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Infiniti2001
Mar 8th, 2007, 01:44 PM
By HARVEY ARATON
Published: March 8, 2007

When Venus called, Larry Scott knew it wasn’t to chat or catch up on the latest Tour gossip.

Not the style of most tennis divas and certainly not that of the senior, more studious Williams playing sister.

“She’s not always the most accessible, responsive person, wanting to be out there, wanting to be heard,” said Scott, the chief executive of the Women’s Tennis Association. “But in my time with the Tour, Venus has been a member of the player council and she’s one of the people whose opinions on the big issues I’ve come to admire and count on. She’s incredibly thoughtful. Her feelings about some things run deep.”

Where has the gangly teenager with the braids and bouncing beads gone? In June, Williams will turn 27, the approximate age of a full-blown Tour stateswoman, the role she appears to be embracing right on time and, not surprisingly, on her own terms.

It’s not that Venus — who with her sister Serena bucked overwhelming odds in ascending from Compton, Calif., to African-American champion of the global country club — has no interest in what conventional wisdom would envision as her natural social cause. She is just the product of a family with a fierce independent streak, a young woman who has traveled the world as part of an international troupe and apparently developed a more wide-ranging scope.

Today, International Women’s Day, is as good a time for Williams to say that her plan is to follow a path paved long ago by Billie Jean King.

“Gender equity is an issue I expect to be involved in for the rest of my life,” she said in a telephone interview, discussing a partnership between the W.T.A. and Unesco to advance women’s rights around the world through a series of programs and scholarship.

She began as a vocal and successful equal prize-money campaigner at Wimbledon in 2005 — “close your eyes, imagine your daughter is being treated as less than equal,” Williams told a room full of Grand Slam tournament executives — and will now front a joint operation of the world’s best-known female athletes and the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization.

At Wimbledon, it was about the principle, not the money, Williams said. In Madrid, where she hastily traveled last November when Scott called and asked her to serve as campaign ambassador, the announcement at the Tour’s year-end championships was the realization of the impact a simple suggestion could have.

“I wouldn’t say no,” she said. “I couldn’t.”

The inspiration, after all, was her.

She had gone to the Espys last spring to receive a trophy and left with a calling. She watched the presentation of the Arthur Ashe Award for Courage to a couple of young Afghan females who helped start a women’s soccer program in post-Taliban Kabul, found their story “so moving” that she telephoned Scott to say, “These are the kinds of things for women around the world that we should be doing.”



Scott listened carefully, heard something rare.

“It was kind of a peek behind Venus’s curtain and I’ll tell you, in all my years in tennis, on the men’s Tour and women’s, I haven’t gotten too many calls like that,” he said.

That it came from Venus Williams would only surprise those who have judged her from afar, or fallen into the trap of comparing her with her more charismatic, flamboyant sister, who always carried the lesser burden of the intra-family competition. Though neither has been dominant or overly active on the Tour, it feels like a long time since Serena wasn’t eclipsing Venus, at least in the superficial way the public gets to judge.

Under such circumstances, any parent that has reared two children with such disparate personalities would have to occasionally feel for Venus, the quiet, introspective one. Meanwhile, injuries aside, she has been growing up, taking the measure of her years, and of those to come.

She credited one of her Tour predecessors and fellow African-Americans, Zina Garrison, for helping to raise her consciousness. But Garrison, in a telephone interview, said there have been times when it felt like the other way around.

“You know how everyone always talks about how African-Americans come out of low-income housing and that’s why they excel at sports?” Garrison said. “It was Venus who first made me understand why the Russian girls were doing so well. She said, ‘You know, they come from one-bedroom houses, too. They’re hungry. They may look different and speak a different language but their situation is no different.’

“That’s Venus — she’s in touch with a lot more things than most people realize. Personality wise, I’ve always compared her to Arthur Ashe and I’ve told her that I believe in my heart that she has a gift, the capability of being a humanitarian, too. Venus would give me that little eye and say, ‘O.K., Zina,’ but when I heard what she’s doing, I said, ‘You do get it, girl.’ ”

Ashe saw beyond discrimination at home, all the way to the horrors of apartheid in South Africa. Asked if she thought some might be disappointed that she, as a black role model, is not championing racial equality, Williams said, by all means, she is.

She talked about conditions in Africa and other parts of the third world, where AIDS, tribal traditions and prostitution are devastating for women. “I know Serena and I are well known in African countries,” she said. “Every one of us is famous somewhere. We should use that to help women where they don’t have rights.”



She said the campaign, still taking form, will be a collective effort, not her show. Once a polarizing locker-room figure, Williams now aims to be a grand Tour unifier. She said she was healthy again, hungry after her recent small tournament victory in Memphis. She wants to win more Grand Slam events before the years fly by, before she hits the far side of 30, before her new moonlighting gig as the stateswoman of tennis turns into the day job.

If it ever does, it will trace to a phone call. Even Ashe and Billie Jean had to start somewhere.

E-mail: hjaraton@nytimes.com

xr6turbo
Mar 8th, 2007, 01:50 PM
:worship:

volta
Mar 8th, 2007, 01:56 PM
omg i love you Vee :worship:

saki
Mar 8th, 2007, 01:57 PM
Well, there's a nice thing to read on International Womens' Day! Women across the world need people like Venus campaigning for them. If she's really dedicated to this cause, she can do an awful lot to help.

John.
Mar 8th, 2007, 01:58 PM
Venus :worship:

Paneru
Mar 8th, 2007, 02:00 PM
Venus! :clap2:

Seenus
Mar 8th, 2007, 02:02 PM
Inspired and inspirational Venus

southpaw58
Mar 8th, 2007, 02:04 PM
Keep Going VEE!

tennisIlove09
Mar 8th, 2007, 02:04 PM
oh, how i love her. *sigh* :hearts:

frontier
Mar 8th, 2007, 02:15 PM
we love you venus!!!!!!

Kunal
Mar 8th, 2007, 02:22 PM
that is a breath of fresh air

do ur thing vee

Bijoux0021
Mar 8th, 2007, 02:31 PM
Thanks for posting this great articles.

Most Venus' fans have always knew she had it in her to do great things to help others that are less fortunate.

Williams-forever
Mar 8th, 2007, 02:31 PM
Venus is such a rolemodel:hearts:

sweetpeas
Mar 8th, 2007, 03:28 PM
Venus is such a rolemodel


You"re so,,,right!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

winone23
Mar 8th, 2007, 03:29 PM
Venus :worship: :worship: :worship: :)

spokenword73
Mar 8th, 2007, 03:47 PM
Venus is such a rolemodel


You"re so,,,right!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


Vee is a terrific role model. :worship:

I love your avatar. Where did you get it?

StarDuvallGrant
Mar 8th, 2007, 03:58 PM
Great stuff Venus :clap2:

dangerjenny
Mar 8th, 2007, 04:11 PM
you go girl,we love that u r standing up for all women.

eugreene2
Mar 8th, 2007, 04:16 PM
Venus - such class, beauty and purpose!

Mrs. Peel
Mar 8th, 2007, 04:31 PM
Venus - such class, beauty and purpose!

Venus :hearts: :hearts:

ico4498
Mar 8th, 2007, 04:32 PM
Vee!

Tennisation
Mar 8th, 2007, 04:34 PM
this is such a treat, go vee!:worship:

Williams Rulez
Mar 8th, 2007, 04:38 PM
Venus... :) i love ya girl!

Tennisaddict
Mar 8th, 2007, 04:44 PM
:hatoff: to Venus she is indeed very special that´s why I admire her.

GogoGirl
Mar 8th, 2007, 04:47 PM
Hey All,

Great read. Thanks.

I am glad to hear this from Venus. Similarly - Oprah is doing something to help SA girls get an opp. for success by opening a wonderful school. Andre Agassi gets props too for his Academy. Now we shall add Venus to the list.

This is a wonderful place she finds herself in now - and may God continue to empower, guide and bless her.

"THAT'S OUR GIRL" "WAY TO CARRY IT - VENUS" "CONCEIVE - BELIEVE - ACHIEVE"

harloo
Mar 8th, 2007, 04:51 PM
Keep up the good work Venus!!!:worship:

jjames69
Mar 8th, 2007, 04:57 PM
great, does this mean shes going to start playing a full schedule?

Vlover
Mar 8th, 2007, 05:09 PM
This is an example of why my love, admiration and respect for her supersede her tennis.:hearts: She is so forward thinking and has her life pointing in the direction she wants it to go especially after retirement. I have no doubt that with the encouragement of Zena and BJK she will do great in these endeavors.:D

Hope she has a great season and I'll forever be rooting for you Vee!:kiss:

brent-o
Mar 8th, 2007, 05:26 PM
Great article. Did anyone else get slightly depressed when it was brought up that she's 27 already? Man, where did the years go?

tonythetiger
Mar 8th, 2007, 05:35 PM
Venus is one amazing girl.

Vlover
Mar 8th, 2007, 05:35 PM
Great article. Did anyone else get slightly depressed when it was brought up that she's 27 already? Man, where did the years go?

I know:lol: but I think she has a few months to go but maybe her mind is already there. Anyway I hope she sticks with the 33 yrs before she even start to consider retirement for our sakes.;)

Paneru
Mar 8th, 2007, 05:49 PM
I know:lol: but I think she has a few months to go but maybe her mind is already there. Anyway I hope she sticks with the 33 yrs before she even start to consider retirement for our sakes.;)

She said in 04' she'd like to play
to 33 y.o. & compete at the
London Games. :hearts:

Marcell
Mar 8th, 2007, 05:51 PM
Yes, this is the quote from the interview.

"Where do you see yourself in 10 years?
“Hopefully I’m not fat and struggling to wear Lycra. How old will I be? 35. I’ll probably be retired, three years already. But before that happens, I want to make two more Olympics. That’s my goal. My game is improving, so I don’t think it’ll be that tough—unless something dreadfully awful happens.”

MisterQ
Mar 8th, 2007, 05:57 PM
awesome, Venus :worship:

venus_rulez
Mar 8th, 2007, 06:00 PM
Love her so much, not only for her beautiful tennis, but for the beautiful person that is inside and dedicated to these kinds of causes. :worship:

DOUBLEFIST
Mar 8th, 2007, 06:05 PM
It is hard to believe the braced teeth, beaded wonder is now 27. It just doesn't seem right. :lol:

But what a WONDEROUS 27 she is. She is emerging into a woman whose substance is far more significant than her style!

I've always felt that, while Venus' TENNIS victories might get over shadow by Serena, ultimately the whole of who Venus is will have more historically impact than Serena.

Venus!!! :worship: :worship: :yeah:

venus_rulez
Mar 8th, 2007, 06:08 PM
The only thing I didn't like about the article is the indirect put downs on Serena. Why do people insist on comparing these two? For some people seeing Serena win her trophies and not caring what people think motivates them and makes them happy. For others, Venus' new found position of ambassador for women's causes makes her a role model and someone to follow. Different strokes for different folks, even two sisters.

hotandspicey
Mar 8th, 2007, 07:05 PM
Venus!! :hearts: She is just simply the best!! :hearts :bigclap: So proud to be a fan!! :bounce: What an inspiration!

Knizzle
Mar 8th, 2007, 07:19 PM
The only thing I didn't like about the article is the indirect put downs on Serena. Why do people insist on comparing these two? For some people seeing Serena win her trophies and not caring what people think motivates them and makes them happy. For others, Venus' new found position of ambassador for women's causes makes her a role model and someone to follow. Different strokes for different folks, even two sisters.I concur, I noticed them too. :rolleyes:

¤CharlDa¤
Mar 8th, 2007, 07:25 PM
Venus :hearts: :worship:

She is a great example to follow. I've grown up admiring her and I always will. She always showed class, intelligence and genuine respect. She cares for the people around her, as well as anyone who struggles.

I love you Vee :)

~Cherry*Blossom~
Mar 8th, 2007, 08:30 PM
Venus :bigclap:

iWill
Mar 8th, 2007, 08:46 PM
I was really glad to read this about Venus I've always wondered if she would remain a part of the tennis world after she retired and this shows me that she is heading in that direction, also she did bring up a very good point about the Russian women and the success they are having, I know Maria's story was somewhat like that but when you think about it, it does explain the stories of all the other top players as well

vwfan
Mar 8th, 2007, 08:50 PM
This is a perfect role for her now and after she leaves the game. She has always been years beyond her age!

Congrats to Venus for charting a great new path for herself. Gotta love her!

Sylwiiia
Mar 8th, 2007, 09:08 PM
That's my girl :hearts: :hearts: :worship:

frontier
Mar 8th, 2007, 09:17 PM
i dont know why the media people like to highlight venus age like she is 80yrs old,for goodness sake she is 26yrs.what about momo.hingis,patty,sugiyama,likhotseva and others that they never mention age.its as if they cant wait for sisters to go away and they are counting each and every birthday.i hope venus will play and retire on her own watch.
if what she said on letterman is true she has five more years to play.

Viktymise
Mar 8th, 2007, 09:36 PM
Vee :hearts:

Nemesis
Mar 8th, 2007, 09:48 PM
Venus :hearts:
this woman is fantastic!

great read. I don't have much time to read such long articles (due to my thesis) but for this, I make time.
that article sums up the reason why in these years my love for Venus almost equals that of my fellow landmate Justine ... and the more I read about her, the closer love for her gets to that strong love you always have for a landmate!

it's really like her great speach at what was it again? ... if you saw that, and now read this you can't help but like Venus! she's one of the big idols, if not the only real idol of the tennis world (maybe Lindsay comes close, in terms of spokes(wo)manship)

it's sad that in Belgium these things are not mentioned about Vee. she's depicted as a greedy, arrogant, egoistic woman. idiots on the radio or in magazines call her "bosaap" when she beats Kim (I will not translate that).

and like people say here, it's sad that this article puts down Serena. this woman doen't deserve this!

Nemesis
Mar 8th, 2007, 10:13 PM
I just posted this article on a Belgian tennis board.
I hope it opens many Belgian's eyes.
Venus should be adored everywhere!

soomaal
Mar 8th, 2007, 10:20 PM
Venus :hearts:
this woman is fantastic!

great read. I don't have much time to read such long articles (due to my thesis) but for this, I make time.
that article sums up the reason why in these years my love for Venus almost equals that of my fellow landmate Justine ... and the more I read about her, the closer love for her gets to that strong love you always have for a landmate!

it's really like her great speach at what was it again? ... if you saw that, and now read this you can't help but like Venus! she's one of the big idols, if not the only real idol of the tennis world (maybe Lindsay comes close, in terms of spokes(wo)manship)

it's sad that in Belgium these things are not mentioned about Vee. she's depicted as a greedy, arrogant, egoistic woman. idiots on the radio or in magazines call her "bosaap" when she beats Kim (I will not translate that).

and like people say here, it's sad that this article puts down Serena. this woman doen't deserve this!


Shocking!! I'll translate and it means along the lines of jungle ape - that is monkey, gorrila, ape whatever you call it.

Pure racism

Nemesis
Mar 8th, 2007, 10:36 PM
Shocking!! I'll translate and it means along the lines of jungle ape - that is monkey, gorrila, ape whatever you call it.

Pure racism
your translation is correct.

This was said on the Q-Music radio by Sven Ornelis after Venus beat Kim in the 2003 Antwerp final. I was furious. that was f*cking racistic. I wish the guy would've been sacked, but nooo ... He's still presenting. Everytime I see him (I don't listen and never listened to him, because he's plain stupid and the radio channel he's on is *barf*), I think about it.
More recently, in Humo, a Flemish magazine, they compared Serena and Venus to monkeys. The week before they compared Sven Ornelis (the radio presentor above mentioned) to an ape, so it could be that they criticised his words. But I fear that it was a coincidence and they actually insulted Vee & Rena, because I think except for me & tennis addicts, no one remembers what that moronic radio presentor said.

new-york
Mar 8th, 2007, 10:40 PM
great read.

it seems that people outside of her support base won't come here to say anything positive.

whatever.:hearts::hearts::hearts:

saki
Mar 8th, 2007, 10:41 PM
your translation is correct.

This was said on the Q-Music radio by Sven Ornelis after Venus beat Kim in the 2003 Antwerp final. I was furious. that was f*cking racistic. I wish the guy would've been sacked, but nooo ... He's still presenting. Everytime I see him (I don't listen and never listened to him, because he's plain stupid and the radio channel he's on is *barf*), I think about it.
More recently, in Humo, a Flemish magazine, they compared Serena and Venus to monkeys. The week before they compared Sven Ornelis (the radio presentor above mentioned) to an ape, so I'm could be that they criticised his words. But I fear that it was a coincidence and they actually insulted Vee & Rena, because I think except for me & tennis addicts, no one remembers what that moronic radio presentor said.

I was kinda hoping that what you meant was that someone had called in to a phone-in show to say that. I'm beyond shocked that it was a presenter and not one that got fired.

soomaal
Mar 8th, 2007, 10:41 PM
your translation is correct.

This was said on the Q-Music radio by Sven Ornelis after Venus beat Kim in the 2003 Antwerp final. I was furious. that was f*cking racistic. I wish the guy would've been sacked, but nooo ... He's still presenting. Everytime I see him, I think about it.
More recently, in Humo, a Flemish magazine, they compared Serena and Venus to monkeys. The week before they compared Sven Ornelis (the radio presentor above mentioned) to an ape, so I'm could be that they criticised his words. But I fear that it was a coincidence and they actually insulted Vee & Rena, because I think except for me & tennis addicts, no one remembers what that moronic radio presentor said.


Well even if they criticised his words in Humo but then delivered a blow of subtle racism themselves, they are just as ugly and guilty of racism. I find it very sad that nothing has been done about that presenter. Those who defend people like him are equally bad and anger me even more than the culprit.

But it's good to know there's someone out there for Vee :kiss:

saki
Mar 8th, 2007, 10:43 PM
great read.

it seems that people outside of her support base won't come here to say anything positive.

whatever.:hearts::hearts::hearts:


I'm not a fan and I did!

But this is generally true - WTAworld is not exactly the most mature place.

Shuji Shuriken
Mar 8th, 2007, 10:43 PM
No words :sobbing: :hearts: :worship: :hearts: :worship: :sobbing:

Marcell
Mar 8th, 2007, 10:51 PM
I never knew that Venus was championing equal pay since she came on tour. I found this article and learn something new about the sisters that I never knew.


It was only a dream. Or maybe more correctly, the idea of a dream. But no one could convince Richard Dove Williams that his two little girls were not going to be major tennis stars.

He just knew it. Heck, he claims he knew it before they were even born. And as unlikely as that may sound, bear in mind one very pertinent fact: He was right.

Today, Venus and Serena Williams are two of the hottest commodities on the professional circuit, and their stock continues to climb. As this issue of All Hands goes to press, 18-year-old Venus is ranked No. 5 in the world and Serena, 17, is not far behind at No. 10. This year alone they won two Women's Tennis Association (WTA) tournaments on the same day (Venus at the IGA Superthrift Tennis Classic and Serena at the Open Gaz de France, February 28); faced each other in the finals at the Lipton Championships March 28, and made history by defeating Martina Hingis and Anna Kournikova in the French Open doubles championship (6-3,6-7,8-6) June 6, becoming the first sister act to do so. And between the two of them, they've won four Grand Slam mixed doubles and hold nine - that's right - nine singles titles.

Go ahead, call Richard Williams a dreamer. But don't forget that this high school dropout, who taught himself and his girls how to play tennis, also knows a thing or two about making dreams come true.

"My dad always knew that I could be a real player," said 17-year old Serena. "He's worked so hard with Venus and I since we were little." He began training them when Serena was four and Venus was five and never let up. Discipline was the norm on the court and off for the girls. Even in the home. It forced them to be fiercely competitive and self-reliant, and it paid off big time.

"I was only 8 years old when I realized I could go far," remarked Serena, "and my parents were always around to see that discipline was applied. The hours were long and as I look back, I really don't know how I was able to stay out that long and be focused. In the end, though, it was and always is, worth it."

Professional tennis coach Nick Bollettieri couldn't agree more. He says the efforts of the girls' parents to keep them grounded have made all the difference in the world. "I have worked with thousands of students during the past four decades, including seven No. 1 world players. Richard and Mrs. Williams are geniuses in the way they have worked with their daughters. Not only have Venus and Serena become challengers for the very top, but the quality of life and values they hold off the court also meet the highest of standards."

The competition to get ahead in any sport is brutal, certainly no less so in tennis. But how tough is it between sisters? Well, of course, there's a sibling rivalry. You just don't get to be this good without one. But it's the way the girls handle themselves that prove they're real pros. Their finals match against each other in the Lipton Championships marked the first time since 1884 that sisters had squared off against each other for a professional title. Venus took the match (6-1,4-6,6-4), winning her second consecutive Lipton title and defeating her little sister for the third straight time. But the girls walked off the court together -- arm-in-arm.

They never let a game, or much else for that matter, come between them.

"Family is so important to us. It provides stability and support in our lives," said Venus. "After all, in the end all anyone has left is their family." They both agree the sport could never damage their relationship. In fact, they claim the opposite is true - that it only inspires them to work harder and brings them closer.

For her part, Venus demonstrates that work ethic every day. "My goal this year is to become the WTA's Player of the Year," she said. "This means I have to play superb tennis. I need to be more aggressive and mean when I play." With a record-setting serve of 127.4 mph, some would say she couldn't get much tougher.

Off the court, both girls are equally goal-oriented. "Serena and I are always trying new things in life, keeping ourselves busy," explained Venus. Recent graduates of the Driftwood Academy, where they maintained healthy 3.0 GPAs, they are now taking college courses. Venus also studies French and German; Serena's working on her Russian (her French is already pretty solid). And when they're not smashing balls across the net or surfing, they're publishing their own newsletter, The Tennis Monthly Recap, which they'll be quick to remind you is doing quite well. "We now have more than 100 subscriptions from all over the world," boasts Venus.

On the more serious side, vocal Venus has also been heavily engaged in garnering more respect for women in professional tennis, to include trying to close the gender gap in prize money. "You don't get anything free, and the chance of the Grand Slams (besides the U.S. Open) giving us equal prize money without us collectively lobbying for it, would be as good as giving an opponent a match gratis," said Venus. She says women have to stand together and let the Grand Slams know that they are serious.

After tennis - and neither is quite ready to give up the sport just yet - the girls want to forge careers in fashion design, perhaps even opening up their own business one day. Venus has already designed a warm-up suit.

For now, though, they are knee deep in competition, with their peers and with themselves - and they wouldn't have it any other way. Put simply, they're happy. And they're doing things for women's tennis that seemed unfathomable just a few years ago. They're making it exciting and a whole lot more fun to watch.

Like them or hate them, praise them or envy them, the Williams sisters are living proof that the American Dream still thrives. You can become anything you desire. You can pursue your talents and make your dreams come true. Focus and discipline are the keys.

Just ask Richard Williams. Or, better yet, talk to one of his girls.

"There's no limit to what you can achieve when you start going after your dreams," said Serena. "When you feel like quitting - don't. You can do it. The strength is always inside of you."


http://www.mediacen.navy.mil/pubs/allhands/sep99/pg16.htm

Nemesis
Mar 8th, 2007, 11:11 PM
I was kinda hoping that what you meant was that someone had called in to a phone-in show to say that. I'm beyond shocked that it was a presenter and not one that got fired.

well, I looked it up, because my memory is not always right, 'cause I remember Oracene was furious about it during Antwerp so it must have been before the Antwerp final then ...
and found this article

Q-Music krijgt blaam wegens ,,bosaap"-incident
BRUSSEL -- Q-Music, de commerciële radio van de Vlaamse Mediamaatschappij (VMMa), heeft van de Vlaamse Geschillenraad een blaam gekregen wegens het ,,aansporen tot rassenhaat''. De raad vindt het onaanvaardbaar dat de populaire radiopresentatoren Erwin Deckers en Sven Ornelis tijdens de Open Australische tenniskampioenschappen de zussen Serena en Venus Williams in hun ochtendshow onder meer ,,bosapen'' hebben genoemd.
It says it was during the AO 2003 (after Venus & Rena beat Justine & Kim respectively) and "onder meer" means that they have called Venus AND Serena more than it.
The radio channel only got a "blame" and the radio station gave a "sanction" to them. Believe me, that means they just said: just don't do it again. It's incomprehensible. They should've been SACKED!
I should've written to the channel to ask their resignation. Damn me.

Well even if they criticised his words in Humo but then delivered a blow of subtle racism themselves, they are just as ugly and guilty of racism. I find it very sad that nothing has been done about that presenter. Those who defend people like him are equally bad and anger me even more than the culprit.Humo hates the radio presentor too and I laughed my ass of when they compared HIM to a monkey. But that the week after it they reduplicate the comparison of Venus & Serena to monkeys, made me uneasy about buying the magazine. Even if they meant to criticise that moron, it's not good to do the same like him without the actual reference to what he said. It's like they think the same like him. It's beyond words how much racist jokes are tolerated here.
But it's good to know there's someone out there for Vee
thanks. I'm striving to make more people like her. And posting this article on Belgian forums may help ;) I'm thinking about sending this article to the Belgian newspapers so it can be published here and so that the eyes of many Belgians open up.

But this thread is derailing. It's about the wonderful Venus! :bowdown:

new-york
Mar 8th, 2007, 11:25 PM
I'm not a fan and I did!

But this is generally true - WTAworld is not exactly the most mature place.

yay.;)

but i was not that concerned. the postwhore that i am knows the board where he spams.

Orion
Mar 8th, 2007, 11:39 PM
That was a fantastic article. Things like this need to be the front-page tennis news.

tennisbum79
Mar 9th, 2007, 12:58 AM
Venus complexity come through this article.
Wee have seen the grilish part on court after a victory or at press conferences,
This was the wise, mature, collected Venus. Who wnat to take changre and emulate her hero and continue her work beyond where BJK has taken it.
She also listen to Zina for her support over the years.

If she leaves tennis, we will miss here, but we will be happy that she will be embarking on a mission more noble and making a difference in the lives of many more people.

She made me proud.

mboyle
Mar 9th, 2007, 01:21 AM
I'm floored. So floored...:worship:

tennisbum79
Mar 9th, 2007, 01:37 AM
your translation is correct.

This was said on the Q-Music radio by Sven Ornelis after Venus beat Kim in the 2003 Antwerp final. I was furious. that was f*cking racistic. I wish the guy would've been sacked, but nooo ... He's still presenting. Everytime I see him (I don't listen and never listened to him, because he's plain stupid and the radio channel he's on is *barf*), I think about it.
More recently, in Humo, a Flemish magazine, they compared Serena and Venus to monkeys. The week before they compared Sven Ornelis (the radio presentor above mentioned) to an ape, so it could be that they criticised his words. But I fear that it was a coincidence and they actually insulted Vee & Rena, because I think except for me & tennis addicts, no one remembers what that moronic radio presentor said.

Thank for being so candid about this.

But I am asure there would be some people in denial, who would make some convoluted argument with conclusion that would say it does not translate to ape.
Or they would say "there is racism everywhere, not just in Belgium..."

vw.
Mar 9th, 2007, 01:37 AM
:worship: Venus :worship:

tennisbum79
Mar 9th, 2007, 01:42 AM
I am surprised were are this far in the thread, and Spencer has not found
an angle to criticise Venus for and pur her down.
Rest assured if she does not find thing, she will bring Serena in and sayd totally unrelated to this article, but that in her mind put Serena - and there fore Venus - in bad light.

auntie janie
Mar 9th, 2007, 01:47 AM
Venus! So far-sighted, so big-hearted. :hug: The Tour is lucky to have a star like her. She's really coming into her own now. :worship:

williams123
Mar 9th, 2007, 01:47 AM
that's my one and only. always you boo. when you retire i will no longer watch ladies tennis.

vettipooh
Mar 9th, 2007, 02:15 AM
Vee is so much more, than she gets credit for. :sad:
Quite an inspiring and refreshing article, on a very bright, classy, talented, and sohisticated lady! :hearts: :hearts: :hearts:

stevos
Mar 9th, 2007, 05:21 AM
this deserves bumping

LucasArg
Mar 9th, 2007, 05:38 AM
I love her soo much :inlove:

She is my #1 forever, the biggest one :kiss: :hug:

akosijepoy
Mar 9th, 2007, 08:33 AM
awesome article
i'm glad that Vee is not only entertaining viewers with her tennis but making a difference in the lives of people around the world

vwfan
Mar 9th, 2007, 01:44 PM
just like the true champion that she is!

LUIS9
Mar 9th, 2007, 02:46 PM
You can only bow and admire this budding lady. She makes an excellent spokesperson for unesco and it's so mature and thoughtful of her to support such a great cause. :worship:

Vlover
Mar 9th, 2007, 05:26 PM
I just posted this article on a Belgian tennis board.
I hope it opens many Belgian's eyes.
Venus should be adored everywhere!

I must commend you for doing your part because if there are enough people like you then the world will be changing for the better. :yeah: As my signature stated a quote for MLK suggests we know the opinions of our "enemies" but if our friends choose to remain silent and tolerate people of such ilk then we become part of the problem also. Such people are everywhere but even on this board but we should not allow them to feel comfortable and unaccountable for their uncivilized actions.

Rosa Parks had no idea how many people would stand with her to champion the civil rights of others but America is far better on a for it. Likewise Nelson Mandela suffered in prison for 27 years but their were millions of people around the world who didn't remain silent and South Africa is now better for it.:D

Let all people with conscience unite against those who deliberately try to divide us in this way.:hug:

hotandspicey
Mar 9th, 2007, 06:44 PM
I must commend you for doing your part because if there are enough people like you then the world will be changing for the better. :yeah: As my signature stated a quote for MLK suggests we know the opinions of our "enemies" but if our friends choose to remain silent and tolerate people of such ilk then we become part of the problem also. Such people are everywhere but even on this board but we should not allow them to feel comfortable and unaccountable for their uncivilized actions.

Rosa Parks had no idea how many people would stand with her to champion the civil rights of others but America is far better on a for it. Likewise Nelson Mandela suffered in prison for 27 years but their were millions of people around the world who didn't remain silent and South Africa is now better for it.:D

Let all people with conscience unite against those who deliberately try to divide us in this way.:hug:

:yeah: :worship:

Zweli
Mar 9th, 2007, 07:45 PM
She is awsome isn't she.:kiss: