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View Full Version : Argentina's New Female President


samsung101
Oct 29th, 2007, 06:46 PM
Cristina Kirchner, wife of the current President, a current Senator, elected
President of Argentina.

She herself has said in the past, she is not Hillary Clinton-esque. She noted
she held elected office prior to her husbands election, and has been involved
in politics on her own for years.

Sort of anyway.


She won because the opposition was fragmented, divided among many groups, and
frankly, her win was almost assured, so few really cared much to vote.
Lots of complaints about the election itself - some fraud, messiness, etc.

She won in a big fashion, avoiding a run off.


She will likely do little different from her husband.


However, she seems to be far less contentious with the USA, in comparison to her
husband. I mean she will be far less vocally against the USA, as her husband is.
I doubt she'll embrace the USA. But, she will likely be a little more polite. She
has met President and Mrs. Bush, and on a personal level, seemed more friendly to
both, than the husband was. Can't hurt. She knows the Clintons as well.

Argentina is still in a tough economic period, and many have not recovered from the
depression that hit the nation a few years ago, where millions of middle class people
lost it all.

Argentina has moved far to the left under Mr. Kirchner, wrapped itself up with Hugo
Chaves financially, and is very anti-USA at the UN. Still, the two nations are trading
partners, and people need Americans for tourism dollars.

She is an attractive figure. Colorful. Imelda Marcos-esque in her shoe collection.


Will she be the real President, or will her husband be the wizard behind the curtain again?

I'd like to think she'll run the country her way......

Get the country back on track, spending less on plastic surgery (which is rampant in Argentina),
and a little more on fixing the economic system.

Apoleb
Oct 29th, 2007, 07:32 PM
so few really cared much to vote

Voting is mandatory in Argentina. :weirdo:

Other than that, interesting drivel. :lol:

Tripp
Oct 29th, 2007, 10:08 PM
That bitch :fiery:

I just hate her, both she and her husband are so power-hungry.

She won the election with the vote of the lower class -which of course is most of Argentina's society-, mostly buying it with small money.

The middle & higher class voted either for Elisa Carrió or Roberto Lavagna, who are much more capable of running a clean presidence. It's just disgusting the way they their power to shut anything negative about their decisions.

Fingon
Oct 30th, 2007, 04:22 AM
Cristina Kirchner, wife of the current President, a current Senator, elected
President of Argentina.

She herself has said in the past, she is not Hillary Clinton-esque. She noted
she held elected office prior to her husbands election, and has been involved
in politics on her own for years.

Sort of anyway.


She won because the opposition was fragmented, divided among many groups, and
frankly, her win was almost assured, so few really cared much to vote.
Lots of complaints about the election itself - some fraud, messiness, etc.

She won in a big fashion, avoiding a run off.


She will likely do little different from her husband.


However, she seems to be far less contentious with the USA, in comparison to her
husband. I mean she will be far less vocally against the USA, as her husband is.
I doubt she'll embrace the USA. But, she will likely be a little more polite. She
has met President and Mrs. Bush, and on a personal level, seemed more friendly to
both, than the husband was. Can't hurt. She knows the Clintons as well.

Argentina is still in a tough economic period, and many have not recovered from the
depression that hit the nation a few years ago, where millions of middle class people
lost it all.

Argentina has moved far to the left under Mr. Kirchner, wrapped itself up with Hugo
Chaves financially, and is very anti-USA at the UN. Still, the two nations are trading
partners, and people need Americans for tourism dollars.

She is an attractive figure. Colorful. Imelda Marcos-esque in her shoe collection.


Will she be the real President, or will her husband be the wizard behind the curtain again?

I'd like to think she'll run the country her way......

Get the country back on track, spending less on plastic surgery (which is rampant in Argentina),
and a little more on fixing the economic system.

Well, the rumour I heard from my friends that still live in Argentina is that Kirchner was linked to montoneros, the terrorist group that terrorized the country (with other groups) in the 70s. They weren't as bad as the ERP (Ejercito Revolucionario del Pueblo, People's revolutionary army in English) but the ERP was confined to the North while Montoneros were a urban guerrilla.

Apparently numerous elements of Montoneros are part of the Kirchner's goverment, I can't think it will be any different with his wife, she might be more outspoken, better looking but there isn't really any difference.

Economic boom? my ass, it's because soy and corn's prices are very high now, but like their friend Chavez, they are not reinvesting anything, previous goverments destroyed the country's industry, Kirchner is destroying the country's primary producers.

Nothing right will come from this, I've seen that too many times, unfortunately.

esquímaux
Oct 30th, 2007, 05:08 PM
That bitch :fiery:

I just hate her, both she and her husband are so power-hungry.

She won the election with the vote of the lower class -which of course is most of Argentina's society-, mostly buying it with small money.

The middle & higher class voted either for Elisa Carrió or Roberto Lavagna, who are much more capable of running a clean presidence. It's just disgusting the way they their power to shut anything negative about their decisions.Whoa! Sour grapes babe? :tape:

Tripp
Oct 30th, 2007, 05:15 PM
The gabinet chief (who is sord of like the ministers chief) came out today complaining about how voters in Buenos Aires couldn't "committ to the same project as the rest of the country" and criticized for "voting like they're part of an island", because Kirchner only got 25% of the votes here, falling way behind Carrió, who came out first with almost 37%.

The thing is that Kirchner didn't win, or won with a lower percentage on urban centers, mostly because people there usually have a higher education level than those in the poorer areas of the country. Statistically, 70% of the middle class rejects the current government. But as usual, the winner got to that place with the support of the lower class, which tends to be very manipulable, in the sense that they'll vote for anyone who offers them a meal -and I'm not kidding, that's what it takes in most cases-.

My friend's mother was telling me about how she was on the line to vote when she heard some girls behind her saying about how they would spend the $50 ($15,62 US dollars) they'd given them to vote for Cristina on booze.

And in most cases what happened was simply that people took all of the opposition's papers so that no one could put them inside the envelope in which you vote. When I got into the dark room there were almost no papers representing the lower parties.

History tends to repeat itself in Argentina, and I can see where this is going.

Last president we had who wasn't from the PJ -the most popular party- was taken down in 2001 mostly because of the lack of support he had in the lower class, in a riot that was organized by the PJ.

And in the meanwhile, prices of everything -and I do mean everything, mostly food- have duplicated over the last 4 years, whereas the wages stayed where they were. Over the last couple of months, basic items such as tomatoes and potatoes have seen its price grow to more than 400% its original value, and Cristina herself came out saying how it was all a story made up by the media to increase the reject for the government.

Living in a country like this can get so frustrating sometimes.

Tripp
Oct 30th, 2007, 05:18 PM
Whoa! Sour grapes babe? :tape:

If sour grapes means complaining about how my country is going down the sink, yeah, I guess those were sour grapes.

sfselesfan
Oct 30th, 2007, 06:07 PM
You're right Samsung, she's not Hillary-esque....she's far to the left of Hillary. Closer to Kucinich.

SF

Scotso
Oct 31st, 2007, 03:28 AM
They don't seem that liberal to me. Political dynasties and power consolidation isn't very "liberal."

She's hot, though. At least Argentina has a hot president. She and Bachelet can get together for some girl chat.

South American politics doesn't make much sense to me, so I won't comment on anything else.

Scotso
Oct 31st, 2007, 03:32 AM
Voting is mandatory in Argentina. :weirdo:

While that may be so, it seems a lot of people didn't vote.

polishprodigy
Oct 31st, 2007, 03:34 AM
Funny how she won even though she didn't want to engage in policy debates.

AleOrtu
Oct 31st, 2007, 02:06 PM
That bitch :fiery:

She won the election with the vote of the lower class -which of course is most of Argentina's society-, mostly buying it with small money.

The middle & higher class voted either for Elisa Carrió or Roberto Lavagna, who are much more capable of running a clean presidence. It's just disgusting the way they their power to shut anything negative about their decisions.

That is true, I also voted Elisa Carrió.
But the lower classes, who really need a change in the country, voted for her because they follow the Perón-evita party no matter what happens.

For example, she obtained 72.33% votes in Formosa, (the most poor province, next to the Paraguay border) where children and people are starving.
Can you believe a person dying of hunger in a country that produces (and exports) so many food? This people really need a different goverment.



Well, the rumour I heard from my friends that still live in Argentina is that Kirchner was linked to montoneros, the terrorist group that terrorized the country (with other groups) in the 70s. They weren't as bad as the ERP (Ejercito Revolucionario del Pueblo, People's revolutionary army in English) but the ERP was confined to the North while Montoneros were a urban guerrilla.

Apparently numerous elements of Montoneros are part of the Kirchner's goverment, I can't think it will be any different with his wife, she might be more outspoken, better looking but there isn't really any difference.



That is true.





Get the country back on track, spending less on plastic surgery (which is rampant in Argentina),
and a little more on fixing the economic system.

Impossible.
We have inflation back since last year, but when we can see around that goods and stuff has risen about 20% - 30% officially they claim we have 0,6% inflation per month. They lie to us, the press tell the people "they are lying" and that´s why she lost in Buenos Aires city, where most of the people has university acces and not-so-low- live conditions. Buenos Aires can´t be bought, same than the most important cities like Rosario, Mar del Plata, La Plata, Córdoba, all the places where Cristina Kirchner was defeated.


The gabinet chief (who is sord of like the ministers chief) came out today complaining about how voters in Buenos Aires couldn't "committ to the same project as the rest of the country" and criticized for "voting like they're part of an island", because Kirchner only got 25% of the votes here, falling way behind Carrió, who came out first with almost 37%.

The thing is that Kirchner didn't win, or won with a lower percentage on urban centers, mostly because people there usually have a higher education level than those in the poorer areas of the country. Statistically, 70% of the middle class rejects the current government. But as usual, the winner got to that place with the support of the lower class, which tends to be very manipulable, in the sense that they'll vote for anyone who offers them a meal -and I'm not kidding, that's what it takes in most cases-.



Exactly, that´s what I said.

[qoute]
And in most cases what happened was simply that people took all of the opposition's papers so that no one could put them inside the envelope in which you vote.

History tends to repeat itself in Argentina, and I can see where this is going.

Last president we had who wasn't from the PJ -the most popular party- was taken down in 2001 mostly because of the lack of support he had in the lower class, in a riot that was organized by the PJ.

[/QUOTE]

100% true.


Funny how she won even though she didn't want to engage in policy debates.


That´s why she was sure to win.
She also refused invitations to TV and Radio programs where all the other candidates accepted to go and answer people questiions (for example "Magdalena Tempranisimo" in Radio Continental, all of them come to the program).

In fact, she and our current president, never speak to the press.
And the press is people´s ears, eyes and mouth.

samsung101
Oct 31st, 2007, 06:09 PM
She didn't have to engage in those things, she was that far ahead in
every poll, of every type. What was it, 2 to 1 over several candidates.

Why risk messing up, when you don't really have to.

Consequently, she didn't even have to spell out any policy ideas or plans.
That's troubling.

The fact she is attractive didn't hurt.
In Argentina, the portenos like that very much.
That's not a stereotype of Buenos Aires, that's
a fact most portenos would promote, not be insulted by.
They like to look good, look like they 're living well, and
enjoy their beautiful city.



She's a left of center politician. Not quite as much as hubby, but still,
clearly,not conservative.

The USA hopes she's more like Brazil's left of late, open to the USA, and not
so much hugging Hugo Chaves all the time.

Argentina has been in a political mess for years, they had 2 or 3 presidents
in about 6 months a few years ago. A depression. Middle Class slashed.
Poverty rose. Folks, real poverty, real depression, no jobs, people leaving
the country to work elsewhere, not to mention the foot-mouth disease of the
cattle, that killed a lot of business worldwide. The country should be
far more financially successful than it is right now in 2007.

Mr. Kirchner did enough to stabilize the mess, fixed a few things. But, considering
how bad it was, anything was an improvement. He did it by clinging to Chaves, and
bashing the USA, and some mild govt. changes.

Let's see what she will do.

I think she will be a little more pro-USA for financial reasons: American dollars in
Argentina, along with the Euro, can help the people of Argentina. Very simple.

LoveFifteen
Oct 31st, 2007, 06:24 PM
While that may be so, it seems a lot of people didn't vote.

It's "mandatory", but if you don't vote, the fine is just a few pesos. Not that anyone pays it. :tape: