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View Full Version : Dementieva at Jelzin's funeral, speaking for SWISS TV


Oizo
Apr 25th, 2007, 03:02 PM
I guess the Swiss Television had no clue who she is, as they haven't written her name on the screen while taking the interview :rolls:

Click here and on the left under the pics on the VIDEO:Tagesschau :)

http://tagesschau.sf.tv/nachrichten/archiv/2007/04/25/international/jelzin_tritt_letzte_reise_an

pierce0415
Apr 25th, 2007, 03:05 PM
just watched the video
Lena :hug:
hope she is not too sad for her return to tennis

goldenlox
Apr 25th, 2007, 03:06 PM
This is a big event in Moscow

Washington - Former presidents George HW Bush and Bill Clinton will lead the US delegation attending the funeral of former Russian President Boris Yeltsin, said the White House on Tuesday.
White House spokesperson Dana Perino said the two would leave New York on Tuesday night and travel together to Moscow for the state funeral on Wednesday.
Yeltsin, 76, died on Monday from heart failure and was the first democratically elected Russian president.
He presided over the dismantling of the Soviet Union and led Russia in its first chaotic years of independence.
Of the two US ex-presidents, Clinton had the closer connection to Yeltsin.
The two leaders, dubbed the "Boris and Bill Show" on the world stage, held sway in the 1990s with a series of high-profile meetings across the globe as the Clinton White House tried to help steer Moscow's transition to democracy. They met more than 15 times, starting in Vancouver, Canada, in 1993 and continuing until 2000, when Clinton made his final trip to Moscow as president to see Yeltsin's newly empowered successor, Vladimir Putin.

http://www.news24.com/News24/World/N...103918,00.html


http://www.news24.com/News24/World/N...103492,00.html (http://www.news24.com/News24/World/News/0,,2-10-1462_2103492,00.html)


Day of mourning for Yeltsin
23/04/2007


Moscow - Russian President Vladimir Putin on Monday declared a day of mourning for Boris Yeltsin, who he said had helped give birth to a "new democratic Russia".
Yeltsin, who ruled Russia from 1991 to 1999, died on Monday aged 76.
Russia will pay its respects with a national day of mourning on April 25, Putin said.
"He was the first Russian president. With this title he has for ever entered the history of the country and the whole world," Putin said at the Novo-Ogaryovo presidential residency outside Moscow.
"A man passed away, thanks to whom a whole new epoch was born. New democratic Russia was born, a free state open to the world.
"The state in which power truly belongs to the people," Putin said. "We will do everything so that the memory of Boris Nikolayevich Yeltsin, his noble thoughts, his words: 'protect Russia' always serve us as moral and political guidelines," Putin said.

AnnaK_4ever
Apr 25th, 2007, 03:24 PM
from wtatour.ru

Dementieva:
http://img133.imageshack.us/img133/8029/dementievapd1.png

Myskina (also Youzhny and Tarpischev):
http://img441.imageshack.us/img441/8025/myskinafl0.jpg

goldenlox
Apr 25th, 2007, 03:24 PM
Excellent, thanks!

Alvarillo
Apr 25th, 2007, 03:28 PM
Boris :sad:
Elena :hearts:

azmad_88
Apr 25th, 2007, 03:31 PM
Lena saying something thereE?

AnnaK_4ever
Apr 25th, 2007, 03:35 PM
Lena saying something thereE?

Yes. Some nice and warm words on B.N.

sonnys
Apr 25th, 2007, 03:37 PM
yes, i saw it on tv today from the memorial to the funeral...it was very emotional..my prayers are with the family!:sad:

danadruncea
Apr 25th, 2007, 03:41 PM
Very sweet from Elena :)
Putin says his Russia is democratic? I don't think even he can believe it.

Dementinator
Apr 25th, 2007, 03:41 PM
nice

Wayn77
Apr 25th, 2007, 03:43 PM
RIP Boris.

- lookin forward to seeing Lena back in action.

Demska
Apr 25th, 2007, 03:44 PM
Nastya :hug:

Make him pround and go kick some more butt for him. :hug:

Oizo
Apr 25th, 2007, 03:46 PM
Now who will hold their hands up when they win the Moskow tourney :sad:

azmad_88
Apr 25th, 2007, 03:58 PM
any other RUssian tennis player not pplaying tournaments were theere?

Sharapova? Kafelnikov?

miffedmax
Apr 25th, 2007, 04:05 PM
Yes, hopefully both Lena and Nasty will be inspired to win some tournaments now.

His legacy is not perfect, and history may change its verdict, but there is no question he helped shape Russia and the rest of the world. He presided over a very difficult time, and there are many who would have done much worse.

I think he will go down as one of the "Near Great" figures of Russian history.

Tenis Srbija
Apr 25th, 2007, 04:10 PM
For sure they knew who Lena was... In other case why the heck would have made an interview with her :rolleyes:

Boris :sad: :sobbing:

AnnaK_4ever
Apr 25th, 2007, 04:28 PM
I think he will go down as one of the "Near Great" figures of Russian history.

B.N. is one of five figures (along with Petr I, Ekaterina II, Alexandr II, and Stalin) who made the biggest impact on Russian history. He provided us a choice to live how WE want and to do what WE want. Those who chose to work have succeeded or done Ok at least; those who chose to whine and drink have failed. But that's how it should be in reality.

Martian Jeza
Apr 25th, 2007, 05:33 PM
I recognized her then ;) Why did the French TV ( France 3 ) not mention it was Elena ? :rolleyes:

thrust
Apr 25th, 2007, 05:37 PM
AnnaK- Very well put! Whatever his flaws, Boris is one of the truly great men in Russia^s history. May he R.I.P. Saw some of the funeral service on tv. It was very beautiful and moving. What was interesting is that Boris had that beautiful chruch rebuilt after it had been destroyed by the Communists.

miffedmax
Apr 25th, 2007, 05:39 PM
Lenin's not on the list? Or Ivan?

I largely agree (I'm not a Russian history expert, but I read a lot of history for fun, including Russian).

I think Yeltsin's impact was enormous. I say "near great" because like a number of others I believe he made some serious errors during his tenure that made Russia's transition more difficult than it might have been. Yet it could have been much worse, with dire implications for Russia and the rest of the world.

By the same token, I would argue that while Stalin indeed had a huge impact on Russia's history, he was not a great leader because he did so much to harm his people and maintain his grip on power. So while I would consider him important, I would not call him great.

I'm not trying to start a fight, because I think we're just parsing over what I meant by "near-great."

thrust
Apr 25th, 2007, 05:43 PM
azmad- I doubt Maria knew who Boris was before he died. I could be wrong though-lol!!

crazillo
Apr 25th, 2007, 05:45 PM
Jelzin will be missed, esp. at the Moscow event concerning tennis. He was suffering from many things for a long time, so probably one could expect he was not very healthy...

thrust
Apr 25th, 2007, 05:46 PM
Stalin was indeed one of the most evil leaders of all time, but Lenin wasn^t much better, perhaps just as bad, I also believe that Putin is the opposite of Yeltsin in that he does not truly believe in democracy or free speech.

kinglear
Apr 25th, 2007, 05:58 PM
Wow, Lena looks so young. I would have thought that was from years ago. :eek:

goldenlox
Apr 25th, 2007, 06:14 PM
http://www.daviscup.com/shared/medialibrary/image/gallery/DC_6860_gallery.JPG

bellascarlett
Apr 25th, 2007, 06:26 PM
Lena and Nastya...:hug:

I'll miss seeing Yeltsin's face cheering for the Russian team and his players.

Dementinator
Apr 25th, 2007, 06:27 PM
The guy wasnt perfect ,but I truly believe he tried.. thats more than most armchair critics will ever do.....

bellascarlett
Apr 25th, 2007, 06:30 PM
azmad- I doubt Maria knew who Boris was before he died. I could be wrong though-lol!!

:rolleyes:

Gosh, give it a rest sometimes. I don't think this is proper in a thread like this. :o

Last year's French Open - Boris cheering for Maria and Maria coming over to him at the end of the match and Boris giving his hat for Maria to sign.

ys
Apr 25th, 2007, 06:39 PM
Having women like Lena and Nastya grieving over you like this is definitely worth living for.. probably even worth dying for..

AnnaK_4ever
Apr 25th, 2007, 07:04 PM
Lenin's not on the list? Or Ivan?

I largely agree (I'm not a Russian history expert, but I read a lot of history for fun, including Russian).

I think Yeltsin's impact was enormous. I say "near great" because like a number of others I believe he made some serious errors during his tenure that made Russia's transition more difficult than it might have been. Yet it could have been much worse, with dire implications for Russia and the rest of the world.

By the same token, I would argue that while Stalin indeed had a huge impact on Russia's history, he was not a great leader because he did so much to harm his people and maintain his grip on power. So while I would consider him important, I would not call him great.

I'm not trying to start a fight, because I think we're just parsing over what I meant by "near-great."

You know, I'd never call Lenin a "great" figure (in any meaning of this word). I would rather call him a pitiful but cruel brigand.
As for Stalin, he was truly great in his evil methods of manipulation of people and destroying any kind of opposition. He was strong leader, evil but the great one.

gmak
Apr 25th, 2007, 07:15 PM
Lena :hug:

miffedmax
Apr 25th, 2007, 07:28 PM
I'd flip your assessments of Lenin and Stalin, but that's the fun of these sorts of arguments.

Of course, Stalin did successfully manage the defeat of the one man on earth who was worse than he was.

goldenlox
Apr 25th, 2007, 08:38 PM
Clinton bids farewell to his friend Boris

Reuters | Thursday, 26 April 2007
Email a Friend (http://www.stuff.co.nz/emailafriend/4038439a12.html) | Printable View (http://www.stuff.co.nz/print/4038439a12.html) | Have Your Say (http://www.stuff.co.nz/3127301a4621.html)

http://www.stuff.co.nz/images/292362.jpg Reuters
GRAND GOODBYE: Serving and past Russian politicians and foreign dignitaries have farwelled Boris Yeltsin in a cathedral he had rebuilt as a symbol of national revival.


MOSCOW: Former US President Bill Clinton embraced Boris Yeltsin's widow with one of his trademark hugs as he paid his last respects to the man with whom he formed a diplomatic double act in the 1990s.


Yeltsin's widow Naina and his two daughters Tatyana and Yelena, clad in black, their eyes puffy from crying, sat beside his open coffin as a stream of serving and past Russian politicians and foreign guests filed past.
In a moment of reconciliation, former Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev a long-standing rival left without a job when Yeltsin dismantled the Soviet Union kissed Naina and whispered words of condolence as he gripped Yelena's hand.
A sombre-looking Clinton, one half of what was known for its public banter and bonhomie as "the Bill and Boris show", stooped to put his right arm around Naina's shoulder, pulling her tightly towards him and then patting her gently on the back.
In the cathedral of Christ the Saviour blown up by Josef Stalin and rebuilt under Yeltsin as a symbol of national revival a Russian Orthodox choir sang psalms and soldiers from the Kremlin regiment stood at each corner of the coffin.
Clinton was joined by fellow former President George H W Bush and former British Prime Minister John Major. They were followed by Russian President Vladimir Putin and his wife Lyudmilla, who after offering their condolences sat down next to Yeltsin's family to hear a funeral oration by Orthodox cleric Metropolitan Yuvenaly.

Nemesis
Apr 25th, 2007, 08:54 PM
Lena, Nastya & Youzhny... Pretty logical that they were there. He did a great lot for them. All Russian tennis players should've been there. But I think Nastya & Lena D were closest to him

We lost a great leader and a great tennis maecenas :sad:

goldenlox
Apr 25th, 2007, 09:01 PM
Wearing dark suits and ties with white shirts, Bush and Clinton warmly embraced and kissed the late leader's family, before standing among other dignitaries near the coffin.

Bush paused to speak with Naina, whom he knew from his summits with Yeltsin in the 1990s.

State television reported that 35,000 people overall streamed in to pay last respects to the man who brought down the Soviet Union and oversaw painful economic and democratic (http://www.metimes.com/storyview.php?StoryID=20070425-090001-6690r#) reforms that left Russians deeply divided over his legacy.

"It's my era and now it's over," said one mourner, Lyubov Martenyanova, 58, outside the cathedral.

Yeltsin, who died Monday of a heart attack, aged 76, was to be taken later for burial at Moscow's 16th century Novodevichy convent, alongside other eminent Russians including playwright Anton Chekhov.

The Kremlin declared a day of mourning and flags were lowered nationwide. State-run television broadcast almost continuous coverage of the ceremonies.

"The destiny of [Yeltsin] reflected the dramatic history of the 20th century," said a message from Russian Patriarch Alexi II read out in the cathedral by a metropolitan bishop dressed in jeweled, gold-trimmed robes.

"The desire of our people to live in freedom was very strong and [he] felt this and he helped to bring this about."

In addition to the former US presidents (http://www.metimes.com/storyview.php?StoryID=20070425-090001-6690r#), foreign dignitaries at the funeral included Britain's former prime minister John Major and German President Horst Koehler, as well as leaders of former Soviet republics that Yeltsin freed from Moscow's grip at the start of his 1991-99 rule.

Western leaders have lined up to eulogize Yeltsin, casting him as a hero for dealing the coup de grace to the Soviet Union and embracing democracy and capitalism.

Shvedbarilescu
Apr 25th, 2007, 09:05 PM
Thank you so much goldenlox for all the articles and photos you have shown us over the couple of days. They are very very appreciated. :hug:

Wayn77
Apr 25th, 2007, 09:30 PM
You know, I'd never call Lenin a "great" figure (in any meaning of this word). I would rather call him a pitiful but cruel brigand.
As for Stalin, he was truly great in his evil methods of manipulation of people and destroying any kind of opposition. He was strong leader, evil but the great one.

Pitiful and cruel is rather over-dramatic isn't it? Lenin understood better than anyone how to gain control of a country, and keep it. The political class had to control the men with the guns and the intelligence services - and by these means could ensure that neither the army nor another political class could challenge for power.

AnnaK_4ever
Apr 25th, 2007, 10:05 PM
Pitiful and cruel is rather over-dramatic isn't it? Lenin understood better than anyone how to gain control of a country, and keep it. The political class had to control the men with the guns and the intelligence services - and by these means could ensure that neither the army nor another political class could challenge for power.

And again, I wouldn't call the Civil war the best way to control the country. Let alone that Lenin's role at performing October perevorot (sorry, can't find the right word) was greatly exaggerated. The only decision which he was 'brave' enough for committing was murder of Tsar family.

schorsch
Apr 25th, 2007, 10:14 PM
did they cut out the video ? i have looked through all the vidz, but didnt see her anywhere.

itzhak
Apr 25th, 2007, 11:42 PM
here is longer video including Lena; Anastasia with Youzny (he speaks and not Nastya) and than Shamil Tarpischev. it is from 07:00 min. to 08:30 so be patient...

http://www.1tv.ru/owa/win/ort6_videopage.main?sender=news&p_topic_id=101943&p_video_num=1&counter1_href=287212&counter2_href=id=268366;t=56

Medina
Apr 25th, 2007, 11:48 PM
lena :inlove:

crazillo
Apr 26th, 2007, 12:35 AM
Thanx goldenlox for your oinsight articles and phot.s Doesn't make the situation much better though...

mauresmofan
Apr 26th, 2007, 01:41 AM
I feel so sorry for them - you could tell that they really appreciated what he did for their careers and ultimately their lives. If Boris was watching Anastasia God help the player she was playing because she used to play at at her best level.

miffedmax
Apr 26th, 2007, 03:22 AM
Nasty looked really choked up in the vid.

hwanmig
Apr 26th, 2007, 05:39 AM
did they cut out the video ? i have looked through all the vidz, but didnt see her anywhere.

Me too, I thought I was the only one who couldn't find it.