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View Full Version : Don Imus was WRONGED! He Should Keep his Job...


Foot_Fault
Apr 13th, 2007, 05:43 AM
I am pissed off at those Nappy Headed Ho's!:fiery:
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......:lol: :bounce:

I think more was made out of the situation, but it good America is behind Blacks again Post 9/11

Wigglytuff
Apr 13th, 2007, 06:02 AM
wow. you have a major problem.

DemWilliamsGulls
Apr 13th, 2007, 06:23 AM
Imus will keep his damn mouth shut next time....he should have learned from Kramer..."Nappy head hoes" bitch who are you to disrespect sista's like that on a National Radio show!

Scotso
Apr 13th, 2007, 06:28 AM
I don't really care what happens to him, but I think that it's setting a dangerous precedent that in this country people can call for someone's scalp and get it.

Rocketta
Apr 13th, 2007, 06:34 AM
I don't really care what happens to him, but I think that it's setting a dangerous precedent that in this country people can call for someone's scalp and get it.

better than setting the other precedent that it's ok to hurl racist and sexist insults and still keep your job. :shrug:

Wigglytuff
Apr 13th, 2007, 06:43 AM
better than setting the other precedent that it's ok to hurl racist and sexist insults and still keep your job. :shrug:

:worship: :worship: :worship: :worship:

tterb
Apr 13th, 2007, 06:52 AM
I don't really care what happens to him, but I think that it's setting a dangerous precedent that in this country people can call for someone's scalp and get it.

Nobody is entitled to his or her job. Just because someone is a media figure doesn't mean he can shirk the consequences of his words. If a person in any other position makes bigotted comments, they're likely to get fired. Why should a public figure be an exception?

On a different tangent, I don't like the insinuation I've seen in other threads that Imus' firing is akin to "thought police" or censorship. Outraged editorials and boycotts of sponsors are simple expressions of free speech in reaction to Imus' own free speech. And if people don't like what he has to say, there's no reason a company is obligated to keep paying him to broadcast his thoughts. Free speech does not mean speech without consequences.

And on yet another tangent (my bad!), people have become quite adept at pulling out the "double standards" card these days. As if bringing up slightly related cases should dictate anything about how this case should be handled. It's really shoddy logic, people.

/end tangents/

Wigglytuff
Apr 13th, 2007, 07:17 AM
Nobody is entitled to his or her job. Just because someone is a media figure doesn't mean he can shirk the consequences of his words. If a person in any other position makes bigotted comments, they're likely to get fired. Why should a public figure be an exception?

On a different tangent, I don't like the insinuation I've seen in other threads that Imus' firing is akin to "thought police" or censorship. Outraged editorials and boycotts of sponsors are simple expressions of free speech in reaction to Imus' own free speech. And if people don't like what he has to say, there's no reason a company is obligated to keep paying him to broadcast his thoughts. Free speech does not mean speech without consequences.

And on yet another tangent (my bad!), people have become quite adept at pulling out the "double standards" card these days. As if bringing up slightly related cases should dictate anything about how this case should be handled. It's really shoddy logic, people.

/end tangents/

well said in bold

Scotso
Apr 13th, 2007, 07:20 AM
Hate speech is still protected. You don't have to like it, but it's not illegal.

The problem is that this is the kind of stuff they hired him for. He's a shock jock.

The only reason they did anything was because people are mad, and they don't want to lose business.

ico4498
Apr 13th, 2007, 07:24 AM
Hate speech is still protected. You don't have to like it, but it's not illegal.

Imus aint in jail, aint even been charged with a crime.

just got canned for some sick racist shit.

Wigglytuff
Apr 13th, 2007, 07:31 AM
Imus aint in jail, aint even been charged with a crime.

just got canned for some sick racist shit.

exactly. no one said anything about Anus being a criminal, said hes a racist prick.

Selah
Apr 13th, 2007, 12:05 PM
you know whats NOT funny about this thread? Is that these young women are being victimized again because people like you think he was wronged. They are receiving hate mail :sad:

Foot_Fault
Apr 13th, 2007, 12:35 PM
better than setting the other precedent that it's ok to hurl racist and sexist insults and still keep your job. :shrug:

agreed Rocketta! I am sure the Message was sent. Rush Limbaugh(sp) needs to be NEXT 20 years ago.

Foot_Fault
Apr 13th, 2007, 12:38 PM
you know whats NOT funny about this thread? Is that these young women are being victimized again because people like you think he was wronged. They are receiving hate mail :sad:
Please I think you and one other unmentionable person are the only one's who didn't get that my title was bait to Agree with his Firing.

I still thought when it was said, it was funny, i laugh b/c i watched MSNBC in the am preparing for work, however, after hearing from Rutgers, my tune was quickly changed. Still i am human, i like to be comical, and as wrong as it was...it was funny to hear him say it, not read it, i heard him say it in the moment. So not going to apologize for laughing b/c it hit my funny bone. But Rutgers had the last laugh...
His Firing and an Oprah Appearance.

tterb
Apr 13th, 2007, 01:42 PM
Hate speech is still protected. You don't have to like it, but it's not illegal.

The problem is that this is the kind of stuff they hired him for. He's a shock jock.

The only reason they did anything was because people are mad, and they don't want to lose business.

As has been pointed out, he's not in jail, nor should he be.

Isn't the point of a business to make money? If I pick my nose while I talk to my customers, that's not illegal either. But if that leads to me losing business, why should my company keep me around?

His job is "entertaining" commentary. If people no longer find his commentary entertaining (can't believe they did in the first place, but I digress...), he's not performing his job well. And as with any job, poor performance leads to firing.

Hateful speech is still protected, yes. But a company isn't obligated to give someone a platform to spew it. Imus can still practice his free speech like the rest of us - demonstrations, editorials, etc. - but his job doesn't have some protected status. (Whether they are being hypocritical for hiring as a "shock jock" and firing him for being too controversial is another story...)

"Sluggy"
Apr 13th, 2007, 01:46 PM
why not just make him get some counseling. How bad is what he said anyway, and how much damage did he really cause? of course, it was bad, but how bad i dont know?

Apoleb
Apr 13th, 2007, 01:50 PM
:haha: @ counseling.

timafi
Apr 13th, 2007, 02:05 PM
Glen Beck anyone?:mad: :mad: :mad: :mad: :mad:
he called the victims of Katrina scumbags,mum and I were sitting there watching and we were just :speakles: :speakles:

Wigglytuff
Apr 13th, 2007, 04:10 PM
Please I think you and one other unmentionable person are the only one's who didn't get that my title was bait to Agree with his Firing.


from your post history its not above you to feel that he was wrong. plus its really not funny, not something to joke about AT ALL.

Rollo
Apr 13th, 2007, 05:09 PM
On a different tangent, I don't like the insinuation I've seen in other threads that Imus' firing is akin to "thought police" or censorship. Outraged editorials and boycotts of sponsors are simple expressions of free speech in reaction to Imus' own free speech. And if people don't like what he has to say, there's no reason a company is obligated to keep paying him to broadcast his thoughts. Free speech does not mean speech without consequences.


Agreed. And I'm not sorry Imus is gone. On the other hand people who are asking for a little consistency have a point. Are all the people up in arms over this going to go after the music industry that spits out all sorts of filth? CBS puts out a lot of that music too.

The major lesson here is that money talks. CBS bailed only after major sponsors were opting out.

Rocketta
Apr 13th, 2007, 05:14 PM
why not just make him get some counseling. How bad is what he said anyway, and how much damage did he really cause? of course, it was bad, but how bad i dont know?

If you can't see the absolute viscious nature of this situation then there is very little hope. What do you mean, how bad was it? A decrepid old man, called a bunch of young ladies the day after they lost the championship a bunch of nappy-headed hos, not to their face but behind their back to a couple of million people and he did it for no apparent reason other than he didn't like the way they looked compared to the other team. If you think that doesn't have an effect on people then you are wrong.

Rocketta
Apr 13th, 2007, 05:17 PM
Agreed. And I'm not sorry Imus is gone. On the other hand people who are asking for a little consistency have a point. Are all the people up in arms over this going to go after the music industry that spits out all sorts of filth? CBS puts out a lot of that music too.

The major lesson here is that money talks. CBS bailed only after major sponsors were opting out.

How many times will people have to point out that many many many people went after rap and the rap industry but the Media didn't care to cover it. It's quite insulting that people would just assume that no one has tried to speak on the rap/hip hop situation just because some apologists tried to use it to save the scumbags job.

Martian KC
Apr 13th, 2007, 05:18 PM
why not just make him get some counseling. How bad is what he said anyway, and how much damage did he really cause? of course, it was bad, but how bad i dont know?

Isn't there a rehab for racists/sexists/homophobes? Didn't Isiah Washington go to one?

Or was that just an anger management ordeal? :tape:

samsung101
Apr 13th, 2007, 06:32 PM
LA Times - Imus cancellation creates a vacuum for the
Democrats to reach audience. This is the worry of
the LA Times and former Senator Bill Bradley.

Admitting the guy was an open and easy door for the Democratic
Party to get out their messages on tv and radio.

Seeming that the white guy had an audience that reached
the right, left, and middle, especially middle class white men.

Oh well.

He's done and gone now.

Where else will NBC and CBS be able to place their news guys on
to talk about what else, their other NBC and CBS shows.

The silence of regular guest Tim Russert is disturbing.
Way to stand up for your buddy Tim. At least say the
guy was wrong, but, you know he's not a bad man. Didn't
say a word yet. Nice.

Ditto for Dan Rather and John Kerry and Doris Kearns Goodwin.

At least McCain and Harold Ford said that Imus was wrong and
should be punished by his employer, but, still their friend and
a decent man.

Sure, like the Democrats don't have Hollywood, the Mainstream
Media, most tv talk shows, and most radio shows of the left or
right. The conservative shows regularly invite liberals on the air
for debates, i.e., Laura Ingraham, Al Rantel, Glenn Beck, Sean
Hannity. The reverse is not really that true. The Democrats
will have no problem finding new forums to get out their
messages.

Infiniti2001
Apr 13th, 2007, 06:53 PM
Glen Beck anyone?:mad: :mad: :mad: :mad: :mad:
he called the victims of Katrina scumbags,mum and I were sitting there watching and we were just :speakles: :speakles:

He needs to go too if you asked me :rolleyes:

Cam'ron Giles
Apr 13th, 2007, 06:53 PM
LA Times - Imus cancellation creates a vacuum for the
Democrats to reach audience. This is the worry of
the LA Times and former Senator Bill Bradley.

Admitting the guy was an open and easy door for the Democratic
Party to get out their messages on tv and radio.

Seeming that the white guy had an audience that reached
the right, left, and middle, especially middle class white men.

Oh well.

He's done and gone now.

Where else will NBC and CBS be able to place their news guys on
to talk about what else, their other NBC and CBS shows.

The silence of regular guest Tim Russert is disturbing.
Way to stand up for your buddy Tim. At least say the
guy was wrong, but, you know he's not a bad man. Didn't
say a word yet. Nice.

Ditto for Dan Rather and John Kerry and Doris Kearns Goodwin.

At least McCain and Harold Ford said that Imus was wrong and
should be punished by his employer, but, still their friend and
a decent man.

Sure, like the Democrats don't have Hollywood, the Mainstream
Media, most tv talk shows, and most radio shows of the left or
right. The conservative shows regularly invite liberals on the air
for debates, i.e., Laura Ingraham, Al Rantel, Glenn Beck, Sean
Hannity. The reverse is not really that true. The Democrats
will have no problem finding new forums to get out their
messages.

Do you have a job? and are you sure you are female? I will need to see proof...:mad:

Stamp Paid
Apr 13th, 2007, 10:44 PM
Please I think you and one other unmentionable person are the only one's who didn't get that my title was bait to Agree with his Firing.

I still thought when it was said, it was funny, i laugh b/c i watched MSNBC in the am preparing for work, however, after hearing from Rutgers, my tune was quickly changed. Still i am human, i like to be comical, and as wrong as it was...it was funny to hear him say it, not read it, i heard him say it in the moment. So not going to apologize for laughing b/c it hit my funny bone. But Rutgers had the last laugh...
His Firing and an Oprah Appearance.

I'm sure you found it funny too when he said that Venus would be better off in National Geographic than Playboy?

Wannabeknowitall
Apr 13th, 2007, 11:07 PM
OK can be we be all honest with ourselves.

Imus looks like the devil reincarnated with cancer.

As much as I love those girls at Rutgers if I took pictures of them right now and asked some men from around the way if they would date some these girls and give me a reason to why or why not, the majority of them would say no and explain that they're fugly.

One girl looked like Martin Lawrence in drag as Shenaynay.

Everyone wants to be PC now.

Yes they are someone's children and a few of them will say they have a lot of inner beauty and are good people.

If we can admit to ourselves that not every baby is cute, then surely we can admit that a couple of adults look a bit I'll use the word conflicted.

It's kinda interesting.
You cross the line likely if you call a college girl a hot mess but noone seems to have a problem with calling Greg Oden 45 years old which is not a compliment just because he looks it.

I'm not advocating what Imus did or said at the same time from looking at Della Reese last night on Larry King, she looks better at 76 than a few of those girls looked at 19, Vivian Stringer looks better at 60 than a few of those girls look at 19.
Is there anything wrong with a makeover?

RVD
Apr 13th, 2007, 11:57 PM
OK can be we be all honest with ourselves.

Imus looks like the devil reincarnated with cancer.

As much as I love those girls at Rutgers if I took pictures of them right now and asked some men from around the way if they would date some these girls and give me a reason to why or why not, the majority of them would say no and explain that they're fugly.

One girl looked like Martin Lawrence in drag as Shenaynay.

Everyone wants to be PC now.

Yes they are someone's children and a few of them will say they have a lot of inner beauty and are good people.

If we can admit to ourselves that not every baby is cute, then surely we can admit that a couple of adults look a bit I'll use the word conflicted.

It's kinda interesting.
You cross the line likely if you call a college girl a hot mess but noone seems to have a problem with calling Greg Oden 45 years old which is not a compliment just because he looks it.

I'm not advocating what Imus did or said at the same time from looking at Della Reese last night on Larry King, she looks better at 76 than a few of those girls looked at 19, Vivian Stringer looks better at 60 than a few of those girls look at 19.
Is there anything wrong with a makeover?I've found beauty in what most consider outwardly ugly. And true ugliness in what has been considered 'traditional beauty'. So it all depends on who you ask.

Moreover, your example above says far more about the survey taker than the Rutger ladies. There are mega-beauties today in Hollywood who if they removed their make-up would be considered 'a hot mess'. Yet men desire the illusion that make-up offers. :shrug: In other words, these women are basketball players, not models.
Hell, have you seen some models with their make-up?! :scared:

Sorry, but there is no defending what Imus did.

I will say once again...
Look at the pattern...the pattern...the pattern...of abuse this man has amassed.

mykarma
Apr 13th, 2007, 11:57 PM
I don't really care what happens to him, but I think that it's setting a dangerous precedent that in this country people can call for someone's scalp and get it.
Why am I not surprised? :lol::lol::lol:

mykarma
Apr 14th, 2007, 12:01 AM
I don't really care what happens to him, but I think that it's setting a dangerous precedent that in this country people can call for someone's scalp and get it.
No, you'd rather that someone can on a public radio station under the umbrella of the FCC can sprew hate and degrade women and minorities. You're really a piece of work. Go get your confederate flag that you love so much and march in front of the 3 digit sponsors that dropped their sponsorship from the Anus show. :fiery:

mykarma
Apr 14th, 2007, 12:02 AM
Nobody is entitled to his or her job. Just because someone is a media figure doesn't mean he can shirk the consequences of his words. If a person in any other position makes bigotted comments, they're likely to get fired. Why should a public figure be an exception?

On a different tangent, I don't like the insinuation I've seen in other threads that Imus' firing is akin to "thought police" or censorship. Outraged editorials and boycotts of sponsors are simple expressions of free speech in reaction to Imus' own free speech. And if people don't like what he has to say, there's no reason a company is obligated to keep paying him to broadcast his thoughts. Free speech does not mean speech without consequences.

And on yet another tangent (my bad!), people have become quite adept at pulling out the "double standards" card these days. As if bringing up slightly related cases should dictate anything about how this case should be handled. It's really shoddy logic, people.

/end tangents/
:lol::lol::lol:

mykarma
Apr 14th, 2007, 12:03 AM
Hate speech is still protected. You don't have to like it, but it's not illegal.

The problem is that this is the kind of stuff they hired him for. He's a shock jock.

The only reason they did anything was because people are mad, and they don't want to lose business.
OK :lol::lol::lol:

mykarma
Apr 14th, 2007, 12:07 AM
why not just make him get some counseling. How bad is what he said anyway, and how much damage did he really cause? of course, it was bad, but how bad i dont know?
He's had over 20 years to get counseling.

Mother_Marjorie
Apr 14th, 2007, 12:08 AM
I am pissed off at those Nappy Headed Ho's!:fiery:
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
......:lol: :bounce:

I think more was made out of the situation, but it good America is behind Blacks again Post 9/11
Look at what they are selling on Ebay:

http://froogle.google.com/froogle?q='nappy-headed+ho%22+t-shirt&hl=en&safe=off&rls=GGLD,GGLD:2004-37,GGLD:en&um=1&sa=X&oi=froogle&ct=title

http://www.drudgereport.com/nh.jpg

Mother_Marjorie
Apr 14th, 2007, 12:12 AM
Jesse Jackson can have a child out of wedlock, during an adulterous affair, and he's still a Reverend.

Anything is possible in the United States.

Imus will rise again on satellite, and they'll wish they hadn't made such a huge deal of it all...cause he'll really get brutal.

Mother_Marjorie
Apr 14th, 2007, 12:16 AM
better than setting the other precedent that it's ok to hurl racist and sexist insults and still keep your job. :shrug:
Howard Stern has been doing it for years and has made quite a lucrative career of it.

Where's the outrage?

mykarma
Apr 14th, 2007, 12:24 AM
Jesse Jackson can have a child out of wedlock, during an adulterous affair, and he's still a Reverend.

Anything is possible in the United States.

Imus will rise again on satellite, and they'll wish they hadn't made such a huge deal of it all...cause he'll really get brutal.
Are their no white reverends that fit the same catagory? So interesting that you'd rather attack Rev. Jackson instead of Imus. Whether you like it or not, people in the U.S. are really tiring of you closet racist.

mykarma
Apr 14th, 2007, 12:27 AM
Howard Stern has been doing it for years and has made quite a lucrative career of it.

Where's the outrage?
Even Howard Stern thinks Anus is an idiot. He said that he's heard Anus call one of his employees a ******. Also Robin from the Howard Stern show said that Anus has called her one.

I think Anus needs to go back to being a junkie, he was probably much nicer then.

Mother_Marjorie
Apr 14th, 2007, 12:27 AM
Are their no white reverends that fit the same catagory? So interesting that you'd rather attack Rev. Jackson instead of Imus. Whether you like it or not, people in the U.S. are really tiring of you closet racist.
Well, people are getting tired of the double standards. I mean, if you are going to judge it and compare sins, I think you know which is the greater.

Imus didn't try use racist-political pressure to falsely imprison three young men of the opposite race, now did he?

http://www.buzzle.com/img/articleImages/542017-10.jpg

Wannabeknowitall
Apr 14th, 2007, 12:35 AM
I've found beauty in what most consider outwardly ugly. And true ugliness in what has been considered 'traditional beauty'. So it all depends on who you ask.

Moreover, your example above says far more about the survey taker than the Rutger ladies. There are mega-beauties today in Hollywood who if they removed their make-up would be considered 'a hot mess'. Yet men desire the illusion that make-up offers. :shrug: In other words, these women are basketball players, not models.
Hell, have you seen some models with their make-up?! :scared:

Sorry, but there is no defending what Imus did.

I will say once again...
Look at the pattern...the pattern...the pattern...of abuse this man has amassed.

Didn't defend what Imus said have never defended what Imus has said.

Sadly the survey takers happen to be a more general demographic than you would think.
Yes we know what these hollywood stars look like thanks to some tabloids who make a living off of it.
Many of these hollywood stars you're talking about, have actually had to go "ugly" to be taken seriously by their peers.

As I have mentioned before there's this odd tug of war that goes on.

I just have a thing with the staches.
Either grease them up and acknowledge they're there or wax on wax off but don't pretend it's not there.

mykarma
Apr 14th, 2007, 12:44 AM
[quote]Well, people are getting tired of the double standards.Yes we are.

Imus didn't try use racist-political pressure to falsely imprison three young men of the opposite race, now did he?Neither did Jesse. Take a look in the mirror, your hate is blinding you. :sad:

lizchris
Apr 14th, 2007, 12:49 AM
This isn't a free speech issue or it is a censorship issue; you don't have a right to have a talk show and you do not have the right to make a hostile workplace for people. Don Imus was arrogant enough to think that he could say anything racist he wanted about a group of women he know nothing about and believe that he could still keep his job. He also was arrongant believe that all the years he caused a hostile workplace for black women at CBS Radio and NBC Radio would be ingored because of these statements (for those who don't know, when Howard Stern first started working at NBC radio in the mid-1980's, he witnessed Imus calling a black secretary a n****r and he went to management to get them to do something about it, but they said that they couldn't do anything about it because he was Imus; Stern has hated him ever since). For all those people who now feel so sorry for Don Imus and feel he, being a white male, is now the ultimate victim, why don't you go to where you work, walk up to a black employee and call them a n****r, jigaboo, porch monkey, moulenyan (for you Italians), moreno (for you Puerto Ricans). I mean, why not?

Mother_Marjorie
Apr 14th, 2007, 12:52 AM
This isn't a free speech issue or it is a censorship issue; you don't have a right to have a talk show and you do not have the right to make a hostile workplace for people. Don Imus was arrogant enough to think that he could say anything racist he wanted about a group of women he know nothing about and believe that he could still keep his job. He also was arrongant believe that all the years he caused a hostile workplace for black women at CBS Radio and NBC Radio would be ingored because of these statements (for those who don't know, when Howard Stern first started working at NBC radio in the mid-1980's, he witnessed Imus calling a black secretary a n****r and he went to management to get them to do something about it, but they said that they couldn't do anything about it because he was Imus; Stern has hated him ever since). For all those people who now feel so sorry for Don Imus and feel he, being a white male, is now the ultimate victim, why don't you go to where you work, walk up to a black employee and call them a n****r, jigaboo, porch monkey, moulenyan (for you Italians), moreno (for you Puerto Ricans). I mean, why not?
With Imus gone, critics turning to rap

By MARCUS FRANKLIN, Associated Press Writer

NEW YORK - Fighting in vain to keep his job, radio host Don Imus claimed that rappers routinely "defame and demean black women" and call them "worse names than I ever did."

That's an argument many people made as the Imus fallout intensified, culminating with his firing Thursday for labeling the Rutgers women's basketball team "nappy-headed hos." Now that Imus has been silenced (for the moment), some critics are moving down the radio dial to take on hip-hop, boosting the growing movement against harmful themes in rap.

"We all know where the real battleground is," wrote Kansas City Star columnist Jason Whitlock. "We know that the gangsta rappers and their followers in the athletic world have far bigger platforms to negatively define us than some old white man with a bad radio show."

"We have to begin working on a response to the larger problem," said the Rev. DeForest B. Soaries Jr., who as pastor of the Rutgers coach helped mediate the Imus imbroglio. Soaries announced Friday that he is organizing a nationwide initiative to address the culture that "has produced language that has denigrated women."

The larger problem was alluded to by CBS President and Chief Executive Officer Leslie Moonves when he announced Imus' firing: "The effect language like this has on our young people, particularly young women of color trying to make their way in this society ... has weighed most heavily on our minds as we made our decision."

Pointing out that the rapper Mims uses "ho" and worse epithets in his chart-topping song "This Is Why I'm Hot," columnist Michelle Malkin asked: "What kind of relief do we get from this deadening, coarsening, dehumanizing barrage?"

The Rev. Al Sharpton, among the loudest critics calling for Imus' termination, indicated that entertainment is the next battleground. "We will not stop until we make it clear that no one should denigrate women," he said after Imus' firing. "We must deal with the fact that ho and the b-word are words that are wrong from anybody's lips.

"It would be wrong if we stopped here and acted like Imus was the only problem. There are others that need to get this same message."

It is a message that was spreading even before Imus' comments.

After "Seinfeld" actor Michael Richards was castigated for a racist on-stage rant, the New York City Council passed a symbolic resolution banning the n-word, and other cities around the country have passed similar measures.

Cultural critic, author and columnist Stanley Crouch, a longtime foe of rap music, suspected the Imus ordeal would galvanize young black women across the country. He said a key moment was when the Rutgers players appeared at a news conference this week poised, dignified and defying stereotypes seen in rap videos and "dumb" comedies.

"When the public got to see these women, what they were, it was kind of shocking," Crouch said. "It made accepting the denigration not quite as comfortable as it had been for far too long."

Some defenders of rap music and hip-hop culture, such as the pioneering mogul Russell Simmons, deny any connection between Imus and hip-hop. They describe rap lyrics as reflections of the violent, drug-plagued, hopeless environments that many rappers come from. Instead of criticizing rappers, defenders say, critics should improve their reality.

"Comparing Don Imus' language with hip-hop artists' poetic expression is misguided and inaccurate and feeds into a mindset that can be a catalyst for unwarranted, rampant censorship," Simmons said in a statement Friday.

The superstar rapper Snoop Dogg also denied any connection to Imus. "(Rappers) are not talking about no collegiate basketball girls who have made it to the next level in education and sports," he told MTV.com. "We're talking about hos that's in the 'hood that ain't doing ---- that's trying to get a n---- for his money."

Criticism of rap is nothing new it began soon after the music emerged from New York City's underclass more than 30 years ago.

In 1993, the rapper-turned actor Queen Latifah challenged rap's misogyny in her hit song "U.N.I.T.Y." That same year, C. Delores Tucker, who was chairwoman of the National Political Congress of Black Women Inc., led an organized movement which included Congressional hearings condemning sexist and violent rap.

That same year, the Rev. Calvin Butts of the Abyssinian Baptist Church in Harlem drove a steamroller over a pile of tapes and CDs.

In 2004, students at Spelman College, a black women's college in Atlanta, became upset over rapper Nelly's video for his song "Tip Drill," in which he cavorts with strippers and swipes a credit card between one woman's buttocks. The rapper wanted to hold a campus bone marrow drive for his ailing sister, but students demanded he first participate in a discussion about the video's troubling images. Nelly declined.

In 2005, Essence magazine launched its "Take Back the Music" campaign. Writers such as Joan Morgan and Kierna Mayo and filmmaker Byron Hurt also have tackled the issue recently.

T. Denean Sharpley-Whiting, author of "Pimps Up, Ho's Down: Hip Hop's Hold on Young Black Women" and a professor at Vanderbilt University, said many black women resist rap music and hip-hop culture, but their efforts are largely ignored by mainstream media. As an example, the professor pointed to "Rap Sessions," the 10-city tour in which she's participating. She said the tour and its central question does hip-hop hate women? have gotten very little mainstream media coverage.

"It's only when we interface with a powerful white media personality like Imus that the issue is raised and the question turns to 'Why aren't you as vociferous in your critique of hip-hop?' We have been! You've been listening to the music but you haven't been listening to the protests from us."

Crouch said that change in rap music and entertainment likely won't come fast, because corporations are still profiting from the business but it's coming.

"I've been on (rappers) for 20 years," Crouch said. "I was in the civil rights movement. I know it takes a long time when you're standing up against extraordinary money and great power. But we're beginning to see a shift."

miffedmax
Apr 14th, 2007, 12:58 AM
I suspect Imus will have a lucrative career writing and lecturing on his horrible mistreatment at the hands of the infamous liberal press.

He's 66, and a millionaire several times over.

He'll do just fine, I suspect.

Stamp Paid
Apr 14th, 2007, 12:59 AM
Well, people are getting tired of the double standards. I mean, if you are going to judge it and compare sins, I think you know which is the greater.

Imus didn't try use racist-political pressure to falsely imprison three young men of the opposite race, now did he?

http://www.buzzle.com/img/articleImages/542017-10.jpg
http://i.a.cnn.net/si/2006/magazine/06/22/duke0626/t1_nifong.jpg

lizchris
Apr 14th, 2007, 01:00 AM
With Imus gone, critics turning to rap

By MARCUS FRANKLIN, Associated Press Writer

NEW YORK - Fighting in vain to keep his job, radio host Don Imus claimed that rappers routinely "defame and demean black women" and call them "worse names than I ever did."

That's an argument many people made as the Imus fallout intensified, culminating with his firing Thursday for labeling the Rutgers women's basketball team "nappy-headed hos." Now that Imus has been silenced (for the moment), some critics are moving down the radio dial to take on hip-hop, boosting the growing movement against harmful themes in rap.

"We all know where the real battleground is," wrote Kansas City Star columnist Jason Whitlock. "We know that the gangsta rappers and their followers in the athletic world have far bigger platforms to negatively define us than some old white man with a bad radio show."

"We have to begin working on a response to the larger problem," said the Rev. DeForest B. Soaries Jr., who as pastor of the Rutgers coach helped mediate the Imus imbroglio. Soaries announced Friday that he is organizing a nationwide initiative to address the culture that "has produced language that has denigrated women."

The larger problem was alluded to by CBS President and Chief Executive Officer Leslie Moonves when he announced Imus' firing: "The effect language like this has on our young people, particularly young women of color trying to make their way in this society ... has weighed most heavily on our minds as we made our decision."

Pointing out that the rapper Mims uses "ho" and worse epithets in his chart-topping song "This Is Why I'm Hot," columnist Michelle Malkin asked: "What kind of relief do we get from this deadening, coarsening, dehumanizing barrage?"

The Rev. Al Sharpton, among the loudest critics calling for Imus' termination, indicated that entertainment is the next battleground. "We will not stop until we make it clear that no one should denigrate women," he said after Imus' firing. "We must deal with the fact that ho and the b-word are words that are wrong from anybody's lips.

"It would be wrong if we stopped here and acted like Imus was the only problem. There are others that need to get this same message."

It is a message that was spreading even before Imus' comments.

After "Seinfeld" actor Michael Richards was castigated for a racist on-stage rant, the New York City Council passed a symbolic resolution banning the n-word, and other cities around the country have passed similar measures.

Cultural critic, author and columnist Stanley Crouch, a longtime foe of rap music, suspected the Imus ordeal would galvanize young black women across the country. He said a key moment was when the Rutgers players appeared at a news conference this week poised, dignified and defying stereotypes seen in rap videos and "dumb" comedies.

"When the public got to see these women, what they were, it was kind of shocking," Crouch said. "It made accepting the denigration not quite as comfortable as it had been for far too long."

Some defenders of rap music and hip-hop culture, such as the pioneering mogul Russell Simmons, deny any connection between Imus and hip-hop. They describe rap lyrics as reflections of the violent, drug-plagued, hopeless environments that many rappers come from. Instead of criticizing rappers, defenders say, critics should improve their reality.

"Comparing Don Imus' language with hip-hop artists' poetic expression is misguided and inaccurate and feeds into a mindset that can be a catalyst for unwarranted, rampant censorship," Simmons said in a statement Friday.

The superstar rapper Snoop Dogg also denied any connection to Imus. "(Rappers) are not talking about no collegiate basketball girls who have made it to the next level in education and sports," he told MTV.com. "We're talking about hos that's in the 'hood that ain't doing ---- that's trying to get a n---- for his money."

Criticism of rap is nothing new it began soon after the music emerged from New York City's underclass more than 30 years ago.

In 1993, the rapper-turned actor Queen Latifah challenged rap's misogyny in her hit song "U.N.I.T.Y." That same year, C. Delores Tucker, who was chairwoman of the National Political Congress of Black Women Inc., led an organized movement which included Congressional hearings condemning sexist and violent rap.

That same year, the Rev. Calvin Butts of the Abyssinian Baptist Church in Harlem drove a steamroller over a pile of tapes and CDs.

In 2004, students at Spelman College, a black women's college in Atlanta, became upset over rapper Nelly's video for his song "Tip Drill," in which he cavorts with strippers and swipes a credit card between one woman's buttocks. The rapper wanted to hold a campus bone marrow drive for his ailing sister, but students demanded he first participate in a discussion about the video's troubling images. Nelly declined.

In 2005, Essence magazine launched its "Take Back the Music" campaign. Writers such as Joan Morgan and Kierna Mayo and filmmaker Byron Hurt also have tackled the issue recently.

T. Denean Sharpley-Whiting, author of "Pimps Up, Ho's Down: Hip Hop's Hold on Young Black Women" and a professor at Vanderbilt University, said many black women resist rap music and hip-hop culture, but their efforts are largely ignored by mainstream media. As an example, the professor pointed to "Rap Sessions," the 10-city tour in which she's participating. She said the tour and its central question does hip-hop hate women? have gotten very little mainstream media coverage.

"It's only when we interface with a powerful white media personality like Imus that the issue is raised and the question turns to 'Why aren't you as vociferous in your critique of hip-hop?' We have been! You've been listening to the music but you haven't been listening to the protests from us."

Crouch said that change in rap music and entertainment likely won't come fast, because corporations are still profiting from the business but it's coming.

"I've been on (rappers) for 20 years," Crouch said. "I was in the civil rights movement. I know it takes a long time when you're standing up against extraordinary money and great power. But we're beginning to see a shift."


Critics can do all they want, but the only way gansta rappers are going away is when they no longer make money for the companies that employ them. And that is happening, but not because of critics like Crouch or Whitlock, who, from now on, I will refer to as Big and Greasy; it is because sales are down and that is because of people downloading single songs from I Tunes and not having to buy the whole album. It is also important to note that 20 years ago, people were screaming for warning lables to be put on albums and that was done, so the record companies have done their part; it is because of the sorry parents not doing theirs is the reason why there is the problem of this music being popluar.

Mother_Marjorie
Apr 14th, 2007, 01:04 AM
http://i.a.cnn.net/si/2006/magazine/06/22/duke0626/t1_nifong.jpg
http://www.nykola.com/images/sharptonchairman.jpg
http://www.thepoliticalpitbull.com/images/carlsonjackson1.jpg
http://msnbcmedia4.msn.com/j/getty/57312573sd001_dukecase.h2.jpg
http://www.sfgate.com/blogs/images/sfgate/cwnevius/2006/04/25/duke_rape350x278.jpg
http://www.chicagodefender.com/images/upload/DukeDA.jpg

Sam L
Apr 14th, 2007, 01:09 AM
Critics can do all they want, but the only way gansta rappers are going away is when they no longer make money for the companies that employ them. And that is happening, but not because of critics like Crouch or Whitlock, who, from now on, I will refer to as Big and Greasy; it is because sales are down and that is because of people downloading single songs from I Tunes and not having to buy the whole album.

You've just made my day.

Mother_Marjorie
Apr 14th, 2007, 01:12 AM
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1624140/posts

Black panthers to march at Duke Univeristy

Posted on 04/30/2006 8:47:13 AM PDT by JaggedEdge


DURHAM - The national chairman of the New Black Panther Party for Self-Defense says his group intends to march at Duke University on Monday to "deal directly" with lacrosse players about charges of rape of an escort service dancer at a team party.

Duke's campus police are coordinating with the Durham Police Department to prepare for the black-separatist group, which has a reputation for coming to its protests armed.

Malik Zulu Shabazz, a Washington lawyer who is the leader of the New Panthers, said he will be in Durham to rally with local black leaders and monitor progress of the criminal case against Collin Finnerty and Reade Seligmann, the two students charged with raping and kidnapping the dancer.

"We are conducting an independent investigation, and we intend to enter the campus and interview lacrosse players," Shabazz said Thursday. "We seek to ensure an adequate, strong and vigorous prosecution."
Duke is a private institution, and its campus is private property. Shabazz said he has not sought permission to enter but that his group has "received no word that we are not welcome."

John Burness, Duke's vice president for public affairs and community relations, said Thursday that the university will allow a controlled march on campus, as long as the New Black Panthers follow specific rules.

"As an institution we support free speech, and we will treat them like any other group," Burness said. "But we do not permit weapons. We will take necessary steps to keep the campus safe."

One of the key tenets of the New Black Panthers is owning firearms and knowing how to use them, according to the Anti-Defamation League, a national Jewish group that has monitored Shabazz and his followers for years.

"They are a racist and anti-Semitic group," said Myrna Shinbaum, a spokesperson for the New York-based league. "These guys come armed. They carry shotguns to demonstrations. The authorities down there should know this."

Asked whether his followers will be armed when they come to Duke, Shabazz chuckled and said, "I don't know if I can comment on that."

A flier distributed by the group this week displays photos of Finnerty and Seligmann and calls for those who have "had enough of disrespect and racism from Duke" to assemble at the front gates of the university's West Campus at 10 a.m.

"We as black men cannot sit idly by and allow white men to rape black women, regardless of what our sister (who by nature is a queen and a divine black woman) was doing," Shabazz is quoted as saying in a media release announcing the event.

In a telephone interview Thursday, Shabazz said he and several local black leaders will meet with Durham District Attorney Mike Nifong about the case Monday. Nifong did not return a message late Thursday seeking to confirm that a meeting is planned.

A "town hall" meeting is also planned at 6 p.m. Monday at St. Joseph's African Methodist Episcopal Church on Fayetteville Street. Shabazz is set to be the keynote speaker. The Rev. Philip R. Cousin Jr., the minister of the church and a Durham County commissioner, did not return calls about the event. Representatives of the NAACP and the Nation of Islam are also expected to attend.

New Panthers' origin

The New Black Panthers is listed as a racist hate group by the Southern Poverty Law Center, an organization more often cited for its efforts to monitor the Ku Klux Klan, neo-Nazis and other white supremacists. The Panthers is also disavowed by the Dr. Huey P. Newton Foundation, named for the activist who helped found the original Black Panther Party in 1966.

According to the Anti-Defamation League, the New Panthers are a black separatist militia founded in 1990 by Khallid Muhammad, who was removed from a top leadership post at the Nation of Islam after Louis Farrakhan reportedly found his statements against Jews, Catholics and homosexuals too radical.

Shabazz became the group's leader in 2001, after Muhammad's death. He has drawn media headlines in recent years for claiming that Jews were evacuated from the World Trade Center before the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks and voicing support for Zacarias Moussaoui, the so-called "20th hijacker" who was found eligible for the death penalty this month for his role in the Sept. 11 plot.

Shabazz, who said the group's current membership numbers in the "low thousands," backed away from claims published in a Durham newspaper Thursday that the New Black Panthers are providing security for the dancer and her family after she received death threats.

The accuser's mother told The News & Observer on Thursday that Panthers came by the family's house Wednesday and offered their protection, but the family decline

lizchris
Apr 14th, 2007, 01:18 AM
You've just made my day.


Thank you; I like making people's day by talking sense.

People may not like what positions I take, but at least I take the teme to learn about the issue; in this case, the issue isn't about black rappers or three well-to-do white men being wronged by the system; this is about an old decrepid weasel who was arrongant enough to think he could keep his job by saying what he said and the aftermath of how he handled the siutation.

Foot_Fault
Apr 14th, 2007, 01:31 AM
I'm sure you found it funny too when he said that Venus would be better off in National Geographic than Playboy?

HE didn't say that....know your facts!

Mother_Marjorie
Apr 14th, 2007, 01:32 AM
Thank you; I like making people's day by talking sense.

People may not like what positions I take, but at least I take the teme to learn about the issue; in this case, the issue isn't about black rappers or three well-to-do white men being wronged by the system; this is about an old decrepid weasel who was arrongant enough to think he could keep his job by saying what he said and the aftermath of how he handled the siutation.
No, Liz.

This issue is about hypocrisy at its worst.

Stamp Paid
Apr 14th, 2007, 01:43 AM
HE didn't say that....know your facts!

Excuse me, when his producer said it.
I hope you found it funny tho.

lizchris
Apr 14th, 2007, 01:51 AM
No, Liz.

This issue is about hypocrisy at its worst.


Hypocrity by whom?

I hope you are aware the ladies who were slurred and who stood up for themselves are now recieving hate mail, possibly from white former Imus listeners and whtie sympathizers who defended what he said and his right to say it. I don't see many people speaking out about that.

Mother_Marjorie
Apr 14th, 2007, 01:54 AM
Hypocrity by whom?

I hope you are aware the ladies who were slurred and who stood up for themselves are now recieving hate mail, possibly from white former Imus listeners and whtie sympathizers who defended what he said and his right to say it. I don't see many people speaking out about that.
Liz.

People will make millions off of buttons like these. Just like music producers and executives made millions off of calling women "ho's" and "bitches" in the Rap Industry. Does it make it right?

http://images.cafepress.com/product/124293494v5_240x240_Front.jpg
Selling for $149.99

Infiniti2001
Apr 14th, 2007, 01:56 AM
Hypocrity by whom?

I hope you are aware the ladies who were slurred and who stood up for themselves are now recieving hate mail, possibly from white former Imus listeners and whtie sympathizers who defended what he said and his right to say it. I don't see many people speaking out about that.

Not only that-- I want to know where all these people are when black men are falsely accused :help:

lizchris
Apr 14th, 2007, 02:32 AM
Not only that-- I want to know where all these people are when black men are falsely accused :help:


Whites are never around when black men are falsely accused of ANYTHING. Csae in point, a black man who worked as a maintenance man at a Brooklyn school and who never was in trouble with the law, was accused by an 8 year old child of sexual abuse. He was handcuffed, hauled off to jail, the police lied and said they had his DNA on the child and he should confess. Well, what REALLY happened is that the child lied, but in the meantime, he was jailed for three days on a bail he couldn't raise, threatened with beatings because he raped child. He was let out of jail after the child recanted her story and he was crying. It was pitiful to watch. He said he is suing for false arrest. My question is that where were the white people?

shootermcgavin
Apr 14th, 2007, 02:43 AM
better than setting the other precedent that it's ok to hurl racist and sexist insults and still keep your job. :shrug:

and it's acceptable to throw homophobic insults at your co-worker?

Isiah Washington called his co-worker a f*gg*t. COuld you imagine if T.R. Knight had called him a n*gg*r?

THis double standard must be stopped.

Imus called them nappy-headed ho's. Ok. It's insensitive etc etc but at the moment being played out way too much. He's lost his two jobs but is likely to get a job on Sirius radio for ten's of millions of dollars. Maybe he didn't lose out in the end?

Bijoux0021
Apr 14th, 2007, 02:43 AM
This isn't a free speech issue or it is a censorship issue; you don't have a right to have a talk show and you do not have the right to make a hostile workplace for people. Don Imus was arrogant enough to think that he could say anything racist he wanted about a group of women he know nothing about and believe that he could still keep his job. He also was arrongant believe that all the years he caused a hostile workplace for black women at CBS Radio and NBC Radio would be ingored because of these statements (for those who don't know, when Howard Stern first started working at NBC radio in the mid-1980's, he witnessed Imus calling a black secretary a n****r and he went to management to get them to do something about it, but they said that they couldn't do anything about it because he was Imus; Stern has hated him ever since). For all those people who now feel so sorry for Don Imus and feel he, being a white male, is now the ultimate victim, why don't you go to where you work, walk up to a black employee and call them a n****r, jigaboo, porch monkey, moulenyan (for you Italians), moreno (for you Puerto Ricans). I mean, why not?
Racists are a bunch of SCARED COWARDS. They are not brave enough to say vile things to the faces of the people they hate, because they know for a fact that they wouldn't have a face. That's why they feel so safe hiding under white sheets, behind microphones, behind computers, etc. to spew their hatred. Institutional racism is one of the worst kinds of racism, because the racists can camouflage their hate and easily get away with it for a very long time.

shootermcgavin
Apr 14th, 2007, 02:44 AM
Whites are never around when black men are falsely accused of ANYTHING. Csae in point, a black man who worked as a maintenance man at a Brooklyn school and who never was in trouble with the law, was accused by an 8 year old child of sexual abuse. He was handcuffed, hauled off to jail, the police lied and said they had his DNA on the child and he should confess. Well, what REALLY happened is that the child lied, but in the meantime, he was jailed for three days on a bail he couldn't raise, threatened with beatings because he raped child. He was let out of jail after the child recanted her story and he was crying. It was pitiful to watch. He said he is suing for false arrest. My question is that where were the white people?

That si a disgusting generalization and a very racist statement.

DOn't take the race road when you project racially insensitive ideas yourself? Ok? Really.. You should be smarter than that.

lizchris
Apr 14th, 2007, 02:52 AM
That si a disgusting generalization and a very racist statement.

DOn't take the race road when you project racially insensitive ideas yourself? Ok? Really.. You should be smarter than that.


It might be, but where were all these white people, who have diarrhea of the mouth with hip hop, when this guy, along with many other black men, were in jail for rapes they never committed?

cellophane
Apr 14th, 2007, 02:53 AM
That si a disgusting generalization and a very racist statement.

DOn't take the race road when you project racially insensitive ideas yourself? Ok? Really.. You should be smarter than that.

Better duck or you'll be called names. You really should get used to it. There is so much bs said around here w.r.t. "race".

shootermcgavin
Apr 14th, 2007, 02:55 AM
It might be, but where were all these white people, who have diarrhea of the mouth with hip hop, when this guy, along with many other black men, were in jail for rapes they never committed?

Holy Cow!
C"mon there buddy that's so offensive. I stopped reading after that point b/c clearly you have nothing intelligent to say.

lizchris
Apr 14th, 2007, 02:55 AM
and it's acceptable to throw homophobic insults at your co-worker?

Isiah Washington called his co-worker a f*gg*t. COuld you imagine if T.R. Knight had called him a n*gg*r?

THis double standard must be stopped.

Imus called them nappy-headed ho's. Ok. It's insensitive etc etc but at the moment being played out way too much. He's lost his two jobs but is likely to get a job on Sirius radio for ten's of millions of dollars. Maybe he didn't lose out in the end?


Losing two jobs in one week shows he is a loser and if Howard Stern has anything to say about it, Imus isn't going to Sirius. He'd better go to XM, where his apologist friends Opie and Anthony are.

shootermcgavin
Apr 14th, 2007, 02:57 AM
Here's a bad rep I received:
mykarma: You're the one that's the racist idiot.

Right. I highlighted a person, a black person midn you, syaing racist and culturally insensitive remarks about caucasian people. Obviously I am a racist due to this.

Racism is not a white upon Black issue. It could be asians upon white, black upon asian etc etc.

shootermcgavin
Apr 14th, 2007, 02:58 AM
Losing two jobs in one week shows he is a loser and if Howard Stern has anything to say about it, Imus isn't goingto Sirius. He'd better go to XM, where his apologist friends Opie and Anthony are.

uhh Sirius and XM are merging. Please do some research before posting.

Stamp Paid
Apr 14th, 2007, 02:59 AM
Better duck or you'll be called names. You really should get used to it. There is so much bs said around here w.r.t. "race".

Yes he'll get called names, and for good reason. He's dropping pretty heavy material for someone with just 5 posts. Why the alias?

lizchris
Apr 14th, 2007, 03:00 AM
uhh Sirius and XM are merging. Please do some research before posting.


They are talking about merging; they have to go through the FCC and the FCC didn't say they would look into this any time soon.

shootermcgavin
Apr 14th, 2007, 03:01 AM
Yes he'll get called names, and for good reason. He's dropping pretty heavy material for someone with just 5 posts. Why the alias?

LOL. alright there bud. I have an education and I hae an opinion. Just b/c I am a newbie doesn't prevent me from using it.

miffedmax
Apr 14th, 2007, 03:02 AM
Look up The Innocence Project, an organization where people of all ethnicities work together to free falsely imprisoned people.

hablo
Apr 14th, 2007, 03:03 AM
He's dropping pretty heavy material for someone with just 5 posts. Why the alias?
I just noticed that too.

shootermcgavin
Apr 14th, 2007, 03:03 AM
They are talking about merging; they have to go through the FCC and the FCC didn't say they would look into this any time soon.

Wrong again
http://news.com.com/Sirius,+XM+say+FCC+rules+do+not+bar+their+merger/2100-1027_3-6169509.html

lizchris
Apr 14th, 2007, 03:05 AM
Look up The Innocence Project, an organization where people of all ethnicities work together to free falsely imprisoned people.


I am very aware of this organization and I am aware that most of the men they have freed are black and if not for them, five would already six feet under.

cellophane
Apr 14th, 2007, 03:06 AM
Yes he'll get called names, and for good reason. He's dropping pretty heavy material for someone with just 5 posts. Why the alias?

For good reason? What exactly has he said that would be a good reason? He is a troll because he got registered and his first posts are in this thread?

cellophane
Apr 14th, 2007, 03:07 AM
I just noticed that too.

So anyone whose first posts are in this thread is a troll? :scratch:

lizchris
Apr 14th, 2007, 03:07 AM
Wrong again
http://news.com.com/Sirius,+XM+say+FCC+rules+do+not+bar+their+merger/2100-1027_3-6169509.html


They may say that, but the FCC will try to block the merger. Let's face it; the earliest they will merge is the fall of 2008.

shootermcgavin
Apr 14th, 2007, 03:08 AM
I am very aware of this organization and I am aware that most of the men they have freed are black and if not for them, five would already six feet under.

Whites are never around when black men are falsely accused of ANYTHING.

Wow.

mykarma
Apr 14th, 2007, 03:10 AM
Liz.

People will make millions off of buttons like these. Just like music producers and executives made millions off of calling women "ho's" and "bitches" in the Rap Industry. Does it make it right?

http://images.cafepress.com/product/124293494v5_240x240_Front.jpg
Selling for $149.99
I'm sure you already have your order in.

lizchris
Apr 14th, 2007, 03:11 AM
Wow.

You know damn well what I mean; I was not talking about this organization; I was talking about the whites whose careers were dying before they could hitch their sorry wagons to this story and now are resurecting them because of them sucesfully blaming black rappers calling the Rutgers womens' basketball players those two digusting terms when it came out of Imus' old, decrepid, wrinkly mouth.

shootermcgavin
Apr 14th, 2007, 03:13 AM
You know damn well what I mean; I was not talking about this organization; I was talking about the whites whose careers were dying before they could hitch their sorry wagons to this story and now are resurecting them because of them sucesfully blaming black rappers calling the Rutgers womens' basketball players those two digusting terms when it came out of Imus' old, decrepid, wrinkly mouth.

You in no way alluded to that in your original post. You just said, and I quote, "whites".

Let this be a lesson to you.

lizchris
Apr 14th, 2007, 03:14 AM
I'm sure you already have your order in.

Along with the new poster and the trash on TV who are blaming black men for what Imus is going through.

DemWilliamsGulls
Apr 14th, 2007, 03:15 AM
why not just make him get some counseling. How bad is what he said anyway, and how much damage did he really cause? of course, it was bad, but how bad i dont know?

Celebrities alway try to get out of shit they say with "counseling" when they show their true colors....LOOK...Imus put himself out on a limb by those unnesessary racist comments he made...I hope the bastard saved him some money...the company has a right to fire him..because he reprsents the company. They did the same thing to Whoopi Goldberg when slimfast dropped her because of her comments about the president, they are damn near about to fire Isaiah Washington about his "fag" comment. Kramer cant get a job anywhere because of his comments.....learn to shut up sometimes...i dont pity Imus not 1 bit! He wasnt even popular till now...anyway...

lizchris
Apr 14th, 2007, 03:15 AM
You in no way alluded to that in your original post. You just said, and I quote, "whites".

Let this be a lesson to you.


Let this be a lesson to you; you are the only person who didn't know opr understand what I was talking about. But then again, you are new to this board, so I will give you a pass.

mykarma
Apr 14th, 2007, 03:29 AM
and it's acceptable to throw homophobic insults at your co-worker?

Isiah Washington called his co-worker a f*gg*t. COuld you imagine if T.R. Knight had called him a n*gg*r?

THis double standard must be stopped.

Imus called them nappy-headed ho's. Ok. It's insensitive etc etc but at the moment being played out way too much. He's lost his two jobs but is likely to get a job on Sirius radio for ten's of millions of dollars. Maybe he didn't lose out in the end?
You don't really think that Anus only offended black now do you. :lol::lol::lol: He's insulted blacks, gays, Jews, women and probably you if you went in front of him talking the nonsense you're talking on this board.

Anus can say what ever he wants to say but when the sponsors pull their money he has to go. Sponsors pulled their advertising because they didn't want to be associated with someone that would attack innocent young ladies that had done nothing to him and that he didn't even know. He should have been fired way before now. He went over the line this time and has to pay the consequences. Also, this is about Don Anus and not Isiah Washington. If they had fired Isiah he would have deserved it but they didn't. I feel the same way about Mel Gibson but I don't see you mentioning him. If you don't like it that Isiah didn't get fired, go picket the show.

BTW, I returned the rep you sent me. I can't help but laugh at you calling me a racist. :wavey:

miffedmax
Apr 14th, 2007, 03:37 AM
I might--might--be able to summon up a smidgin of sympathy of Imus for losing his job if I didn't know he'll make a killing peddling his story on the lecture circuit.

Wigglytuff
Apr 14th, 2007, 03:37 AM
Whites are never around when black men are falsely accused of ANYTHING.

i dont agree with a lot of what you say. but in the case of racist like Major Racist this is 100%. you see how she is now trying to relate EVERYTHING (even the weather) to the duke players to the point of increasing her already extreme lunacy. but where was she when a little girl got what was it 5 years for shoving a teachers aid? the girl was black so Major could not care less. she talks about hypocrisy but its a wonder her empty head doesnt explode from all her own hypocrisies.

lizchris
Apr 14th, 2007, 03:41 AM
i dont agree with a lot of what you say. but in the case of racist like Major Racist this is 100%. you see how she is now trying to relate EVERYTHING (even the weather) to the duke players to the point of increasing her already extreme lunacy. but where was she when a little girl got what was it 5 years for shoving a teachers aid? the girl was black so Major could not care less. she talks about hypocrisy but its a wonder her empty head doesnt explode from all her own hypocrisies.

She got seven and from what I understand, got an additonal year for supposedly breaking some rule.:rolleyes:

Wigglytuff
Apr 14th, 2007, 03:43 AM
Are their no white reverends that fit the same catagory? So interesting that you'd rather attack Rev. Jackson instead of Imus. Whether you like it or not, people in the U.S. are really tiring of you closet racist.

:worship: :worship: :worship: :worship:

mykarma
Apr 14th, 2007, 03:45 AM
Here's a bad rep I received:
mykarma: You're the one that's the racist idiot.

Right. I highlighted a person, a black person midn you, syaing racist and culturally insensitive remarks about caucasian people. Obviously I am a racist due to this.

Racism is not a white upon Black issue. It could be asians upon white, black upon asian etc etc.

You have a short memory dude. I was responding to the bad rep you sent me yesterday before you even posted one post.

http://imgsrv2.tennisuniverse.com/wtaworld/images/reputation/reputation_balance.gif Imus - when will... (http://wtaworld.com/showthread.php?p=10511709#post10511709) Apr 12th, 2007 10:43 PM shootermcgavin (http://wtaworld.com/member.php?u=50250) racist; you need to get a new lens on life.. then you will achieve a true level of knowledge.

mykarma
Apr 14th, 2007, 03:50 AM
i dont agree with a lot of what you say. but in the case of racist like Major Racist this is 100%. you see how she is now trying to relate EVERYTHING (even the weather) to the duke players to the point of increasing her already extreme lunacy. but where was she when a little girl got what was it 5 years for shoving a teachers aid? the girl was black so Major could not care less. she talks about hypocrisy but its a wonder her empty head doesnt explode from all her own hypocrisies.
Shoving an aid that shoved her first.

mykarma
Apr 14th, 2007, 03:50 AM
She got seven and from what I understand, got an additonal year for supposedly breaking some rule.:rolleyes:
Yeah she had an extra pair of socks.

Wigglytuff
Apr 14th, 2007, 03:53 AM
She got seven and from what I understand, got an additonal year for supposedly breaking some rule.:rolleyes:

and where was Major asshole when all this was going on. oh she can TALK about how she cares about justice for the wrongly accused, but we know she really means continuing her hatred towards black people even if it means backing some people that no one really knows is guilty or not and may never know.

lizchris
Apr 14th, 2007, 03:53 AM
Yeah she had an extra pair of socks.'


WHAT?

Wigglytuff
Apr 14th, 2007, 03:54 AM
Yeah she had an extra pair of socks.

fucking sick.

now THAT is a miscarriage of justice. not that some people care anything for justice. :fiery: :fiery: :fiery: :mad: :mad: :mad:

Wigglytuff
Apr 14th, 2007, 03:55 AM
'


WHAT?

after she was already in juvy jail she got an extra year for something, turns out that something was having an extra pair of socks.

lizchris
Apr 14th, 2007, 03:57 AM
Are their no white reverends that fit the same catagory? So interesting that you'd rather attack Rev. Jackson instead of Imus. Whether you like it or not, people in the U.S. are really tiring of you closet racist.


I have a few:

Rev. James Dobson
Rev.Ted Haggard
Rev. Jimmy Swaggart
Rev. Jerry Fawell
Rev. Pat Robertson
and
Rev. Jim Bakker

Mother_Marjorie
Apr 14th, 2007, 05:26 AM
even if it means backing some people that no one really knows is guilty or not and may never know.
If the DNA don't fit, you must acquit.