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JackWalker
Apr 15th, 2007, 11:03 PM
what is it? i heard something about a program called the rosetta stone which teaches you a language in a matter of weeks. has anyone tried it? i would love to learn how to speak japanesse.

tennislover
Apr 15th, 2007, 11:28 PM
what do you mean with "teachs you a language in a matter of weeks"? In weeks you can learn only the basic elements of a language......

for basic language the Internet is a good way
for advanced level you must live for years in the country(s) that language is spoken and you must also read a deluge of books/magazines etc :shrug:

I have never been/ lived in an English speaking country, that's why my Eglish language skills...cry!

¤CharlDa¤
Apr 15th, 2007, 11:42 PM
Being inserted in a place where that language is spoken is the best way to learn fast and effective. Good for the speaking part, tougher for the writing.

Conor
Apr 15th, 2007, 11:51 PM
I found this really cool site.... http://www.ielanguages.com/ it helped me out loads with my Spanish.

The best way for me is just speaking it as much as i can... which can be hard 'cause nobody here speaks it lol But the more you say it, the easier to remember. Also listening to a native speaker helps, im sure theres some clips you could download... im not sure :rolleyes:

Good luck! ;)

janko
Apr 16th, 2007, 12:31 AM
Being inserted in a place where that language is spoken is the best way to learn fast and effective. Good for the speaking part, tougher for the writing.


100% agree with that, that's the way I've learnt french.

To have sex with someone from the country is also a good option, lessons are more "practical";)

Sam L
Apr 16th, 2007, 03:34 AM
Being inserted in a place where that language is spoken is the best way to learn fast and effective. Good for the speaking part, tougher for the writing.

That's because it's the immersion process. The flaw with that is you don't learn the grammar. That's why it's tougher for writing.

The best way is immersion and formal education in a school. You need to learn the basic grammar of a language in a school like a child and then use it in every day language. That's the best way.

azza
Apr 16th, 2007, 05:43 AM
what is it? i heard something about a program called the rosetta stone which teaches you a language in a matter of weeks. has anyone tried it? i would love to learn how to speak japanesse.

Learn a full language in a matter of weeks :haha: u wish buddy

gentenaire
Apr 16th, 2007, 06:00 AM
Best way to learn a language:

1. accept that there's no way you can learn a language in only a few weeks.
2. take a few basic classes to start
3. read books in the language, watch movies in the language
4. continue taking the advanced course
5. travel to countries where the language is spoken, use it, read more books, etc.
6. Keep in touch with native speakers because as soon as you stop using the language, you forget half of what you've learned.

Pengwin
Apr 16th, 2007, 06:43 AM
Ooh hi!

I am a qualified English teacher (TEFL), and these are the 'accepted methods' of learning a language:

1. Grammar translation - learning and translating
2. Direct method - total immersion in a culture
3. Audio-Lingualism - habitual, hearing and repeating
4. Communicative Approach - concentrating on writing and speaking
5. Presentation, Practice and Production - through role plays, questionnaires, real life situations

Halardfan
Apr 16th, 2007, 09:10 AM
As people have said learning another language to a advanced level is daunting, but if you want to learn enough to get by on a holiday to Japan, then I reccomend a book/CD called Teach Yourself Instant Japanese...it teaches only about 500 basic words and phrases, but its designed to be completed in just six weeks...will you then speak fluent Japanese...no...but youll be able to say a few words in most situations, enough that most Japanese people appreciate the effort.

After that I did the beginners version, and so took things further, then I went to Japan for a holiday, and I did get by...Im now on the intermediate one...but my progress has finally ground to a halt...still, for the basics, they do the job well.

supergrunt
Apr 16th, 2007, 10:58 AM
I think taking a class is the best way to learn :) .

wipeout
Apr 16th, 2007, 11:59 AM
There are memory techniques to help learn languages, particularly to remember the gender of words.

Google for "foreign language mnemonics".

Meesh
Apr 16th, 2007, 01:53 PM
Best way to learn a language:


3. read books in the language, watch movies in the language
.

This is a great way... my friend checked out pre-school books and children books to help her get to the next level in Spanish.

markhingis
Apr 16th, 2007, 04:46 PM
I've improved my English mostly by learning by heart song lyrics, figuring out their meaning and singing them. That helped me to get to know some useful phrases,idioms,phrasal verbs.

Besides,reading and posting on forum like this one, is helpful. Of course, most of us write here in informal way,but it's also useful.

Just Do It
Apr 16th, 2007, 08:24 PM
Visting that country is the best way to learn a langauge :)

Helen Lawson
Apr 16th, 2007, 08:49 PM
There is some place a friend of mine went, and he was fluent in Mandarin in a couple of weeks, even native speakers were impressed. It's like the Britney Spears rehab/nuthouse, though, you're at a place and immersed 100%. No English. That's not Rosetta.

I'm always suspicious of Rosetta, it claims "Latin" as a language. Latin is no longer spoken, how can they teach Latin. Also, they call it "Chinese" when, really, it's "Mandarin" or "Cantonese" though I know of no reason to learn Cantonese anymore.

mirzalover
Apr 16th, 2007, 09:17 PM
Learning new a language is so hard I hate spainish class cause I'm just lost the whole time

égalité
Apr 16th, 2007, 09:21 PM
Take real classes.
Find various forms of media in the language you want to learn. I listened to Russian music and it helped me a lot.
Use it as often as you can.
Go somewhere where they speak the language you want to learn (which sort of necessitates the above suggestion). My cousin went to Italy, and in 6 months she was speaking, thinking, and dreaming in Italian. My Russian's pretty good, but until I go there, there's no way I'll be as fluent as I want to be.

Just Do It
Apr 16th, 2007, 09:31 PM
Guys from America, do you MUST learn foreighn lanuages there ?

mirzalover
Apr 16th, 2007, 10:10 PM
Guys from America, do you MUST learn foreighn lanuages there ?

We have to take two semesters of a Language French or Spanish German or whatever in High School then in college I know you have to take atleast one Semester of a Language but I'm not sure beyond that cause I'm not in college yet

kiwifan
Apr 16th, 2007, 10:57 PM
Guys from America, do you MUST learn foreighn lanuages there ?

I took 2 years of Latin and 3 years of Spanish in High School and then 1 year of Latin in college. I think most high schools require 2 years of a foriegn language and then colleges usually require 1 year...

...the problem is, that we don't ever really have to speak the languages so you forget it all (also last year I was in Europe for a month and everyone wanted to speak to me in English :tape: I only learned one two words in German :( )...

...after a month in Madrid, I picked up/re-learned a lot of the stuff that I learned years before in class...

...but right now, I don't remember much (only the inside jokes) just "I need", "I want", "where is", "how much does this cost"...

...that's about it.

I really would like to know that much German (to better communicate with my "Nephews" :angel: :angel: :angel: I currently only know some curse words and how to say "pass me the ball" :devil: )

hdfb
Apr 16th, 2007, 11:35 PM
Going to the country and staying there for a long period of time. An acquaintance's brother went to France without knowing anything beyond Bonjour for three months and came back speaking really good French.

kabuki
Apr 16th, 2007, 11:48 PM
There is some place a friend of mine went, and he was fluent in Mandarin in a couple of weeks, even native speakers were impressed. It's like the Britney Spears rehab/nuthouse, though, you're at a place and immersed 100%. No English. That's not Rosetta.

I'm always suspicious of Rosetta, it claims "Latin" as a language. Latin is no longer spoken, how can they teach Latin. Also, they call it "Chinese" when, really, it's "Mandarin" or "Cantonese" though I know of no reason to learn Cantonese anymore.


I think you are talking about Berlitz...

Sam L
Apr 16th, 2007, 11:57 PM
There is some place a friend of mine went, and he was fluent in Mandarin in a couple of weeks, even native speakers were impressed. It's like the Britney Spears rehab/nuthouse, though, you're at a place and immersed 100%. No English. That's not Rosetta.

I'm always suspicious of Rosetta, it claims "Latin" as a language. Latin is no longer spoken, how can they teach Latin. Also, they call it "Chinese" when, really, it's "Mandarin" or "Cantonese" though I know of no reason to learn Cantonese anymore.

Helen!! Latin is still spoken. Haven't you seen "Who's afraid of Virginia Woolf?" :p

JackWalker
Apr 17th, 2007, 06:40 AM
does anyone know if the rosetta program works?

ViennaCalling
Apr 17th, 2007, 08:33 AM
Best way to learn a language:

6. Keep in touch with native speakers because as soon as you stop using the language, you forget half of what you've learned.

True! :sad:

Erika_Angel
Apr 17th, 2007, 08:51 AM
does anyone know if the rosetta program works?

It has won awards so I'm sure it helps.

I don't know where you got the 'few weeks' thing from because I've looked on the official website and I haven't seen it make that claim. Learning a language in a few weeks is seemingly impossible unless you are a linguistic genius. The site infact states that the basis of the software is that you learn 'at your own pace'.

Lin Lin
Apr 17th, 2007, 12:26 PM
Then,which language is the most one to study?