PDA

View Full Version : Mildred Loving dies at 68 (From Loving v. Virginia, 1967,ban on interracial marriage)


Pureracket
May 5th, 2008, 08:16 PM
Source: The Richmond Times Dispatch

MILFORD -- Mildred Loving, a black woman whose challenge to Virginia law banning interracial marriage ultimately dismantled anti-miscegenation laws nationwide, has died.

Peggy Fortune, her daughter, said the 68-year-old Loving died Friday at her rural Caroline County home. Fortune did not disclose the cause of death.

Loving and her white husband, Richard, changed history in 1967 when the U.S. Supreme Court upheld their right to marry. The ruling struck down laws banning racially mixed marriages in at least 17 states.

In a rare interview with The Associated Press last June, Loving said she wasn't trying to change history -- she just wanted to get married.

Services are planned Saturday.

Read more: http://www.inrich.com/cva/ric/news.apx.-content-article...

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/3/34/Mildred_Jeter_and_Richard_Loving.jpg

mykarma
May 5th, 2008, 09:30 PM
Source: The Richmond Times Dispatch

MILFORD -- Mildred Loving, a black woman whose challenge to Virginia law banning interracial marriage ultimately dismantled anti-miscegenation laws nationwide, has died.

Peggy Fortune, her daughter, said the 68-year-old Loving died Friday at her rural Caroline County home. Fortune did not disclose the cause of death.

Loving and her white husband, Richard, changed history in 1967 when the U.S. Supreme Court upheld their right to marry. The ruling struck down laws banning racially mixed marriages in at least 17 states.

In a rare interview with The Associated Press last June, Loving said she wasn't trying to change history -- she just wanted to get married.

Services are planned Saturday.

Read more: http://www.inrich.com/cva/ric/news.apx.-content-article...

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/3/34/Mildred_Jeter_and_Richard_Loving.jpg
Only in America that it took until 1967 for the law to be changed. :help:

kwilliams
May 5th, 2008, 09:42 PM
Source: The Richmond Times Dispatch

MILFORD -- Mildred Loving, a black woman whose challenge to Virginia law banning interracial marriage ultimately dismantled anti-miscegenation laws nationwide, has died.

Peggy Fortune, her daughter, said the 68-year-old Loving died Friday at her rural Caroline County home. Fortune did not disclose the cause of death.

Loving and her white husband, Richard, changed history in 1967 when the U.S. Supreme Court upheld their right to marry. The ruling struck down laws banning racially mixed marriages in at least 17 states.

In a rare interview with The Associated Press last June, Loving said she wasn't trying to change history -- she just wanted to get married.
Services are planned Saturday.

Read more: http://www.inrich.com/cva/ric/news.apx.-content-article...

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/3/34/Mildred_Jeter_and_Richard_Loving.jpg

You gotta love that! These are the people that often do change history.

Pureracket
May 5th, 2008, 09:48 PM
I just find it so wonderfully ironic that the name is "Loving."

Wannabeknowitall
May 5th, 2008, 10:15 PM
RIP.

I've never been a person who had an issue with interracial relationship persay I just have a problem with who is chosen for that interracial relationship.

Example: Robin Givens.

In 1989, she was dating Brad Pitt.
In 1999, she was dating Murphy Jensen. :eek:

What the hell happened in 10 years.

darrinbaker00
May 5th, 2008, 10:28 PM
RIP.

I've never been a person who had an issue with interracial relationship persay I just have a problem with who is chosen for that interracial relationship.

Example: Robin Givens.

In 1989, she was dating Brad Pitt.
In 1999, she was dating Murphy Jensen. :eek:

What the hell happened in 10 years.
First of all, Brad Pitt wasn't "Brad Pitt" in 1989, and Brad had good reason to break it off with Robin. Secondly, Robin and Murphy did more than just date:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robin_Givens

Murph must have been talking to Boris Becker. ;)

hablo
May 5th, 2008, 10:39 PM
Source: The Richmond Times Dispatch

MILFORD -- Mildred Loving, a black woman whose challenge to Virginia law banning interracial marriage ultimately dismantled anti-miscegenation laws nationwide, has died.

Peggy Fortune, her daughter, said the 68-year-old Loving died Friday at her rural Caroline County home. Fortune did not disclose the cause of death.

Loving and her white husband, Richard, changed history in 1967 when the U.S. Supreme Court upheld their right to marry. The ruling struck down laws banning racially mixed marriages in at least 17 states.

In a rare interview with The Associated Press last June, Loving said she wasn't trying to change history -- she just wanted to get married.

Services are planned Saturday.

Read more: http://www.inrich.com/cva/ric/news.apx.-content-article...

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/3/34/Mildred_Jeter_and_Richard_Loving.jpg

:awww:

PatrickRyan
May 5th, 2008, 11:05 PM
Only in America that it took until 1967 for the law to be changed. :help:

And 40 years later gays still can't get married :o

Pureracket
May 5th, 2008, 11:24 PM
And 40 years later gays still can't get married :oWeird that you say that. Mildred was quite a remarkable woman. I LOVE this letter that you wrote less than a year ago. Sadly, critics say her race played a factor in not being selected to be in the forefront of the LGBT's efforts to marry:

Loving for All

By Mildred Loving*

Prepared for Delivery on June 12, 2007,
The 40th Anniversary of the Loving vs. Virginia Announcement

When my late husband, Richard, and I got married in Washington, DC in 1958, it wasn’t to make a political statement or start a fight. We were in love, and we wanted to be married.

<snip>

Though it turned out we had to fight, happily Richard and I didn’t have to fight alone. Thanks to groups like the ACLU and the NAACP Legal Defense & Education Fund, and so many good people around the country willing to speak up, we took our case for the freedom to marry all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court. And on June 12, 1967, the Supreme Court ruled unanimously that, “The freedom to marry has long been recognized as one of the vital personal rights essential to the orderly pursuit of happiness by free men,” a “basic civil right.”

My generation was bitterly divided over something that should have been so clear and right. The majority believed that what the judge said, that it was God’s plan to keep people apart, and that government should discriminate against people in love. But I have lived long enough now to see big changes. The older generation’s fears and prejudices have given way, and today’s young people realize that if someone loves someone they have a right to marry.

Surrounded as I am now by wonderful children and grandchildren, not a day goes by that I don’t think of Richard and our love, our right to marry, and how much it meant to me to have that freedom to marry the person precious to me, even if others thought he was the “wrong kind of person” for me to marry. I believe all Americans, no matter their race, no matter their sex, no matter their sexual orientation, should have that same freedom to marry. Government has no business imposing some people’s religious beliefs over others. Especially if it denies people’s civil rights.

I am still not a political person, but I am proud that Richard’s and my name is on a court case that can help reinforce the love, the commitment, the fairness, and the family that so many people, black or white, young or old, gay or straight seek in life. I support the freedom to marry for all. That’s what Loving, and loving, are all about.

More:
http://www.positiveliberty.com/2007/06/mildred-lovings-... (http://www.positiveliberty.com/2007/06/mildred-lovings-statement.html)