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*JR*
Feb 7th, 2007, 01:46 PM
POSTED: 1159 GMT (1959 HKT), February 7, 2007

PARIS, France (AP) -- Opening arguments began Wednesday in a defamation trial against a French satirical weekly that reprinted caricatures of the Prophet Mohammed last year, stoking outrage and violence across the Muslim world.

Charlie-Hebdo magazine and the publication's director, Philippe Val, are charged with "publicly slandering a group of people because of their religion."

If convicted, the charge carries a possible six-month prison sentence and a fine of up to $28,530. The Paris Mosque and the Union of Islamic Organizations of France brought the charges.

The caricatures, one of which showed Mohammed with a bomb-shaped turban, were published first in a Danish paper in September 2005, and sparked angry protests across the Muslim world and in Europe. Many European papers later reprinted them in the name of media freedom.

France's Charlie-Hebdo ran the drawings last February. The magazine featured a cover page showing Mohammed with his head in his hands, crying and saying: "It's hard to be loved by idiots."

Val called the case a "medieval trial," saying religions should be subject to "critique and to democratic debate."

Terrorism, not Muslims, were the intended target of the drawings, he told reporters during a news conference on the eve of the trial.

"Before being Muslim, one is a citizen of the (French) Republic," he said. France has a Muslim population of around 5 million -- the largest in western Europe.

azdaja
Feb 7th, 2007, 01:52 PM
Terrorism, not Muslims, were the intended target of the drawings, he told reporters during a news conference on the eve of the trial
if i believed them i would say they missed the target. but i don't.

Sam L
Feb 7th, 2007, 02:53 PM
POSTED: 1159 GMT (1959 HKT), February 7, 2007

PARIS, France (AP) -- Opening arguments began Wednesday in a defamation trial against a French satirical weekly that reprinted caricatures of the Prophet Mohammed last year, stoking outrage and violence across the Muslim world.

Charlie-Hebdo magazine and the publication's director, Philippe Val, are charged with "publicly slandering a group of people because of their religion."

If convicted, the charge carries a possible six-month prison sentence and a fine of up to $28,530. The Paris Mosque and the Union of Islamic Organizations of France brought the charges.

The caricatures, one of which showed Mohammed with a bomb-shaped turban, were published first in a Danish paper in September 2005, and sparked angry protests across the Muslim world and in Europe. Many European papers later reprinted them in the name of media freedom.

France's Charlie-Hebdo ran the drawings last February. The magazine featured a cover page showing Mohammed with his head in his hands, crying and saying: "It's hard to be loved by idiots."

Val called the case a "medieval trial," saying religions should be subject to "critique and to democratic debate."

Terrorism, not Muslims, were the intended target of the drawings, he told reporters during a news conference on the eve of the trial.

"Before being Muslim, one is a citizen of the (French) Republic," he said. France has a Muslim population of around 5 million -- the largest in western Europe.


Is freedom of speech dead in France? :disappointed:

I agree with him, this is nothing more than a medieval trial and death to liberalism. There's nothing racist or prejudiced about these cartoons.

samsung101
Feb 7th, 2007, 04:47 PM
A lawsuit over a satirical cartoon? In a satire magazine.

Uh, okay.

Sad to see.

Yes, freedom of speech is dead in France, Italy, Spain, Netherlands, etc.

The population trends show the traditional European population is at
a near zero population growth rate...people are not having children,
and if they do, not many.

The Muslim and immigrant Muslim population and the 'revert' Muslim
population all over Europe is booming, the birthrate is multiple times
that of other Europeans.

Result: the type of case we see here will be the norm, not the
exception.

Medieval ideas are what the Muslim fanatics who like to slice off heads,
and who protest over cartoons, call for death for artists who in any way
mock Mohammad, would like to see return.

When will France and Europe and the West realize this?

It is sadly, a clash of civilizations.

Multi-culturism only works if the other culture wants any part of
yours. Facts show that isn't happening in Europe.... They would
like you to change your culture to be like theirs, not the other way
around.

samsung101
Feb 7th, 2007, 04:48 PM
'Revert' as Muslims (many) believe you are born Muslim, and just
don't know it yet.

Once you revert/convert, etc., you cannot go back.
The penalty for that, well, that's death.

Dementieva_Dude
Feb 7th, 2007, 05:19 PM
I'm sure the cartoonist could have found a way of depicting terrorism without involving Mohammed. The inclusion of Mohammed in the cartoon was sloppy, and never should have gone to print. Do I neccessarily agree with the lawsuit? Personally, I find it slightly frivolous, but it is the right of ALL people (Muslim or not) to take such cases to court.

Diam's
Feb 7th, 2007, 05:34 PM
Is freedom of speech dead in France? :disappointed:

The trial hasn't occurred yet so it's a bit silly to say that now. We will know after the trial.



Sad to see.

Yes, freedom of speech is dead in France, Italy, Spain, Netherlands, etc.

Does your 'etc' include the US ? because as far as I remember very few American major newspapers reprinted these cartoons :

They wouldn't meet our standards for what we publish in the paper," said Leonard Downie, Jr., executive editor of The Washington Post, which ran a front-page story on the issue Friday, but has not published the cartoons. "We have standards about language, religious sensitivity, racial sensitivity and general good taste." ...

At USA Today, deputy foreign editor Jim Michaels offered a similar explanation. "At this point, I'm not sure there would be a point to it," he said about publishing the cartoons. "We have described them, but I am not sure running it would advance the story." Although he acknowledged that the cartoons have news value, he said the offensive nature overshadows that.

The Boston Globe, while acknowledging the right of newspapers to print material that may offend, argues that " newspapers ought to refrain from publishing offensive caricatures of Mohammed in the name of the ultimate Enlightenment value: tolerance."

etc

:wavey:

Johno_uk
Feb 7th, 2007, 05:48 PM
A lawsuit over a satirical cartoon? In a satire magazine.

Uh, okay.

Sad to see.

Yes, freedom of speech is dead in France, Italy, Spain, Netherlands, etc.

The population trends show the traditional European population is at
a near zero population growth rate...people are not having children,
and if they do, not many.

The Muslim and immigrant Muslim population and the 'revert' Muslim
population all over Europe is booming, the birthrate is multiple times
that of other Europeans.

Result: the type of case we see here will be the norm, not the
exception.

Medieval ideas are what the Muslim fanatics who like to slice off heads,
and who protest over cartoons, call for death for artists who in any way
mock Mohammad, would like to see return.

When will France and Europe and the West realize this?

It is sadly, a clash of civilizations.

Multi-culturism only works if the other culture wants any part of
yours. Facts show that isn't happening in Europe.... They would
like you to change your culture to be like theirs, not the other way
around.

What?
First of all, the population of the UK in 60million; why would we want population growth exactly? The UK population is going to stay in the 60-70 bracket, as that is all this country can sustain.

Secondly, white populations are growing in several European countries at a sustainable rate such as in Ireland and Norway; UK has a small increase in whites.

Thirdy not all immigrants are muslims!! The muslims of the UK are a minority of our ethnic minorities.

So the UK is going to become a muslim country when exactly?
This is not the first time you've been spuing rubbish about Europe becoming a muslim area....

If you want an example of a country which IS being taken over (demographically) by (recent) immigrants, try the USA: USA whites will be a minority within the next 10 years. UK whites (90-92%) are going to be the minority when exactly?

Or have I missed your point? i.e. only muslim immigranst are bad, and a Mexican could never be as evil as a muslim??

Tylane
Feb 7th, 2007, 06:09 PM
Lots of muslims are not opened and tolerant. I can't accept that. :rolleyes:

Religion should not be taboo !

Apoleb
Feb 7th, 2007, 06:17 PM
It's in bad taste, but it shouldn't be outlawed.

samsung101
Feb 7th, 2007, 08:10 PM
When the Muslim majority that is coming in Europe - just by sheer
immigration numbers and a booming birth rate, announces it
wants all women to wear a head scarf, or all alcohol to be banned,
or all films and books and tv shows to pass the new majority
govt. rulings, will that be okay?

Wake up.

French birth rate. German birth rate. Irish birth rate. Dutch birth rate.
Compared to the Islamic immigrant and Islamic revert population birth
rate...do the math. Majority rule isn't far behind for the Islamic
citiens of the EU in many nations.


Today it is the cartoon, or it's Oriana Fallaci being taken to court for
writing about Islam in a true, and negative light.




It's fashionable to bash Bush or the West or Christian historical
values in the West/USA....it's easy...and it's easy and accepted
part of life.

But, the train of thought in the Muslim world that goes across borders
is not about Bush and the USA actions in Iraq, it's about the growing
Islamic Fanatics who want to take over the West and make it their
own - not be part of France, England, Netherlands. They want those
nations to be part of their world.

Saudi Arabia in Paris. Iran in Amsterdam.

I could go to Salt Lake City or the heart of Catholic Boston and
find an anti-Mormon and anti-Catholic book or paper or publication
or piece of art, and it would be legal and accepted. Not necessarily
liked, but, almost certainly there.



The cartoonist, whether he's poking fun at Mohammad or Christ or
Joseph Smith or a bug on the ground, is supposed to be free to do
that any way they want.

I'm sure he could have done it w/o Mohammad.

But, why should he have to.

That's the point.
Today it is a cartoon.

Tomorrow it will be your schooling, education, what women can do,
what men can do, who you are ALLOWED to worship - by force or by
choice.

The Crow
Feb 7th, 2007, 09:03 PM
If you gonna laugh at a religion (whichever religion) be creative instead of continuously repeating that Danish cartoon thing :rolleyes:

Muslims should let it go already though.

wipeout
Feb 7th, 2007, 10:09 PM
Well, it's a good thing that none of the major religions such as Christianity, Islam and others "publicly slanders a group of people because of their religion" in any of their religious texts then. :angel:

Diam's
Feb 10th, 2007, 05:23 AM
Dismissal Sought in Prophet Cartoon Case


Friday February 9, 2007 10:31 AM

AP Photo PAR108

By PIERRE-ANTOINE SOUCHARD

Associated Press Writer

PARIS (AP) - A state attorney Thursday called for the dismissal of a court case brought by French Muslims against a satirical weekly that printed caricatures of the Prophet Mohamed, saying the cartoons denounce terrorists' use of the Muslim faith but do not damage Islam.

The trial, which opened Wednesday, has drawn nationwide attention in a country with Europe's largest Muslim community and a strong commitment to freedom of expression and secularism.

Journalists and politicians have testified and Interior Minister Nicolas Sarkozy sent a letter of support for the weekly, Charlie-Hebdo.

The publication and its director, Philippe Val, are charged with ``publicly abusing a group of people because of their religion.'' Val risks a six-month prison sentence and a fine of up to 28,500.

The state prosecutor - whose role in court is to defend French law - argued in favor of the magazine, which on Feb. 8, 2006, printed three caricatures - two of them reprints of those carried by a Danish newspaper in 2005 that stoked anger across the Islamic world. One caricature was an original.

``It is not faith in Islam that was stigmatized by these caricatures. It is not an attack on religious convictions as such,'' said prosecutor Anne de Fontette.

Instead, she argued, the caricatures denounced ``terrorists who pretend to be acting in (Islam's) name or in the name of the prophet.''

A verdict was expected March 15.

In September, a Danish court rejected a lawsuit against the newspaper that first printed the cartoons - a verdict some Arab politicians and intellectuals warned would widen a cultural gap.

The case against Charlie-Hebdo was brought by the conservative Mosque of Paris and the fundamentalist Union of Islamic Organizations of France. Attorneys for the Mosque of Paris denounced the mixing of religious and terrorist themes.

The caricatures ``constitute an outrageous expression of belief in a terrorist prophet,'' lawyer Christophe Bigot argued.

On Wednesday, the defense read a letter of support for Charlie-Hebdo from Sarkozy, a presidential candidate. Sarkozy, who wrote the letter on campaign paper and not ministry stationary, said he preferred ``an excess of caricatures to an absence of caricatures.''

Another presidential candidate, centrist leader Francois Bayrou, testified for the weekly, calling freedom of expression ``the central pillar of the society in which we live.''

``It protects us all, believers, nonbelievers, agnostics,'' he said.

The French Council for the Muslim Faith complained that the case was taken on a political character.

..

Diam's
Mar 22nd, 2007, 09:29 PM
Is freedom of speech dead in France? :disappointed:

The trial hasn't occurred yet so it's a bit silly to say that now. We will know after the trial.

:wavey:

French cartoons editor acquitted

The editor of a satirical French magazine accused of insulting Muslims by reprinting cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad has been acquitted.

A French court has ruled in favour of weekly Charlie Hebdo, rejecting accusations by Islamic groups who said it incited hatred against Muslims.

The cartoons were covered by freedom of expression laws and were not an attack on Islam, but fundamentalists, it said.

The case was seen as an important test for freedom of expression in France.

Applause broke out in the courtroom at the announcement of the verdict, which ruled that the three cartoons published in February 2006 were not insulting to the Muslim community, the AFP news agency reports.

Editor Philippe Val had rejected the allegations, saying the cartoons were not an attack on Muslims, but on terrorists.

He said the ruling was a victory for secular French Muslims.

"This debate was necessary," he said.

The case had been brought by the Grand Mosque of Paris and the Union of French Islamic Organisations.

Taboo depiction

At a two-day trial last month, Mr Val said he had published the cartoons - which first appeared in Denmark in September 2005 - to denounce terrorism.

Mr Val, the executive editor of the publication, was facing a maximum fine of nearly 30,000 euros (20,000; $40,000) and a jail sentence of up to six months.

Depictions of the human form are generally taboo in Islam.

The cartoons, including one of the Prophet Muhammad with a headdress in the form of a bomb, triggered riots in some Muslim countries.
Story from BBC NEWS:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/2/hi/europe/6479673.stm

Published: 2007/03/22 14:33:54 GMT