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Rocketta
Apr 26th, 2007, 02:41 PM
Survey: Blacks face housing bias in N.O.

By MICHAEL KUNZELMAN, Associated Press WriterWed Apr 25, 10:58 AM ET


Blacks already feeling the pinch from a housing shortage in the New Orleans area after Hurricane Katrina are facing racial discrimination in their search for rental property, a survey by housing advocates found.


The survey sent black and white "testers" — paired by matching incomes, careers, family types and rental histories — to inquire about openings at 40 rental properties in metropolitan New Orleans.


The findings, released Tuesday by the Greater New Orleans Fair Housing Action Center, found blacks encountered "less favorable treatment" than their white counterparts in 57.5 percent of those tests.


In one example, an agent told the black tester who responded to an apartment ad on Jan. 22 that only one unit was available, and not until February. The same agent told the white tester later that day that two units would available Feb. 1 and mentioned two other units.


Tammy Esponge, association executive for the Apartment Association of Greater New Orleans, she has no reason to believe housing discrimination is more acute in New Orleans than in other parts of the country.


"There's discrimination all the time out there — not just in the apartment market. I'm talking all over the place," she said. "But we are highly in support of our members enforcing the fair housing laws."


She said her group offers annual fair housing training seminars for its members, which include 34 owners and managers of 20,000 rental units in southeast Louisiana.


James Perry, executive director of the Greater New Orleans Fair Housing Action Center, said the group intends to sue several landlords.
"At a time when people need housing desperately, we really can't stand to have discrimination occurring," Perry said.

Rocketta
Apr 26th, 2007, 02:42 PM
Just imagine what the percentage would be if things weren't currently so "equal" in the USA. :help:

samsung101
Apr 26th, 2007, 04:30 PM
I thought no one lived in New Orleans.
That it was all under water and unlivable.
A mess.

How can there be homes and apartments to rent?

Fact is New Orleans has been largely up and running in most
parts since weeks after Katrina. The entire city was never a
disaster, major portions of it were, but, not all. The overdone,
horrendous, fake stories of dead babies, and no assistance to
blacks at all worked: business has stayed away, new residents
have stayed away, and the rebuilding has been slow because of it.


The group sponsoring the survey doesn't have an angle to push does it?
Gee, no.

I'm sure there is some discrimination.
Based on money, based on job records, based on past rental
history, based on the landlords history with previous tenants.

If they kept blacks out solely on color, that's wrong. It seems
that would be hard to do in a city that was and is still largely
a minority filled city: blacks, creoles, mixed race, Indian, asian,
hispanic, etc. Much like LA.

Sue away though. Give it a try.

It's New Orleans, why would another scandal or insider deal be a surprise?
That's what New Orleans does, and has done for 100+ years. The city
was a mess before Katrina, it still is, thanks largely to the local political
machine. Everyone wants the cash from the feds and charity.





How is it a record number of hispanics are moving in and buying homes in
New Orleans after Katrina? How are they getting along and booming?
Many of whom are illegal.

samsung101
Apr 26th, 2007, 04:32 PM
There are some great 'small home' designs and
shelters popping up with the help of top notch
architects and designers. Creative new homes
and apartments.

Many of which are not in the areas hardest hit by
the flooding...and should not be located there.

Experts agree some areas that were flooded, and are
the lowest, should not have homes built in them again.

Marshmallow
Apr 28th, 2007, 05:32 PM
I saw this article a few days ago and was gonna post it myself, but got beat to it.



The group sponsoring the survey doesn't have an angle to push does it?
Gee, no.

I'm sure there is some discrimination.
Based on money, based on job records, based on past rental
history, based on the landlords history with previous tenants.

If they kept blacks out solely on color, that's wrong. It seems
that would be hard to do in a city that was and is still largely
a minority filled city: blacks, creoles, mixed race, Indian, asian,
hispanic, etc. Much like LA.


Why do you write in verse? :o

Anyway, you are right that this article is vague, leaving out a lot of details to rule out propaganda. But, most of these testers studies are usually based on first time interactions. Hence, knowledge of financial history often isn't known. And if it is based on finance, why not just be clear about the price of the units / homes and those who can't afford it, be honest. There is no need to lie about it, if people can't afford it, they aren't entitled. But to deceive them, and tell others the truth? What is going on here is not right. And not uncommon, i remember when Queen Latifah had a talk show and she did the race observations thing.. it was shocking at time, how institutional racism occurs almost everywhere.

Rocketta
Apr 28th, 2007, 05:40 PM
Anyway, you are right that this article is vague, leaving out a lot of details to rule out propaganda. But, most of these testers studies are usually based on first time interactions. Hence, knowledge of financial history often isn't known. And if it is based on finance, why not just be clear about the price of the units / homes and those who can't afford it, be honest. There is no need to lie about it, if people can't afford it, they aren't entitled. But to deceive them, and tell others the truth? What is going on here is not right. And not uncommon, i remember when Queen Latifah had a talk show and she did the race observations thing.. it was shocking at time, how institutional racism occurs almost everywhere.

It's a moot point anyway because the article clearly states


The survey sent black and white "testers" — paired by matching incomes, careers, family types and rental histories — to inquire about openings at 40 rental properties in metropolitan New Orleans.

they clearly made the people look the same on paper only difference being their race and that's what was the determining factor if they were treated fairly/the same as the other. :(

Marshmallow
Apr 28th, 2007, 06:00 PM
It's a moot point anyway because the article clearly states

they clearly made the people look the same on paper only difference being their race and that's what was the determining factor if they were treated fairly/the same as the other. :(

Well there you go folks. No other term but Racism. What exactly are they hoping, to get a racial divide where african americans end up in poor quality homes and locations? Then from there on, relate poor quality conditions to the race of the majority of the population. :rolleyes:

In this day and age i really cannot undertsand motives. What are the gains of perpetuating racial divides?

Mother_Marjorie
Apr 29th, 2007, 12:06 AM
I thought no one lived in New Orleans.
That it was all under water and unlivable.
A mess.

How can there be homes and apartments to rent?

Fact is New Orleans has been largely up and running in most
parts since weeks after Katrina. The entire city was never a
disaster, major portions of it were, but, not all. The overdone,
horrendous, fake stories of dead babies, and no assistance to
blacks at all worked: business has stayed away, new residents
have stayed away, and the rebuilding has been slow because of it.


The group sponsoring the survey doesn't have an angle to push does it?
Gee, no.

I'm sure there is some discrimination.
Based on money, based on job records, based on past rental
history, based on the landlords history with previous tenants.

If they kept blacks out solely on color, that's wrong. It seems
that would be hard to do in a city that was and is still largely
a minority filled city: blacks, creoles, mixed race, Indian, asian,
hispanic, etc. Much like LA.

Sue away though. Give it a try.

It's New Orleans, why would another scandal or insider deal be a surprise?
That's what New Orleans does, and has done for 100+ years. The city
was a mess before Katrina, it still is, thanks largely to the local political
machine. Everyone wants the cash from the feds and charity.

How is it a record number of hispanics are moving in and buying homes in
New Orleans after Katrina? How are they getting along and booming?
Many of whom are illegal.
Having personally visited New Orleans on three occasions since Katrina, I can attest to the catastrophic conditions the city continues to face. New Orleans East is no more. The 9th ward is uninhabitable, 95% of Lakeview is uninhabitable. Only the CBD, french quarter, parts of uptown/garden district and Faubourg Marigny are up and running for business. Unless you go to Jefferson Parish, the Westbank or across the Lake Ponchartrain bridge to Covington, housing is at a minimal.

1-2 bedroom apartments that once rented for $500/month are now $900-$1200 per month. Businesses in the French Quarter are having to curtail their hours because of the lack of available service workers in the area secondary to the skyrocketing rental rates. Hundred of thousands of homeowners in the area have yet to receive a dime for the rebuilding process, and some will never be able to, much less have the will.

There is a severe shortage of mental health professionals, nurses, doctors and the existing medical complex continues to hobble along attempting to adjust for the basic needs of the current community.

Yes, you still see the blue roofs (blue tarp draped over damaged roofs) and FEMA trailers galore.

New Orleans isn't anywhere near what most would consider a "recovery." In fact, it might well take at least 15 years just to lure a fraction of the businesses back to the region.

And to date, their levy system is still vulnerable. The recent revamped pumping system was found to operate at below pre-Katrina standards (1 inch of water/hour).

I have friends who left before the hurricane who never plan on returning. They started the long and painful road of rebuilding their lives from scratch in a new place. Most of what they had worked for years was lost. Those who were spared their homes, returned to face malignant stress of worrying when the next "big one" would hit and whether it was worth returning. A few even sold their homes and left.

In my best estimation, New Orleans isn't a place to consider relocating for at least ten years.

CrossCourt~Rally
Apr 29th, 2007, 12:56 AM
Thanks for your insight Mother Dearest :kiss:

RVD
Apr 29th, 2007, 01:02 AM
Tammy Esponge, association executive for the Apartment Association of Greater New Orleans, she has no reason to believe housing discrimination is more acute in New Orleans than in other parts of the country.
:worship: Tammy is exactly correct.
Though New Orleans being through the most recent of catastrophes exemplifies and magnifies the disparities blacks face daily.

But who really cares other than the ones who endure such treatment?
So the larger question is...Will someone within the state or federal government step up and resolve this?

Seriously doubt it.

RVD
Apr 29th, 2007, 01:13 AM
Having personally visited New Orleans on three occasions since Katrina, I can attest to the catastrophic conditions the city continues to face. New Orleans East is no more. The 9th ward is uninhabitable, 95% of Lakeview is uninhabitable. Only the CBD, french quarter, parts of uptown/garden district and Faubourg Marigny are up and running for business. Unless you go to Jefferson Parish, the Westbank or across the Lake Ponchartrain bridge to Covington, housing is at a minimal.

1-2 bedroom apartments that once rented for $500/month are now $900-$1200 per month. Businesses in the French Quarter are having to curtail their hours because of the lack of available service workers in the area secondary to the skyrocketing rental rates. Hundred of thousands of homeowners in the area have yet to receive a dime for the rebuilding process, and some will never be able to, much less have the will.

There is a severe shortage of mental health professionals, nurses, doctors and the existing medical complex continues to hobble along attempting to adjust for the basic needs of the current community.

Yes, you still see the blue roofs (blue tarp draped over damaged roofs) and FEMA trailers galore.

New Orleans isn't anywhere near what most would consider a "recovery." In fact, it might well take at least 15 years just to lure a fraction of the businesses back to the region.

And to date, their levy system is still vulnerable. The recent revamped pumping system was found to operate at below pre-Katrina standards (1 inch of water/hour).

I have friends who left before the hurricane who never plan on returning. They started the long and painful road of rebuilding their lives from scratch in a new place. Most of what they had worked for years was lost. Those who were spared their homes, returned to face malignant stress of worrying when the next "big one" would hit and whether it was worth returning. A few even sold their homes and left.

In my best estimation, New Orleans isn't a place to consider relocating for at least ten years.But the whole point is that there are people who've called NO home all their lives. That would include ALL ethnic backgrounds. So what then do the poorer or middle-income people of color do when faced with open discrimination? :shrug: It's easy to save, don't come back because it looks like a dump. Also, where do they move to?
That is what this survey exposes.

Would anyone who've endured such a catastrophe feel motivated to uproot from the only place they've known as 'home' due to the illegal activities of these landlords? It's a crime that's clearly being commited. Again, this sort of thing is so grossly typical.