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ClaudiaZ-S
Oct 18th, 2007, 07:51 PM
:eek: :eek:


British actress Deborah Kerr, known to millions for her roles in The King And I, Black Narcissus and From Here To Eternity, has died at the age of 86.
Born in Scotland in 1921, the actress made her name in British films before becoming successful in Hollywood.

Nominated for the best actress Oscar six times, she was given an honorary award by the Academy in 1994.

Kerr, who had suffered from Parkinson's disease for a number of years, died in Suffolk on Tuesday, her agent said.

So sad :sad: :sad: :sad:

-Ph51-
Oct 18th, 2007, 07:57 PM
:sad:

CrossCourt~Rally
Oct 18th, 2007, 08:52 PM
Actress Deborah Kerr Dies at Age 86


LONDON (AP) - Deborah Kerr , who shared one of Hollywood's most famous kisses while portraying an Army officer's unhappy wife in "From Here to Eternity" and danced with the Siamese monarch in "The King and I," has died. She was 86.

Kerr, who suffered from Parkinson's disease, died Tuesday in Suffolk in eastern England, her agent, Anne Hutton, said Thursday.

For many she will be remembered best for her kiss with Burt Lancaster as waves crashed over them on a Hawaiian beach in the wartime drama "From Here to Eternity."

Kerr's roles as forceful, sometimes frustrated women pushed the limits of Hollywood's treatment of sex on the screen during the censor-bound 1950s.

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences nominated Kerr six times for best actress, but never gave her an Academy Award until it presented an honorary Oscar in 1994 for her distinguished career as an "artist of impeccable grace and beauty, a dedicated actress whose motion picture career has always stood for perfection, discipline and elegance."

She had the reputation of a "no problem" actress.

"I have never had a fight with any director, good or bad," she said toward the end of her career. "There is a way around everything if you are smart enough."

Kerr (pronounced CARR) was the only daughter of a civil engineer and architect who died when she was 14. Born in Helensburgh, Scotland, she moved with her parents to England when she was 5, and she started to study dance in the Bristol school of her aunt. Kerr won a scholarship to continue studying ballet in London, and at 17 she made her stage debut as a member of the corps de ballet in "Prometheus."

She soon switched to drama, however, and began playing small parts in repertory theater in London until it was shut down by the 1939 outbreak of World War II.

After reading children's stories on British Broadcasting Corp. radio, she was given the part of a hatcheck girl with two lines in the film "Contraband," but her speaking role ended on the cutting-room floor.

After more repertory acting she had another crack at films, reprising her stage role of Jenny, a Salvation Army worker, in a 1940 adaptation of George Bernard Shaw's "Major Barbara," receiving favorable reviews both in Britain and the United States.

She continued making films in Britain during the war, including one - "Colonel Blimp" - in which she played three different women over a span of decades.

"It is astonishing how she manages to make the three parts distinctly separate as characterizations," said New Movies magazine at the time.

Kerr was well-reviewed as an Irish spy in "The Adventuress" and as the tragic girlfriend of a Welsh miner in "Love on the Dole."

She was invited to Hollywood in 1946 to play in "The Hucksters" opposite Clark Gable . She went on to work with virtually all the other top American actors and with many top directors, including John Huston, Otto Preminger and Elia Kazan .

Tired of being typecast in ladylike roles, she rebelled to win a release from her MGM contract and get the role of Karen Holmes in "From Here to Eternity."

Playing the Army officer's alcoholic, sex-starved wife in a fling with Lancaster's Sgt. Warden opened up new possibilities for Kerr.

She played virtually every part imaginable from murderer to princess to a Roman Christian slave to a nun.

In "The King and I," with her singing voice dubbed by Marni Nixon, she was Anna Leonowens, who takes her son to Siam so that she can teach the children of the king, played by Yul Brynner .

Her best-actress nominations were for "Edward, My Son" (1949), "From Here to Eternity" (1953), "The King and I" (1956), "Heaven Knows, Mr. Allison" (1957), "Separate Tables" (1958), and "The Sundowners" (1960).

Among her other movies is "An Affair to Remember" with Cary Grant .

Other notable roles were in "The Sundowners," "Beloved Infidel," "The Innocents" (an adaptation of the Henry James novella "Turn of the Screw"), "The Night of the Iguana" with Richard Burton and "The Arrangement" with Kirk Douglas .

After "The Arrangement" in 1968, she took what she called a "leave of absence" from acting, saying she felt she was "either too young or too old" for any role she was offered.

Kerr told The Associated Press that she turned down a number of scripts, either for being too explicit or because of excessive violence.

She refused to play a nude scene in "The Gypsy Moths," released in 1968. "It was when they started that `Now everybody has got to take their clothes off,"' she said. "My argument was that it was completely gratuitous. Had it been necessary for the dramatic content, I would have done it."

In fact she undressed for "The Arrangement," even though the scene was later cut. "There the nude scene was necessary, husband and wife in bed together," Kerr said. "That was real."

She returned to the stage, acting in Edward Albee's "Seascape" on Broadway and "Long Day's Journey Into Night" in Los Angeles.

Her Broadway debut came in 1953, when she was acclaimed as Laura Reynolds, a teacher's wife who treats a sensitive student compassionately in "Tea and Sympathy."

After a full season in New York, she took it on a national tour and recreated the role in a movie in 1956.

Kerr was active until the mid-1980s, with "The Assam Garden," "Hold the Dream" and "Reunion at Fairborough" all in 1985.

She told the AP that TV reruns of her old movies have "kept me alive" for a new generation of film fans.

In 1945 Kerr married Anthony Charles Bartley, whom she had met when he was a squadron leader in the Royal Air Force. They had two daughters and were divorced in 1959. A year later she married novelist-screenwriter Peter Viertel with whom she lived on a large estate with two trout ponds in the Swiss Alpine resort of Klosters and in a villa in Marbella, Spain.

Kerr is survived by Viertel, two daughters and three grandchildren.

CrossCourt~Rally
Oct 18th, 2007, 09:05 PM
Rat Pack Comedian Joey Bishop Dies


LOS ANGELES (Oct. 18) - Joey Bishop, the stone-faced comedian who found success in nightclubs, television and movies but became most famous as a member of Frank Sinatra 's Rat Pack, has died at 89.


He was the group's last surviving member. Peter Lawford died in 1984, Sammy Davis Jr. in 1990, Dean Martin in 1995, and Sinatra in 1998.

Bishop died Wednesday night of multiple causes at his home in Newport Beach, publicist and longtime friend Warren Cowan said Thursday.

The Rat Pack became a show business sensation in the early 1960s, appearing at the Sands Hotel in Las Vegas in shows that combined music and comedy in a seemingly chaotic manner.

Reviewers often claimed that Bishop played a minor role, but Sinatra knew otherwise. He termed the comedian "the Hub of the Big Wheel," with Bishop coming up with some of the best one-liners and beginning many jokes with his favorite phrase, "Son of a gun!"

"He was the perfect match for the Rat Pack. He fit right in like an old shoe," Hollywood's honorary mayor, Johnny Grant, said Thursday.

The quintet lived it up whenever members were free of their own commitments. They appeared together in such films as "Ocean's Eleven" and "Sergeants 3" and proudly gave honorary membership to a certain fun-loving politician from Massachusetts, John F. Kennedy, at whose inauguration gala Bishop served as master of ceremonies.

The Rat Pack faded after Kennedy's assassination, but the late 1990s brought a renaissance, with the group depicted in an HBO movie and portrayed by imitators in Las Vegas and elsewhere. The movie "Ocean's Eleven" was even remade in 2003 with George Clooney and Brad Pitt in the lead roles.

Bishop defended his fellow performers' rowdy reputations in a 1998 interview.

"Are we remembered as being drunk and chasing broads?" he asked. "I never saw Frank, Dean, Sammy or Peter drunk during performances. That was only a gag. And do you believe these guys had to chase broads? They had to chase 'em away."

Away from the Rat Pack, Bishop starred in two TV series, both called "The Joey Bishop Show."

The first, an NBC sitcom, got off to a rocky start in 1961. Critical and audience response was generally negative, and the second season brought a change in format. The third season brought a change in network, with the show moving to ABC, but nothing seemed to help and it was canceled in 1965.

In the first series, Bishop played a TV talk show host.

Then, he really became a TV talk show host. His program was started by ABC in 1967 as a challenge to Johnny Carson's immensely popular "The Tonight Show."

Like Carson, Bishop sat behind a desk and bantered with a sidekick, TV newcomer Regis Philbin. But despite an impressive guest list and outrageous stunts, Bishop couldn't dent Carson's ratings, and "The Joey Bishop Show" was canceled after two seasons.

Bishop then became a familiar guest figure in TV variety shows and as sub for vacationing talk show hosts, filling in for Carson 205 times.

He also played character roles in such movies as "The Naked and the Dead" ("I played both roles"), "Onion-head," "Johnny Cool," "Texas Across the River," "Who's Minding the Mint?" "Valley of the Dolls" and "The Delta Force."

His comedic schooling came from vaudeville, burlesque and nightclubs.

Skipping his last high school semester in Philadelphia, he formed a music and comedy act with two other boys, and they played clubs in Pennsylvania and New Jersey. They called themselves the Bishop Brothers, borrowing the name from their driver, Glenn Bishop.

Joseph Abraham Gottlieb would eventually adopt Joey Bishop as his stage name.

When his partners got drafted, Bishop went to work as a single, playing his first solo date in Cleveland at the well-named El Dumpo.

During these early years he developed his style: laid-back drollery, with surprise throwaway lines.

After 3 1/2 years in the Army, Bishop resumed his career in 1945. Within five years he was earning $1,000 a week at New York's Latin Quarter. Sinatra saw him there one night and hired him as opening act.

While most members of the Sinatra entourage treated the great man gingerly, Bishop had no inhibitions. He would tell audiences that the group's leader hadn't ignored him: "He spoke to me backstage; he told me `Get out of the way."'

When Sinatra almost drowned filming a movie scene in Hawaii, Bishop wired him: "I thought you could walk on water."

Born in New York's borough of the Bronx, Bishop was the youngest of five children of two immigrants from Eastern Europe.

When he was 3 months old the family moved to South Philadelphia, where he attended public schools. He recalled being an indifferent student, once remarking, "In kindergarten, I flunked sand pile."

In 1941 Bishop married Sylvia Ruzga and, despite the rigors of a show business career, the marriage survived until her death in 1999.

Bishop, who spent his retirement years on the upscale Lido Isle in Southern California's Newport Bay, is survived by son Larry Bishop; grandchildren Scott and Kirk Bishop; and longtime companion Nora Garabotti.

CrossCourt~Rally
Oct 18th, 2007, 09:12 PM
I am especialy saddened to see Deborah Kerr pass away as i am a huge movie buff and i have seen probobly 20 of her films over the past 10 years. I just saw her in a british film called Seperate Tables with Rita Hayworth. But, my fave Deborah movies would have to be...From Here To Eternity and An Affair To Remember :kiss: .

I mostly remember Joey Bishop from the Rat Pack films aswell as the Joey Bishop Show which Nick at Nite reran in the 90s ...:wavey:

Frode
Oct 19th, 2007, 01:20 AM
R.I.P to both of them.

:sad:

trivfun
Oct 19th, 2007, 01:25 AM
I like the movie "black Narcissus" from 1947. She played the role of a nun in India to perfection. The patronizing attitude towards Indian culture and the people by trying to take over that Hindu temple and it bit them in the butt.

I remember her boobs were briefly exposed in Gypsy Moths. I hope she is gay so I won't feel rejected and that she was acting the whole time with a family. That deserves an Oscar consideration.

VivalaSeles
Oct 19th, 2007, 02:07 AM
http://home.hiwaay.net/%7Eoliver/dkformal.jpg

Pasta-Na
Oct 19th, 2007, 04:37 AM
:sad:

Dawn Marie
Oct 19th, 2007, 04:46 AM
Rest in Peace Deborah Kerr :)

galadriel
Oct 19th, 2007, 08:15 AM
:sad: :sad:

Helen Lawson
Oct 19th, 2007, 08:58 AM
The old bats from my generation are dropping like flies!
Let's not forget Joey Bishop's best role as the MC at the telethon where Neely gets her "breakthrough" with Lyon and Anne watching. It's the scene where Neely is singing and gyrating her torso and her double-stranded necklace separates during the song to cup both her breasts. One of the classic moments of Valley of the Dolls!

Jakeev
Oct 19th, 2007, 09:14 AM
The old bats from my generation are dropping like flies!
Let's not forget Joey Bishop's best role as the MC at the telethon where Neely gets her "breakthrough" with Lyon and Anne watching. It's the scene where Neely is singing and gyrating her torso and her double-stranded necklace separates during the song to cup both her breasts. One of the classic moments of Valley of the Dolls!


Yeah it's kinda sad in away considering they will all be gone most likely by the end of the next decade.

Helen Lawson
Oct 19th, 2007, 07:03 PM
Yeah it's kinda sad in away considering they will all be gone most likely by the end of the next decade.

I know, there are hardly any pre-1960's icons left anymore. Who do we have now, a bunch of nobodies!

trivfun
Oct 20th, 2007, 02:07 AM
I know, there are hardly any pre-1960's icons left anymore. Who do we have now, a bunch of nobodies!

Liz Taylor beat Deborah for an Oscar in 1960 for Butterfield 8 when Deborah did an awesome job on Sundowners. What do you mean now, yes there are a bunch of Liz Taylor wannabes and they are doing a poor job of it.

CrossCourt~Rally
Oct 20th, 2007, 04:19 PM
I know, there are hardly any pre-1960's icons left anymore. Who do we have now, a bunch of nobodies!


There's always Mamie Van Doren :lol: Checkout her website sometime... MamieVanDoren.com . She still poses nude for photo shoots at age 77 :eek: .

Helen Lawson
Oct 20th, 2007, 04:48 PM
Mamie's a hot number! I used to frequent that site, I will have to go back. She talks in graphic detail about all the stars she's banged, so you know you're getting the real deal from her. That film she did with Jayne Mansfield, Hillbillies in Las Vegas or something, goes the distance. A far cry from I Want To Live!, but we all can't be Oscar winners.

CrossCourt~Rally
Oct 20th, 2007, 05:19 PM
Mamie's a hot number! I used to frequent that site, I will have to go back. She talks in graphic detail about all the stars she's banged, so you know you're getting the real deal from her. That film she did with Jayne Mansfield, Hillbillies in Las Vegas or something, goes the distance. A far cry from I Want To Live!, but we all can't be Oscar winners.

:lol: or... I'll Cry Tomorow ;)

Helen Lawson
Oct 20th, 2007, 06:35 PM
Or My Foolish Heart, another all-time great!

I guess I can break my silence now that Debs has gone to the big studio in the sky. Backstage at the Oscars in '58, David Niven told me privately after we'd both won that he'd voted for me and not his co-star Debs for "Separate Tables." I told him I'd take it to the grave, but now that he and Debs have both croaked, I guess it's ok to let out that tidbit.

CrossCourt~Rally
Oct 20th, 2007, 06:43 PM
Or My Foolish Heart, another all-time great!

I guess I can break my silence now that Debs has gone to the big studio in the sky. Backstage at the Oscars in '58, David Niven told me privately after we'd both won that he'd voted for me and not his co-star Debs for "Separate Tables." I told him I'd take it to the grave, but now that he and Debs have both croaked, I guess it's ok to let out that tidbit.

:haha: