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View Full Version : Former russian President Jelzin dead!


ChampLindsay
Apr 23rd, 2007, 02:12 PM
Cause of death: cardiac arrest!!

He was 76 years old !!

Tennis lost a great supporter of tennis:sad:

Effy
Apr 23rd, 2007, 02:15 PM
:sad:

http://img192.imageshack.us/img192/5706/1052107210961072121be.jpg
http://img220.imageshack.us/img220/1517/u1752p6t12d2252562f44dt2006060.jpg

the cat
Apr 23rd, 2007, 02:18 PM
Sad news. :( President Yeltsin did so much for Russian tennis and was the biggest fan of Russian tennis too.

georgekuo1017
Apr 23rd, 2007, 02:26 PM
RIP :sad:

miffedmax
Apr 23rd, 2007, 02:37 PM
Not only a great fan of Russian tennis, but a man who presided over some of the most difficult years of Russian history. I don't think anyone would say he did it all perfectly, but I think it's also clear that a lot of leaders would have really botched things up with bad ramifications for not just Russians, but the rest of the world.

tenisto
Apr 23rd, 2007, 02:37 PM
Former Russian leader Boris Yeltsin dies

By Paul Willis
Last Updated: 3:20pm BST 23/04/2007

Former Russian President Boris Yeltsin has died, a spokesman for the Kremlin said today.

Mr Yeltsin, who won two elections as president, had heart problems, although the exact cause of his death was not immediately available.

He was 76 years old.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2007/04/23/wyeltsin123.xml


http://www.tribuneindia.com/2003/20031006/sp3.jpg

http://english.people.com.cn/200412/17/images/Russianp.jpg

:sad:

-sugi-
Apr 23rd, 2007, 02:38 PM
:sad: I couldn't believe it when I heard the news, he always seemed such a nice enthusiastic man.

Craigy
Apr 23rd, 2007, 03:42 PM
:speakles:

jazzfuzion
Apr 23rd, 2007, 03:43 PM
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/obit_yeltsin

*JR*
Apr 23rd, 2007, 04:04 PM
Former Russian leader Yeltsin dead
POSTED: 1524 GMT April 23, 2007

• He became the first democratically elected president of Russia in 1991
• In final years, Yeltsin was dogged by health problems, seemed out of touch
• He created a private sector and allowed foreign investment
• He preferred chess game of politics to work of solving economic, social problems.

MOSCOW, Russia (CNN) -- Former Russian President Boris Yeltsin has died at the age of 76, a Kremlin spokesman confirmed Monday.

Kremlin spokesman Alexander Smirnov confirmed Yeltsin's death, but gave no further details.

Yeltsin had been rarely seen in public since resigning from office on December 31, 1999.

He became the first democratically elected president of Russia in 1991 and two months later put down a coup attempt against Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev.

One of the images most associated with Yeltsin is that of him sitting on a tank during the raucous street rallies that marked the coup attempt.

"I think that is the image that he would like people to have forever," former Yeltsin adviser Alexander Nekrassov told CNN Monday.

But just two years later, he ordered tanks to storm the Russian White House to oust barricaded deputies who dug in after Yeltsin dissolved parliament, accusing it of blocking reforms.

"He has trampled on democracy," said Gorbachev in a later interview. "The first freely elected elected parliament in Russia in 1,000 years and he fires on it with tanks!"

CNN's Senior International Correspondent in Moscow Matthew Chance said Yeltsin was both loved and hated by fellow Russians.

"[Many] Russians who lived under his power didn't think much of him," Chance said.

A large part of the population blamed him for the overall demise of Russia, Chance said.

In December 1994, Yeltsin sent tanks to stop the fighting in Chechnya in what would become a 21-month conflict. Later he said he couldn't tolerate the "disintegration of Russia," and acknowledged his actions might have been a mistake.

"I feel the pain of every mother's family," Yeltsin said. "My heart bleeds for every victim. It makes me sleepless at night, and no one can help me with that."

Chance said Yeltsin talked about the war in Chechnya as his biggest regret adding that Yeltsin said he felt responsible for the deaths of the Russian soldiers in Chechnya.

Other people remember the more positive aspects of Yeltsin's reign. He played a large part in the demise of the Soviet Union and promoted democratic reform in Russia.

While he was an ideological man who took positive steps to reform his country, Chance said Yeltsin was an inconsistent reformer.

"He was a totally imperfect statesman and certainly had many failings," Chance said.

Yeltsin favored privatization but sweeping corruption put the vast majority of wealth in the hands of a few individuals who "wielded enormous political power." Chance said this upset and angered many Russians who were left with nothing.

Former CNN Moscow Bureau Chief Jill Dougherty, now CNN's U.S. Affairs Editor in Washington, said Yeltsin's image on the international stage was very different.

Dougherty said everything about Yeltsin was larger than life.

"He was oversized, he was huge, everything about him -- he was physically a giant, a big-barrel chest of complete charisma," she said. "When you met him or were around him he was absolutely charismatic ... He was an intensely sophisticated politician."

While Yeltsin may have been a failed statesman, Dougherty said he was charismatic and had a unique ability to connect with people.

"He was able to -- in the late 1980s, early 1990s -- tap into something that was afoot in Russia. He was able to emotionally connect with people in a way few politicians have ever been able to do."

White House spokesman Gordon Johndroe said Monday the United States offers its condolences to Yeltsin's wife, his family and the people of Russia.

"He was an historic figure during a time of great change and challenge for Russia," Johndroe said.

Yeltsin had a darker side as well, embarrassing incidents in which he appeared to be drunk. In Berlin in 1994, he grabbed a baton from a conductor and tried to direct an orchestra while singing and stumbling.

Yeltsin had suffered health problems for years and battled with alcoholism.

sonnys
Apr 23rd, 2007, 04:17 PM
I just heard on radio...:eek: My gondolences to family. :sad:

KV
Apr 23rd, 2007, 06:07 PM
:sad:

Cam'ron Giles
Apr 23rd, 2007, 06:11 PM
RIP...he was a great man...:sad:

But to lighten the mood...

http://www.tribuneindia.com/2003/20031006/sp3.jpg
I now pronounce you vampire...and I'll be your first victim...

Halardfan
Apr 23rd, 2007, 06:22 PM
Im suprised how positive everyone is being about him...Gorbachev is the one who deserves our praise...Yeltsin sold Russia's immense resources for almost nothing to a few corrupt businessman who became instant billionares, who embraced an anything goes capitalism which in the end brought Russia to its knees and lose faith in democracy and freedom...which sent the Russian people running into the arms of hard man Putin...now, with stupid Bush talking of putting Missile defence in Poland, we stand perhaps on the brink another cold war...

Lord Nelson
Apr 23rd, 2007, 06:31 PM
Im suprised how positive everyone is being about him...Gorbachev is the one who deserves our praise...Yeltsin sold Russia's immense resources for almost nothing to a few corrupt businessman who became instant billionares, who embraced an anything goes capitalism which in the end brought Russia to its knees and lose faith in democracy and freedom...which sent the Russian people running into the arms of hard man Putin...now, with stupid Bush talking of putting Missile defence in Poland, we stand perhaps on the brink another cold war...
Gorbatchev sucked and so did Yeltsin. Yeltsin got Russian troops in Chechnya and then took them out. Putin did a far better job. However Yeltsin broke up the USSR. Gorby along with Reagan ended the Cold War. But not many Russians would want him as leader today becasue he was against free market reforms. If that had happened and if SSR ahd pursued pro-Russian policies such as russifying USSR then USSR may still be intact today. The onyl Russian leader I have esteem is Putin. Actually Stalin was not that bad either. There was law and order in USSR and he was not into nepotism since he refused to negotiate for his son mprisoned in Germany. (He would later be killed there)

Halardfan
Apr 23rd, 2007, 09:09 PM
Stalin not that bad? He was responsible for the deaths and disappearance of any number of millions of his own people.

You said a word out of place you disapeared.

LefandePatty
Apr 23rd, 2007, 09:35 PM
http://www.tribuneindia.com/2003/20031006/sp3.jpg

:sad: :awww:

He was so sweet with Nastya! :hearts:

R.I.P

MisterQ
Apr 23rd, 2007, 10:24 PM
Gorbatchev sucked and so did Yeltsin. Yeltsin got Russian troops in Chechnya and then took them out. Putin did a far better job. However Yeltsin broke up the USSR. Gorby along with Reagan ended the Cold War. But not many Russians would want him as leader today becasue he was against free market reforms. If that had happened and if SSR ahd pursued pro-Russian policies such as russifying USSR then USSR may still be intact today. The onyl Russian leader I have esteem is Putin. Actually Stalin was not that bad either. There was law and order in USSR and he was not into nepotism since he refused to negotiate for his son mprisoned in Germany. (He would later be killed there)

Stalin was a nightmare. Tell the families of those whose loved ones mysteriously disappeared in the Great Terror that he was a successful leader.

Perhaps this isn't appropriate for this thread, but I'm amazed there are still those who praise Stalin's "law and order".

moon
Apr 23rd, 2007, 10:29 PM
I'm gonna miss seeing him at Russian tennis matches..
RIP

Marshmallow
Apr 23rd, 2007, 10:34 PM
I don't know much about his politics, i heard his reforms left millions in poverty.

But he seemed like a funny man, always looking to have fun, laughing and smiling, making jokes. He'll be missed for that. He was quite cute too. ... :sobbing:

Alvarillo
Apr 23rd, 2007, 10:50 PM
Boris :sad:
I will miss you in the Fed and Davis ties!

ys
Apr 23rd, 2007, 10:58 PM
Perhaps one of the greatest men of the century.. If you want to know what can happen when a volatile country goes through a painful transformation, look at former Yugoslavia, look at Iraq.. We had few tough years, but we avoided major violence and civil unrest.. Russia's growing prosperity is a direct result of his work..

Yes, he made his mistakes, and who didn't.. but he walked the path that no one ever walked before.. and he has always stayed a very noble person.

He will be very missed and remembered. And Russian tennis lost its most influential person ever..

aussie12
Apr 24th, 2007, 12:35 AM
RIP Boris

disposablehero
Apr 24th, 2007, 01:18 AM
Are you sure it wasn't polonium radiation?

frontier
Apr 24th, 2007, 01:45 AM
he was an alcoholic and confessed to being drunk from vodka throughout his presidency.

Kenny
Apr 24th, 2007, 04:19 AM
I feel horrible for the Russian players because I know they looked up to him in a way.