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Dementinator
Apr 23rd, 2007, 11:19 PM
Just a nice pic as a tribute to the Late Boris Yeltsin, who did a lot to promote tennis in his country...

http://img378.imageshack.us/img378/1213/596imageov4.jpg

RIP

azmad_88
Apr 24th, 2007, 02:29 AM
Boris :D

go hingis
Apr 24th, 2007, 02:50 AM
Rest In Peace

strawberry.babou
Apr 24th, 2007, 02:52 AM
RIP Boris

shirgan
Apr 24th, 2007, 03:15 AM
Yeltsin left Russia in ruins
I would think his alleged support of tennis would not be so important in that case.

And how did he support tennis so much? by sitting in the benches of the Kremlin cup?

MS_FP
Apr 24th, 2007, 05:00 AM
RIP Boris...all around great guy no matter what people may say :worship:

Nicolás89
Apr 24th, 2007, 05:06 AM
he was always so funny in public apparitions:lol:

(notice nastya never losed with boris around:D)

Vinicius_Uraitan
Apr 24th, 2007, 05:29 AM
Rest In Peace, Boris !!!

peanuts
Apr 24th, 2007, 07:00 AM
RIP Boris Yeltsin.

sonnys
Apr 24th, 2007, 07:59 AM
:worship: :worship:

DOUBLEFIST
Apr 24th, 2007, 08:24 AM
RIP Mr. Yeltsin.

Though not infallable, he was a man of great courage.

mankind
Apr 24th, 2007, 09:03 AM
Yeltsin left Russia in ruins
And how did he support tennis so much? by sitting in the benches of the Kremlin cup?

I am unsure of the details of his support for Russian tennis, but I know that even with his mere presence at Fed Cup ties, Davis Cup ties and at Moscow, he made a difference.

It's terrible and shocking to me that he is dead, at just 76. God rest his soul.

DarkchildSwiss
Apr 24th, 2007, 09:09 AM
RIP Boris

Mana
Apr 24th, 2007, 09:12 AM
Yeltsin left Russia in ruins
I would think his alleged support of tennis would not be so important in that case.

And how did he support tennis so much? by sitting in the benches of the Kremlin cup?

I agree, Yeltsin was an alcholic who ran Russia into the ground in his latter years. He embarresed Russia and himself many times and had no respect from this pairs.

Inspite of this tho, RIP.

mankind
Apr 24th, 2007, 09:19 AM
I agree, Yeltsin was an alcholic who ran Russia into the ground in his latter years. He embarresed Russia and himself many times and had no respect from this pairs.

Inspite of this tho, RIP.

Don't make me cry - it's hard enough as it is! If you want to abuse a dead man who had problems and an exceedingly difficult job, please go somewhere else

goldenlox
Apr 24th, 2007, 11:34 AM
From Russia with (tennis) love

Boris Yeltsin helped his country become a tennis superpower

By Paul Bauman - Bee Staff Writer
Published 12:00 am PDT Tuesday, April 24, 2007

Professional tennis lost one of its most influential figures when former Russian President Boris Yeltsin died Monday at 76.
Yeltsin was a fanatic of the sport and one reason Russia, with little tradition in the game under communism, has become the top tennis nation in the world as a democracy.
Folsom resident Dmitry Tursunov, a Moscow native and the 23rd-ranked male tennis player in the world, said Yeltsin played a big role in Russia's success.
"Yeltsin was watching over tennis because he enjoyed it," Tursunov, a Russian citizen and key member of last year's Davis Cup championship team, recently told The Bee. "Anybody who wanted to get close to him also had to play tennis. Some people around him who didn't play carried rackets anyway.
"He pushed for more courts. Tennis became a cool thing to do. A lot of rich people started to play and sponsor players."
How big was Yeltsin's influence? Consider:
• Russia currently has more players ranked among the top 100 men and top 100 women -- 25 total -- than any other country. Next are the United States and France with 21 each.
• Russia won the Davis Cup, the men's international team competition in 2002 and 2006, and the Fed Cup, the women's counterpart, in 2004 and 2005.
• Russian women won three of the four Grand Slam singles titles in 2004: Anastasia Myskina in the French Open, Maria Sharapova at Wimbledon and Svetlana Kuznetsova in the U.S. Open. Also, Sharapova won last year's U.S. Open.
• Russian men Marat Safin and Yevgeny Kafelnikov each have won two Grand Slam singles titles. (Kafelnikov retired at the end of 2003.)
• Sharapova, Safin and Kafelnikov all have been ranked No. 1.
Although Tursunov didn't realize it at the time, Yeltsin attended the first two sets of the unseeded player's four-set victory over Safin, seeded 19th, in the first round at Wimbledon in 2004.
Tursunov, however, said he met Yeltsin on several other occasions.
"I used to train at a club where he practiced. When I was 8 or 9, I gave him a little present -- a tennis ball with a wire. I made it to look like him. He wasn't president at the time but high up," Tursunov, who moved from Moscow to Los Altos in the Bay Area when he was 12 and later to Roseville, recalled in January.
"I also met him at the Davis Cup semifinals and final (both in Moscow) last year. Before the final, the team had dinner at his summer home. He watches every match in Russia."
At the dinner, "I let him do most of the talking because he's older," Tursunov said. "He's very funny, always joking around.
"He has a dry sense of humor. He was telling his wife he was going to divorce her because the Russian dumplings were overcooked. At first, you're going, 'What the hell is going on?' Then you see he had a little smile."

http://www.sacbee.com/100/story/160105.html

Renaissance
Apr 24th, 2007, 11:58 AM
We are in a tennis forum,and he helped a lot russian tennis but that's all.

Chechenya,poor standards of living in russia,and oligarchy (mafia) it's because of him.


He is'nt a hero.

Good results in tennis don't help russians in their daily life.

goldenlox
Apr 24th, 2007, 12:05 PM
Former Russian President, Tennis Supporter Boris Yeltsin Is Dead At 76
http://www.sportsmediainc.net/tennisweek/YeltsinMyskinaGETTY.jpg
By Tennis Week
04/24/2007

Former Russian President Boris Yeltsin, an avid tennis player and supporter of the sport who was the first president of the Russian Tennis Federation and a long-time fixture at Russian Davis Cup and and Fed Cup ties, has died, the Kremlin announced today. He was 76.
Yeltsin broke political barriers and leaped over tennis barricades during an adventurous public life.
Though the Kremlin has not released an official cause of death, the Associated Press, citing The Interfax news agency, reports Yeltsin died of heart failure (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/18271701/).
A pivotal figure in Russia's evolution, Yeltsin is credited with presiding over the peaceful dissolution of the former Soviet state in 1991 and of encouraging the nation to embrace many democratic principles.
Yeltsin was a passionate tennis player and devoted fan of the sport, who played a role in fostering the growth of the game in his country. Yeltsin was a close friend of Russian Davis Cup and Fed Cup captain Shamil Tarpischev, who worked at the Kremlin during Yeltsin's administration. Yeltsin was inducted into the Russian Tennis Hall of Fame in 2003 (http://www.sportsmediainc.com/tennisweek/index.cfm?func=showarticle&newsid=14198)— a year after Mikhail Sumarokov-Elston, 1973 Wimbledon finalist Alex Metreveli, Tarpischev and Yevgeny Kafelnikov.
In February of 2006, Marat Safin, former Davis Cup teammate Yevgeny Kafelnikov and Tarpischev joined distinguished guests, including former U.S. President Bill Clinton and Russian President Vladimir Putin in attending former Yeltsin's black-tie birthday celebration.
Yeltsin was in the crowd cheering on Safin and teammates Mikhail Youzhny and Kafelnikov when they led Russia to its first Davis Cup championship in history with a 3-2 triumph over host France in the 2002 final (http://www.sportsmediainc.com/tennisweek/index.cfm?func=showarticle&newsid=7492) that saw former Davis Cup ball boy Youzhny fight back from a two-set deficit to defeat Paul-Henri Mathieu in the decisive fifth match (http://www.sportsmediainc.com/tennisweek/index.cfm?func=showarticle&newsid=7318).
Yeltsin was a friend and fan of fellow Muscovites Anastasia Myskina and Elena Dementieva. He was in the crowd for the 2000 Kremlin Cup final when Martina Hingis beat Anna Kournikova and again in 2001 when Jelena Dokic defeated Dementieva. And when Myskina made history as the first Russian woman to win the Kremlin Cup title with a 6-2, 6-4, conquest of Amélie Mauresmo in the 2003 final, an ecstatic Yeltsin leaped over the barrier separating spectators from players, rushed out onto the court and embraced Myskina with the exuberance of a proud parent. Yeltsin also traveled to Paris in June of 2004 and was on hand to see Myskina become the Russian woman to win a Grand Slam championship when the sixth-seeded Myskina crushed Dementieva, 6-1, 6-2, in the French Open final.
The former President was a proud supporter of Russia's Fed Cup team, which capture the country's first Fed Cup championship in Moscow in November of 2004 (http://www.sportsmediainc.com/tennisweek/index.cfm?func=showarticle&newsid=11846).
Tennis Week senior correspondent Richard Evans was in Moscow last September to cover Russia's Davis Cup semifinal victory over the United States and filed this report on Russian Tennis Racquet Revolution: When The Soviet Union Imploded, Russian Tennis Exploded (http://www.sportsmediainc.com/tennisweek/index.cfm?func=showarticle&newsid=16237) (note the smiling Yeltsin standing next to Safin in the photo).



http://www.sportsmediainc.com/tennisweek/index.cfm?func=showarticle&newsid=16861&bannerregion=

Alvarillo
Apr 24th, 2007, 01:29 PM
Boris
we will miss you in the russia's team competitions :sad:

Lucyxx
Apr 24th, 2007, 01:36 PM
Yeltsin helped shape this bold new stretch of tennis here and your tribute is much appreciated. RIP Boris.

Just Do It
Apr 24th, 2007, 01:40 PM
Oh he was a big fan of Nastya !

RIP !!!

slk45
Apr 24th, 2007, 03:28 PM
I agree, Yeltsin was an alcholic who ran Russia into the ground in his latter years. He embarresed Russia and himself many times and had no respect from this pairs.

Inspite of this tho, RIP.
It was communism that ran Russia into the ground, liquidated its peoples and eviscerated its economy. Boris Yeltsin took on the unenviable task of resurrecting it on principles of economic freedom and democracy against bureaucrats who had no interest in giving up their power and privileges.

Like all of us, he was not perfect, and had personal and political failures. But he helped fill the leadership vacuum and gave Russia a foundation for recovery. Russian tennis is a happy by-product of his efforts.

RIP

Wayn77
Apr 24th, 2007, 03:32 PM
RIP Boris.

He wasn't perfect by any means, but a great character.

Shvedbarilescu
Apr 24th, 2007, 03:38 PM
It was communism that ran Russia into the ground, liquidated its peoples and eviscerated its economy. Boris Yeltsin took on the unenviable task of resurrecting it on principles of economic freedom and democracy against bureaucrats who had no interest in giving up their power and privileges.

Like all of us, he was not perfect, and had personal and political failures. But he helped fill the leadership vacuum and gave Russia a foundation for recovery. Russian tennis is a happy by-product of his efforts.

RIP

Excellent post. :yeah:

slk45
Apr 24th, 2007, 04:18 PM
Yeltsin always reminded me of WC Fields. This clip from The Old-Fashioned Way is an apt allegory for the task he faced (go to full screen and turn up your volume):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5MZWq14uD-A

shirgan
Apr 24th, 2007, 04:48 PM
I am unsure of the details of his support for Russian tennis, but I know that even with his mere presence at Fed Cup ties, Davis Cup ties and at Moscow, he made a difference.

It's terrible and shocking to me that he is dead, at just 76. God rest his soul.
the average life expectency for men in Russia is 58 years so compared to other russians to die at the age of 76 is not so bad...

Talula
Apr 24th, 2007, 07:08 PM
It was communism that ran Russia into the ground, liquidated its peoples and eviscerated its economy. Boris Yeltsin took on the unenviable task of resurrecting it on principles of economic freedom and democracy against bureaucrats who had no interest in giving up their power and privileges.

Like all of us, he was not perfect, and had personal and political failures. But he helped fill the leadership vacuum and gave Russia a foundation for recovery. Russian tennis is a happy by-product of his efforts.

RIP

It was Gorbachev who took on communism. Yeltsin drank on his coat tails, and was deposed. He left Russia with no foundation but corruption. I could go on but can't be bothered. EXCEPT: it is very apt that the fat, pointless, bloated drunk/druggie with a very small whatsit the Duke of York represents the UK at his funeral.

Talula
Apr 24th, 2007, 07:09 PM
We are in a tennis forum,and he helped a lot russian tennis but that's all.

Chechenya,poor standards of living in russia,and oligarchy (mafia) it's because of him.


He is'nt a hero.

Good results in tennis don't help russians in their daily life.

Spot on. It is a tennis forum, but this hysterical glorification of a mass murderer is ridiculous.

Talula
Apr 24th, 2007, 07:19 PM
Yeltsin left Russia in ruins
I would think his alleged support of tennis would not be so important in that case.

And how did he support tennis so much? by sitting in the benches of the Kremlin cup?

A sane, intelligent voice. In a world that embraces fake emotion. Just as the UK did with Diana.

Imagine if Hitler or his gang adored tennis and embraced the pretty winners of titles, for Nazism, what would be said of him and them? It's like whitewashing the Hitler gang and Leni Riefenstahl just because her films were eye catching. She was still a collaborator. And many, many, people refuse to collaborate, even it means their demise. Marlene Dietrich refused to collaborate and fled to America, and fought against her homeland for the Allies. Good for her. You would never see a pic of Marlene hugging a murderer. Seeing the pics of these dimwits hug an alcoholic murderer says more about them than maybe they, and their supporters, care to admit.

Bad rep me all you like you lot. I would prefer to be a Marlene than a self-serving adorer of a mass murderer.

slk45
Apr 24th, 2007, 07:44 PM
It was Gorbachev who took on communism. Yeltsin drank on his coat tails, and was deposed. He left Russia with no foundation but corruption. I could go on but can't be bothered. EXCEPT: it is very apt that the fat, pointless, bloated drunk/druggie with a very small whatsit the Duke of York represents the UK at his funeral.

Gorbachev was hoping to benefit from the introduction of a market economy, while maintaining the Communist political apparatus and the Soviet Union. These were mutually exclusive goals. It was Yeltsin who began the transition. It was Gorbachev who failed.

During his presidency and now at his death, leftists and communist sympathizers still use the same attacks, both in the U.S. and elsewhere, and precisely because he did effect a break with communism, the unforgivable sin.

Talula
Apr 24th, 2007, 08:05 PM
Gorbachev was hoping to benefit from the introduction of a market economy, while maintaining the Communist political apparatus and the Soviet Union. These were mutually exclusive goals. It was Yeltsin who began the transition. It was Gorbachev who failed.

During his presidency and now at his death, leftists and communist sympathizers still use the same attacks, both in the U.S. and elsewhere, and precisely because he did effect a break with communism, the unforgivable sin.

It was Gorbachev who saw the taking down of the wall, encouraged links with Reagan and Thatcher. Rightly or wrongly. As you say, for his own purposes because all the communist baloney was untenable. But Yeltsin was simply a transition with no focus. And this obsession with his love of tennis is laughable.

But hey, we're going to disagree! Unlike Yeltsin, we are not - I hope - going to order the murder of one another's families!

shirgan
Apr 24th, 2007, 10:05 PM
Gorbachev was hoping to benefit from the introduction of a market economy, while maintaining the Communist political apparatus and the Soviet Union. These were mutually exclusive goals. It was Yeltsin who began the transition. It was Gorbachev who failed.

During his presidency and now at his death, leftists and communist sympathizers still use the same attacks, both in the U.S. and elsewhere, and precisely because he did effect a break with communism, the unforgivable sin.
This is not about "protecting" soviet communism, I couldn't care less abou that. it's about the facts:

Yeltsin sold out his country, its assets, to the oligarchs and their economic interests and left the regular people with nothing except crime and hunger.
Why else do you think life expectancy in Russia in declining and is now as low as 58 y/o?
Because more and more people are left without medical care, without food, without protection from the police. This is the big "contribution" of Yeltsin (and Putin as well).

Compared to this, Yeltsin's contribution to tennis means nothnig, even if it was substantial (and I'm sure it wasn't).

goldenlox
Apr 24th, 2007, 10:09 PM
Washington - Former presidents George HW Bush and Bill Clinton will lead the US delegation attending the funeral of former Russian President Boris Yeltsin, said the White House on Tuesday.
White House spokesperson Dana Perino said the two would leave New York on Tuesday night and travel together to Moscow for the state funeral on Wednesday.
Yeltsin, 76, died on Monday from heart failure and was the first democratically elected Russian president.
He presided over the dismantling of the Soviet Union and led Russia in its first chaotic years of independence.
Of the two US ex-presidents, Clinton had the closer connection to Yeltsin.
The two leaders, dubbed the "Boris and Bill Show" on the world stage, held sway in the 1990s with a series of high-profile meetings across the globe as the Clinton White House tried to help steer Moscow's transition to democracy. They met more than 15 times, starting in Vancouver, Canada, in 1993 and continuing until 2000, when Clinton made his final trip to Moscow as president to see Yeltsin's newly empowered successor, Vladimir Putin.

http://www.news24.com/News24/World/News/0,,2-10-1462_2103918,00.html

goldenlox
Apr 24th, 2007, 11:45 PM
http://www.news24.com/News24/World/News/0,,2-10-1462_2103492,00.html


Day of mourning for Yeltsin
23/04/2007


Moscow - Russian President Vladimir Putin on Monday declared a day of mourning for Boris Yeltsin, who he said had helped give birth to a "new democratic Russia".
Yeltsin, who ruled Russia from 1991 to 1999, died on Monday aged 76.
Russia will pay its respects with a national day of mourning on April 25, Putin said.
"He was the first Russian president. With this title he has for ever entered the history of the country and the whole world," Putin said at the Novo-Ogaryovo presidential residency outside Moscow.
"A man passed away, thanks to whom a whole new epoch was born. New democratic Russia was born, a free state open to the world.
"The state in which power truly belongs to the people," Putin said. "We will do everything so that the memory of Boris Nikolayevich Yeltsin, his noble thoughts, his words: 'protect Russia' always serve us as moral and political guidelines," Putin said.

The Daviator
Apr 24th, 2007, 11:51 PM
http://i27.photobucket.com/albums/c187/pacomexican/fullj-2.jpg

:awww: RIP Boris :)

*JR*
Apr 25th, 2007, 12:13 AM
It was Gorbachev who took on communism. Yeltsin drank on his coat tails, and was deposed.
He retired on December 31st, 1999. He wasn't deposed. Get your facts straight, please. :rolleyes:

mankind
Apr 25th, 2007, 01:57 AM
the average life expectency for men in Russia is 58 years so compared to other russians to die at the age of 76 is not so bad...

Just shocking to me because my grandfather is 96 and he is Russian...some of his friends are still alive as well.

ys
Apr 25th, 2007, 03:34 AM
He was wonderful person, very Russian in every way.. I feel like I lost a piece of myself yesterday.. I am sure our tennis girls shed a tear or two either..

shirgan
Apr 25th, 2007, 04:07 AM
Just shocking to me because my grandfather is 96 and he is Russian...some of his friends are still alive as well.
Russian Life Expectancy on Downward Trend (http://www.sptimes.ru/index.php?action_id=2&story_id=9036)

mankind
Apr 25th, 2007, 09:41 AM
Russian Life Expectancy on Downward Trend (http://www.sptimes.ru/index.php?action_id=2&story_id=9036)

You don't need to preach to me about my own country. :)

Compared to most who have led us, Boris is a saint.

shirgan
Apr 25th, 2007, 10:37 AM
You don't need to preach to me about my own country. :)

Compared to most who have led us, Boris is a saint.
I only gave that link as proof of the low life expectancy in Russia,
because you wrote you couldn't believe it.

Hakeem
Apr 25th, 2007, 10:49 AM
Rest in peace

...

goldenlox
Apr 25th, 2007, 12:05 PM
Yeltsin’s legacy to live long after his death
(Reuters)

25 April 2007



MOSCOW - Yevgeny Kafelnikov, Marat Safin and Maria Sharapova brought Russia tennis glory but it was keen player and avid fan Boris Yeltsin who helped to make the sport popular nationwide.
http://www.khaleejtimes.ae/images/feature2_25042007.jpgRussian tennis chief Shamil Tarpishchev said it was mainly because of the former Russian president that the game — considered a bourgeois sport in the communist Soviet Union — became a pastime that appealed to the masses.
Yeltsin, the man who dismantled the Soviet Union and led Russia in its first chaotic years of independence, died in Moscow on Monday from heart failure, aged 76.
“Yeltsin’s name became synonymous with tennis in Russia,” Tarpishchev told Reuters. “When he picked up a tennis racket in 1992 it was the most significant moment for our sport.
“It was a major landmark in Russian tennis history alongside the feat of Andrei Chesnokov when in 1987 he became the first Russian to win a Grand Prix event and Kafelnikov winning Russia’s first grand slam title at Roland Garros in 1996.”
Tarpishchev, who has captained Russia to two Davis Cup and two Fed Cup titles in the last five years, said Yeltsin’s love of the game had a profound effect on Russian tennis.
“In large part due to him tennis has become what it is today — not only one of the most popular sports in Russia, along with soccer and ice hockey, but also the most successful,” he said.
Photographs of the president indulging in his hobby gave tennis an immediate appeal, prompting Russia’s political and business elite to join in and enticing thousands of youngsters to take up the game.
National game

Kafelnikov’s triumph coupled with Anna Kournikova’s looks, fame and fortune took the game’s popularity to even greater heights. Then came Safin, Anastasia Myskina, Elena Dementieva and Svetlana Kuznetsova.
Siberian-born Sharapova, who stunned the sporting world by winning the Wimbledon crown in 2004 as a little-known 17-year-old, became another success story out of Russia.
But to be recognised as a truly national game in Russia, tennis, a highly individual sport, had to achieve something special to bring the whole country together.
That day came on Dec. 1, 2002 when Russia won its first major team trophy — the Davis Cup — by edging France 3-2 in the Paris final after an amazing comeback by Mikhail Youzhny.
Youzhny, a late substitute for Kafelnikov, beat Paul-Henri Mathieu in the deciding fifth rubber and became the first player in the event’s 102-year history to win a match in the final after losing the first two sets.
Yeltsin was an integral part of that success.
Not only did he made the trip to Paris to support the team, he sat in the VIP box along with French President Jacques Chirac during the entire three-day encounter, cheering wildly at every winning point for Russia.
In the most dramatic moments of the tie, Yeltsin, the self-proclaimed team mascot, punched the air in delight.
Proudest moment

The moment Youzhny clinched the title, Yeltsin climbed over a courtside barrier to bearhug him and the rest of the squad.
Yeltsin, who was an accomplished volleyball player in his youth, later recalled that Davis Cup victory as his proudest moment in sport.
The image of Yeltsin hugging Russian winners became a familiar sight over the following years as the country captured the Fed Cup in 2004 and the Davis Cup last year on home soil.
He was not a fair-weather fan, like many politicians who show up only at awards presentations to be seen with winners.
Yeltsin once said he knew every Russian tennis player by name and he could also recite the names of most leading foreign players.
He had attended every major tennis event in Moscow for the last several years, except when he was ill.
Health problems prevented him from going to Russia’s last two home ties, this month’s Davis Cup quarter-final against France and last weekend’s Fed Cup quarter-final against Spain.
The day after the Russian women routed Spain 5-0, he died.
Tarpishchev said Yeltsin’s legacy in Russian tennis would live long after his death.
“We were very fortunate to have him around for all these years. He was one of our most loyal fans,” he said. “While we all mourn his death, I’m sure Russian tennis will not only survive but will become even more successful in years to come.”