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mykarma
Apr 21st, 2007, 12:20 AM
BLACKSBURG, Va. - The family of Virginia Tech gunman Seung-Hui Cho told The Associated Press on Friday that they feel "hopeless, helpless and lost," and "never could have envisioned that he was capable of so much violence."


"He has made the world weep. We are living a nightmare," said a statement issued by Cho's sister, Sun-Kyung Cho, on the family's behalf.
It was the Chos' first public comment since the 23-year-old student killed 32 people and committed suicide Monday in the deadliest shooting rampage in modern U.S. history.
Raleigh, N.C., lawyer Wade Smith provided the statement to the AP after the Cho family reached out to him. Smith said the family would not answer any questions, and neither would he.


"Our family is so very sorry for my brother's unspeakable actions. It is a terrible tragedy for all of us," said Sun-Kyung Cho, a 2004 Princeton University graduate who works as a contractor for a State Department office that oversees American aid for Iraq (http://search.news.yahoo.com/search/news/?p=Iraq).
"We pray for their families and loved ones who are experiencing so much excruciating grief. And we pray for those who were injured and for those whose lives are changed forever because of what they witnessed and experienced," she said. "Each of these people had so much love, talent and gifts to offer, and their lives were cut short by a horrible and senseless act."
Authorities are in frequent contact with Cho's family, but have not placed them in protective custody, said Assistant FBI (http://search.news.yahoo.com/search/news/?p=FBI) Director Joe Persichini, who oversees the bureau's local Washington office. Authorities believe they remain in the Washington area, but are staying with friends and relatives.
Persichini said the FBI and Fairfax County Police have assured Cho's parents that they will investigate any hate crimes directed at the family if and when they ever return to their Centreville home.

The family statement was issued during a statewide day of mourning for the victims. Silence fell across the Virginia Tech campus at noon and bells tolled in churches nationwide in memory of the victims.


"We are humbled by this darkness. We feel hopeless, helpless and lost. This is someone that I grew up with and loved. Now I feel like I didn't know this person," Cho's sister said. "We have always been a close, peaceful and loving family. My brother was quiet and reserved, yet struggled to fit in. We never could have envisioned that he was capable of so much violence."
She said her family will cooperate fully and "do whatever we can to help authorities understand why these senseless acts happened. We have many unanswered questions as well."


Wendy Adams, whose niece, Leslie Sherman, was killed in the massacre, said of the family's statement: "I'm not so generous to be able to forgive him for what he did. But I do feel for the family. I do feel sorry for them."
"I do believe they're living a nightmare," she added.
Robert Jeffers of Idaho Falls, Idaho, a friend of slain 25-year-old student Brian Bluhm, said: "I hope people can see that the right action to take from all of this is love, not hate."


"Based on this sorrowful statement, it is apparent that the family grieves with everyone in the world," Virginia Tech spokesman Larry Hincker said.
Cho's name was given as "Cho Seung-Hui" by police and school officials earlier this week. But the the South Korean immigrant family said their preference was "Seung-Hui Cho." Many Asian immigrant families Americanize their names by reversing them and putting their surnames last.
While Cho clearly was seething and had been taken to a psychiatric hospital more than a year as threat to himself, investigators are still trying to establish exactly what set him off, why he chose a dormitory and a classroom building for the rampage and how he selected his victims.


"The why and the how are the crux of the investigation," Virginia State Police spokeswoman Corinne Geller said. "The why may never be determined because the person responsible is deceased."
During the campus memorial, hundreds of somber students and area residents, most wearing the school's maroon and orange, stood with heads bowed on the parade ground in front of Norris Hall, the classrooom building where all but two of the victims died. Along with the bouquets and candles was a sign reading, "Never forgotten."


"It's good to feel the love of people around you," said Alice Lo, a Virginia Tech graduate and friend of Jocelyne Couture-Nowak, a French instructor killed in the rampage. "With this evil, there is still goodness."
The mourners gathered in front of stone memorials, each adorned with a basket of tulips and an American flag. There were 33 stones — one for each victim and Cho.
"His family is suffering just as much as the other families," said Elizabeth Lineberry, who will be a freshman at Virginia Tech in the fall.

No Name Face
Apr 21st, 2007, 12:34 AM
i do feel bad for the family. it must be mortifying to have to hear that your son or brother did something like this. furthermore, they're probably being judged by ignorant people.

mykarma
Apr 21st, 2007, 12:53 AM
i do feel bad for the family. it must be mortifying to have to hear that your son or brother did something like this. furthermore, they're probably being judged by ignorant people.

I know, it's really sad. :sad:

MisterQ
Apr 21st, 2007, 01:08 AM
I can't imagine what his family is dealing with. :sad: The usual grief, no doubt, but also intense guilt, and probably fear for their safety/future.

Paneru
Apr 21st, 2007, 01:56 AM
i do feel bad for the family. it must be mortifying to have to hear that your son or brother did something like this. furthermore, they're probably being judged by ignorant people.

My heart and prayers go
out to them as well. :sad:

Xanadu11
Apr 21st, 2007, 03:15 AM
I think its really sad. It's obviously a very hard time for them. At the time same, I think this should be a warning to everyone talk to your brothers and sisters, know what they are feeling and spend time with them.

nflatte
Apr 21st, 2007, 05:14 AM
There's just such a stark contrast between Cho and his sister; both schools they attended were of hugely different qualities. I think there's a lot of pressure from Cho to conform to society's accepted standards and values. This led him into isolation and as a result caused such a tragic incident.

austennis
Apr 21st, 2007, 05:19 AM
I feeel terrible for all the families of those involved.. but for the CHO family there must be so much guilt and so many what if questions..

Wigglytuff
Apr 21st, 2007, 05:38 AM
so senseless and cruel. pray and send all your goodness to all the families.

it is good that in this tragic time so many can realize that Cho's family members are victims just like all the other families. he ruined and changed forever their lives to. and they too did not ask for, did not want this.

so cruel. one professor survived nazi germany. and then this. so sicking. so much suffering.

i cant type anymore.

eck
Apr 21st, 2007, 11:46 AM
I feel disgusted at Cho's actions. But I'm extremely pitiful toward's his family. They shouldn't have to suffer for what Cho did.

Rocketta
Apr 21st, 2007, 12:12 PM
There's just such a stark contrast between Cho and his sister; both schools they attended were of hugely different qualities. I think there's a lot of pressure from Cho to conform to society's accepted standards and values. This led him into isolation and as a result caused such a tragic incident.

That's not true at all. FYI, some people actually rather go to a local state supported school then a private university. Especially, if they are going with a specific major in mind. There may be a huge difference in reputation but definitely not in quality.

timafi
Apr 21st, 2007, 12:36 PM
feel sad of the family also;this must be terrible on them as well :sad:
be strong Cho family,be strong :hug:

The_Pov
Apr 21st, 2007, 06:10 PM
I don't think anyone can imagine what it is like for the Cho family not only do they have do deal with the grief of losing a loved one but also the guilt of knowing their son/brother destroyed all those lives. It can't be easy for them having to see those pictures of him brandishing those guns. They must be feeling the pain just much (if not more) than the victims families.

HippityHop
Apr 21st, 2007, 06:14 PM
It's very interesting that Americans have so much sympathy for the family of that crazy muthafucka.

I wonder what the Korean reaction would have been had an American done the same in Korea. And not only toward the family of the perp but toward Americans in general.

mykarma
Apr 21st, 2007, 08:22 PM
It's very interesting that Americans have so much sympathy for the family of that crazy muthafucka.

I wonder what the Korean reaction would have been had an American done the same in Korea. And not only toward the family of the perp but toward Americans in general.
If he had been British would you be asking the same question. :rolleyes:

Rocketta
Apr 21st, 2007, 11:02 PM
It's very interesting that Americans have so much sympathy for the family of that crazy muthafucka.

I wonder what the Korean reaction would have been had an American done the same in Korea. And not only toward the family of the perp but toward Americans in general.

Why? that didn't happen and probably will never happen so what would be the point of wondering? Even if the South Korean people would react differently (which I doubt) what does that have to do with what's the right thing to do? :scratch:

Apoleb
Apr 21st, 2007, 11:12 PM
It's very interesting that Americans have so much sympathy for the family of that crazy muthafucka.



Ugh. Stupid people like you make me itch. :lol: What has nationality got to do with anything? Why are Americans supposed not to feel sympathy for his family? This is not a question of nationality. This is question of sympathy with another human being. :rolleyes:

The fact that you think that's what's relevant tells us tons about yourself and your prejudiced views about South Koreans.

frontier
Apr 21st, 2007, 11:14 PM
i think they are really scared of the backlash,and they are going to live with this burden of guilt for the rest of their lives.they should move to another state or a big city where they are anonymous.

hectopascal
Apr 21st, 2007, 11:27 PM
It's very interesting that Americans have so much sympathy for the family of that crazy muthafucka.

I wonder what the Korean reaction would have been had an American done the same in Korea. And not only toward the family of the perp but toward Americans in general.


That was just the most naive thing I've ever read :tape:

HippityHop
Apr 21st, 2007, 11:56 PM
As news spread that America's worst killing spree was perpetrated by a South Korean who has lived in the US since 1992, reactions among South Koreans have ranged from profound personal shame to a fear of reprisal.

"Because Koreans are also very emotional, Koreans tend to behave more sensitively together than others," says Paik Jin-Hyun, a professor at Seoul National University. "So, one tends not to see the event isolated to an individual but as an ethnic identity."

Koreans are perhaps unique in their sense of a singular national identity, molded through a long history of invasion and occupation, says Yook Dong-In, editor of social issues at The Korea Economic Daily. The heightened sense of having one "blood" or ethnic race has led to a hypersensitivity about foreign perceptions, many experts say.

The collective sense of sorrow and penitance about the killings was reflected in comments by South Korea's ambassador to the United States, Lee Tae Sik, who suggested that Koreans in the US fast for 32 days – one day for each victim.

Many people noted appreciatively the lack of anti-Korean feelings among Americans. YTN, a South Korean news channel, interviewed a Korean student who has been studying at Virginia Tech on a foreign student visa since 2005. "My Caucasian friend was shocked at first to learn that it was a Korean," said Ha Dong-Woo. "But he instead wanted to protect and take care of us."

Several of the people interviewed added that had an American student living in South Korea killed 32 people, American expatriates would face serious reprisals. To describe such an eventuality, many interviewees used the word nallinada, which can be loosely translated to mean upheaval, disaster, or chaos.

"Anti-Americanism would have become extreme," says Mr. Yook, citing the groundswell of anti-American activism during negotiations for the recently signed free trade agreement between the US and South Korea. The country also saw a protracted uproar after American soldiers hit and killed two young girls while driving a convoy in June 2002. The direct fallout from that accident lasted several months, says Yook, and hard feelings persist today.

One woman, who was interviewed in Seoul on Wednesday, said she is married to a Korean diplomat. Korea's foreign ministry, she said, held late-night meetings to discuss how to protect Korean-Americans from possible reprisals. She was certain that, had an American attacked Koreans, the reprisals would have been swift.

"People will throw rocks at them and tell them 'Yankees go home,' " said the woman, who asked to remain anonymous because her husband is a government official. "People will go even crazier here if exactly the same incident at Virginia Tech happened here but committed by an American."

HippityHop
Apr 22nd, 2007, 12:01 AM
Why? that didn't happen and probably will never happen so what would be the point of wondering? Even if the South Korean people would react differently (which I doubt) what does that have to do with what's the right thing to do? :scratch:

I find the question worth asking particularly since some people were very quick to wonder and even accuse Americans of being biased against Koreans as a result of the shooting.

An even more interesting question to me is why people get indignant about questions being asked.

HippityHop
Apr 22nd, 2007, 12:04 AM
Ugh. Stupid people like you make me itch. :lol: What has nationality got to do with anything? Why are Americans supposed not to feel sympathy for his family? This is not a question of nationality. This is question of sympathy with another human being. :rolleyes:

The fact that you think that's what's relevant tells us tons about yourself and your prejudiced views about South Koreans.

While in your utopian world different nationalities, religions, etc. might all react the same, I have not found that to be the case in the real world.
I find that Americans tend to be far more sympathetic in situations like this than others. Can you prove me wrong?

Veritas
Apr 22nd, 2007, 12:12 AM
It's very interesting that Americans have so much sympathy for the family of that crazy muthafucka.

I wonder what the Korean reaction would have been had an American done the same in Korea. And not only toward the family of the perp but toward Americans in general.

Most likely, there'd be anti-American rallies - if the reactions against the stupidity of dumb G.I. jocks stationed in South Korea is any indication.