if Churchill & Roosevelt weren't chickens with Stalin, they wouldn't have literally sold Poland (especially with our commitment to for example the Battle of England), Czech Republic etc to USSR in Jalta and our position in Europe would had been some much different. Should would I know, but it's a very touchy subject for people from this areas of Europe.

StephenUK
Jun 2nd, 2008, 10:12 AM
Well all I want to say that if Churchill & Roosevelt weren't chickens with Stalin, they wouldn't have literally sold Poland (especially with our commitment to for example the Battle of England), Czech Republic etc to USSR in Jalta and our position in Europe would had been some much different. Should would I know, but it's a very touchy subject for people from this areas of Europe.

Yes, I know. Politics is a dirty business. But the fact is that the Red Army had occupied most of these areas anyway so were you really expecting the US and Britain to fight another war at that point to free them? With the advent of nuclear weapons, such a war would have destroyed the whole world, and whilst you suffered the price for 45 years, at least you are around now to tell the tale, rather than living in a nuclear desert.

Unfortunately, Poland has suffered much in its history from being in between Germany and Russia, look at the Partitions of the 18th century, you can't blame all of that on Stalin, Britain or the US. And let's face it, Poland was quite happy to join in other dirty deals just like Yalta when it suited them - getting their own bit of Czechslovakia in 1938 from the Nazis as part of the Munich Agreement.

Can we please get back to the tennis and could you answer my question about the rise of Polish tennis?

Lunaris
Jun 2nd, 2008, 10:26 AM
Yes, I know. Politics is a dirty business. But the fact is that the Red Army had occupied most of these areas anyway so were you really expecting the US and Britain to fight another war at that point to free them? With the advent of nuclear weapons, such a war would have destroyed the whole world, and whilst you suffered the price for 45 years, at least you are around now to tell the tale, rather than living in a nuclear desert.

Unfortunately, Poland has suffered much in its history from being in between Germany and Russia, look at the Partitions of the 18th century, you can't blame all of that on Stalin, Britain or the US. And let's face it, Poland was quite happy to join in other dirty deals just like Yalta when it suited them - getting their own bit of Czechslovakia in 1938 from the Nazis as part of the Munich Agreement.

Can we please get back to the tennis and could you answer my question about the rise of Polish tennis?
That's not entirely correct. The US army was already in Bohemia before any Russian soldier. But because they had a deal with Stalin the western forces stopped their advancement in western Bohemia and waited for the Red army to arrive from Berlin to free rest of the country. That took a few addiditonal days and cost lives of many people, who would have survived if the US forces had continued their march towards Prague.

Dexter
Jun 2nd, 2008, 10:36 AM
Yes, I know. Politics is a dirty business. But the fact is that the Red Army had occupied most of these areas anyway so were you really expecting the US and Britain to fight another war at that point to free them? With the advent of nuclear weapons, such a war would have destroyed the whole world, and whilst you suffered the price for 45 years, at least you are around now to tell the tale, rather than living in a nuclear desert.

Unfortunately, Poland has suffered much in its history from being in between Germany and Russia, look at the Partitions of the 18th century, you can't blame all of that on Stalin, Britain or the US. And let's face it, Poland was quite happy to join in other dirty deals just like Yalta when it suited them - getting their own bit of Czechslovakia in 1938 from the Nazis as part of the Munich Agreement.

Can we please get back to the tennis and could you answer my question about the rise of Polish tennis?I'm not saying we were always all that saint. There's unfortunately lots of moments in our history we should be ashamed of. Still my point was there are things due to which we are discriminated against, when in fact the decisions weren't even made by us.

As for tennis in Poland, it's still estimated as a sport's discipline of an upper class. You don't see many children playing it after school. The facilities are poor. Most of courts are clay and in terrible condition. In my city which is one of the biggest in Poland there's no hardcourts. Agnieszka plans to build some just to be able to train when she's back home. I hope with her raise the situation will improve, because there's nothing special happening in here you can explain her achievements with. I believe the situation is different in Czechia and Russia.