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fifiricci
Feb 6th, 2007, 11:49 AM
Note from fifi: just in case any of you ever thought that non integration was a "crime" invented by and particular to Muslims, which some "superior Western Europeans" who frequent this board would have some of you believe. ;)

Vive les pubs, la liberté et Londres! Britain's French connection

When Nicolas Sarkozy arrived in London this week, London's French expat community came out to greet him. Ed Caesar talks to the people who opted for life on this side of the channel

Published: 03 February 2007

By anyone's yardstick, there are more French people in London than there have ever been - 300,000 at the last count, although some statisticians estimate there may be as many as 350,000. Driven to London by a more dynamic job market, the opportunity to learn English, and by the demands of their French employers, our streets are now clogged with a horde (a shrug?) of baguette-wielding Gauls.

Indeed, go anywhere in west London - particularly the haute middle-class boroughs of South Kensington, Chiswick, Ealing and Clapham, where the émigrés send their children to French schools - and one will see, or, more likely hear, a French person. Their bustling presence in London, though, is nothing new.

Since the persecuted Huguenots flocked to Soho and Spitalfields and Wandsworth in the 17th century, the French have had a special relationship with London. And this current boom in French expats has been boiling for some time. As recently as a decade ago, London was teeming with 200,000 French people eager for the London experience. The key difference is that now, fewer than ever are returning home. Why?

"In France," says Stephen Clarke, author of Talk to the Snail, "it's practically impossible to get a decent full-time job, because none of the 35-65s are moving. Plus, in the French system, you need diplomas for just about every job. If you wanted to be a waitress in Paris you'd probably need a diploma from the National School of French Waitressing. Young people therefore, have very little chance to get into the job market.

"Compare that to London. You could turn up at J P Morgan and they'd make you chief stockbroker or something, and if you were any good, you'd keep your job. Loads of French people are going over to London because they realise that at least someone will give them a chance to do something in life."
That was certainly the case for Valerie Janin, 26, who has lived in Ladbroke Grove for a year. Mme Janin now works in the international division of Rough Trade records, having found it impossible to find work in the music business in Paris.

"You almost cannot find any work in Paris at the moment," she says. "I'd always wanted to be in the music business and I worked for free in France for a long time. After a while I thought, 'I might as well go to London where at least I can learn English while I am working for free.' And, luckily, I got hired."
Of course, most of the expats who turned up to hear M. Sarkozy's pitch on Wednesday night weren't hip young things like Mme Janin. They were suits, lured to London by the great chests of gold that are swilling around the City and Canary Wharf at the moment. It is this group that forms the backbone of the French community in London - who send their children to the private Lycée in South Kensington, and who largely stick together.

Francine Joyce, who has lived in South Kensington for almost six years, is married to a banker at HSBC, and also teaches English part time. She never wanted to leave France, but now loves London so much "I want to stay here my whole life". When she's not teaching, or looking after her three children, Ms Joyce organises activities for west London's French community.

"It's great fun being part of the French set in London," she says. "We have all sorts of groups - we go to the gym at Imperial College together; we go to each other's houses to cook. I suppose my friends are about half French and half English. We all meet at Paul, the patisserie, in South Ken. But all the cafes around the lycée are always packed with French people."

Ah yes, Frog Alley, otherwise known as Bute Street. Turn up on a school day and one will find legions of yummy mamans drinking coffee and discussing the price of brie. Indeed, the French have effectively cornered this swish part of west London - "you must admit, South Kensington is a very nice place to have a ghetto", says Clarke - but the expat life is not for everyone.
Fred Leris, 46, came to London eight years ago with his wife, Sophie, to try to crack the London art market as a dealer. Now a carpenter living in Hackney, M. Leris says that he only has "a couple of very good French friends" in London. Why?

"I used to sell paintings to all those French bankers, but now I really try to avoid them," says M. Leris. "They don't integrate. They are always complaining about this thing or that thing that is not the same as at home, and they don't really try to be part of life here. For me, there's no other way to live somewhere than just to throw yourself in there.

"London was really easy to settle in. Compared to Paris, where everyone just stays with their own circle, England is much more open. Here, you go to a party, and everyone speaks to you, and you can meet an architect, a journalist, a teacher, and a carpenter all at the same event. That makes the place much more vibrant and interesting."

Perhaps, then, it is not just the lure of job opportunities that is driving the French from la patrie, but something deeper in the psyche. Could it be that the French have fallen in love with the English way of life?

Clarke certainly thinks so. "They may all claim to have oysters and champagne every day, but they secretly love hamburgers and pubs," he says. "Going to a pub and having a drink and a laugh and then going out into the street and vomiting - that's not fashionable in Paris. Also, the French still think the UK is Cool Britannia. The Blair effect still works over here. There's an enormous romanticism about coming to London, where everyone thinks they're going to get into the art scene and maybe set up a cool design company."

Can this be true? Phillipe Castaing, 32, a restaurant owner living in Brixton, thinks he is "turning into an Englishman". M. Castaing moved to London from La Rochelle 13 years ago not for money but "for love", as his girlfriend, Stephanie, had just moved here herself. Five years ago, Stephanie and Phillipe opened Opus, a café in Brixton, and last year, they opened the Upstairs Restaurant on Acre Lane. "What I really loved, when I came to London, was the freedom," says M. Castaing. "London was so exciting. I had come from a small town, and I came to live in Ladbroke Grove. That was a culture shock. I remember walking up Portobello Road on my first weekend with all the stalls, and the music, and the spliffs, and thinking 'gosh, what is this town?'

"What I've done here - setting up a business - I could never have done in France. France is completely crippled by its academic records. Unless you study such and such, and have 15 years' experience, you can forget about doing anything. Here, I was the general manager of the Polygon restaurant in Clapham at the age of 23. That would be unthinkable in France - they would say 'who do you think you are?'"

So the French come here, incredibly, because they love our laissez-faire attitudes and thriving job market and our unflinching commitment to binge drinking. But there must be some things that they miss about home?
"Of course, the French bread," says Mme Joyce. Moi aussi, says M. Leris: "In Paris the quality of the food you can buy, and the easiness of buying it was amazing. Here, everything is expensive." What about our abysmal transport system? "Yes, that's true," says M. Janin. "The transport is completely rubbish. In France, yes, we strike, but at least everyone knows when there's going to be a strike and avoids the trains. Here, it's like a strike every day, except, no one's actually on strike."

That's better. From their voluble praise for London, it would be easy to think that the French had lost their famous spikiness. Too much time in Albion perfide, it seems, will do that to you. The question now is, will any of them go home? M. Sarkozy, who, on Wednesday, called London "a great French city", asked not only for the expats to vote for him, but to buy a return ticket as well. According to one Anglophile, he may be fighting a losing battle.
"England is one giant happy mess," says M. Castaing. "It seems to run without too many problems given the complete lack of efficient management. I think it is a bit like Marmite, you either love it or you hate it. I am not planning to return to France ... especially if Sarko gets in."

Where the French live...
South Kensington, or "the 21st arrondissement" as it is known, where the Lycée Francais educates the wealthy ex-pats' children. One Onslow Square resident says: "The French are everywhere. They tend to be bankers on three-year contracts, and they don't seem to mix very well with the rest of us." Other French enclaves include Chiswick, Ealing, Chelsea and Clapham.
Eat...
Racine, in South Kensington, where the Francophile Englishman Henry Harris will serve them their Tête de Veau. Didier, one regular, says it has "the best soup this side of the channel". The Michelin-starred Chez Bruce off Wandsworth Common is another firm favourite with the south London French contingent. Also One-O-One in Knightsbridge, where the French claim the fish is legendary.
Work...
In the City and Canary Wharf, where they hold high-powered broking or banking jobs. At the lower end, there are thousands of French in catering and hospitality jobs across the capital. "There are basically two types of French person in London," says Patricia Connell, who runs franceinlondon.co.uk. "Those who move here with big companies, and young people who can't find work at home - who'll do anything."
Drink coffee...
In the South Kensington ghetto, Raison d'Etre is a favourite on Bute Street - otherwise known as Frog Alley. The writer Marc Levy claims the café has "the best baguettes I have ever eaten". On school days, every café around the Lycée is full to bursting, but the South Kensington branch of Paul is another favourite.
...and watch sport
At the Bouchon Bordelais in Battersea Rise, Clapham. Here they can watch French football and rugby games on one television, while watching their French heroes Thierry Henry and Thomas Castaignede in the English leagues. The Bouchon is also a magnet for post-World Cup and European Championship victory parties. "Even when France loses, we never have any trouble," says Frederick, the manager.

http://news.independent.co.uk/uk/this_britain/article2211623.ece

PS: please be assured that personally I am an enormous francophile ;)

Sam L
Feb 6th, 2007, 01:08 PM
Yes except I wouldn't call this non-integration. There are things about France that are better than UK. Like the article said people have moved to UK for various reasons.

The other thing of course is the French aren't trying to change UK into France.

pla
Feb 6th, 2007, 01:15 PM
Yes except I wouldn't call this non-integration. There are things about France that are better than UK. Like the article said people have moved to UK for various reasons.

The other thing of course is the French aren't trying to change UK into France.

How is that different of non-integration? What´s exactly different between the Franch people in London, the Portuguese in Luxembourg, the Muslims in France and so on?

Lord Nelson
Feb 6th, 2007, 01:20 PM
Many muslims of France want to impose their values on the French. I saw part of Sarkozy's speech the other day on the local channel I was impressed with him. He said that he was for minority rights but that he was also for the rights of the majority. in other words those from the minority should not impose their views on others. i.e shariah law where in Canada that almost happened!

Sam L
Feb 6th, 2007, 01:30 PM
How is that different of non-integration? What´s exactly different between the Franch people in London, the Portuguese in Luxembourg, the Muslims in France and so on?

What because they say things are better France? French bread is better than bread in UK so they must not be integrating. :rolleyes:

Like I said it's not like they're trying to change UK into France and like Lord Nelson said they're not imposing their values onto the UK people.

mandy7
Feb 6th, 2007, 01:34 PM
Dude, bread is bread.
even if you call it a baguette.
now remove head from arse.

pla
Feb 6th, 2007, 01:34 PM
What because they say things are better France? French bread is better than bread in UK so they must not be integrating. :rolleyes:

Like I said it's not like they're trying to change UK into France and like Lord Nelson said they're not imposing their values onto the UK people.

No, it´s the way they are percieved that changes. I.e. I´ve heard multiple times in Luxembourg that the Portuguese people want to turn Luxembourg into a mini-Portugal. So, are the Portuguese people ¨dangerous¨ as you seem to think about the Muslims or not cause they are Christians?

Btw, how are the Muslims trying to impose their values?

Lord Nelson
Feb 6th, 2007, 02:11 PM
Hey Pla, i may not have gone to Luxembourg but I know that the Portuguese do not want to turn Luxembourg into a mini-Portugal. You think just because many of us have not gone to Luxembourg we have to believe what you say? Give us some sources then to back you up. You would have been better talking about Belgium, your neighbour. But there, the wallons and the Flamands are indigineous people.

Also I will not answer your question on how are muslims trying to impose their values. I know that you are smarter then you seem and you know what is going on in the region, Belgium, France etc... Again, Luxembourg is not in the middle of nowhere. I will give you some clues though. Laic, Ecoles, voiles.

Diam's
Feb 6th, 2007, 02:29 PM
Funny I've just read a similar article about the Brit expats in France! :lol:
and of course the Brit expats in France 'largely stick together' too and 'don't integrate and are always complaining about this thing or that thing that is not the same as at home (just have a look at their blogs :tape: ) , and they don't really try to be part of life here' :lol:

marmotte
Feb 6th, 2007, 03:25 PM
Funny I've just read a similar article about the Brit expats in France! :lol:
and of course the Brit expats in France 'largely stick together' too and 'don't integrate and are always complaining about this thing or that thing that is not the same as at home (just have a look at their blogs :tape: ) , and they don't really try to be part of life here' :lol:

yep, it's exactly the same with the brit expats here.
i often go to chamonix because my grand father lives here, and i need to speak english to order a beer at the pub :rolleyes: , there are some stores which sell only british food, and so on...
no wonder the french are fed up with them over there...

i guess it's the same wherever there is a large community of expats, they tend to stick together.

"Sluggy"
Feb 6th, 2007, 03:25 PM
Based in this article, it sounds like they are talking about the children of wealthy french, who like to go to England and live there. most french are not wealthy so we might be dealing with the upper class here, who may or may not function like the "average" frenchman....

I dont really understand what we expect them to do. It is true that bread is known to be very good in france, in fact, amongst the best in the world. And English food is known to be amongst the worst.

Most people take their origins with them. I am an American in France, my children will probably take, from me and my brother (how also lives here), many aspects of the American world view. I'm sure that my son will probably tremble when he sees food going to waste and might be like a vulture on carion when he sees a sandwich for the taking. so be it. In the town I reside in, we have a huge population of Portugese. We see them in hordes on Sunday congreating at the Catholic Church. Frequently, Portugese are easy to recognize based on their dress, the women's short hair, etc. So yes, the Portugese in my town, at least, are very recognizable. I can't imagine anything that they do that is not integrating into French life though... they go to the same cafés, they shop at the market and live like French people. I'm sure they go to French restaurants too.

What is not surprising is that the French are not perceived as mixing much with the English. French people in France don't really mix much with foreigners like me (an American), nor my other anglophone or hispanic friends either. so that is not a surprise.

Diam's
Feb 6th, 2007, 03:34 PM
Expats and immigrants are 2 different things.
But most expats (from any country, and in any country in the world) tend to stick together :shrug:

"Sluggy"
Feb 6th, 2007, 03:41 PM
Expats and immigrants are 2 different things.
But most expats (from any country, and in any country in the world) tend to stick together :shrug:


I dont know any expats that stick together here in france, me and my brother dont seek out americans. My other expat friends dont either.

Diam's
Feb 6th, 2007, 03:53 PM
I dont know any expats that stick together here in france, me and my brother dont seek out americans. My other expat friends dont either.

That's why I said most
I used to live in Brittany where there are many British expats ... and most of them can't speak French at all and are not willing to learn either so they stick together.

controlfreak
Feb 6th, 2007, 04:16 PM
I'm sure most Brits are happier to have French people living there than more Poles, Czechs, Arabs, etc whose language they can't even understand. Also, in any country in the world, given the choice between integrating and not integrating, 9 out of 10 immigrants prefer not to. C'est la vie.

Halardfan
Feb 6th, 2007, 05:33 PM
I'm sure most Brits are happier to have French people living there than more Poles, Czechs, Arabs, etc whose language they can't even understand.



Except Anglo/French relations tend to be ummmm...difficult.

There is a cerain regrettable antipathy between us, which I feel is a pity.

Maybe because we are both rather arrogant countries who think we are a bit special.



;)

suffer well
Feb 6th, 2007, 06:22 PM
fifiricci you must be the Al Murray of the board?;)

I dont mind French women its the men who get my goat (and this is not a pun that French men are into beastality)

fifiricci
Feb 6th, 2007, 06:51 PM
fifiricci you must be the Al Murray of the board?;)

I dont mind French women its the men who get my goat (and this is not a pun that French men are into beastality)

I'm not sure if that's a compliment or not! (I know I'm better looking than him, but I should be, being female :lol:)

I just wanted to make the point, using this article, that we seem to put more pressure on those who look and act more differently to us (eg coloured people or muslims) to "integrate" into our society, when others who superficially appear more similar to "us", but who might be just as alien in many other ways, are allowed to get away with it almost without comment. ;)

Personally, I care not a jot if the French want to integrate into British life or not and I rather like diversity, one of my favourite mottos being "vive la difference" :D

I'm one of the few people I know who really do like the French and most of the time I am even able to forgive their complete disregard for our lovely British queuing system :fiery:

;)

Pamela Shriver
Feb 6th, 2007, 06:58 PM
I have a pad in London. Us giraffes integrate well into Brit culture, just ask Sue Barker.

suffer well
Feb 6th, 2007, 07:01 PM
I'm not sure if that's a compliment or not! (I know I'm better looking than him, but I should be, being female :lol:)

I just wanted to make the point, using this article, that we seem to put more pressure on those who look and act more differently to us (eg coloured people or muslims) to "integrate" into our society, when others who superficially appear more similar to "us", but who might be just as alien in many other ways, are allowed to get away with it almost without comment. ;)

Personally, I care not a jot if the French want to integrate into British life or not and I rather like diversity, one of my favourite mottos being "vive la difference" :D

I'm one of the few people I know who really do like the French and most of the time I am even able to forgive their complete disregard for our lovely British queuing system :fiery:

;)

Compliment :) of course. Just Al Murray came into my head. There's never much occupying my head so when a thought gets trapped there God help it

I always think that the British don’t like any foreigners not specifically the French...and no I'm not Alf Garnett ;)

TheBoiledEgg
Feb 6th, 2007, 07:11 PM
I always think that the British don’t like any foreigners not specifically the French...and no I'm not Alf Garnett ;)

just wondering what the foreigners who watching the football in London tonight make of this.

4 diff matches in London right now, and most of them would be living in UK.

Brazil vs Portugal
Australia vs Denmark
Ghana vs Nigeria
S Korea vs Greece.

this couldnt happen anywhere else in the world.

suffer well
Feb 6th, 2007, 07:19 PM
just wondering what the foreigners who watching the football in London tonight make of this.

4 diff matches in London right now, and most of them would be living in UK.

Brazil vs Portugal
Australia vs Denmark
Ghana vs Nigeria
S Korea vs Greece.

this couldnt happen anywhere else in the world.

I wouldnt know. I never go near London, nobody speaks English there

suffer well
Feb 6th, 2007, 07:21 PM
London is the most diverse city on the planet - and long may that continue. And I'm a Londoner who couldn't give a shit about football either.

You must be female or gay or both

suffer well
Feb 6th, 2007, 07:24 PM
I am neither.

Men who dont like football are gay thats a known fact. Just look at Julian Clary

suffer well
Feb 6th, 2007, 07:27 PM
It's also a known fact that men who like football are t.h.i.c.k :kiss:

C'mon! That's one hell of a bitchy reply. You must be gay ;)

Just look at the way you wrote t.h.i.c.k...just like that G.A.Y. nightclub

Yasmine
Feb 6th, 2007, 07:29 PM
How is that different of non-integration? What´s exactly different between the Franch people in London, the Portuguese in Luxembourg, the Muslims in France and so on?
oh and the britts in France, looking for the sun... and after a few years there can't speak a word of french :lol:

Anyway that said, I get your point Fiona;)

suffer well
Feb 6th, 2007, 07:32 PM
oh and the britts in France, looking for the sun... and after a few years there can't speak a word of french :lol:

Anyway that said, I get your point Fiona;)

If it wasn't for us Britts you'd be speaking German

Yasmine
Feb 6th, 2007, 07:33 PM
If it wasn't for us Britts you'd be speaking German
your point being? :scratch:

suffer well
Feb 6th, 2007, 07:34 PM
Nor do I read The S(c)um, watch shit brother or like Robbie Williams ... so you might have a point, but then again ...

He's also in denial

fifiricci
Feb 6th, 2007, 07:35 PM
oh and the britts in France, looking for the sun... and after a few years there can't speak a word of french :lol:



Yeah, I know, I'm a case in point, apparently :lol:

suffer well
Feb 6th, 2007, 07:36 PM
your point being? :scratch:

Us britts in France, looking for the sun... and after a few years there can't speak a word of German...thats what I mean :)

fifiricci
Feb 6th, 2007, 07:38 PM
If it wasn't for us Britts you'd be speaking German

Oh my word, methinks the merde has just hit the fan :p

Once we lay claim to saving mainland Europe from the Germans, the Yanks are all gonna pile in here and claim that it was only thanks to them :unsure: (which it wasn't of course, but that's what they'll say, seeming to forget that they were merely "hired help" and we've only just finished paying Uncle Sam back for it ;) ).

I think this is an appropriate point for me to disappear to the pub....

Bonne soiree mes enfants!!

suffer well
Feb 6th, 2007, 07:39 PM
apologies to my French friends - there seems to be a "Brit Chav" about :o

No need for you to be so apologetic. We accept you for being you chav or no chav...a gay chav? Theres always a first I guess

suffer well
Feb 6th, 2007, 07:41 PM
Oh my word, methinks the merde has just hit the fan :p

Once we lay claim to saving mainland Europe from the Germans, the Yanks are all gonna pile in here and claim that it was only thanks to them :unsure: (which it wasn't of course, but that's what they'll say, seeming to forget that they were merely "hired help" and we've only just finished paying Uncle Sam back for it ;) ).

I think this is an appropriate point for me to disappear to the pub....

Bonne soiree mes enfants!!

Mines a vodka and coke if you are buying?:) Don't forget the pork scratchings

Yasmine
Feb 6th, 2007, 07:42 PM
why should a brit be speaking german when living in France? :scratch: Just making a parallel, you might as well wonder how us coming from France to live in the UK (and I was one of those for a few years) don't speak german uh?

Fiona, you're so damn right, the pub is a much nicer place to be :devil:

For some people's informations: funnily enough not only I live in an area in France where a lot of english people have settled (which I have no problem with) but I also happened to be one of those french who went to live in the UK for a few years and did integrate pretty well ;)

suffer well
Feb 6th, 2007, 07:46 PM
why should a brit be speaking german when living in France? :scratch: Just making a parallel, you might as well wonder how us coming from France to live in the UK (and I was one of those for a few years) don't speak german uh?

Fiona, you're so damn right, the pub is a much nicer place to be :devil:

For some people's informations: funnily enough not only I live in an area in France where a lot of english people have settled (which I have no problem with) but I also happened to be one of those french who went to live in the UK for a few years and did integrate pretty well ;)

Where in the UK did you live? It has to be London that’s where all the foreigners go. There and Suffolk

pla
Feb 6th, 2007, 08:49 PM
oh and the britts in France, looking for the sun... and after a few years there can't speak a word of french :lol:

Anyway that said, I get your point Fiona;)

In my ¨refreshing the language" classes here, there was a Brittish lady, real fantastic, oldish woman who was living here for more than 20 years without knowing a word of French, German or Luxembourgish. :D But she made the effort at the end ;)

But I must say, she didn´t lack company around the place :lol:

Yasmine
Feb 6th, 2007, 09:22 PM
euh I wasn't living in London no :p :angel: In Leicester, which is also a pretty multicultural place I found :)

suffer well
Feb 7th, 2007, 08:26 PM
euh I wasn't living in London no :p :angel: In Leicester, which is also a pretty multicultural place I found :)

Im not into multiculturalism myself. I don't believe in it and it only works when everyone who participates in it has lots of money

azdaja
Feb 7th, 2007, 09:51 PM
No, it´s the way they are percieved that changes. I.e. I´ve heard multiple times in Luxembourg that the Portuguese people want to turn Luxembourg into a mini-Portugal.
isn't luxembourg a mini-portugal already? :o

fifiricci
Feb 9th, 2007, 08:58 AM
Many muslims of France want to impose their values on the French.

You know, sweeping statements like this really interest me.

Firstly, I don't recall anyone ever making claims like this before 9 frigging 11.

Secondly, I live in an environment (in the UK) where there are plenty of muslims, asylum seekers and economic migrants. And do you know what, not one of them has ever come up to me in the street or knocked on my door and tried to impose "their values" on me. In fact, the only people who have ever banged on my door trying to impose "their values" on me have been frigging Mormons and Jehovah's Witnesses. :rolleyes:

Thirdly, no-one ever managed to get the French to do anything other than exactly what they want to do. :lol:

"Sluggy"
Feb 9th, 2007, 09:12 AM
Le Pen was on tv for 2 hours last night. Very scary!

Lord Nelson
Feb 9th, 2007, 11:59 AM
You know, sweeping statements like this really interest me.

Firstly, I don't recall anyone ever making claims like this before 9 frigging 11.

Secondly, I live in an environment (in the UK) where there are plenty of muslims, asylum seekers and economic migrants. And do you know what, not one of them has ever come up to me in the street or knocked on my door and tried to impose "their values" on me. In fact, the only people who have ever banged on my door trying to impose "their values" on me have been frigging Mormons and Jehovah's Witnesses. :rolleyes:

Thirdly, no-one ever managed to get the French to do anything other than exactly what they want to do. :lol:

I had Muslims tried to convert me at university prior to 9/11. I almost became one myself......You are no different then me. You say that Jehovah's witness people try to convert you whereas I speak of another group trying to convert me. But unlike you I don't care about political correctness. To you it is ok to talk about Jehovah's witness trying to convert people but not about Muslims doing the samething. Why is that?

I also have been to the UK and obviously we have not been in the same areas. In parts of London, you feel as if you are in Pakistan....Stop talking about 9/11. I had the same attitude before this period. I even knew about Bin Laden before this. He was still a wanted criminal hiding in Sudan but Clinton and Sudanese government let him go away.

Sam L
Feb 9th, 2007, 12:05 PM
I had Muslims tried to convert me at university prior to 9/11. I almost became one myself......


Oh no! How did you save yourself? :eek:

Lord Nelson
Feb 10th, 2007, 12:43 PM
Oh no! How did you save yourself? :eek:

:lol: I must have regained my sanity by then. :p
Well the guy was being a little to insistent. Anyway I still remained on good terms with my friend from Malaysia but I stayed away from his friends.

fifiricci
May 28th, 2009, 01:01 PM
Funny I've just read a similar article about the Brit expats in France! :lol:
and of course the Brit expats in France 'largely stick together' too and 'don't integrate and are always complaining about this thing or that thing that is not the same as at home (just have a look at their blogs :tape: ) , and they don't really try to be part of life here' :lol:

Too true and also of the Spanish Costas, which the Brits invaded years ago and quickly turned into Blackpool (bingo, pubs, full english breakfasts etc) but with nice weather! Not for them the filthy local food! ;)