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View Full Version : Alarming stats about 30 youngers TOP100 players (WTA worst nightmare for future?)


Cp6uja
Nov 19th, 2007, 02:52 AM
2007 final ranking list in WTA competition have 30 teenagers (20 y.o. or younger girls)... and this is no more "domination" - this is BIG PROBLEM for womans tennis future:



TEENEGERS in TOP100 (2007 year end ranking):



RANK .. PLAYER .................COUNTRY..... CONTINENT
.4. Ana Ivanovic (1987) ..........SRB......... EUROPE
.5. Maria Sharapova (1987) .......RUS......... EUROPE
.6. Anna Tchakvetadze (1987) .....RUS......... EUROPE
12. Nicole Vaidisova (1989) ......CZE......... EUROPE
13. Tatiana Golovin (1988) .......FRA......... EUROPE
17. Shahar Peer (1987) ...........ISR......... EUROPE*
20. Agnes Szavay (1988) ..........HUN......... EUROPE
24. Lucie Safarova (1987) ........CZE......... EUROPE
26. Agnieszka Radwanska (1989) ...POL......... EUROPE
30. Vika Azarenka (1989) .........BLR......... EUROPE
31. Maria Kirilenko (1987) .......RUS......... EUROPE
34. Michaella Krajicek (1989) ....NED......... EUROPE
42. Tamira Paszek (1990) .........AUT......... EUROPE
49. Olga Govortsova (1988) .......BLR......... EUROPE
51. Karin Knapp (1987) ...........ITA......... EUROPE
52. Dominika Cibulkova (1989) ....SVK......... EUROPE
56. Alize Cornet (1990) ..........FRA......... EUROPE
60. Ioana-Raluca Olaru (1989) ....ROU......... EUROPE
64. Caroline Wozniacki (1990) ....DEN......... EUROPE
70. Sara Errani (1987) ...........ITA......... EUROPE
78. Yung-Jan Chan (1989) .........TPE......... ASIA
83. Olga Poutchkova (1987) .......RUS......... EUROPE
84. Yaroslava Shvedova (1987) ....RUS......... EUROPE
88. Angelique Kerber (1988) ......GER......... EUROPE
89. Tatjana Malek (1987) .........GER......... EUROPE
90. Aravane Rezai (1987) .........FRA......... EUROPE
91. Alla Kudryavtseva (1987) .....RUS......... EUROPE
94. Olga Savchuk (1987) ..........UKR......... EUROPE
95. Tsvetana Pironkova (1987) ....BUL......... EUROPE
98. Andrea Petkovic (1987) .......GER......... EUROPE




EDIT POST: Year Ending Rank by Years old and Region from:

26 year old and older (32 in TOP100) - 56% from Europe, 44% from rest of world
Between 21 and 25 (38 in TOP100) - 71% from Europe, 29% from rest of world
20 y.o. and younger (30 in TOP100) - 97% from Europe , 3% from rest of world


TOP100 (year end ranking) stats by region from past:
1990 - 55 from Europe, 45 from Rest of World
1995 - 57 from Europe, 43 from Rest of World
2000 - 66 from Europe, 34 from Rest of World
2005 - 71 from Europe, 29 from Rest of World
2007 - 74 from Europe, 26 from Rest of World

mckyle.
Nov 19th, 2007, 02:55 AM
I think it's time.

You need to admit your addiction to creating useless threads about meaningless statistics.

Cp6uja
Nov 19th, 2007, 02:58 AM
I think it's time.

You need to admit your addiction to creating useless threads about meaningless statistics.Try to use your brain and even you will see something very strange in this stats (very bad for womans tennis if this trend continue).

bunch_01
Nov 19th, 2007, 03:17 AM
When did Israel move to Europe?

RJWCapriati
Nov 19th, 2007, 03:24 AM
Very interesting, thank you :)

Cp6uja
Nov 19th, 2007, 03:25 AM
When did Israel move to Europe?In all sports (including tennis) Israel is counted like Europian country (look they group/zone at FED CUP and Davis Cup).

BTW when i mention FED CUP - if this trend will continue, already before 2015 FED CUP will be renamed in "Europien Championship" :help:

Pheobo
Nov 19th, 2007, 03:27 AM
I think what's more alarming is how underwhelmingly talentless most of these girls are. Most of them will fall off the radar, so it's going to be interesting to see what happens next

polishprodigy
Nov 19th, 2007, 03:29 AM
An interesting trend, but I think some American girls are just as good as some of the European girls on that list. But yes, I do see some Russian and Chinese domination/success in the future, as well as European.

I wonder though how well the Chinese will do post-Beijing Olympics ;)

canuckfan
Nov 19th, 2007, 03:32 AM
Interesting stats!

But it only shows that it's a bad situation for the USA, because the other regions (South/Central America, Africa, Asia) were never tennis powerhouse anyway...

Cp6uja
Nov 19th, 2007, 03:48 AM
Interesting stats!

But it only shows that it's a bad situation for the USA, because the other regions (South/Central America, Africa, Asia) were never tennis powerhouse anyway...I not agree... Australia and South America have always great prospects - but no more! Also tennis in Asia is in great expansion last two decades - even last year when 1986 girls is still been teenagers, two of TOP5 1986 girls is from Asia (Mirza and Peng)... but if we look now 1987, 1988, 1989... only Chan is TOP100 of Asian teens (vs. 29 TOP100 teenagers from Europe). And for young USA players (WTA) i have only one word right now - (total) dissaster!

njnetswill
Nov 19th, 2007, 05:43 AM
The problem with this thread is that it lumps countries like Ukraine, Israel, France and Denmark together. Yes they are "European", but they are drastically different countries with different cultures, languages, tennis traditions, and tennis systems. You cannot compare it to when countries like the USA single handidly dominated rankings. A Bulgarian playing against a Dutch player is hardly the same as two Americans playing against each other, which was commonplace when tennis was less global. I highly doubt when Sharapova wins a slam, other European players take pride in a "European" win.

DimaDinosaur
Nov 19th, 2007, 06:03 AM
WOW, that's a lot

Ilikebigboobies
Nov 19th, 2007, 06:13 AM
20 is not a teenager. :confused:

Harvs
Nov 19th, 2007, 06:27 AM
i think this is a good thing...

chuvack
Nov 19th, 2007, 07:18 AM
nobody can say with a straight face that Sharapova reperesent "Europe". You need to put next to her name "USA Import".

But really what the statisctics shows is that now is a very bad time for up-coming players, and a very good time for veteran players.

Pasta-Na
Nov 19th, 2007, 07:42 AM
nobody can say with a straight face that Sharapova reperesent "Europe". You need to put next to her name "USA Import".

But really what the statisctics shows is that now is a very bad time for up-coming players, and a very good time for veteran players.

still remember her "dancing" and "cheering" when she showed up in Fed Cup Final :angel:

petkoan
Nov 19th, 2007, 08:51 AM
When did Israel move to Europe?




:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :smash: :haha: :haha: :haha: :woohoo: :banana: ХАХАХАХ I liked it ..a lot :D :d...I don't know when it move :D :D

Kworb
Nov 19th, 2007, 08:52 AM
Sharapova is from Siberia, the Asian part of Russia

DutchieGirl
Nov 19th, 2007, 09:26 AM
players who are 20 years old are no longer "teenagers"! Teen = 13-19 Lucie sure as hell isn't a teenager anymore, and I don't think Kirilenko is either. In fact I don't think you can really count anyone from 87 as a "teenager" unless their birthday is now until the end of December. (Therefore you should take out: Ivanovic, Chaky, Sharapova, Safarova, Peer, Kirilenko, Knapp, Errani, Poutchkova, Shvedova, Malek, Rezai, Savchuk, Kudryavtseva, Petkovic & Pironkova) - wow now I see why you included 20 year olds as being "teenagers" - if you hadn't, you lose half your list. Maybe you should redefine what a teenager is. Because as I see it, from your list there are 14 teenagers in the top 100 - which isn't so many, but then with the AER it's harder to get in there anyway, which is why we now see alot more 19-20 year olds finally moving up the rankings as they can play a full schedule then. And I don't think it's BAD for womens tennis - how is it bad? Everyone complains there is no depth, when we get some, people complain coz no one's dominating?

Dexter
Nov 19th, 2007, 09:30 AM
Well, 16 out of the players you listed are not teenagers anymore. :o

DutchieGirl
Nov 19th, 2007, 09:33 AM
Well, 16 out of the players you listed are not teenagers anymore. :o

:p copy cat. ;) :angel:

Ilikebigboobies
Nov 19th, 2007, 09:36 AM
You all copied from me. :ras:

DutchieGirl
Nov 19th, 2007, 09:37 AM
You all copied from me. :ras:

:lol: I actually said more about it. :p (And I didn't see your post anyway). :lol:

DutchieGirl
Nov 19th, 2007, 09:39 AM
I not agree... Australia and South America have always great prospects - but no more! Also tennis in Asia is in great expansion last two decades - even last year when 1986 girls is still been teenagers, two of TOP5 1986 girls is from Asia (Mirza and Peng)... but if we look now 1987, 1988, 1989... only Chan is TOP100 of Asian teens (vs. 29 TOP100 teenagers from Europe). And for young USA players (WTA) i have only one word right now - (total) dissaster!

:scratch: Australia still has a few good younger prospects - Jess Moore is one of them.

chuvack
Nov 19th, 2007, 09:53 AM
Sharapova is from Siberia, the Asian part of Russia


Sharapova is from Florida, the south-eastern part of United States.

kittyking
Nov 19th, 2007, 10:30 AM
No need to rush juniors, unless you want another Lina incident :o

williams.i.am
Nov 19th, 2007, 10:38 AM
20 is not a teenager. :confused:

thank u!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :tape:

Cp6uja
Nov 19th, 2007, 02:19 PM
Why nobody dont take seriously all this facts???
It's dangeruos trend in woman tennis and no need to ignore that.
Look this stats for 2007 year end ranking:

26 year old and older (32 in TOP100) - 56% from Europe, 44% from rest of world
Between 21 and 25 (38 in TOP100) - 71% from Europe, 29% from rest of world
20 y.o. and younger (30 in TOP100) - 97% from Europe , 3% from rest of world



2007 year end Ranking
By Year old and Region

20y and younger Between 21y and 25y 26y and older
EUROPE - 29 of 30 (97%) EUROPE - 27 of 38 (71%) EUROPE - 18 of 32 (56%)
WORLD - 1 of 30 (3%) WORLD - 11 of 38 (29%) WORLD - 14 of 32 (44%)

4. Ana Ivanovic (SRB, 1987) 1. Justine Henin (BEL, 1982) 7. Serena Williams (USA, 1981)
5. Maria Sharapova (RUS, 1987) 2. Svetlana Kuznetsova (RUS, 1985) 8. Venus Williams (USA, 1980)
6. Anna Tchakvetadze (RUS, 1987) 3. Jelena Jankovic (SRB, 1985) 11. Elena Dementieva (RUS, 1981)
12. Nicole Vaidisova (CZE, 1989) 9. Daniela Hantuchova (SVK, 1983) 16. Patty Schnyder (SUI, 1978)
13. Tatiana Golovin (FRA, 1988) 10. Marion Bartoli (FRA, 1984) 18. Amelie Mauresmo (FRA, 1979)
17. Shahar Peer (ISR, 1987) 14. Nadia Petrova (RUS, 1982) 19. Martina Hingis (SUI, 1980)
20. Agnes Szavay (HUN, 1988) 15. Dinara Safina (RUS, 1986) 21. Sybille Bammer (AUT, 1980)
24. Lucie Safarova (CZE, 1987) 22. Alona Bondarenko (UKR, 1984) 25. Francesca Schiavone (ITA, 1980)
26. Agnieszka Radwanska (POL, 1989)23. Vera Zvonareva (RUS, 1984) 27. Katarina Srebotnik (SLO, 1981)
30. Vika Azarenka (BLR, 1989) 28. Virginie Razzano (FRA, 1983) 36. Mara Santangelo (ITA, 1981)
31. Maria Kirilenko (RUS, 1987) 29. Na Li (CHN, 1982) 37. Tathiana Garbin (ITA, 1977)
34. Michaella Krajicek (NED, 1989) 32. Sania Mirza (IND, 1986) 39. Ai Sugiyama (JPN, 1975)
42. Tamira Paszek (AUT, 1990) 33. Julia Vakulenko (UKR, 1983) 45. Emilie Loit (FRA, 1979)
49. Olga Govortsova (BLR, 1988) 35. Ana Isabel Medina (ESP, 1982) 48. Meilen Tu (USA, 1978)
51. Karin Knapp (ITA, 1987) 38. Gisela Dulko (ARG, 1985) 50. Akiko Morigami (JPN, 1980)
52. Dominika Cibulkova (SVK, 1989) 40. Flavia Pennetta (ITA, 1982) 53. Meghann Shaughnessy (USA, 1979)
56. Alize Cornet (FRA, 1990) 41. Vera Dushevina (RUS, 1986) 57. Alicia Molik (AUS, 1981)
60. Ioana-Raluca Olaru (ROU, 1989) 43. Eleni Daniilidou (GRE, 1982) 65. Laura Granville (USA, 1981)
64. Caroline Wozniacki (DEN, 1990) 44. Kateryna Bondarenko (UKR, 1986)66. Elena Likhovtseva (RUS, 1975)
70. Sara Errani (ITA, 1987) 46. Shuai Peng (CHN, 1986) 69. Nathalie Dechy (FRA, 1979)
78. Yung-Jan Chan (TPE, 1989) 47. Samantha Stosur (AUS, 1984) 71. L. Dominguez-Lino (ESP, 1981)
83. Olga Poutchkova (RUS, 1987) 54. Martina Muller (GER, 1982) 72. Nicole Pratt (AUS, 1973)
84. Yaroslava Shvedova (RUS, 1987) 55. Elena Vesnina (RUS, 1986) 73. Lindsay Davenport (USA, 1976)
88. Angelique Kerber (GER, 1988) 58. Pauline Parmentier (FRA, 1986) 74. Milagros Sequera (VEN, 1980)
89. Tatjana Malek (GER, 1987) 59. Zi Yan (CHN, 1984) 76. Camille Pin (FRA, 1981)
90. Aravane Rezai (FRA, 1987) 61. Klara Zakopalova (CZE, 1982) 79. Jill Craybas (USA, 1974)
91. Alla Kudryavtseva (RUS, 1987) 62. Roberta Vinci (ITA, 1983) 80. Tzipora Obziler (ISR, 1973)
94. Olga Savchuk (UKR, 1987) 63. Yvonne Meusburger (AUT, 1983) 81. V. Ruano Pascual (ESP, 1973)
95. Tsvetana Pironkova (BUL, 1987) 67. Aiko Nakamura (JPN, 1983) 82. Anne Kremer (LUX, 1975)
98. Andrea Petkovic (GER, 1987) 68. Ashley Harkleroad (USA, 1985) 92. Tatiana Poutchek (BLR, 1979)
75. Kaia Kanepi (EST, 1985) 93. Lilia Osterloh (USA, 1978)
77. Anast. Rodionova (RUS, 1982) 100. Julie Ditty (USA, 1979)
85. Edina Gallovits (ROU, 1984)
86. Casey Dellacqua (AUS, 1985)
87. Maria E. Salerni (ARG, 1983)
96. Tatiana Perebiynis (UKR, 1982)
97. Maria Elena Camerin (ITA, 1982)
99. Akgul Amanmuradova (UZB, 1984)

Experimentee
Nov 19th, 2007, 02:22 PM
Europeans always tend to do well when they are young, however Australians and Asians tend to be late bloomers who are over 20 when they start doing things on the main tour and breaking into the top 100.

Shvedbarilescu
Nov 19th, 2007, 03:01 PM
Why nobody dont take seriously all this facts???
It's dangeruos trend in woman tennis and no need to ignore that.
Look this stats for 2007 year end ranking:

26 year old and older (32 in TOP100) - 56% from Europe, 44% from rest of world
Between 21 and 25 (38 in TOP100) - 71% from Europe, 29% from rest of world
20 y.o. and younger (30 in TOP100) - 97% from Europe , 3% from rest of world



2007 year end Ranking
By Year old and Region

20y and younger Between 21y and 25y 26y and older
EUROPE - 29 of 30 (97%) EUROPE - 27 of 38 (71%) EUROPE - 18 of 32 (56%)
WORLD - 1 of 30 (3%) WORLD - 11 of 38 (29%) WORLD - 14 of 32 (44%)

4. Ana Ivanovic (SRB, 1987) 1. Justine Henin (BEL, 1982) 7. Serena Williams (USA, 1981)
5. Maria Sharapova (RUS, 1987) 2. Svetlana Kuznetsova (RUS, 1985) 8. Venus Williams (USA, 1980)
6. Anna Tchakvetadze (RUS, 1987) 3. Jelena Jankovic (SRB, 1985) 11. Elena Dementieva (RUS, 1981)
12. Nicole Vaidisova (CZE, 1989) 9. Daniela Hantuchova (SVK, 1983) 16. Patty Schnyder (SUI, 1978)
13. Tatiana Golovin (FRA, 1988) 10. Marion Bartoli (FRA, 1984) 18. Amelie Mauresmo (FRA, 1979)
17. Shahar Peer (ISR, 1987) 14. Nadia Petrova (RUS, 1982) 19. Martina Hingis (SUI, 1980)
20. Agnes Szavay (HUN, 1988) 15. Dinara Safina (RUS, 1986) 21. Sybille Bammer (AUT, 1980)
24. Lucie Safarova (CZE, 1987) 22. Alona Bondarenko (UKR, 1984) 25. Francesca Schiavone (ITA, 1980)
26. Agnieszka Radwanska (POL, 1989)23. Vera Zvonareva (RUS, 1984) 27. Katarina Srebotnik (SLO, 1981)
30. Vika Azarenka (BLR, 1989) 28. Virginie Razzano (FRA, 1983) 36. Mara Santangelo (ITA, 1981)
31. Maria Kirilenko (RUS, 1987) 29. Na Li (CHN, 1982) 37. Tathiana Garbin (ITA, 1977)
34. Michaella Krajicek (NED, 1989) 32. Sania Mirza (IND, 1986) 39. Ai Sugiyama (JPN, 1975)
42. Tamira Paszek (AUT, 1990) 33. Julia Vakulenko (UKR, 1983) 45. Emilie Loit (FRA, 1979)
49. Olga Govortsova (BLR, 1988) 35. Ana Isabel Medina (ESP, 1982) 48. Meilen Tu (USA, 1978)
51. Karin Knapp (ITA, 1987) 38. Gisela Dulko (ARG, 1985) 50. Akiko Morigami (JPN, 1980)
52. Dominika Cibulkova (SVK, 1989) 40. Flavia Pennetta (ITA, 1982) 53. Meghann Shaughnessy (USA, 1979)
56. Alize Cornet (FRA, 1990) 41. Vera Dushevina (RUS, 1986) 57. Alicia Molik (AUS, 1981)
60. Ioana-Raluca Olaru (ROU, 1989) 43. Eleni Daniilidou (GRE, 1982) 65. Laura Granville (USA, 1981)
64. Caroline Wozniacki (DEN, 1990) 44. Kateryna Bondarenko (UKR, 1986)66. Elena Likhovtseva (RUS, 1975)
70. Sara Errani (ITA, 1987) 46. Shuai Peng (CHN, 1986) 69. Nathalie Dechy (FRA, 1979)
78. Yung-Jan Chan (TPE, 1989) 47. Samantha Stosur (AUS, 1984) 71. L. Dominguez-Lino (ESP, 1981)
83. Olga Poutchkova (RUS, 1987) 54. Martina Muller (GER, 1982) 72. Nicole Pratt (AUS, 1973)
84. Yaroslava Shvedova (RUS, 1987) 55. Elena Vesnina (RUS, 1986) 73. Lindsay Davenport (USA, 1976)
88. Angelique Kerber (GER, 1988) 58. Pauline Parmentier (FRA, 1986) 74. Milagros Sequera (VEN, 1980)
89. Tatjana Malek (GER, 1987) 59. Zi Yan (CHN, 1984) 76. Camille Pin (FRA, 1981)
90. Aravane Rezai (FRA, 1987) 61. Klara Zakopalova (CZE, 1982) 79. Jill Craybas (USA, 1974)
91. Alla Kudryavtseva (RUS, 1987) 62. Roberta Vinci (ITA, 1983) 80. Tzipora Obziler (ISR, 1973)
94. Olga Savchuk (UKR, 1987) 63. Yvonne Meusburger (AUT, 1983) 81. V. Ruano Pascual (ESP, 1973)
95. Tsvetana Pironkova (BUL, 1987) 67. Aiko Nakamura (JPN, 1983) 82. Anne Kremer (LUX, 1975)
98. Andrea Petkovic (GER, 1987) 68. Ashley Harkleroad (USA, 1985) 92. Tatiana Poutchek (BLR, 1979)
75. Kaia Kanepi (EST, 1985) 93. Lilia Osterloh (USA, 1978)
77. Anast. Rodionova (RUS, 1982) 100. Julie Ditty (USA, 1979)
85. Edina Gallovits (ROU, 1984)
86. Casey Dellacqua (AUS, 1985)
87. Maria E. Salerni (ARG, 1983)
96. Tatiana Perebiynis (UKR, 1982)
97. Maria Elena Camerin (ITA, 1982)
99. Akgul Amanmuradova (UZB, 1984)


This is an outstanding post and it illustrates your point very effectively. One stat that I find extraordinary is that Serena Williams, who is 26, is the 2nd youngest American in the top 100 and this is 10 full years after she 1st entered the top 100. The fact that America is blessed with three current Grand Slam champions, in the two Williams sisters and Davenport, really masks a very bleak future for American tennis. There was a time I recall when the top twenty was made up of more Americans than non Americans and the top Hundred had better than 40 Americans in its rankings. But this is so far removed from the picture today. Looking at these statistics it really is no wonder Women's tennis is losing popularity in America.

On a more positive note the picture looks great in Europe and if the popularity in Women's tennis can continue of grow in Asia this will go a long way towards compensating for its loss of appeal in the US. It is clearly important for the sport that more Asian players emmerge and if somehow even just one young American with top 20 talent could come through I think a lot of people would breathe a sigh of relief.

All that said, I must add that I really like the crop of young, mostly East Europeans, emerging at the moment.

Shvedbarilescu
Nov 19th, 2007, 03:11 PM
One more stat, 6 out of 18 of the players in the top hundred (33%) born in the 70s are American. But only 4 out of 82 players (5%) born in the 80s are American. That is a huge contrast.

Cp6uja
Nov 19th, 2007, 03:22 PM
Europeans always tend to do well when they are young, however Australians and Asians tend to be late bloomers who are over 20 when they start doing things on the main tour and breaking into the top 100.I agree generaly, but in this case this is (dangeruous) TREND!!!


Here is stats for WTA TOP100 year ends ranking in past (by Region):

1990 - 55 from Europe, 45 from Rest of World
1995 - 57 from Europe, 43 from Rest of World
2000 - 66 from Europe, 34 from Rest of World
2005 - 71 from Europe, 29 from Rest of World
2007 - 74 from Europe, 26 from Rest of World


It's trend and i dont see when this will be stoped because in younger generations of tennis players Europian girls even more dominate (29 vs. 1 is simple :help: :help: :help: )




The problem with this thread is that it lumps countries like Ukraine, Israel, France and Denmark together. Yes they are "European", but they are drastically different countries with different cultures, languages, tennis traditions, and tennis systems. You cannot compare it to when countries like the USA single handidly dominated rankings. A Bulgarian playing against a Dutch player is hardly the same as two Americans playing against each other, which was commonplace when tennis was less global. I highly doubt when Sharapova wins a slam, other European players take pride in a "European" win.You obviously dont get point from this thread. Nobody claim here that East, West, South, North or Central Europe is same thing - or that North America, South America, Asia, Africa or Australia is same thing... but in youngest generation of WTA players (20y and younger group) we have girls from Eastern, Western, Southern, Northern and Central Europe all around, but dont have any girl from North or South America, from Australia, from Africa or from Asia (except Chan)!? Also, this is not stats Europe vs America - its Europe vs REST OF WORLD and stats is still :help: :help: :help: .

RND
Nov 19th, 2007, 03:51 PM
You may well change the thread title to: Chan(Aug 1989),the sole Asian teen in the top 100.Or,Chan admiration thread! :worship:

Yung-Jan :kiss:

Cp6uja
Nov 19th, 2007, 05:32 PM
Why nobody dont take seriously all this facts???
It's dangeruos trend in woman tennis and no need to ignore that.
Look this stats for 2007 year end ranking:

26 year old and older (32 in TOP100) - 56% from Europe, 44% from rest of world
Between 21 and 25 (38 in TOP100) - 71% from Europe, 29% from rest of world
20 y.o. and younger (30 in TOP100) - 97% from Europe , 3% from rest of world



2007 year end Ranking
By Year old and Region

20y and younger Between 21y and 25y 26y and older
EUROPE - 29 of 30 (97%) EUROPE - 27 of 38 (71%) EUROPE - 18 of 32 (56%)
WORLD - 1 of 30 (3%) WORLD - 11 of 38 (29%) WORLD - 14 of 32 (44%)

4. Ana Ivanovic (SRB, 1987) 1. Justine Henin (BEL, 1982) 7. Serena Williams (USA, 1981)
5. Maria Sharapova (RUS, 1987) 2. Svetlana Kuznetsova (RUS, 1985) 8. Venus Williams (USA, 1980)
6. Anna Tchakvetadze (RUS, 1987) 3. Jelena Jankovic (SRB, 1985) 11. Elena Dementieva (RUS, 1981)
12. Nicole Vaidisova (CZE, 1989) 9. Daniela Hantuchova (SVK, 1983) 16. Patty Schnyder (SUI, 1978)
13. Tatiana Golovin (FRA, 1988) 10. Marion Bartoli (FRA, 1984) 18. Amelie Mauresmo (FRA, 1979)
17. Shahar Peer (ISR, 1987) 14. Nadia Petrova (RUS, 1982) 19. Martina Hingis (SUI, 1980)
20. Agnes Szavay (HUN, 1988) 15. Dinara Safina (RUS, 1986) 21. Sybille Bammer (AUT, 1980)
24. Lucie Safarova (CZE, 1987) 22. Alona Bondarenko (UKR, 1984) 25. Francesca Schiavone (ITA, 1980)
26. Agnieszka Radwanska (POL, 1989)23. Vera Zvonareva (RUS, 1984) 27. Katarina Srebotnik (SLO, 1981)
30. Vika Azarenka (BLR, 1989) 28. Virginie Razzano (FRA, 1983) 36. Mara Santangelo (ITA, 1981)
31. Maria Kirilenko (RUS, 1987) 29. Na Li (CHN, 1982) 37. Tathiana Garbin (ITA, 1977)
34. Michaella Krajicek (NED, 1989) 32. Sania Mirza (IND, 1986) 39. Ai Sugiyama (JPN, 1975)
42. Tamira Paszek (AUT, 1990) 33. Julia Vakulenko (UKR, 1983) 45. Emilie Loit (FRA, 1979)
49. Olga Govortsova (BLR, 1988) 35. Ana Isabel Medina (ESP, 1982) 48. Meilen Tu (USA, 1978)
51. Karin Knapp (ITA, 1987) 38. Gisela Dulko (ARG, 1985) 50. Akiko Morigami (JPN, 1980)
52. Dominika Cibulkova (SVK, 1989) 40. Flavia Pennetta (ITA, 1982) 53. Meghann Shaughnessy (USA, 1979)
56. Alize Cornet (FRA, 1990) 41. Vera Dushevina (RUS, 1986) 57. Alicia Molik (AUS, 1981)
60. Ioana-Raluca Olaru (ROU, 1989) 43. Eleni Daniilidou (GRE, 1982) 65. Laura Granville (USA, 1981)
64. Caroline Wozniacki (DEN, 1990) 44. Kateryna Bondarenko (UKR, 1986)66. Elena Likhovtseva (RUS, 1975)
70. Sara Errani (ITA, 1987) 46. Shuai Peng (CHN, 1986) 69. Nathalie Dechy (FRA, 1979)
78. Yung-Jan Chan (TPE, 1989) 47. Samantha Stosur (AUS, 1984) 71. L. Dominguez-Lino (ESP, 1981)
83. Olga Poutchkova (RUS, 1987) 54. Martina Muller (GER, 1982) 72. Nicole Pratt (AUS, 1973)
84. Yaroslava Shvedova (RUS, 1987) 55. Elena Vesnina (RUS, 1986) 73. Lindsay Davenport (USA, 1976)
88. Angelique Kerber (GER, 1988) 58. Pauline Parmentier (FRA, 1986) 74. Milagros Sequera (VEN, 1980)
89. Tatjana Malek (GER, 1987) 59. Zi Yan (CHN, 1984) 76. Camille Pin (FRA, 1981)
90. Aravane Rezai (FRA, 1987) 61. Klara Zakopalova (CZE, 1982) 79. Jill Craybas (USA, 1974)
91. Alla Kudryavtseva (RUS, 1987) 62. Roberta Vinci (ITA, 1983) 80. Tzipora Obziler (ISR, 1973)
94. Olga Savchuk (UKR, 1987) 63. Yvonne Meusburger (AUT, 1983) 81. V. Ruano Pascual (ESP, 1973)
95. Tsvetana Pironkova (BUL, 1987) 67. Aiko Nakamura (JPN, 1983) 82. Anne Kremer (LUX, 1975)
98. Andrea Petkovic (GER, 1987) 68. Ashley Harkleroad (USA, 1985) 92. Tatiana Poutchek (BLR, 1979)
75. Kaia Kanepi (EST, 1985) 93. Lilia Osterloh (USA, 1978)
77. Anast. Rodionova (RUS, 1982) 100. Julie Ditty (USA, 1979)
85. Edina Gallovits (ROU, 1984)
86. Casey Dellacqua (AUS, 1985)
87. Maria E. Salerni (ARG, 1983)
96. Tatiana Perebiynis (UKR, 1982)
97. Maria Elena Camerin (ITA, 1982)
99. Akgul Amanmuradova (UZB, 1984)
I forget to notice that for next season girls from "Rest of World" with best chances to be like teenagers with Chan in TOP100 is current 19y.o. and younger girls ranked currently between 100 and 200 place: #109 Vania King (USA, 1989), #138 Ayumi Morita (JPN, 1990), #151 Shuai Zhang (CHN, 1989), #165 Marina Erakovic (NZL, 1988) and #193 Mariana Duque Marino (COL, 1989)

LCS
Nov 19th, 2007, 05:39 PM
20 year-olds are not teenagers...:)

LCS
Nov 19th, 2007, 05:39 PM
But I get the point...:)

Elwin.
Nov 19th, 2007, 05:43 PM
very interesting!!

lee station
Nov 19th, 2007, 05:44 PM
20 is not a teenager. :confused:yes it is, like 1990 is the last year of the eighties, in example

pancake
Nov 19th, 2007, 06:09 PM
yes it is, like 1990 is the last year of the eighties, in example

But twenty is not ended with 'teen', and I am pretty sure if you look up the word 'teenager' in dictionary, it means young person between 13-19 year old.

BTW I don't think there is such a dangerous trend about having more and more European players in top 100, and I think there will be more Asian playing tennis in the future and there may be more top 100 players from Asian.

Doc
Nov 19th, 2007, 06:18 PM
But twenty is not ended with 'teen', and I am pretty sure if you look up the word 'teenager' in dictionary, it means young person between 13-19 year old.

BTW I don't think there is such a dangerous trend about having more and more European players in top 100, and I think there will be more Asian playing tennis in the future and there may be more top 100 players from Asian.

The point is that there are no top up and coming players from the Americas, Australia, Africa, Asia etc. Not many from Western Europe. That spells trouble for the game.

njnetswill
Nov 19th, 2007, 06:42 PM
When were there ever top juniors from Africa, Asia etc.?

I think the point was to say that the USA has a bleak tennis future on the women's side, but we all knew that anyway. :p As an American I don't really care because all my favorite players come from Europe/Asia anyway. :lol:

Drimal
Nov 19th, 2007, 08:20 PM
Personally I think it isn't that bad for tennis. :)

Europe, although second smallest continent is probably the one with the most different cultures and languages on a close area.

From your list one can see: Russia (6), France (3), Germany (3), Italy (2), Belarus (2), Czech Republic (1), the Netherlands (1), Austria (1), Romania (1), Hungary (1), Bulgaria (1). Ukraina (1), Denmark (1), Slovakia (1), Poland (1), Serbia (1), Israel (1)

So that's 17 different countries and 12 of them "only" have 1 good youngster in the top 100. That's a nice diversity and satisfying for many nations, especially since some of them like the Netherlands or Denmark didn't have a promising youngster a long time before.

Times where the United States were dominating the sport are over because tennis has become very popular especially in Eastern Europe. Many of the Eastern European girls were born around the time of the fall of Sovietian Union and maybe that was a special motivation for these countries to improve in "rich" Western sports like tennis. In addition to that typical tennis nations like France or Italy (they have always had good players) still have a couple of good youngsters.


But for the United States the fact is alarming because they are lacking of future stars at the moment. It's also a bit surprising to see no Chinese or Japanese player in the list.

I want to add that some players are late starters and we always see players doing well after 20 years but being low ranked as a teenager like Sybille Bammer (not inside top 200 before age 22!) or promising youngsters who disappear outside top 100 soon (sometimes because they have started too early or even reached too much too early) like Claudine Schaul (in top 50 with 20 years and among best 9 in junior times).

supergrunt
Nov 19th, 2007, 08:26 PM
all the teens are over-rated :shrug:

Cp6uja
Nov 19th, 2007, 08:38 PM
BTW I don't think there is such a dangerous trend about having more and more European players in top 100, and I think there will be more Asian playing tennis in the future and there may be more top 100 players from Asian.Of course that is nothing bad in fact that we have more and more good players from Europe - problem is because we have less and less quality players from rest of world! That is dangeruos trend. You THINK there will be more TOP100 players from Asia but where is all that girls right now? For example in 1986 girls we have Mirza and Peng from Asia and they both when have 20 or 19 years already been in TOP50, but if we look now all Asian 20 and 19 girls (1987 and 1988) best ranked 20 y.o. girl is #227 E.Takao and right now best ranked 1988 girl is #300 Hwang...

Not many from Western Europe. That spells trouble for the game.I dont see any problem with any part of Europe including western. For example worlds best ranked 1988 girl is from France, and all three current 1990 girls in TOP100 is from western Europe (Austria, France and Danmark). If we Israel count like western Europe, Peer is one of best 1987 players and Misha Krajicek is one of best 1989 prospects... so i dont see any problem with Western Europe tennis future - but if we look at USA and all others - its simple dissaster! For example youngest player at WTA TOP25 from "rest of world" is Serena Williams - in same time we have 18 Europian girls in TOP25 which is younger than Serena.

DutchieGirl
Nov 19th, 2007, 10:37 PM
Personally I think it isn't that bad for tennis. :)

Europe, although second smallest continent is probably the one with the most different cultures and languages on a close area.

From your list one can see: Russia (6), France (3), Germany (3), Italy (2), Belarus (2), Czech Republic (1), the Netherlands (1), Austria (1), Romania (1), Hungary (1), Bulgaria (1). Ukraina (1), Denmark (1), Slovakia (1), Poland (1), Serbia (1), Israel (1)

So that's 17 different countries and 12 of them "only" have 1 good youngster in the top 100. That's a nice diversity and satisfying for many nations, especially since some of them like the Netherlands or Denmark didn't have a promising youngster a long time before.

Times where the United States were dominating the sport are over because tennis has become very popular especially in Eastern Europe. Many of the Eastern European girls were born around the time of the fall of Sovietian Union and maybe that was a special motivation for these countries to improve in "rich" Western sports like tennis. In addition to that typical tennis nations like France or Italy (they have always had good players) still have a couple of good youngsters.


But for the United States the fact is alarming because they are lacking of future stars at the moment. It's also a bit surprising to see no Chinese or Japanese player in the list.

I want to add that some players are late starters and we always see players doing well after 20 years but being low ranked as a teenager like Sybille Bammer (not inside top 200 before age 22!) or promising youngsters who disappear outside top 100 soon (sometimes because they have started too early or even reached too much too early) like Claudine Schaul (in top 50 with 20 years and among best 9 in junior times).

Yes, and for Australia, Sam Stosur & Alicia Molik both got better later than their teenage years. I think it's just that the Eastern Europeans are working harder from a younger age, so we are hearing about them at a younger age. But I don't think the trend of Europeans being in the top 100 is alarming. I mean Apparantly there are no good prospects from Australia (according to thread starter) yet our population is only 20 million. Sorry, what would you like? Us to have 10 players in the top 100? Hello - NL has a population of 16 millon, and they have 1 player in the top 100. We have 4 million more people and we have 4, plus a couple of good juniors coming up too.

I do think it's a sign of the times that America (US) doesn't seem to be doing so well - but then South America has never been THAT strong on the womens side, and they have some prospects too. I think it's just peaks and troughs. US used to have alot of players, Australia used to have quite a few, now it's Europe's turn. :shrug:

DutchieGirl
Nov 19th, 2007, 10:42 PM
I dont see any problem with any part of Europe including western. For example worlds best ranked 1988 girl is from France, and all three current 1990 girls in TOP100 is from western Europe (Austria, France and Danmark). If we Israel count like western Europe, Peer is one of best 1987 players and Misha Krajicek is one of best 1989 prospects... so i dont see any problem with Western Europe tennis future - but if we look at USA and all others - its simple dissaster! For example youngest player at WTA TOP25 from "rest of world" is Serena Williams - in same time we have 18 Europian girls in TOP25 which is younger than Serena.

:shrug: Really I have to say: so what? Why does America have to have YOUNG girls in the top 100? Like I said before... peaks and troughs.

M2k
Nov 19th, 2007, 10:46 PM
nobody can say with a straight face that Sharapova reperesent "Europe". You need to put next to her name "USA Import".

.




:haha::haha::haha:

Muahahaha :devil:

Cp6uja
Nov 20th, 2007, 12:03 AM
Yes, and for Australia, Sam Stosur & Alicia Molik both got better later than their teenage years. I think it's just that the Eastern Europeans are working harder from a younger age, so we are hearing about them at a younger age. But I don't think the trend of Europeans being in the top 100 is alarming. I mean Apparantly there are no good prospects from Australia (according to thread starter) yet our population is only 20 million. Sorry, what would you like? Us to have 10 players in the top 100? Hello - NL has a population of 16 millon, and they have 1 player in the top 100. We have 4 million more people and we have 4, plus a couple of good juniors coming up too.

I do think it's a sign of the times that America (US) doesn't seem to be doing so well - but then South America has never been THAT strong on the womens side, and they have some prospects too. I think it's just peaks and troughs. US used to have alot of players, Australia used to have quite a few, now it's Europe's turn. :shrug:Of course that Stosur and Molik have better career after teens years but still when Stosur have 20y she finished (2004) season like #65 and when Molik have 20y she finished that (2001) season like #45, and right now we dont have any Ossy 20y or 19y (1987 and 1988) girl in TOP500... dont tell me that you dont see any difference here :confused: .

And for your information (North America + South America + Asia + Africa + Australia) > 6.000.000.000 peaple, so your "so what if population of 20 million dont have good prospects" conclusion is totaly wrong in this case.

Also you ask "so what if (after 100 years!!!) now dont have good players from USA and Australia"? 3 of 5 mandatory tournaments is playing in USA and AUS and also 5 months of season is on USA/AUS teritory (January, March, April, August and September) and more than 40% of all money prizes in womans tennis is from USA/AUS. About 150 GS titles in past reached tennis players from USA and Australia in womans competition, but now they both have big problem to produce not only next future slam winner - they have year by yaer biggest problem to produce even fu**ing TOP100 player. Trust me - tennis maybe survive without Africa, but without USA woman tennis dont be same sport - most popular womans sport with stars and global popularity. This is dangerous trend for womans tennis no doubt... For stats like this good work in Europe is not enough good explanation... Without very bad work in America results like this is not possible.

DutchieGirl
Nov 20th, 2007, 05:51 AM
Of course that Stosur and Molik have better career after teens years but still when Stosur have 20y she finished (2004) season like #65 and when Molik have 20y she finished that (2001) season like #45, and right now we dont have any Ossy 20y or 19y (1987 and 1988) girl in TOP500... dont tell me that you dont see any difference here :confused: .

And for your information (North America + South America + Asia + Africa + Australia) > 6.000.000.000 peaple, so your "so what if population of 20 million dont have good prospects" conclusion is totaly wrong in this case.

Also you ask "so what if (after 100 years!!!) now dont have good players from USA and Australia"? 3 of 5 mandatory tournaments is playing in USA and AUS and also 5 months of season is on USA/AUS teritory (January, March, April, August and September) and more than 40% of all money prizes in womans tennis is from USA/AUS. About 150 GS titles in past reached tennis players from USA and Australia in womans competition, but now they both have big problem to produce not only next future slam winner - they have year by yaer biggest problem to produce even fu**ing TOP100 player. Trust me - tennis maybe survive without Africa, but without USA woman tennis dont be same sport - most popular womans sport with stars and global popularity. This is dangerous trend for womans tennis no doubt... For stats like this good work in Europe is not enough good explanation... Without very bad work in America results like this is not possible.

I was SPECIFICALLY talking about AUSTRALIA when I said about a population of 20 million - so I don't care what the population of Australia + America + whatever else you want to add into it is - I was looking at AUSTRALIA ONLY in what I said above. And as I said, we DO have some good junior players coming up - Moore, Hollands, and some others. So no, my conclusion was spot on actually, and you obviously didn't read what I said correctly, because I said Australia DOES have some good prospects anyway.

fyi, I don't agree with the mandatory tourneys anyway, and 3 of the mandatories are also in Euope so :shrug: I don't see why you are now lumping US in with Australia - they are TOTALLY different countries, and given that they have a MUCH bigger population than Australia, they should be more worried than us that they can't produce at the moment.

I still don't see why this is necessarily BAD for the game though? Like I said - peaks and troughs.