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G1Player2
Jul 2nd, 2007, 06:15 PM
Well, it seems like this is what Serena was diagnosed with spasm induced calf strain. Is this serious?

Meeek
Jul 2nd, 2007, 06:17 PM
What the heck does that mean?

Langers
Jul 2nd, 2007, 06:17 PM
Well, it seems like this is what Serena was diagnosed with spasm induced calf strain. Is this serious?
Yes, VERY.

Be scared.

PamShriverRockz
Jul 2nd, 2007, 06:21 PM
Calf strains can put someone out of action for a few weeks. Depends on how serious it is. (Surely it would be a calf strain induced spasm?)

Serena :sad:

stkenyi
Jul 2nd, 2007, 06:21 PM
Calf strains may be minor or very severe and physician grade the injury according:

Grade 1 Calf Strain : The muscle is stretched causing some small micro tears in the muscle fibers. Full recovery takes approximately two weeks.
Grade 2 Calf Strain : There is partial tearing of muscle fibers. Full recovery takes approximately 5-8 weeks.
Grade 3 Calf Strain : This is the most severe calf strain with a complete tearing or rupture of muscle fibers in the lower leg. Full recovery can take 3-4 months and, in some instances, surgery may be needed.

Wannabeknowitall
Jul 2nd, 2007, 06:21 PM
Riight.
You put an "org" before that "asm", and you have yourself the spasm that created that strain. :tape:

G1Player2
Jul 2nd, 2007, 06:21 PM
Calf strains can put someone out of action for a few weeks. Depends on how serious it is. (Surely it would be a calf strain induced spasm?)

Serena :sad:

If it was that serious I think she would have retired already based on the doctor's advice.

ilovethewilliams
Jul 2nd, 2007, 06:22 PM
shoot. looks like Serena is gone from Wimbledon.

Rome
Jul 2nd, 2007, 06:22 PM
What is a calf strain?
A strain is an injury in which muscle fibers or tendons are stretched or torn. People commonly call such an injury a "pulled" muscle. A calf strain is an injury to the muscles and tendons in the back of your leg below your knee.

How does it occur?
A strain of your calf muscles can occur during a physical activity where you push off forcefully from your toes. It may occur in running, jumping, or lunging.

What are the symptoms?
A calf muscle strain may cause immediate pain in the back of your lower leg. You may hear or feel a pop or a snap.

You may get the feeling that someone has hit you in the back of the leg. It is hard to rise up on your toes. Your calf may be swollen and bruised.

How is it diagnosed?
Your health care provider will examine your lower leg. Your calf muscles will be tender.

How is it treated?
Treatment may include:

applying ice packs to your calf for 20 to 30 minutes every 3 to 4 hours for 2 or 3 days or until the pain goes away
elevating your leg on a pillow while you are lying down
wrapping an elastic bandage around your calf to keep the swelling from getting worse
using crutches, if it is too painful to walk.
taking anti-inflammatory medicine
getting physical therapy, which may include treatment of the muscle tissue by a therapist using ultrasound or muscle stimulation.
having your health care provider or therapist tape the injured muscles while they are healing to help you to return to athletic activities
doing rehabilitation exercises.
While you are recovering from your injury, you will need to change your sport or activity to one that does not make your condition worse. For example, you may need to swim instead of run.

How long will the effects last?
The length of recovery depends on many factors such as your age, health, and if you have had a previous calf injury. Recovery time also depends on the severity of the injury. A mild calf strain may recover within a few weeks, whereas a severe injury may take 6 weeks or longer to recover. You need to stop doing the activities that cause pain until the muscle has healed. If you continue doing activities that cause pain, your symptoms will return and it will take longer to recover.

When can I return to my normal activities?
Everyone recovers from an injury at a different rate. Return to your activities will be determined by how soon your calf recovers, not by how many days or weeks it has been since your injury has occurred. In general, the longer you have symptoms before you start treatment, the longer it will take to get better. The goal of rehabilitation is to return you to your normal activities as soon as is safely possible. If you return too soon you may worsen your injury.

You may safely return to your activities when, starting from the top of the list and progressing to the end, each of the following is true:

You have full range of motion in the injured leg compared to the uninjured leg.
You have full strength of the injured leg compared to the uninjured leg.
You can walk straight ahead without pain or limping.
How can calf strains be prevented?
Calf strains are best prevented by warming up properly and doing calf-stretching exercises before your activity. This is especially important if you are doing jumping or sprinting sports

Fidello
Jul 2nd, 2007, 06:23 PM
Well, it seems like this is what Serena was diagnosed with spasm induced calf strain. Is this serious?
It's very serious but not in medical terms. Richard is gonna strangle her if she quits.

ilovethewilliams
Jul 2nd, 2007, 06:25 PM
dammit. It's Over. All hopes on Venus now so I guess tomorrow will be the last day I was Wimbledon until Next Year.

trufanjay
Jul 2nd, 2007, 06:26 PM
It's very serious but not in medical terms. Richard is gonna strangle her if she quits.
Richard actually suggested that she stop playing. But knowing Serena she will continue.

G1Player2
Jul 2nd, 2007, 06:28 PM
Richard actually suggested that she stop playing. But knowing Serena she will continue.

When did he suggest this? Are you referring to earlier in the tournament?

Yasmine
Jul 2nd, 2007, 06:30 PM
From what the commentators were saying here, is that if it's a strain it will take a few weeks to heal properly :awww: :sad:

~CANUCK~
Jul 2nd, 2007, 06:30 PM
When did he suggest this? Are you referring to earlier in the tournament?

Mary carillo said that during the change over he yelled down to serena to stop playing if she is in to much pain.

50Sense
Jul 2nd, 2007, 06:31 PM
A "spasm" refers to the cramp itself, and the direct consequence of the cramp is the calf strain. People have cramped before and recovered quickly. I think she can do it. As long as it rains for little while longer.

IAM#1
Jul 2nd, 2007, 06:31 PM
no he yelled out to her on the changeover at 6-5

vejh
Jul 2nd, 2007, 06:31 PM
SO maybe she was compensating for her strained hamstring and caused another injury. If it has a chance to get worse; she shoud definitely quit; because it is not worth it.

G1Player2
Jul 2nd, 2007, 06:32 PM
What is a calf strain?
A strain is an injury in which muscle fibers or tendons are stretched or torn. People commonly call such an injury a "pulled" muscle. A calf strain is an injury to the muscles and tendons in the back of your leg below your knee.

How does it occur?
A strain of your calf muscles can occur during a physical activity where you push off forcefully from your toes. It may occur in running, jumping, or lunging.

What are the symptoms?
A calf muscle strain may cause immediate pain in the back of your lower leg. You may hear or feel a pop or a snap.

You may get the feeling that someone has hit you in the back of the leg. It is hard to rise up on your toes. Your calf may be swollen and bruised.

How is it diagnosed?
Your health care provider will examine your lower leg. Your calf muscles will be tender.

How is it treated?
Treatment may include:

applying ice packs to your calf for 20 to 30 minutes every 3 to 4 hours for 2 or 3 days or until the pain goes away
elevating your leg on a pillow while you are lying down
wrapping an elastic bandage around your calf to keep the swelling from getting worse
using crutches, if it is too painful to walk.
taking anti-inflammatory medicine
getting physical therapy, which may include treatment of the muscle tissue by a therapist using ultrasound or muscle stimulation.
having your health care provider or therapist tape the injured muscles while they are healing to help you to return to athletic activities
doing rehabilitation exercises.
While you are recovering from your injury, you will need to change your sport or activity to one that does not make your condition worse. For example, you may need to swim instead of run.

How long will the effects last?
The length of recovery depends on many factors such as your age, health, and if you have had a previous calf injury. Recovery time also depends on the severity of the injury. A mild calf strain may recover within a few weeks, whereas a severe injury may take 6 weeks or longer to recover. You need to stop doing the activities that cause pain until the muscle has healed. If you continue doing activities that cause pain, your symptoms will return and it will take longer to recover.

When can I return to my normal activities?
Everyone recovers from an injury at a different rate. Return to your activities will be determined by how soon your calf recovers, not by how many days or weeks it has been since your injury has occurred. In general, the longer you have symptoms before you start treatment, the longer it will take to get better. The goal of rehabilitation is to return you to your normal activities as soon as is safely possible. If you return too soon you may worsen your injury.

You may safely return to your activities when, starting from the top of the list and progressing to the end, each of the following is true:

You have full range of motion in the injured leg compared to the uninjured leg.
You have full strength of the injured leg compared to the uninjured leg.
You can walk straight ahead without pain or limping.
How can calf strains be prevented?
Calf strains are best prevented by warming up properly and doing calf-stretching exercises before your activity. This is especially important if you are doing jumping or sprinting sports

It's spasm induced though

Pureracket
Jul 2nd, 2007, 06:34 PM
Just looked it up....I don't think she should come back.

G1Player2
Jul 2nd, 2007, 06:44 PM
Just looked it up....I don't think she should come back.

If it was that serious I think the doctors would have told her to hang it up. It's a spasm not an actual calf strain.

doni1212
Jul 2nd, 2007, 06:50 PM
Ok, so who diagnosed this? I was just watching TV and they said that Serena's camp doesn't even know what it is? Who determined it was a spasm induced calf strain?

hablo
Jul 2nd, 2007, 06:53 PM
Such bad luck! :sad:

thomas.chung
Jul 2nd, 2007, 06:59 PM
Ok. Here is the latest dish from the official Wimbledon blog...

"6.23 pm: Lots of you asking for news about Serena. As far as I know, it’s cramp, but she’s locked herself away in the dressing room with her entourage to get treatment so obviously we can’t get any more details.

If it is cramp, then the right drinks and massages should help her. Stretching it out is also often the best way of treating calf cramps."

Hope that helps you guys understand her situation now. But as far as the official wording goes, seems like there is no mention of the word strain yet. It is quite normal for tennis players to have cramps (big or small) and I think she was just being too dehydrated. I wouldn't go as far as blaming it on her conditioning yet because we don't know what she did for preparation. In addition, from my experience, these things you just can't be predicted. However, we should be glad that she didn't get a full body cramp.

hablo
Jul 2nd, 2007, 07:04 PM
Ok. Here is the latest dish from the official Wimbledon blog...

"6.23 pm: Lots of you asking for news about Serena. As far as I know, itís cramp, but sheís locked herself away in the dressing room with her entourage to get treatment so obviously we canít get any more details.

If it is cramp, then the right drinks and massages should help her. Stretching it out is also often the best way of treating calf cramps."

Hope that helps you guys understand her situation now. But as far as the official wording goes, seems like there is no mention of the word strain yet. It is quite normal for tennis players to have cramps (big or small) and I think she was just being too dehydrated. I wouldn't go as far as blaming it on her conditioning yet because we don't know what she did for preparation. In addition, from my experience, these things you just can't be predicted. However, we should be glad that she didn't get a full body cramp.
I really hope it's just cramps because then I think she'll be able to continue her match.

rrfnpump
Jul 2nd, 2007, 07:09 PM
Who made the diagnosis? It really looked like cramps for me. :shrug: Serena's first reaction also indicates it is cramps, because the muscle obviously tightened up and thats a sign for cramps.

I hope it is cramps and nothing serious. I want to see Serena v Justine in the quarters.

Yasmine
Jul 2nd, 2007, 07:10 PM
fingers crossed it's just a cramp :hug:

swissmr
Jul 2nd, 2007, 07:11 PM
If Sue Barker says it's a spasm induced cramp, it's a spasm induced cramp OK!?

winone23
Jul 2nd, 2007, 07:12 PM
I pray that Serena is ok.

Kunal
Jul 2nd, 2007, 07:14 PM
drama