PDA

View Full Version : CBS Fires Don Anus


mykarma
Apr 12th, 2007, 09:49 PM
Just heard on Fox News that CBS has Fired Anus.

selyoink
Apr 12th, 2007, 09:51 PM
Good he should be fired. Absolutely no excuse for what he said.

mykarma
Apr 12th, 2007, 09:53 PM
Good he should be fired. Absolutely no excuse for what he said.
They said that more sponsors were jumping ship. CBS said "enough is enough".

Stamp Paid
Apr 12th, 2007, 09:55 PM
When are they gonna fire Sharpton too? And Jesse? And ban the New Black panther party?
I mean come on, double standard if I ever saw one!

Stamp Paid
Apr 12th, 2007, 09:56 PM
Just heard on Fox News that CBS has Fired Anus.

:scared:

Bijoux0021
Apr 12th, 2007, 10:00 PM
Just heard on Fox News that CBS has Fired Anus.
You watch Fox News?

Zombielicious
Apr 12th, 2007, 10:01 PM
:worship:

*JR*
Apr 12th, 2007, 10:02 PM
POSTED: 4:58 p.m. EDT, April 12, 2007

NEW: CBS pulls plug on "Imus in the Morning," effective immediately
Imus says he will not go on "some talk show tour"
TV network will no longer simulcast "Imus in the Morning"
Rutgers women's basketball team will meet with Imus

NEW YORK (CNN) -- CBS has canceled Don Imus' radio show, effective immediately, after uproar over his racist and sexist comments about Rutgers women's basketball team.

"From the outset, I believe all of us have been deeply upset and revulsed by the statements that were made on our air about the young women who represented Rutgers University in the NCAA Women's Basketball Championship with such class, energy and talent," said CBS President and Chief Executive Officer Leslie Moonves, in announcing the decision.

The decision by CBS came a day after NBC Universal decided to part ways with Imus completely, thus canceling the simulcast of his show on MSNBC.

Amid the outcry over his on-air racial slur last week, shock jock Imus said Thursday that he had "apologized enough" and that he will not go on "some talk show tour."

"I'm not going to go talk to Larry King or Barbara Walters or anyone else," Imus said on his flagship station in New York, WFAN-AM, which is owned by CBS Corp. and distributes "Imus in the Morning" nationally.

"The only other people I want to talk to are these young women at the team, and then that's it," Imus said.

He was referring to the members of the Rutgers University women's basketball team, whom he described as "nappy-headed hos" the day after the team lost the NCAA championship to the University of Tennessee. (Gallery: Other controversial comments aired on Imus show)

He has repeatedly apologized for those remarks. Team members have agreed to meet with him privately, but so far no meeting has taken place.

"It gets said. Kids get hurt," he said. "At some point -- I'm not sure when -- I'm going to go talk to the team and that's all I'm interested in doing."

NBC News President Steve Capus, appearing on CNN, said Imus' comments had "touched a nerve" within the organization and firing him was "the only action we could take."

Earlier in the week, CBS Radio issued a statement announcing a two-week suspension that starts Monday.

Despite being dropped by NBC, Imus hosted his show from the MSNBC studios in New Jersey. He did not appear on TV.

"As you know, MSNBC folded up yesterday, so we're just on the radio," he said.

Imus was broadcasting his 18th annual radio charity fundraiser, which has pulled in $50 million since 1990. It ends Friday.

"This may be our last radiothon, so we need to raise $100 million dollars," Imus said, chuckling.

According to The Associated Press, Imus raised $1 million in the first five hours of Thursday's fundraiser.

The disparaging remark prompted eight companies to pull their ads from Imus' show: Staples, General Motors, Sprint Nextel, GlaxoSmithKline, Procter & Gamble, PetMed Express, American Express and Bigelow Tea.

Bruce Gordon, a member of CBS Corp.'s board of directors, has called for Imus' firing from WFAN.

Speaking Thursday on CNN's "American Morning," Gordon said that, speaking "as an African-American man in this country, Don Imus violated our community. He attacked beautiful, talented, classy women and when those women showed themselves to the country, I think that those words matched with those images made it clear to America that Don Imus was wrong."

Gordon is a former president and CEO of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.

At a rally outside CBS's New York offices Thursday, civil rights activist Al Sharpton pressured the network to cancel Imus' morning show.

Rain cut attendance at the rally -- another has been scheduled for Saturday afternoon -- but Sharpton, joined by the father of a player on the team, spoke to the media.

"NBC has done in our judgment what is right," he said, and CBS must not be "the dam holding back the waters of insensitivity."

Sharpton said he had met with several NBC leaders and planned to meet with CBS leaders later in the day.

Linzell Vaughn, the father of sophomore center Kia Vaughn, said Imus' comments were "like a slap in the face."

"Do not disrespect our children," he said. (Players talk of hurt, seeking understanding)

Sharpton said the airways should not be used to "call children hard-core hos, nappy-headed hos. ... None of us have the right to use the public airways to express our bigotry."

Civil rights activist Jesse Jackson also spoke on Thursday afternoon outside CBS' offices and called for Imus' firing.

"This is not the first time this has happened on this show," he said, and spoke of previous Imus comments that Jackson characterized as racist and sexist.

"'Three strikes you're out' ought to apply to this position," he said.

Pureracket
Apr 12th, 2007, 10:06 PM
Now....let's see swam and drudge dig into these womens' past in order to justify what Imus said.

mykarma
Apr 12th, 2007, 10:08 PM
You watch Fox News?
Not generally but if it's something I'm interested in I will. As example, when the GOP lost the election. Big mouth Bo Dietl is ranting and raving on Fox right now. :lol:

Pureracket
Apr 12th, 2007, 10:13 PM
Not generally but if it's something I'm interested in I will. As example, when the GOP lost the election. Big mouth Bo Dietl is ranting and raving on Fox right now. :lol:
Mykarma,
They were letting you HAVE IT about watching Faux Noose.....LOL!!!!!

Lord Nelson
Apr 12th, 2007, 10:14 PM
:scared:

Yes exactly. Imus hated Bill O'reilly with a passion and so Bill will be enjoying talking about imus's woes as well as the news channel in general.

mentos
Apr 12th, 2007, 10:15 PM
Ho hum. Imus isn't merely an individual--he is a system. Cut off his hateful mouth, eight more grow back in its place. Wheels. Bus. Round and Round. [Wonder if the meeting with the Lady Scarlet Knights of Rutgers roundball has already been cancelled.]

alfonsojose
Apr 12th, 2007, 10:17 PM
Anus? is that his name? :lol:

mykarma
Apr 12th, 2007, 10:23 PM
Mykarma,
They were letting you HAVE IT about watching Faux Noose.....LOL!!!!!
I know it and I don't care. I'm still watching it right now. I'm looking for a fair and balanced opinion of this Don Anus firing. :lol::lol::lol:

Wannabeknowitall
Apr 12th, 2007, 10:24 PM
Now....let's see swam and drudge dig into these womens' past in order to justify what Imus said.

Well this is Rutgers not LSU where Pokey Chatman couldn't help doing a little poking.

They deserve nothing but support but I question why little to nothing was said about someone like Pokey Chatman in the media especially when she was given an incentive after her resignation when she didn't coach the team to the Final Four.

Just an interesting viewpoint from what a parent of one of these student-athletes might see it:

Don Imus: I fuck your child mentally and I get fire.

Pokey Chatman: I fuck your child physically, I resign and then get paid for something I didn't do.

They're both ethically disgusting and I feel Pokey shouldn't have taken the money after she resigned.

Pureracket
Apr 12th, 2007, 10:28 PM
Well this is Rutgers not LSU where Pokey Chatman couldn't help doing a little poking.

They deserve nothing but support but I question why little to nothing was said about someone like Pokey Chatman in the media especially when she was given an incentive after her resignation when she didn't coach the team to the Final Four.

Just an interesting viewpoint from what a parent of one of these student-athletes might see it:

Don Imus: I fuck your child mentally and I get fire.

Pokey Chatman: I fuck your child physically, I resign and then get paid for something I didn't do.

They're both ethically disgusting and I feel Pokey shouldn't have taken the money after she resigned.Always take the money, babe. Always take the money.

timafi
Apr 12th, 2007, 10:33 PM
again good fucking riddance to shitmus:mad: :bigwave: :bigwave:

RVD
Apr 12th, 2007, 10:38 PM
I could not be happier!! :bounce:
Money doesn't just talk, it SCREAMS!! when ripped from the clutches of these corporations. :tape:

darrinbaker00
Apr 12th, 2007, 10:46 PM
Well this is Rutgers not LSU where Pokey Chatman couldn't help doing a little poking.

They deserve nothing but support but I question why little to nothing was said about someone like Pokey Chatman in the media especially when she was given an incentive after her resignation when she didn't coach the team to the Final Four.

Just an interesting viewpoint from what a parent of one of these student-athletes might see it:

Don Imus: I fuck your child mentally and I get fire.

Pokey Chatman: I fuck your child physically, I resign and then get paid for something I didn't do.

They're both ethically disgusting and I feel Pokey shouldn't have taken the money after she resigned.
What's to talk about? Even if charges are never brought against Pokey Chatman, she will never again coach basketball at any level. End of story.

Bijoux0021
Apr 12th, 2007, 10:56 PM
I know it and I don't care. I'm still watching it right now. I'm looking for a fair and balanced opinion of this Don Anus firing. :lol::lol::lol:
That's good. Since I don't watch Fox News, what kind of impression do you get from the hosts and guests regarding this Imus fiasco? Are they for his firing or are they putting the blame on Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson?

Rocketta
Apr 12th, 2007, 11:00 PM
They had no choice after MSNBC stood to the plate and let him go. :clap2:

Wannabeknowitall
Apr 12th, 2007, 11:16 PM
What's to talk about? Even if charges are never brought against Pokey Chatman, she will never again coach basketball at any level. End of story.

Never said there was anything to talk about.
I just thought that the lack of coverage was interesting.

And actually I'm a little sad she'll likely never coach again.
She's a good coach and shyt Bob Knight has done more ethically wrong things than Pokey.
There's only 6 black women coaches in the power conferences in women's college basketball and a good one had to leave.
We know that she's at least bi, if she admits to being a lesbian I think someone might recognize that she's worthy of at least getting a chance where she won't be turned on by the student-athletes, men's college basketball.

mykarma
Apr 12th, 2007, 11:21 PM
That's good. Since I don't watch Fox News, what kind of impression do you get from the hosts and guests regarding this Imus fiasco? Are they for his firing or are they putting the blame on Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson?
They guy that was doing the interviewing was ok. Don't know his name, but he has blond hair and a skinny face. Of course Rev. Sharpton and Jackson were to blame. :lol:

Bijoux0021
Apr 12th, 2007, 11:49 PM
They guy that was doing the interviewing was ok. Don't know his name, but he has blond hair and a skinny face. Of course Rev. Sharpton and Jackson were to blame. :lol:
Thanks. It's no surprise they blame those two for Imus' racist and sexist remarks.

darrinbaker00
Apr 13th, 2007, 12:13 AM
Never said there was anything to talk about.
I just thought that the lack of coverage was interesting.

And actually I'm a little sad she'll likely never coach again.
She's a good coach and shyt Bob Knight has done more ethically wrong things than Pokey.
There's only 6 black women coaches in the power conferences in women's college basketball and a good one had to leave.
We know that she's at least bi, if she admits to being a lesbian I think someone might recognize that she's worthy of at least getting a chance where she won't be turned on by the student-athletes, men's college basketball.
There was no coverage because Pokey Chatman quit her job, took her payoff and went away. I still haven't heard or read any statements from her. Have you?

mykarma
Apr 13th, 2007, 12:20 AM
Thanks. It's no surprise they blame those two for Imus' racist and sexist remarks.
Rocky editorial minimized, shifted attention from Imus' history of racist remarks

The irony is that the Imus show had been slowly getting away from its traditional coarse frat-boy humor and more into biting commentary on politics and the media, and the ratings kept improving as he did. The host asked politicians, journalists and authors blunt and needling questions -- and then gave them time to answer. It was often a refreshing contrast with the morning fluff on the broadcast networks -- although not always, of course, as his comment on the Rutgers team made clear.


As Media Matters for America has extensively documented (http://colorado.mediamatters.org/rd?http://mediamatters.org/items/200704090001), Imus' April 4 remark was not just "coarse frat-boy humor," but part of a lengthy history of racially offensive and inflammatory comments that has continued in recent months. For instance, Imus on " Imus' executive producer, Bernard McGuirk, suggested (http://colorado.mediamatters.org/rd?http://mediamatters.org/items/200703070009) on the March 6 broadcast that that "bitch" Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton (D-NY) would pander to African-Americans by wearing "cornrows and gold teeth." And as the Forward newspaper reported in a December 8, 2006, online article, Imus during his November 30 broadcast referred to the "Jewish management" of CBS Radio as "money-grubbing bastards."
Additionally, as noted in a July 18, 2000, article (http://colorado.mediamatters.org/rd?http://mediamatters.org/rd?http://www.villagevoice.com/news/0028,goldstein,16350,1.html) in The Village Voice, Imus referred to former Defense Secretary William Cohen as "the Mandingo" and to Cohen's African-American wife as "a ho." As The Boston Globe noted in a March 27, 2004, article (http://colorado.mediamatters.org/rd?http://mediamatters.org/rd?http://www.boston.com/news/globe/living/articles/2004/03/27/barnicle_apologizes_for_racial_remark/), " 'Mandingo' is also the title of a 1975 movie (http://colorado.mediamatters.org/rd?http://mediamatters.org/rd?http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0073349/) in which a black male slave is paired intimately with a white female slave master." That article reported that frequent Imus guest Mike Barnicle had apologized for similarly using the term on his own radio show to refer to Cohen's wife, Janet Langhart. The Village Voice article described other racially charged insults that Imus has made about specific individuals:

The muckraker Philip Nobile has been tracking Imus's racist rap in a series for the webzine tompaine.com. When you take this patter out of laff-riot context, it's strikingly similar to the drollery of David Duke. Imus and his buds have called O.J.'s lead attorney "chicken wing Johnny Cochran," Sammy Davis Jr. "a one-eyed lawn jockey," Patrick Ewing "Mighty Joe Young," Defense Secretary William Cohen "the Mandingo," and his black wife "a 'ho."
In an appearance on the April 9 edition (http://colorado.mediamatters.org/rd?http://mediamatters.org/rd?http://transcripts.cnn.com/TRANSCRIPTS/0704/09/sitroom.02.html) of CNN's The Situation Room, Cohen noted that "at one point when we married -- they played 'Jungle Fever' " on Imus in the Morning and that Langhart "was referred to as 'brown sugar' " on the show.
A May 26, 2000, article in The Washington Post (accessed through the Nexis database) similarly reported that "sometime around 1995, when the New York Times hired African-American journalist Gwen Ifill to cover the White House, Imus reportedly said: 'Isn't the Times wonderful? It lets the cleaning lady cover the White House.' " The article further stated that Imus "doesn't deny the Ifill comment, but says he can't find a record of it," and added, "Whether he said it or not, Imus apologized to Ifill on the air after he was criticized."
On the April 10 edition of Imus in the Morning, Imus asserted (http://colorado.mediamatters.org/rd?http://mediamatters.org/items/200704110001), "I never said anything about Gwen Ifill. This was a comedy routine where we make up the news which we've been doing since 1968 on the radio." Later in the program, Imus said "it was intended to reflect the absurd philosophy we perceived of, I guess it was the Reagan administration -- not that we thought the Reagan administration was a bunch of racists, that's not the point." On the April 9 edition of the program, Imus said that "I did not say that, and obviously there are ways to check that. I didn't say that."
Furthermore, on the July 19, 1998, broadcast (http://colorado.mediamatters.org/rd?http://www.onthemedia.org/yore/transcripts/transcripts_081801_imus.html) of CBS News' 60 Minutes, Imus reportedly admitted to reporter Mike Wallace that McGuirk was on his show "to do '******' jokes" and admitted to using the word "******" himself. MIKE WALLACE: You told Tom ANDERSON, the producer, in your car coming home that Bernard McGuirk is there to do "******" jokes.
DON IMUS: Well I've n -- I never use that word.
MIKE WALLACE: Tom?
TOM ANDERSON: I'm right here.
DON IMUS: Did I use that word?
TOM ANDERSON: I recall you using that word.
DON IMUS: Oh, okay, well then I used that word, but I mean -- of course that was an off the record conversation -- [LAUGHTER]
MIKE WALLACE: The hell it was!
In contrast to the News, an April 11 editorial (http://colorado.mediamatters.org/rd?http://www.denverpost.com/search/ci_5635734) in The Denver Post stated, "For nearly 40 years, Don Imus has built a successful broadcast career of acid entertainment, filling the air with chatter of current affairs and sports. Too often, he's indulged himself with abrasive snits and racially charged commentary." The Post editorial (an online version appeared April 10) further noted, "His schtick often includes making fun of racism by pretending to be racist. He and his cast routinely denigrate women, religion, overweight people and, most certainly, racial groups."
In addition to downplaying Imus' history of inflammatory comments, the News also attempted to shift the focus of the controversy from Imus' racist remarks to the "bilge that can be found" in popular rap music: The flap also spotlights one other issue. As John McWhorter, a black scholar with the Manhattan Institute, wrote this week, "Where, after all, did Imus pick up the very terminology he used? Rap music and the language young black people use themselves on the street to refer to one another." The Revs. Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton, who are leading the clamor for Imus' head, might ask themselves how the depiction of women as "hos" penetrated far enough into the popular culture that a 66-year-old white male would use it as a casual reference.
On a nearby page in this section, Michelle Malkin (http://colorado.mediamatters.org/rd?http://mediamatters.org/issues_topics/people/michellemalkin) gives readers a taste of the sort of bilge that can be found right this minute in songs atop the Billboard Hot Rap Tracks chart. Surely that is a far bigger issue than Imus' continued employment. Do Jackson and Sharpton plan to target these purveyors of vile misogyny and human debasement, too? If so, it would do more for the culture than merely forcing Imus off the air.

RVD
Apr 13th, 2007, 12:57 AM
Rocky editorial minimized, shifted attention from Imus' history of racist remarks

The irony is that the Imus show had been slowly getting away from its traditional coarse frat-boy humor and more into biting commentary on politics and the media, and the ratings kept improving as he did. The host asked politicians, journalists and authors blunt and needling questions -- and then gave them time to answer. It was often a refreshing contrast with the morning fluff on the broadcast networks -- although not always, of course, as his comment on the Rutgers team made clear.


As Media Matters for America has extensively documented (http://colorado.mediamatters.org/rd?http://mediamatters.org/items/200704090001), Imus' April 4 remark was not just "coarse frat-boy humor," but part of a lengthy history of racially offensive and inflammatory comments that has continued in recent months. For instance, Imus on " Imus' executive producer, Bernard McGuirk, suggested (http://colorado.mediamatters.org/rd?http://mediamatters.org/items/200703070009) on the March 6 broadcast that that "bitch" Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton (D-NY) would pander to African-Americans by wearing "cornrows and gold teeth." And as the Forward newspaper reported in a December 8, 2006, online article, Imus during his November 30 broadcast referred to the "Jewish management" of CBS Radio as "money-grubbing bastards."
Additionally, as noted in a July 18, 2000, article (http://colorado.mediamatters.org/rd?http://mediamatters.org/rd?http://www.villagevoice.com/news/0028,goldstein,16350,1.html) in The Village Voice, Imus referred to former Defense Secretary William Cohen as "the Mandingo" and to Cohen's African-American wife as "a ho." As The Boston Globe noted in a March 27, 2004, article (http://colorado.mediamatters.org/rd?http://mediamatters.org/rd?http://www.boston.com/news/globe/living/articles/2004/03/27/barnicle_apologizes_for_racial_remark/), " 'Mandingo' is also the title of a 1975 movie (http://colorado.mediamatters.org/rd?http://mediamatters.org/rd?http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0073349/) in which a black male slave is paired intimately with a white female slave master." That article reported that frequent Imus guest Mike Barnicle had apologized for similarly using the term on his own radio show to refer to Cohen's wife, Janet Langhart. The Village Voice article described other racially charged insults that Imus has made about specific individuals:

The muckraker Philip Nobile has been tracking Imus's racist rap in a series for the webzine tompaine.com. When you take this patter out of laff-riot context, it's strikingly similar to the drollery of David Duke. Imus and his buds have called O.J.'s lead attorney "chicken wing Johnny Cochran," Sammy Davis Jr. "a one-eyed lawn jockey," Patrick Ewing "Mighty Joe Young," Defense Secretary William Cohen "the Mandingo," and his black wife "a 'ho."
In an appearance on the April 9 edition (http://colorado.mediamatters.org/rd?http://mediamatters.org/rd?http://transcripts.cnn.com/TRANSCRIPTS/0704/09/sitroom.02.html) of CNN's The Situation Room, Cohen noted that "at one point when we married -- they played 'Jungle Fever' " on Imus in the Morning and that Langhart "was referred to as 'brown sugar' " on the show.
A May 26, 2000, article in The Washington Post (accessed through the Nexis database) similarly reported that "sometime around 1995, when the New York Times hired African-American journalist Gwen Ifill to cover the White House, Imus reportedly said: 'Isn't the Times wonderful? It lets the cleaning lady cover the White House.' " The article further stated that Imus "doesn't deny the Ifill comment, but says he can't find a record of it," and added, "Whether he said it or not, Imus apologized to Ifill on the air after he was criticized."
On the April 10 edition of Imus in the Morning, Imus asserted (http://colorado.mediamatters.org/rd?http://mediamatters.org/items/200704110001), "I never said anything about Gwen Ifill. This was a comedy routine where we make up the news which we've been doing since 1968 on the radio." Later in the program, Imus said "it was intended to reflect the absurd philosophy we perceived of, I guess it was the Reagan administration -- not that we thought the Reagan administration was a bunch of racists, that's not the point." On the April 9 edition of the program, Imus said that "I did not say that, and obviously there are ways to check that. I didn't say that."
Furthermore, on the July 19, 1998, broadcast (http://colorado.mediamatters.org/rd?http://www.onthemedia.org/yore/transcripts/transcripts_081801_imus.html) of CBS News' 60 Minutes, Imus reportedly admitted to reporter Mike Wallace that McGuirk was on his show "to do '******' jokes" and admitted to using the word "******" himself. MIKE WALLACE: You told Tom ANDERSON, the producer, in your car coming home that Bernard McGuirk is there to do "******" jokes.
DON IMUS: Well I've n -- I never use that word.
MIKE WALLACE: Tom?
TOM ANDERSON: I'm right here.
DON IMUS: Did I use that word?
TOM ANDERSON: I recall you using that word.
DON IMUS: Oh, okay, well then I used that word, but I mean -- of course that was an off the record conversation -- [LAUGHTER]
MIKE WALLACE: The hell it was!
In contrast to the News, an April 11 editorial (http://colorado.mediamatters.org/rd?http://www.denverpost.com/search/ci_5635734) in The Denver Post stated, "For nearly 40 years, Don Imus has built a successful broadcast career of acid entertainment, filling the air with chatter of current affairs and sports. Too often, he's indulged himself with abrasive snits and racially charged commentary." The Post editorial (an online version appeared April 10) further noted, "His schtick often includes making fun of racism by pretending to be racist. He and his cast routinely denigrate women, religion, overweight people and, most certainly, racial groups."
In addition to downplaying Imus' history of inflammatory comments, the News also attempted to shift the focus of the controversy from Imus' racist remarks to the "bilge that can be found" in popular rap music: The flap also spotlights one other issue. As John McWhorter, a black scholar with the Manhattan Institute, wrote this week, "Where, after all, did Imus pick up the very terminology he used? Rap music and the language young black people use themselves on the street to refer to one another." The Revs. Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton, who are leading the clamor for Imus' head, might ask themselves how the depiction of women as "hos" penetrated far enough into the popular culture that a 66-year-old white male would use it as a casual reference.
On a nearby page in this section, Michelle Malkin (http://colorado.mediamatters.org/rd?http://mediamatters.org/issues_topics/people/michellemalkin) gives readers a taste of the sort of bilge that can be found right this minute in songs atop the Billboard Hot Rap Tracks chart. Surely that is a far bigger issue than Imus' continued employment. Do Jackson and Sharpton plan to target these purveyors of vile misogyny and human debasement, too? If so, it would do more for the culture than merely forcing Imus off the air.
Ahhh...now I see why folks are using the "rapper" analogy in conjunction with Imus. How convenient. So here we have yet another case of "Why can't whites say 'nigga'. :lol:

I reiterate...
Rock music has been using offensive language far longer than rappers. So then why is it that all of a sudden Rap is bad and Rock music gets a pass? Would someone PLEASE answer this question?

I mean posters here talked about double standards, right? :shrug: So where is the outrage?

And isn't the very same thing happening in the courts of law? White guy sells drugs... and in most cases gets probation. Black guy sells drugs...and gets 25 to life and black community catches the blame. Double standards my ass.

Me thinks those in positions of power are just not doing their jobs, and seek to shift the blame. So why not blame those in less powerful and less influential positions to solve the problems for them. Let's play 'pass-the-buck' shall we?

*JR*
Apr 13th, 2007, 01:45 AM
Furthermore, on the July 19, 1998, broadcast (http://colorado.mediamatters.org/rd?http://www.onthemedia.org/yore/transcripts/transcripts_081801_imus.html) of CBS News' 60 Minutes, Imus reportedly admitted to reporter Mike Wallace that McGuirk was on his show "to do '******' jokes" and admitted to using the word "******" himself.

MIKE WALLACE: You told Tom ANDERSON, the producer, in your car coming home that Bernard McGuirk is there to do "******" jokes.
DON IMUS: Well I've n -- I never use that word.
MIKE WALLACE: Tom?
TOM ANDERSON: I'm right here.
DON IMUS: Did I use that word?
TOM ANDERSON: I recall you using that word.
DON IMUS: Oh, okay, well then I used that word, but I mean -- of course that was an off the record conversation -- [LAUGHTER]
MIKE WALLACE: The hell it was!
Mike Wallace better watch out B4 Rocketta throws a hissy fit that he didn't censor himself by using the sanitized phrase "N word jokes". :tape: (Knizzle too).

Rocketta
Apr 13th, 2007, 01:50 AM
Mike Wallace better watch out B4 Rocketta throws a hissy fit that he didn't censor himself by using the sanitized phrase "N word jokes". :tape: (Knizzle too).


Somebody needs to tell JR he's no Mike Wallace and he's not asking someone to clarify what they said, thanks. :wavey:

quasar
Apr 13th, 2007, 03:08 AM
Reading this incident furthers my appreciation for my country, a peaceful 3rd world nation devoid of neofascist politicians and so-called minority leaders hipocratically leveraging on America's dark past as it pertains slavery to cash in as much political capital as possible by fucking someone who made a remark not aligned with the sacrosanct paradigms set up by what has been artificially defined as politically correct.

It's truly Orwellian not to be able to freely make an observation when those inquisitors who delineate the nouveau Index of Forbidden Words have manipulated public opinion to irrevocably characterize certain phrases as synonimous with spewing hate and intolerance. The Word Police is avidly working and the faux crusaders of freedom, equality and human rights are bulldogs profusely exploiting every instance where they can crucify an inocent who dare utter--regardless of intention--the socially-accepted as Prohibited.

This is truly a magnificent system: Opinion makers boost their careers, the mindless populace rejoices in its own imagined tolerance and feelings of kinship, a poor motherfucker is scapegoated and his career ruined, all the while minorities keep getting screwed all the same.

Kudos to Sharpton, Jackson, Obama and Hillary for working the system to checkmate some dude's life, raising their own public profile and, most importantly, contributing absolutely nothing to changing the rampant social inequality of this newly dystopic "utopia" called the US of A.

Cheers,

Carlos

Stamp Paid
Apr 13th, 2007, 03:34 AM
Reading this incident furthers my appreciation for my country, a peaceful 3rd world nation devoid of neofascist politicians and so-called minority leaders hipocratically leveraging on America's dark past as it pertains slavery to cash in as much political capital as possible by fucking someone who made a remark not aligned with the sacrosanct paradigms set up by what has been artificially defined as politically correct.

It's truly Orwellian not to be able to freely make an observation when those inquisitors who delineate the nouveau Index of Forbidden Words have manipulated public opinion to irrevocably characterize certain phrases as synonimous with spewing hate and intolerance. The Word Police is avidly working and the faux crusaders of freedom, equality and human rights are bulldogs profusely exploiting every instance where they can crucify an inocent who dare utter--regardless of intention--the socially-accepted as Prohibited.

This is truly a magnificent system: Opinion makers boost their careers, the mindless populace rejoices in its own imagined tolerance and feelings of kinship, a poor motherfucker is scapegoated and his career ruined, all the while minorities keep getting screwed all the same.

Kudos to Sharpton, Jackson, Obama and Hillary for working the system to checkmate some dude's life, raising their own public profile and, most importantly, contributing absolutely nothing to changing the rampant social inequality of this newly dystopic "utopia" called the US of A.

Cheers,

Carlos

Are you fucking serious?

Don Imus is not a poor motherfucker. He is a rich white man. How better off can you be in this world? His life nor career are ruined. He will go to XM radio and spout of his bullshit again to a potentially broader audience. He'll be fine.

And coming from a man with Imus' history, how can "nappy headed hoes" be construed in any other way than prejudiced and racist?

In short, stop being a pacifist idiot.

Rocketta
Apr 13th, 2007, 04:54 AM
Reading this incident furthers my appreciation for my country, a peaceful 3rd world nation devoid of neofascist politicians and so-called minority leaders hipocratically leveraging on America's dark past as it pertains slavery to cash in as much political capital as possible by fucking someone who made a remark not aligned with the sacrosanct paradigms set up by what has been artificially defined as politically correct.

It's truly Orwellian not to be able to freely make an observation when those inquisitors who delineate the nouveau Index of Forbidden Words have manipulated public opinion to irrevocably characterize certain phrases as synonimous with spewing hate and intolerance. The Word Police is avidly working and the faux crusaders of freedom, equality and human rights are bulldogs profusely exploiting every instance where they can crucify an inocent who dare utter--regardless of intention--the socially-accepted as Prohibited.

This is truly a magnificent system: Opinion makers boost their careers, the mindless populace rejoices in its own imagined tolerance and feelings of kinship, a poor motherfucker is scapegoated and his career ruined, all the while minorities keep getting screwed all the same.

Kudos to Sharpton, Jackson, Obama and Hillary for working the system to checkmate some dude's life, raising their own public profile and, most importantly, contributing absolutely nothing to changing the rampant social inequality of this newly dystopic "utopia" called the US of A.

Cheers,

Carlos

You're right Sharpton, Jackson, Obama and Hillary are at fault. Each one personally stuck their hands up Imus' ass and made him call those girls "Nappy headed hos". I suppose it was a joint effort between Sharpton and Jackson and they got him to say 'Nappy', Obama squeazed a 'headed' out of him and Hillary of course is responsible for the 'hos' because that's what most women think of women.

Poor Poor Imus, what a sad poor manipulated fucker...doesn't have a brain cell in his head to even think up and be responsible for his own racist diatribe. :tears:

Let us all say a prayer for that poor lamb of God. :rolleyes:

quasar
Apr 13th, 2007, 07:06 AM
Rocketta and King ,

How does shutting off someone for shouting what is *considered* as hate speech solve the actual problems of prejudice towards blacks, muslims, hispanics, (...), and ameliorate the socioeconomic gaps between White America and the fortuneless minorities?

These so called cape crusaders should focus on addressing these actual issues rather than focusing on ineffectual red herrings that, besides benefitting their public personas, don't do much other than distract the attention from the real societal issues afflicting your country.

This is so reminiscent of the propaganda after the totally immaterial--but great in PR terms--capturing of Saddam, while the Iraq campaign was an utter pandemonium. I would hope America as a society would be smarter and don't let its attention be deviated from the real facts by the vacuous and politically-motivated rhetoric espoused by those trying to manipulate inane events for thir own benefit, rather than actually tackling solving the real problems.

Cheers,

Carlos

Ps. King, by characterizing me, a total stranger, as an idiot, you're no better than this Imus fella you apparently are so eager to burn at the stake. You do realize that, don't you?

Stamp Paid
Apr 13th, 2007, 07:17 AM
Rocketta and King ,

How does shutting off someone for shouting what is *considered* as hate speech solve the actual problems of prejudice towards blacks, muslims, hispanics, (...), and ameliorate the socioeconomic gaps between White America and the fortuneless minorities?

These so called cape crusaders should focus on addressing these actual issues rather than focusing on ineffectual red herrings that, besides benefitting their public personas, don't do much other than distract the attention from the real societal issues afflicting your country.

This is so reminiscent of the propaganda after the totally immaterial--but great in PR terms--capturing of Saddam, while the Iraq campaign was an utter pandemonium. I would hope America as a society would be smarter and don't let its attention be deviated from the real facts by the vacuous and politically-motivated rhetoric espoused by those trying to manipulate inane events for thir own benefit, rather than actually tackling solving the real problems.

Cheers,

Carlos

Ps. King, by characterizing me, a total stranger, as an idiot, you're no better than this Imus fella you apparently are so eager to burn at the stake. You do realize that, don't you?

No, because those Rutgers women didn't do anything to deserve Imus' characterization. But by being an apologist for this despicable man, you deserved to be characterized as an idiot.

Wigglytuff
Apr 13th, 2007, 07:25 AM
Reading this incident furthers my appreciation for my country, a peaceful 3rd world nation devoid of neofascist politicians and so-called minority leaders hipocratically leveraging on America's dark past as it pertains slavery to cash in as much political capital as possible by fucking someone who made a remark not aligned with the sacrosanct paradigms set up by what has been artificially defined as politically correct.

It's truly Orwellian not to be able to freely make an observation when those inquisitors who delineate the nouveau Index of Forbidden Words have manipulated public opinion to irrevocably characterize certain phrases as synonimous with spewing hate and intolerance. The Word Police is avidly working and the faux crusaders of freedom, equality and human rights are bulldogs profusely exploiting every instance where they can crucify an inocent who dare utter--regardless of intention--the socially-accepted as Prohibited.

This is truly a magnificent system: Opinion makers boost their careers, the mindless populace rejoices in its own imagined tolerance and feelings of kinship, a poor motherfucker is scapegoated and his career ruined, all the while minorities keep getting screwed all the same.

Kudos to Sharpton, Jackson, Obama and Hillary for working the system to checkmate some dude's life, raising their own public profile and, most importantly, contributing absolutely nothing to changing the rampant social inequality of this newly dystopic "utopia" called the US of A.

Cheers,

Carlos
you are stupid. which is fine dont think you can help it, but you are tAlking shit about something you know nothing about. thats not fine, thats fucking annoying.

ico4498
Apr 13th, 2007, 07:26 AM
No, because those Rutgers women didn't do anything to deserve Imus' characterization. But by being an apologist for this despicable man, you deserved to be characterized as an idiot.

i'm sayin'!

does wtaworld mix these types up in a lab or someting?

Wigglytuff
Apr 13th, 2007, 07:28 AM
No, because those Rutgers women didn't do anything to deserve Imus' characterization. But by being an apologist for this despicable man, you deserved to be characterized as an idiot.

this of course should go without saying but you are talking to an idiot so lots of things that should go without saying would need to be said. :help: :help:

Wigglytuff
Apr 13th, 2007, 07:29 AM
i'm sayin'!

does wtaworld mix these types up in a lab or someting?

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

Wigglytuff
Apr 13th, 2007, 07:48 AM
I could not be happier!! :bounce:
Money doesn't just talk, it SCREAMS!! when ripped from the clutches of these corporations. :tape:

:worship: :worship:

Rocketta
Apr 13th, 2007, 08:46 AM
Rocketta and King ,

How does shutting off someone for shouting what is *considered* as hate speech solve the actual problems of prejudice towards blacks, muslims, hispanics, (...), and ameliorate the socioeconomic gaps between White America and the fortuneless minorities?

These so called cape crusaders should focus on addressing these actual issues rather than focusing on ineffectual red herrings that, besides benefitting their public personas, don't do much other than distract the attention from the real societal issues afflicting your country.

This is so reminiscent of the propaganda after the totally immaterial--but great in PR terms--capturing of Saddam, while the Iraq campaign was an utter pandemonium. I would hope America as a society would be smarter and don't let its attention be deviated from the real facts by the vacuous and politically-motivated rhetoric espoused by those trying to manipulate inane events for thir own benefit, rather than actually tackling solving the real problems.

Cheers,

Carlos

Ps. King, by characterizing me, a total stranger, as an idiot, you're no better than this Imus fella you apparently are so eager to burn at the stake. You do realize that, don't you?

oh please, go sell that to some psuedo intellectual who's buying. :yawn:

You are characterized as an idiot because you are acting like one. Stop acting like an idiot and people won't call you one. :cuckoo:


Oh and its Truly Annoying how you want to use the phrase 'Truly Orwellian' like anyone's impressed. Get real. :rolleyes:

Selah
Apr 13th, 2007, 12:11 PM
Rocketta and King ,

How does shutting off someone for shouting what is *considered* as hate speech solve the actual problems of prejudice towards blacks, muslims, hispanics, (...), and ameliorate the socioeconomic gaps between White America and the fortuneless minorities?

These so called cape crusaders should focus on addressing these actual issues rather than focusing on ineffectual red herrings that, besides benefitting their public personas, don't do much other than distract the attention from the real societal issues afflicting your country.

This is so reminiscent of the propaganda after the totally immaterial--but great in PR terms--capturing of Saddam, while the Iraq campaign was an utter pandemonium. I would hope America as a society would be smarter and don't let its attention be deviated from the real facts by the vacuous and politically-motivated rhetoric espoused by those trying to manipulate inane events for thir own benefit, rather than actually tackling solving the real problems.

Cheers,

Carlos

Ps. King, by characterizing me, a total stranger, as an idiot, you're no better than this Imus fella you apparently are so eager to burn at the stake. You do realize that, don't you?


I am going to agree with the first part of your post here moreso because I heard this morning from Imus' wife that these women are receiving hate mail. So your point is proven that his firing really doesn't solve any problem :sad: You clearly can't censor what is in people's hearts but you can make sure that people in a place of power, policy, and public opinion be held to some standards.

He should have been punished, no doubt. But we all know that he'll have another job somewhere soon, so like you said, problems not solved. unless this has truly affected him in a personal way where he honestly changes his beliefs and views about black women in particular.

DunkMachine
Apr 13th, 2007, 04:12 PM
Oh man, firing this dude is complete DOODOO (sorry for a lack of a better term). I agree that this man received somesort of sanction for his remarks. Allthough he clearly disrespected the basketballplayers, the context in which the words were said is hardly racist. It was in lighthearted banter with several other radiopersonalities.

The owner of afronerd.com had a valid argument when he pointed out that what Snoop Doog did is even worse. That Nukka had black women on leashes during an award ceremony for christ sake.

Why don't people get his ignorant ass fired?!

Rocketta
Apr 13th, 2007, 05:25 PM
I am going to agree with the first part of your post here moreso because I heard this morning from Imus' wife that these women are receiving hate mail. So your point is proven that his firing really doesn't solve any problem :sad: You clearly can't censor what is in people's hearts but you can make sure that people in a place of power, policy, and public opinion be held to some standards.

He should have been punished, no doubt. But we all know that he'll have another job somewhere soon, so like you said, problems not solved. unless this has truly affected him in a personal way where he honestly changes his beliefs and views about black women in particular.

Whether Imus was fired or not has little or nothing to do with idiots who would send hate mail to those players. Every black athlete who is successful receives racist hate mail. Lets not attribute pathetic behavior to anything other than the source of the behavior. Just like with Imus....he's responsible for his actions not Snoop.

Venus and Serena receive hate mail and that's not because of Imus. If they had won the championships, do you think all the mail they received would've been pleasant?

Seems to me the fact that they are receiving hate mail only makes the decision to fire Imus that much more powerful. It shouldn't be tolerated. Also, we as a country need to start calling that behavior what it is.......domestic terrorism.

quasar
Apr 13th, 2007, 07:14 PM
King, by expressing an opinion that disagrees with your point of view, I'm automatically an idiot. Right! Keep on insulting ppl that don't share your ideas...

Rocketta, clearly I had overestimated you. I thought you were a reasonable person, but your recently-displayed vermin shows you're as much a hater as those you criticize so much.

If you were to get out of your shell for a sec, you would realize that intolerance of ideas is in itself as much a form of divide as is intolerance of race. Verbally mistreating ppl for their color is not the only form of abuse that should escandalize American society: Race is not the only manifestation of intolerance. People with characteristics other than race are abused just the same. You--and American society at large--just choose to be oblivious to that. Your choice. Ring me up when you wake up.

Meanwhile, go back to sleep satisfied in winning this battle against Imus, and don't even bother thinking that the war against the real enemy (social inequality and the fiction of justice that you're buying in too) is truly being lost. Badly.

Cheers,

Carlos

griffin
Apr 13th, 2007, 08:55 PM
Meanwhile, go back to sleep satisfied in winning this battle against Imus, and don't even bother thinking that the war against the real enemy (social inequality and the fiction of justice that you're buying in too) is truly being lost. Badly.

Cheers,

Carlos

Wait...you mean....

There's more racisim and discrimination in the world than what came out of Imus' mouth? He's not the only one? :eek:

Gee, thanks for clearing that up.

RVD
Apr 13th, 2007, 11:31 PM
Reading this incident furthers my appreciation for my country, a peaceful 3rd world nation devoid of neofascist politicians and so-called minority leaders hipocratically leveraging on America's dark past as it pertains slavery to cash in as much political capital as possible by fucking someone who made a remark not aligned with the sacrosanct paradigms set up by what has been artificially defined as politically correct.

It's truly Orwellian not to be able to freely make an observation when those inquisitors who delineate the nouveau Index of Forbidden Words have manipulated public opinion to irrevocably characterize certain phrases as synonimous with spewing hate and intolerance. The Word Police is avidly working and the faux crusaders of freedom, equality and human rights are bulldogs profusely exploiting every instance where they can crucify an inocent who dare utter--regardless of intention--the socially-accepted as Prohibited.

This is truly a magnificent system: Opinion makers boost their careers, the mindless populace rejoices in its own imagined tolerance and feelings of kinship, a poor motherfucker is scapegoated and his career ruined, all the while minorities keep getting screwed all the same.

Kudos to Sharpton, Jackson, Obama and Hillary for working the system to checkmate some dude's life, raising their own public profile and, most importantly, contributing absolutely nothing to changing the rampant social inequality of this newly dystopic "utopia" called the US of A.

Cheers,

CarlosHi Quasar...

I've read your post several times since you posted. I'm desperately trying to view the Imus issue from many different positions. If you are at all familiar with my posts, then you know that I tend to be particularly blunt and direct when discussing issues of racism. However, in this case, I've chosen to dissect every nuance of your post in an attempt to view this from your perspective, because you've hit on several points that many have argued now for over 400 years [here in the U.S.A.].

Firstly, I hold no malice towards you, are anyone else possessed of an opposing P.O.V., in reference to the Imus fiasco. So long as the doors of communication are open then there is hope that we can all learn from these very painful acts of racism, bigotry, prejudice, and discrimination.

Now, in reference to your post...

Every country has its evils or shameful periods. Whether 3rd World or World Power, they all experience growing pains. This is particularly true in regards to countries or regions with 'melting pot' populations. Therefore, if you are honest with yourself, you must acknowledge that there is no such utopian society devoid of its own brand of prejudices. So, it’s great that you have pride in your 3rd world nation, however, before drawing comparisons on a particular issue, one must possess historical knowledge [and in this case, recent knowledge...] to offer an informed opinion. Otherwise, prepare to be raked across the coals.

Your use of the term "Orwellian" actually shocked me since there are clearly victims here. And those victims are the Rutger basketball players. Not Imus. Do you not agree?
The Rutger ladies were and are not the ones engaged in political propaganda. They are college basketball players. Nor did they seek to control attitudes, hearts, or minds, through misinformation. Their entire focus was simply winning a basketball championship. The only control they sought was that of their own destinies...before Imus reared his ugly head spoiled what should have been an otherwise positive period in their lives. A moment in their careers in which they could have felt some semblance of accomplishment was sullied— denied them by panderer of hate. A piece of racist filth.
You must understand that Imus makes his living off spewing 'hate'. Again, where are the Rutger ladies at fault in all this? :shrug:

This 'truly magnificent system' allows for individual expression, limited only by the social and cultural attitudes and etiquette of a particular period. In other words, Imus is behind the times.
What was once acceptable behavior... no longer is.
Now, people realize how much damage can be inflicted through words alone. Especially if those words carry with it the weight of an abominable history.

Imus a scapegoat you say? In what way would that be?
He uttered the words himself. No outside force was applied. Nor did the Rutger ladies taunt or provoke him prior to his malicious attack upon them.
And ‘yes’, this was an attack.

*I'm bleeding from my eyes with anger as I write this*

Sharpton, Jackson, Obama and Hillary are all politicians. ALL politicians represent themselves. This issue has less to do with them and more to do with current day racial attitudes. Imus represents a HUGE sector of American society that still feels empowered to hurt people different from them. What will it take for people to understand this!!!
His supporters and audience feel the same. That's equates to approximately 5 million hatemongers who will in all probability breed 2.5 - 5 million+ more hatemongers. Is it no wonder then that [blacks] are so "concerned"?
This purveyor of hate has a platform upon which to preach, and gets paid for his vileness. So please explain again how he’s a scapegoat?
He, as an individual, should take responsibility for his huge mistake. But not only him, but his comedian sidekick [who was also recently fired]; and the media companies associated with such hateful propaganda [which is only partly why advertisers pulled out].

You need to understand that eliminating racism is a gradual process. You are dealing with ingrained fears, ignorance, twisted emotions, and beliefs passed on from even prior to the framing of this country’s constitution [which the founding fathers managed to screw up as well].
Short of all blacks taking up arms in a bloody revolution, I don’t see where Imus’ sort of attitude is ever going to change, or the baseless hate will end.

America, it seems, is slowly bleeding from the thousands of cuts it inflicted upon itself during slavery. The only way I see this being resolved is for the nation as a whole to take responsibility for its past horrors. This nation needs to stop making excuses and step up to the damn plate. And if takes a duplicitous asshole like Don Imus losing his job to mark the beginning of such a change, then so be it.

I'm sure that one lesson Imus will take from this is that "You reap what you sow."

tterb
Apr 14th, 2007, 12:17 AM
Reading this incident furthers my appreciation for my country, a peaceful 3rd world nation devoid of neofascist politicians and so-called minority leaders hipocratically leveraging on America's dark past as it pertains slavery to cash in as much political capital as possible by fucking someone who made a remark not aligned with the sacrosanct paradigms set up by what has been artificially defined as politically correct.

It's truly Orwellian not to be able to freely make an observation when those inquisitors who delineate the nouveau Index of Forbidden Words have manipulated public opinion to irrevocably characterize certain phrases as synonimous with spewing hate and intolerance. The Word Police is avidly working and the faux crusaders of freedom, equality and human rights are bulldogs profusely exploiting every instance where they can crucify an inocent who dare utter--regardless of intention--the socially-accepted as Prohibited.

This is truly a magnificent system: Opinion makers boost their careers, the mindless populace rejoices in its own imagined tolerance and feelings of kinship, a poor motherfucker is scapegoated and his career ruined, all the while minorities keep getting screwed all the same.

Kudos to Sharpton, Jackson, Obama and Hillary for working the system to checkmate some dude's life, raising their own public profile and, most importantly, contributing absolutely nothing to changing the rampant social inequality of this newly dystopic "utopia" called the US of A.

Cheers,

Carlos

So, if a person finds someone else's remarks offensive, they should do what? Shut up in the name of free speech?

Please. Do you really think the only reason people are reacting to this incident is because Sharpton tells them the words are offensive? Your insinuation that people can't make up their own minds about what they find offensive is insulting.

Imus was allowed to "freely" make his "observations." He can put his thoughts out there all he wants, but nobody is by any means obligated to broadcast them. Listeners refusing to fund Imus's public "observations" by boycotting his sponsors is not the equivalent of censorship.

You do have a valid point in that there are much greater battles than this one. Social inequality is obviously not going to go away because one person was held accountable for racist comments. However, that doesn't mean it's unimportant to call people out on their ignorance.

Additionally, another valid point you made was hugely overshadowed by your characterization of Imus.
"...they can crucify an inocent who dare utter--regardless of intention--the socially-accepted as Prohibited."
You're right that context is sometimes overlooked in these types of incidents, which can be problematic, since knowing one's words without their intention can lead people to jump to conclusions. But Imus's past commentary clearly shows he does not belong in the realms of the misunderstood or mischaracterized - it's not an accident when discrimination is thrown about multiple times over the years. So please, come down off the high horse you seem to be accusing others of riding.

ys
Apr 14th, 2007, 03:41 AM
The whole story was interesting.. My points:

- absolutely no sympathy to this arrogant racist pig, no sympathy whatsoever, whatever he got, he got too little
- very classy response from Rutgers team..
- of course it could not get passed that fool Sharpton.. Amazed people still take him seriosly..
- Obama can forget about any White House hopes.. He is simply not smart enough to be President. People will forget about Imus. People will remember that Obama does have some racial agenda on the back of his mind. For a black candidate in this country it dashes any traces of electability potential, even if they existed.

Rocketta
Apr 14th, 2007, 03:55 AM
Rocketta, clearly I had overestimated you. I thought you were a reasonable person, but your recently-displayed vermin shows you're as much a hater as those you criticize so much.

and what's your point? One I haven't called anyone a hater in this thread or about this subject and two I never said I wasn't a hater. I am a hater of pseudo intellectuals who think speaking in theoretical circles about subjects they clearly aren't a part of is something to be proud of, ie You in this thread.

The fact that you think, I would care that you over or underestimated me only points to your insanely inflated self worth. I don't exist for you or anyone I don't know to over or underestimate me. So to be plain, who cares? :yawn:


If you were to get out of your shell for a sec, you would realize that intolerance of ideas is in itself as much a form of divide as is intolerance of race. Verbally mistreating ppl for their color is not the only form of abuse that should escandalize American society: Race is not the only manifestation of intolerance. People with characteristics other than race are abused just the same. You--and American society at large--just choose to be oblivious to that. Your choice. Ring me up when you wake up.

Please point to a post where anyone said any of those things? Please point where anyone said that Imus is the be all end all example of anything? It's like you're having a conversation with an imaginary person in your head. This isn't a thread about how to eradicate racism. This is a thread about an idiot who did his best to insult a group of women who did absolutely nothing to him and the appropriate punishment he received. Beginning, middle, and end of this discussion for me in this thread. :rolleyes:


Meanwhile, go back to sleep satisfied in winning this battle against Imus, and don't even bother thinking that the war against the real enemy (social inequality and the fiction of justice that you're buying in too) is truly being lost. Badly.

Cheers,

Carlos

No shit sherlock! You mean that Imus losing his job hasn't eradicated racism? You mean my 'racism is finally over party' is tad wee bit premature? Damn, I thought all those social ills were over, over, over because one craggy assed bastard got his comeuppance. Well you have opened my eyes. We should've just dropped the issue, let him keep his job and wax poetic about some non-existent utopia, yeah that will end racism in a quick fashion.

You've truly edjumicated me about racisms in dis here soceity. :weirdo:

DemWilliamsGulls
Apr 14th, 2007, 03:56 AM
Just heard on Fox News that CBS has Fired Anus.

And good gotdamn riddance!

mykarma
Apr 14th, 2007, 04:17 AM
And good gotdamn riddance!
Tell us how you really feel. :lol::lol::lol:

*JR*
Apr 14th, 2007, 03:04 PM
- Obama can forget about any White House hopes.. He is simply not smart enough to be President. People will forget about Imus. People will remember that Obama does have some racial agenda on the back of his mind. For a black candidate in this country it dashes any traces of electability potential, even if they existed.
But in the other "race story" in the headlines, Obama called for the investigation (leading to possible disbarment) of DA Mike Nifong, persecuter of those white Duke lacrosse players. You should look @ the whole picture. Furthermore, your remarks imply that any black public figure who called for Imus 2B fired is engaged in some kind of conflict of interest, as if they should just shut up about it.
:confused:

mykarma
Apr 14th, 2007, 05:03 PM
The whole story was interesting.. My points:

- absolutely no sympathy to this arrogant racist pig, no sympathy whatsoever, whatever he got, he got too little
- very classy response from Rutgers team..
- of course it could not get passed that fool Sharpton.. Amazed people still take him seriosly..
- Obama can forget about any White House hopes.. He is simply not smart enough to be President. People will forget about Imus. People will remember that Obama does have some racial agenda on the back of his mind. For a black candidate in this country it dashes any traces of electability potential, even if they existed.
Not smart enough to be President.:lol::lol::lol: One things for sure is he's smarter than George Bush. If George Bush is smart enough to be President then my dog is smart enough. Obama is a Harvard grad. for goodness sakes.

On CNN the panel was talking about how Obama was the only candidate that had the courage to speak up on this unfortunate situation. The other cowards could have at least made a statement whether they agreed or not. Sounds like he's the only one that acted like a Pres. candidate to me.

Anyhow, Obama won't make it because of people like the one's that are sending these girls and Rev. Sharpton hate mail and death threats for having the nerve to speak up against injustice. Imus wife is very upset about this and ask these retards to stop it immediately and if they wanted to send anyone hate mail it should be to her husband, Anus.

b_o_r
Apr 14th, 2007, 05:14 PM
Behind the fall of Imus, a digital brush fire
In a blur, watchdogs, blogs, e-mail, spur radio host's firing

BROOKS BARNES, EMILY STEEL and SARAH MCBRIDE
13 April 2007

At 6:14 a.m. on Wednesday, April 4, relatively few people were tuned into the "Imus in the Morning Show" when Don Imus referred to the Rutgers women's basketball team as "nappy-headed ho's."

Ryan Chiachiere was. A 26-year-old researcher in Washington, D.C., for liberal watchdog organization Media Matters for America, he was assigned to monitor Mr. Imus's program. Mr. Chiachiere clipped the video, alerted his bosses and started working on a blog post for the organization's Web site.

Yesterday, after eight days of dizzying activity, CBS pulled the plug on Mr. Imus's hugely successful radio show. One day earlier, MSNBC had canceled its broadcast of the show on cable TV. CBS had originally suspended Mr. Imus for two weeks, but succumbed amid an escalating national outcry and an exodus of big advertisers. "All of us have been deeply upset and revulsed by the statements that were made on our air," CBS Corp. CEO Leslie Moonves said yesterday in a written statement.

Mr. Imus, who didn't respond to repeated calls seeking comment, had for years been making outrageous and frequently crude remarks about risky subjects such as race, sex and gender, a style that millions of listeners had embraced. The media executives and advertisers profiting from Mr. Imus's popularity stood by him as protests occasionally surfaced. They usually subsided after a few days.

This time it was different. The target was a sympathetic team of young athletes. In the ensuing furor, the lucrative and often vulgar business of talk radio found itself running into new limits, as the Internet sent Mr. Imus to millions of PC screens, driving executives, advertisers and employees to distance themselves from his racist words.

On the morning of the original broadcast, there was little response to Mr. Imus's slur. Media Matters posted the video and transcript on its Web site and sent an email blast to several hundred reporters, as it does nearly every day. The post received dozens of comments, many heated, some more than 300 words long. The next day, top news outlets didn't mention the incident.

On Thursday, at about 3 p.m., NBC News President Steve Capus was conducting a routine planning meeting in his third-floor offices at Rockefeller Center when an assistant interrupted him to take an urgent phone call, according to a person at the meeting. On the other line: MSNBC General Manager Dan Abrams. Mr. Abrams said MSNBC executives were fielding complaints from viewers and employees who had seen a video clip of Mr. Imus's remark on the Media Matters site, this person says.

The group is a Web-based nonprofit organization devoted to monitoring "conservative misinformation" in print, broadcast, cable, radio and Internet media outlets. It frequently complains about Rush Limbaugh and Bill O'Reilly. Although the Imus show isn't generally considered conservative, some of its guests are.

Mr. Capus called an emergency meeting with MSNBC's management team, the producers for the TV version of "Imus in the Morning" and the head of public relations for NBC News. Among other decisions, Mr. Capus asked his PR team to draft a statement apologizing on behalf of MSNBC but clearly pointing out that "Imus in the Morning" was a CBS Radio production. MSNBC and NBC are owned by General Electric Co.'s NBC Universal.

At CBS, CEO Leslie Moonves and incoming CBS Radio CEO Dan Mason spoke on the phone and started debating a course of action. About the same time, WFAN, the CBS-owned radio station that broadcast Mr. Imus's show, received a complaint from Rutgers University, according to Bo Dietl, an investigator and security consultant, and friend to Mr. Imus.

In Chicago, Bryan Monroe, president of the National Association of Black Journalists, saw an email sent by one of his executive board members at 5:06 p.m. "FYI -- do we need to address" read the subject line. It was the Media Matters post.

Mr. Monroe, editorial director of Johnson Publishing Co. in charge of Ebony and Jet magazines, wasn't a regular reader of Media Matters or an Imus listener.

He looked at the email. "My first reaction was: 'Oh, no he didn't,'" he says. Then he watched the clip. "I heard the words come out of his mouth and thought, 'Has he lost his mind?'"

Mr. Monroe picked up the phone and started calling other board members. He had guests over for dinner that night, who also were African-American. They talked about the controversy during dinner. Later that night, he was back on the phone with NABJ members and pulled an all-nighter to draft a statement. It said that the 3,200-member organization was "outraged and disgusted" by the comments, and called for "an immediate and sincere apology." Mr. Monroe posted the statement to the NABJ Web site at 5:30 a.m.

Friday morning, there was again scant mention of Mr. Imus's travails in the newspapers, although TV stations were beginning to pick up the story. Mr. Imus began his program, at 6:06 a.m., with an on-air apology. People close to Mr. Imus say he felt pressured to apologize by NBC and CBS executives. He also realized he needed to try to defuse the brewing storm.

"Want to take a moment to apologize for an insensitive and ill-conceived remark," he said. "Our characterization was thoughtless and stupid, and we're sorry."

It was Good Friday and many people already were off for the holiday weekend. News was supposed to slow to a crawl for several days.

Instead, the apology made the story explode. It hit the wires that day, and reporters began to contact CBS and MSNBC. It quickly became clear an apology wasn't going to suffice, and that the weekend wouldn't douse the fire.

David Carr, who writes a Monday media column for the New York Times business section, decided to scrap his planned subject and write about Mr. Imus instead. He called the remark "the kind of unalloyed racial insult that might not have passed muster on a low-watt AM station in the Jim Crow South."

Mr. Imus's problems were compounded by a power vacuum at CBS Radio, which produced his show. Two weeks earlier, CEO Joel Hollander, a longtime supporter of Mr. Imus and his various charities, had resigned. The company had been underperforming lately and was still reeling from the loss of shock-jock Howard Stern to satellite radio. Mr. Hollander's successor, Mr. Mason, wasn't due to start until April 16. He consulted with CBS executives by phone and email from his home outside Washington, D.C.

Mr. Imus's show is on just one CBS station -- WFAN -- but the media giant also earns revenue from syndicating the show to radio stations around the country. CBS owns 18% of the show's syndicator, Westwood One Inc.

Local stations that carry Imus say they sensed the situation was drifting. "Nobody had a firm hand on it," says Gabe Hobbs, head of talk programming at Clear Channel Communications Inc., which airs the Imus show on a handful of stations, including in Washington, D.C., and Providence, R.I. Some station managers say Westwood's affiliate-relations staff stayed in touch with them throughout the week.

Late Friday, WFAN issued a short statement. "We are disappointed by Imus's actions earlier this week, which we find completely inappropriate." The station said it would "monitor the program's content going forward."

On Friday, advertisers including Procter & Gamble Co. started talking about pulling their advertising from MSNBC's daytime schedule, which included Imus.

Civil-rights leaders such as the Rev. Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson raised the volume of their protests over the weekend, holding rallies in New York and Chicago. At a Saturday rally at the Harlem headquarters of the National Action Network, Mr. Sharpton called for Mr. Imus to be fired. A Sharpton spokesman says more than 200 people attended. Mr. Imus began to grasp the full consequences of what he had done, says his friend Mr. Dietl.

"Everybody is coming after me," Mr. Dietl recalls Mr. Imus telling him in a phone call that day. Mr. Imus and Mr. Dietl discussed the possibility of Mr. Imus appearing on Mr. Sharpton's radio show on Monday. Mr. Dietl says he advised against it, saying Mr. Sharpton would use Mr. Imus only to advance his own agenda. But Mr. Imus told his friend he wanted to use the show to apologize again.

CBS managers checked in with each other by phone, according to a spokesman, and NBC News executives gathered for a lengthy conference call on Sunday to map strategy, says Allison Gollust, head of communications for NBC News. Ms. Gollust hosted 15 people at her home for Easter dinner but never saw them.

Both CBS and NBC realized on Monday that critics were focusing their energy on MSNBC. The channel, critics strategized, was more likely to pull the plug because it had less to lose. Mr. Imus generates about $25 million a year for CBS, but only about $8.3 million for MSNBC. And although Mr. Imus reached over two million radio listeners every morning and only about 350,000 television viewers, TV was a more visible platform to attack.

Mr. Dietl offered to appear on Mr. Sharpton's show with Mr. Imus. "He said, 'No, Bo, I want to go on myself. I want to show I'm not afraid to face the music,'" Mr. Dietl recalls, saying Mr. Imus was convinced the controversy would die down after an apology. But the appearance seemed to make matters worse, with critics latching on to Mr. Imus's use of the phrase "you people," in what they said was a bungled apology.

CBS and NBC faced new problems: The Rutgers basketball team called a news conference for Tuesday morning. Another issue: a two-day charity "radio-athon" scheduled for Mr. Imus's show on Thursday and Friday.

At 6:30 p.m., MSNBC issued a harsh statement announcing it was suspending the show for two weeks, calling Mr. Imus's comments "racist" and "abhorrent." CBS 15 minutes later released its own statement saying it also would suspend the show.

The Rutgers news conference the next day was devastating. Carried live on cable TV, it went on for more than an hour. The coach gave a lengthy speech, before the 10 young women on the team, eight of whom are black, were introduced. They looked uncomfortable in the media glare. Without a hint of professional polish, their remarks came across as heartfelt.

For years, Mr. Imus had been somewhat inoculated from criticism because along with the edgy shtick, he addressed serious issues with guests from the political and media establishment. Presidential candidates (John Kerry, John McCain, Joseph Biden) top journalists (NBC's Tim Russert, David Gregory and Andrea Mitchell) and writers with a book to sell made stops on the show. Mr. Imus also pushed worthy charities, including his New Mexico ranch which hosted children with cancer.

But it soon became clear that events were moving at a speed he couldn't control.

P&G, the nation's largest advertiser, and one of its most conservative, says it quietly pulled ads from the TV broadcast on Friday but it didn't announce it until Tuesday when reporters started calling. P&G pulled ads from MSNBC's daytime schedule.

Mr. Capus called a meeting for 4:30 p.m. Tuesday with African-American employees in the news division, many of whom had complained to managers that MSNBC was sticking with Mr. Imus. The meeting, slated for 45 minutes, stretched for nearly two hours as employees -- some emotional and frank -- argued for axing the broadcast, according to two people who attended.

Jarred by the confrontation, Mr. Capus left the meeting and started lobbying CEO Jeff Zucker to pull the plug, according to a person familiar with the matter.

Senior NBC executives arrived at work on Wednesday to a flood of advertisers clamoring to pull their money from "Imus in the Morning." General Motors Corp., American Express Co., and GlaxoSmithKline PLC all followed P&G's lead. American Express's CEO Kenneth Chenault, an African-American, made the decision personally on Tuesday morning, says a spokeswoman for the financial giant.

At Sprint Nextel Corp., CEO Gary D. Forsee heard about the incident and agreed the spots should be pulled. Sprint employees had lobbied for the move, including members of an African-American Sprint employee group called the Diamond Network, says spokesman Chris Doherty. Sprint publicly confirmed its decision Wednesday.

Mark LaNeve, GM's vice president of North American vehicle sales, service and marketing, had been an occasional guest on Mr. Imus's program, appearing as recently as last Thursday. Over the years Mr. LaNeve had arranged for GM to donate vehicles to Mr. Imus's ranch for sick children. On Tuesday, as advertisers were beginning to pull out, GM said it had "no plans to make any changes at this point." A day later GM changed its mind. Yesterday, Mr. LaNeve and another top marketing executive decided to drop the ads altogether.

At NBC Universal, the only debate left was whether to announce the cancellation of the simulcast that day or wait until the charity telethon was concluded. In the early afternoon, Mr. Zucker checked in with GE CEO Jeffrey Immelt, who had in turn been taking the pulse of GE board members, according to a person close to Mr. Immelt. At a 5 p.m. meeting, Mr. Zucker made the call to pull the plug immediately. "This is the right thing to do," Mr. Zucker said, according to a person in the room.

Communications executives drafted statements to release to employees and the media. NBC News executives called Mr. Imus, and Mr. Zucker placed a tense phone call to CBS's Mr. Moonves around 6 p.m. letting him know the decision.

Mr. Dietl had been reaching out to Mr. Moonves's boss, CBS Chairman Sumner Redstone, on Mr. Imus's behalf. "Two words should not ruin a person's career," he recalls telling Mr. Redstone. A spokesman for Mr. Redstone confirms the media mogul spoke with Mr. Dietl but otherwise declines to comment.

On Wednesday, CBS board member Bruce Gordon, a former head of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, dropped a bomb by telling the Associated Press he had called on Mr. Moonves to fire Mr. Imus.

Mr. Redstone left the decision to pull the show largely to Mr. Moonves, says a person familiar with the matter. On Thursday morning, Mr. Moonves spent an hour and a half meeting with about 10 African-American leaders and women's rights advocates.

Mr. Moonves called Mr. Imus late yesterday afternoon at home and told him that his show was canceled, according to a person familiar with the matter. Mr. Imus was awoken from a nap to take the call, Mr. Dietl says.

Other controversial radio hosts have gravitated to satellite, where there are fewer rules governing on-air standards. That happened with Mr. Stern, and with Opie & Anthony, a duo fired from CBS in August 2002 for encouraging a couple to have sex in New York's St. Patrick's Cathedral.

But right now, the two satellite companies, Sirius Satellite Radio Inc. and XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc., are trying to merge, and need approval from the Federal Communications Commissions. FCC chief Kevin Martin is sensitive to complaints about indecency, and the companies wouldn't want to do anything that would jeopardize their merger prospects, says one satellite radio executive.

Mr. Imus's friend Mr. Dietl, a former New York City Police Department detective, blames the brouhaha on a fundamental mistake made by the radio host. While many others can get away with using offensive language, Mr. Dietl says, "the problem here was the people he talked about were innocent, lovely young ladies who strived and did something great."

--Neal Boudette, Ellen Byron, Brian Steinberg and Suzanne Vranica contributed to this article.

Source: Wall Street Journal

http://www.moneyweb.co.za/mw/view/mw/en/page94?oid=85826&sn=Detail
---------------------------------

mykarma
Apr 14th, 2007, 05:26 PM
But in the other "race story" in the headlines,Obama called for the investigation (leading to possible disbarment) of DA Mike Nifong, persecuter of those white Duke lacrosse players. You should look @ the whole picture. Furthermore, your remarks imply that any black public figure who called for Imus 2B fired is engaged in some kind of conflict of interest, as if they should just shut up about it.
:confused:
:worship::worship::worship:

mykarma
Apr 14th, 2007, 05:39 PM
Behind the fall of Imus, a digital brush fire
In a blur, watchdogs, blogs, e-mail, spur radio host's firing

BROOKS BARNES, EMILY STEEL and SARAH MCBRIDE
13 April 2007

At 6:14 a.m. on Wednesday, April 4, relatively few people were tuned into the "Imus in the Morning Show" when Don Imus referred to the Rutgers women's basketball team as "nappy-headed ho's."

Ryan Chiachiere was. A 26-year-old researcher in Washington, D.C., for liberal watchdog organization Media Matters for America, he was assigned to monitor Mr. Imus's program. Mr. Chiachiere clipped the video, alerted his bosses and started working on a blog post for the organization's Web site.

Yesterday, after eight days of dizzying activity, CBS pulled the plug on Mr. Imus's hugely successful radio show. One day earlier, MSNBC had canceled its broadcast of the show on cable TV. CBS had originally suspended Mr. Imus for two weeks, but succumbed amid an escalating national outcry and an exodus of big advertisers. "All of us have been deeply upset and revulsed by the statements that were made on our air," CBS Corp. CEO Leslie Moonves said yesterday in a written statement.

Mr. Imus, who didn't respond to repeated calls seeking comment, had for years been making outrageous and frequently crude remarks about risky subjects such as race, sex and gender, a style that millions of listeners had embraced. The media executives and advertisers profiting from Mr. Imus's popularity stood by him as protests occasionally surfaced. They usually subsided after a few days.

This time it was different. The target was a sympathetic team of young athletes. In the ensuing furor, the lucrative and often vulgar business of talk radio found itself running into new limits, as the Internet sent Mr. Imus to millions of PC screens, driving executives, advertisers and employees to distance themselves from his racist words.

On the morning of the original broadcast, there was little response to Mr. Imus's slur. Media Matters posted the video and transcript on its Web site and sent an email blast to several hundred reporters, as it does nearly every day. The post received dozens of comments, many heated, some more than 300 words long. The next day, top news outlets didn't mention the incident.

On Thursday, at about 3 p.m., NBC News President Steve Capus was conducting a routine planning meeting in his third-floor offices at Rockefeller Center when an assistant interrupted him to take an urgent phone call, according to a person at the meeting. On the other line: MSNBC General Manager Dan Abrams. Mr. Abrams said MSNBC executives were fielding complaints from viewers and employees who had seen a video clip of Mr. Imus's remark on the Media Matters site, this person says.

The group is a Web-based nonprofit organization devoted to monitoring "conservative misinformation" in print, broadcast, cable, radio and Internet media outlets. It frequently complains about Rush Limbaugh and Bill O'Reilly. Although the Imus show isn't generally considered conservative, some of its guests are.

Mr. Capus called an emergency meeting with MSNBC's management team, the producers for the TV version of "Imus in the Morning" and the head of public relations for NBC News. Among other decisions, Mr. Capus asked his PR team to draft a statement apologizing on behalf of MSNBC but clearly pointing out that "Imus in the Morning" was a CBS Radio production. MSNBC and NBC are owned by General Electric Co.'s NBC Universal.

At CBS, CEO Leslie Moonves and incoming CBS Radio CEO Dan Mason spoke on the phone and started debating a course of action. About the same time, WFAN, the CBS-owned radio station that broadcast Mr. Imus's show, received a complaint from Rutgers University, according to Bo Dietl, an investigator and security consultant, and friend to Mr. Imus.

In Chicago, Bryan Monroe, president of the National Association of Black Journalists, saw an email sent by one of his executive board members at 5:06 p.m. "FYI -- do we need to address" read the subject line. It was the Media Matters post.

Mr. Monroe, editorial director of Johnson Publishing Co. in charge of Ebony and Jet magazines, wasn't a regular reader of Media Matters or an Imus listener.

He looked at the email. "My first reaction was: 'Oh, no he didn't,'" he says. Then he watched the clip. "I heard the words come out of his mouth and thought, 'Has he lost his mind?'"

Mr. Monroe picked up the phone and started calling other board members. He had guests over for dinner that night, who also were African-American. They talked about the controversy during dinner. Later that night, he was back on the phone with NABJ members and pulled an all-nighter to draft a statement. It said that the 3,200-member organization was "outraged and disgusted" by the comments, and called for "an immediate and sincere apology." Mr. Monroe posted the statement to the NABJ Web site at 5:30 a.m.

Friday morning, there was again scant mention of Mr. Imus's travails in the newspapers, although TV stations were beginning to pick up the story. Mr. Imus began his program, at 6:06 a.m., with an on-air apology. People close to Mr. Imus say he felt pressured to apologize by NBC and CBS executives. He also realized he needed to try to defuse the brewing storm.

"Want to take a moment to apologize for an insensitive and ill-conceived remark," he said. "Our characterization was thoughtless and stupid, and we're sorry."

It was Good Friday and many people already were off for the holiday weekend. News was supposed to slow to a crawl for several days.

Instead, the apology made the story explode. It hit the wires that day, and reporters began to contact CBS and MSNBC. It quickly became clear an apology wasn't going to suffice, and that the weekend wouldn't douse the fire.

David Carr, who writes a Monday media column for the New York Times business section, decided to scrap his planned subject and write about Mr. Imus instead. He called the remark "the kind of unalloyed racial insult that might not have passed muster on a low-watt AM station in the Jim Crow South."

Mr. Imus's problems were compounded by a power vacuum at CBS Radio, which produced his show. Two weeks earlier, CEO Joel Hollander, a longtime supporter of Mr. Imus and his various charities, had resigned. The company had been underperforming lately and was still reeling from the loss of shock-jock Howard Stern to satellite radio. Mr. Hollander's successor, Mr. Mason, wasn't due to start until April 16. He consulted with CBS executives by phone and email from his home outside Washington, D.C.

Mr. Imus's show is on just one CBS station -- WFAN -- but the media giant also earns revenue from syndicating the show to radio stations around the country. CBS owns 18% of the show's syndicator, Westwood One Inc.

Local stations that carry Imus say they sensed the situation was drifting. "Nobody had a firm hand on it," says Gabe Hobbs, head of talk programming at Clear Channel Communications Inc., which airs the Imus show on a handful of stations, including in Washington, D.C., and Providence, R.I. Some station managers say Westwood's affiliate-relations staff stayed in touch with them throughout the week.

Late Friday, WFAN issued a short statement. "We are disappointed by Imus's actions earlier this week, which we find completely inappropriate." The station said it would "monitor the program's content going forward."

On Friday, advertisers including Procter & Gamble Co. started talking about pulling their advertising from MSNBC's daytime schedule, which included Imus.

Civil-rights leaders such as the Rev. Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson raised the volume of their protests over the weekend, holding rallies in New York and Chicago. At a Saturday rally at the Harlem headquarters of the National Action Network, Mr. Sharpton called for Mr. Imus to be fired. A Sharpton spokesman says more than 200 people attended. Mr. Imus began to grasp the full consequences of what he had done, says his friend Mr. Dietl.

"Everybody is coming after me," Mr. Dietl recalls Mr. Imus telling him in a phone call that day. Mr. Imus and Mr. Dietl discussed the possibility of Mr. Imus appearing on Mr. Sharpton's radio show on Monday. Mr. Dietl says he advised against it, saying Mr. Sharpton would use Mr. Imus only to advance his own agenda. But Mr. Imus told his friend he wanted to use the show to apologize again.

CBS managers checked in with each other by phone, according to a spokesman, and NBC News executives gathered for a lengthy conference call on Sunday to map strategy, says Allison Gollust, head of communications for NBC News. Ms. Gollust hosted 15 people at her home for Easter dinner but never saw them.

Both CBS and NBC realized on Monday that critics were focusing their energy on MSNBC. The channel, critics strategized, was more likely to pull the plug because it had less to lose. Mr. Imus generates about $25 million a year for CBS, but only about $8.3 million for MSNBC. And although Mr. Imus reached over two million radio listeners every morning and only about 350,000 television viewers, TV was a more visible platform to attack.

Mr. Dietl offered to appear on Mr. Sharpton's show with Mr. Imus. "He said, 'No, Bo, I want to go on myself. I want to show I'm not afraid to face the music,'" Mr. Dietl recalls, saying Mr. Imus was convinced the controversy would die down after an apology. But the appearance seemed to make matters worse, with critics latching on to Mr. Imus's use of the phrase "you people," in what they said was a bungled apology.

CBS and NBC faced new problems: The Rutgers basketball team called a news conference for Tuesday morning. Another issue: a two-day charity "radio-athon" scheduled for Mr. Imus's show on Thursday and Friday.

At 6:30 p.m., MSNBC issued a harsh statement announcing it was suspending the show for two weeks, calling Mr. Imus's comments "racist" and "abhorrent." CBS 15 minutes later released its own statement saying it also would suspend the show.

The Rutgers news conference the next day was devastating. Carried live on cable TV, it went on for more than an hour. The coach gave a lengthy speech, before the 10 young women on the team, eight of whom are black, were introduced. They looked uncomfortable in the media glare. Without a hint of professional polish, their remarks came across as heartfelt.

For years, Mr. Imus had been somewhat inoculated from criticism because along with the edgy shtick, he addressed serious issues with guests from the political and media establishment. Presidential candidates (John Kerry, John McCain, Joseph Biden) top journalists (NBC's Tim Russert, David Gregory and Andrea Mitchell) and writers with a book to sell made stops on the show. Mr. Imus also pushed worthy charities, including his New Mexico ranch which hosted children with cancer.

But it soon became clear that events were moving at a speed he couldn't control.

P&G, the nation's largest advertiser, and one of its most conservative, says it quietly pulled ads from the TV broadcast on Friday but it didn't announce it until Tuesday when reporters started calling. P&G pulled ads from MSNBC's daytime schedule.

Mr. Capus called a meeting for 4:30 p.m. Tuesday with African-American employees in the news division, many of whom had complained to managers that MSNBC was sticking with Mr. Imus. The meeting, slated for 45 minutes, stretched for nearly two hours as employees -- some emotional and frank -- argued for axing the broadcast, according to two people who attended.

Jarred by the confrontation, Mr. Capus left the meeting and started lobbying CEO Jeff Zucker to pull the plug, according to a person familiar with the matter.

Senior NBC executives arrived at work on Wednesday to a flood of advertisers clamoring to pull their money from "Imus in the Morning." General Motors Corp., American Express Co., and GlaxoSmithKline PLC all followed P&G's lead. American Express's CEO Kenneth Chenault, an African-American, made the decision personally on Tuesday morning, says a spokeswoman for the financial giant.

At Sprint Nextel Corp., CEO Gary D. Forsee heard about the incident and agreed the spots should be pulled. Sprint employees had lobbied for the move, including members of an African-American Sprint employee group called the Diamond Network, says spokesman Chris Doherty. Sprint publicly confirmed its decision Wednesday.

Mark LaNeve, GM's vice president of North American vehicle sales, service and marketing, had been an occasional guest on Mr. Imus's program, appearing as recently as last Thursday. Over the years Mr. LaNeve had arranged for GM to donate vehicles to Mr. Imus's ranch for sick children. On Tuesday, as advertisers were beginning to pull out, GM said it had "no plans to make any changes at this point." A day later GM changed its mind. Yesterday, Mr. LaNeve and another top marketing executive decided to drop the ads altogether.

At NBC Universal, the only debate left was whether to announce the cancellation of the simulcast that day or wait until the charity telethon was concluded. In the early afternoon, Mr. Zucker checked in with GE CEO Jeffrey Immelt, who had in turn been taking the pulse of GE board members, according to a person close to Mr. Immelt. At a 5 p.m. meeting, Mr. Zucker made the call to pull the plug immediately. "This is the right thing to do," Mr. Zucker said, according to a person in the room.

Communications executives drafted statements to release to employees and the media. NBC News executives called Mr. Imus, and Mr. Zucker placed a tense phone call to CBS's Mr. Moonves around 6 p.m. letting him know the decision.

Mr. Dietl had been reaching out to Mr. Moonves's boss, CBS Chairman Sumner Redstone, on Mr. Imus's behalf. "Two words should not ruin a person's career," he recalls telling Mr. Redstone. A spokesman for Mr. Redstone confirms the media mogul spoke with Mr. Dietl but otherwise declines to comment.

On Wednesday, CBS board member Bruce Gordon, a former head of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, dropped a bomb by telling the Associated Press he had called on Mr. Moonves to fire Mr. Imus.

Mr. Redstone left the decision to pull the show largely to Mr. Moonves, says a person familiar with the matter. On Thursday morning, Mr. Moonves spent an hour and a half meeting with about 10 African-American leaders and women's rights advocates.

Mr. Moonves called Mr. Imus late yesterday afternoon at home and told him that his show was canceled, according to a person familiar with the matter. Mr. Imus was awoken from a nap to take the call, Mr. Dietl says.

Other controversial radio hosts have gravitated to satellite, where there are fewer rules governing on-air standards. That happened with Mr. Stern, and with Opie & Anthony, a duo fired from CBS in August 2002 for encouraging a couple to have sex in New York's St. Patrick's Cathedral.

But right now, the two satellite companies, Sirius Satellite Radio Inc. and XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc., are trying to merge, and need approval from the Federal Communications Commissions. FCC chief Kevin Martin is sensitive to complaints about indecency, and the companies wouldn't want to do anything that would jeopardize their merger prospects, says one satellite radio executive.

Mr. Imus's friend Mr. Dietl, a former New York City Police Department detective, blames the brouhaha on a fundamental mistake made by the radio host. While many others can get away with using offensive language, Mr. Dietl says, "the problem here was the people he talked about were innocent, lovely young ladies who strived and did something great."

--Neal Boudette, Ellen Byron, Brian Steinberg and Suzanne Vranica contributed to this article.

Source: Wall Street Journal

http://www.moneyweb.co.za/mw/view/mw/en/page94?oid=85826&sn=Detail
---------------------------------
Great post.

Wigglytuff
Apr 14th, 2007, 05:54 PM
Mr. Imus's friend Mr. Dietl, a former New York City Police Department detective, blames the brouhaha on a fundamental mistake made by the radio host. While many others can get away with using offensive language, Mr. Dietl says, "the problem here was the people he talked about were innocent, lovely young ladies who strived and did something great."

exactly!

ys
Apr 15th, 2007, 12:23 AM
You should look @ the whole picture. Furthermore, your remarks imply that any black public figure who called for Imus 2B fired is engaged in some kind of conflict of interest, as if they should just shut up about it. :confused:

No, you can be all the way against like what Imus said, but if he wanted to be understood correctly, if he wanted to be heard as a person who wants to be a President and therefore is supposed to transcend the racial borders, then he should not have connected it to his own life, and he did, referring the same experience of his daughters. He didn't speak against Imus as a potential President, he did it as a black man. Not a smart thing to do, if he really wants to win over hearts of whites. That's why I say he is not smart enough for a topflight politician, he'll definitely make more mistakes like this one..

Vlover
Apr 15th, 2007, 12:26 AM
[QUOTE]Meanwhile, go back to sleep satisfied in winning this battle against Imus, and don't even bother thinking that the war against the real enemy (social inequality and the fiction of justice that you're buying in too) is truly being lost. Badly.

RVD did a fantastic job articulating in context the broader aspects of this which you clearly missed badly. Please don't flatter yourself in thinking that you have a great understanding or knowledge of racial issues in America because it's quite obvious you don't and that is why some people are upset. Why you would choose to lecture people who live and have first hand knowledge of such issues and proceed to be so condescending just baffles me.:rolleyes:

Blacks are the last people to ever think that this solve racism. Try and tell this to the whites who proprogate this false notion that racism has been long eradicated.:help:

mykarma
Apr 15th, 2007, 12:35 AM
Don Imus already got another job. :lol:
Good for him. Was there any doubt that he wouldn't?

Wigglytuff
Apr 15th, 2007, 02:09 AM
[QUOTE=quasar;10516355]


RVD did a fantastic job articulating in context the broader aspects of this which you clearly missed badly. Please don't flatter yourself in thinking that you have a great understanding or knowledge of racial issues in America because it's quite obvious you don't and that is why some people are upset. Why you would choose to lecture people who live and have first hand knowledge of such issues and proceed to be so condescending just baffles me.:rolleyes:

Blacks are the last people to ever think that this solve racism. Try and tell this to the whites who proprogate this false notion that racism has been long eradicated.:help:
:worship: :worship: :worship: :worship: