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samsung101
Feb 5th, 2007, 05:07 PM
Back to normal in New Orleans, 161 murders last year, and it is on pace
already to surpass that in 2007. Most go unsolved. Most involve
young people.

The flood destroyed many criminal records and legal records for
court cases.

Nice system New Orleans, if you're in a bowl, don't you have
a backup? How about a CD back up? Zip drive?


Even with billions pouring into New Orleans, even with a huge chunk
of the population now settled in other cities and states with no
desire to return...the city continues a terrible murder cycle.
One political party has controlled the funding in New Orleans
and most of Louisiana for decades, and corruption is normal.
The city seems determined to keep up that status quo in politics
and spending, and sadly, not getting the job done.


Any wonder it has such a horrendous crime rate.


The dysfunction, govt. corruption, crime, and drug problems it had
before Katrina, have returned with new strength after Katrina.
Gangs control sections of the city again. The same gangs that
turned on the citizens when the storm hit.

The National Guard is there trying to help, but, how much can it do
if the citizens make no effort to change from the ground up. Mayor
Nagin, Gov. Blanco, this is your department, step up. The answers
are at the local level first & foremost.

kabuki
Feb 5th, 2007, 05:14 PM
I was just in the French Quarter last month and had a wonderful time. :wavey:

samsung101
Feb 5th, 2007, 05:18 PM
Reaction of Florida to recent tornado hits, hurricanes,
Washington State and massive flooding, Oregon and
flooding, Sacramento Delta and bad flooding...all had
people waiting for help, some on rooftops, people
evacuating, many of those people poor, elderly, and
alone, and many of color.

How did the states react? Well. Fast. Even in Washington,
where flooding on that scale last year is not typical at all.

They didn't run around screaming 'it's someone elses fault!',
they just set out to do all they could, with what they had,
and the feds came in long after w/funds and assistance.
Far from perfect results, but, good results.

They have a system in Florida, and get this New Orleans, they
follow their plan. They don't throw it out the window. They
do what their emergency plans call for.

samsung101
Feb 5th, 2007, 05:21 PM
Yes, it probably was. A great deal of New Orleans has been up and
running since a few weeks after the flood, yet, few know it. The
dire predictions, the horror stories (even if many were not true, but
urban myths), spread, and it's hard to get people to realize a lot of
the city is safe and nice and ready for guests.


But, the crime problem has always been a factor in New Orleans.
The city almost zoned off tourists from certain areas due to the
crime. It is a dangerous place, and little is done w/i NO to fix it.
Even with a population far below what it was pre-Katrina, it has
a horrendous murder rate going again.

ampers&
Feb 5th, 2007, 05:48 PM
Samsung, for like the millionth time, the scale of the New Orleans disaster was far larger than the scale of flooding in Washington, Florida and Oregon; you can't really compare the evacuation plans or the response to those floods. It doesn't matter if, in both cases, there were "poor citizens of color" who were stranded. There were an ENTIRELY different set of circumstances surrounding Hurricane Katrina. I think that's obvious to any sane person.

Yes, the state is to blame for several of the issues (pre and post-Katrina), but quit trying to excuse Bush's cabinet for their ineptitude following the disaster. We know your tongue is planted firmly on Bush's asshole, but spare us from your obviously biased drivel.

samsung101
Feb 5th, 2007, 07:47 PM
Sadly, New Orleans really needs a revamped local govt.

The system for decades has been very corrupt and has failed
to address real problems.

That's not the failure of a few years, that's going back decades.

This city was losing jobs and business to other gulf coast cities
and states in droves prior to Katrina. It still is.

No jobs, crime grows.

The poorest are the targets of the crime.

What's Nagin doing about it?
What's Blanco doing about it?
What they were doing prior to Katrina - not much.


The citizens of New Orleans have to step up too, it's
their town, the money is there, what do they do w/it?

Lord Nelson
Feb 5th, 2007, 10:29 PM
Samsung, for like the millionth time, the scale of the New Orleans disaster was far larger than the scale of flooding in Washington, Florida and Oregon; you can't really compare the evacuation plans or the response to those floods. It doesn't matter if, in both cases, there were "poor citizens of color" who were stranded. There were an ENTIRELY different set of circumstances surrounding Hurricane Katrina. I think that's obvious to any sane person.

Yes, the state is to blame for several of the issues (pre and post-Katrina), but quit trying to excuse Bush's cabinet for their ineptitude following the disaster. We know your tongue is planted firmly on Bush's asshole, but spare us from your obviously biased drivel.

YOu forgot to mention the inept state government and local one as well. They messed up!!!!

wta_zuperfann
Feb 5th, 2007, 10:35 PM
Louisiana: a RED state.

That explains it all.

Sam L
Feb 6th, 2007, 01:28 AM
Louisiana: a RED state.

That explains it all.

How old are you? 13?

Apoleb
Feb 6th, 2007, 01:30 AM
They all messed up. From the governor, to the state gov, to the fed gov.

Infiniti2001
Feb 6th, 2007, 01:35 AM
Samsung, why don't you remind your president about his own people. All the money being wasted in Iraq could do a hell lot better in New Orleans :rolleyes:

Mother_Marjorie
Feb 6th, 2007, 01:43 AM
Louisiana: a RED state.

That explains it all.

Both the Governor and the Mayor of New Orleans are Democrats.

Brett.
Feb 6th, 2007, 01:47 AM
:scared:

Mother_Marjorie
Feb 6th, 2007, 01:50 AM
New Orleans Murder Rate Skyrockets to Highest in the Nation

Criminal Justice System Struggles as the City Continues to Reel from Katrina Devastation
By Wanda Leibowitz

February 05, 2007

In the wake of Hurricane Katrina, the murder rate in New Orleans has skyrocketed. In 2006, New Orleans was home to 161 murders; 2007 has already seen 18 suspected homicides come under investigation in the city, which is home to just 200,000 people. Those numbers put New Orleans in the top spot for highest murder rate per capita of any city in the United States.

A large percentage of the victim and suspect populations in these cases are teenagers, and approximately two-thirds of the murders go unsolved.

District Attorney Eddie Jordan points to broken community relations as a leading cause of the high crime rate and lack of convictions. Seven New Orleans police officers were indicted last week on murder and attempted murder charges relating to a shooting that occurred during the turmoil immediately following Hurricane Katrina, and a general mistrust of officers by jurors and witnesses due in part to events surrounding the storm permeates the community. Jordan states that this lack of confidence in law enforcement, combined with slow police response and the fact that witnesses fear retaliation on the street, makes for a situation where "by the time the investigative report is presented. . . a good number of witnesses are no longer available or have gotten afraid to testify."

City officials have recently announced a number of plans to reduce the crime rate in New Orleans, including a campaign to mount more cameras in problem areas, an increase in police foot patrols to rebuild community relations, and higher pay levels for police officers and prosecutors, an effort to attract more and better workers in the fight against crime. The possibility of a curfew has been discussed. Some residents, including those in the neighborhood improvement association in the Broadmoor section of New Orleans, are seeking private funding to implement these ideas.

City Council President Oliver Thomas has also called for the reinstatement of mentoring problems for underprivileged youth, and the creation of neighborhood watch groups to come hand in hand with upgrades to the criminal justice system that will increase law enforcement presence and the speed of trials.

However, according to former prosecutor and public defender Eric E. Malveau, the only lasting solution to the high murder rate is creating more police presence, but creating more socioeconomic opportunities for New Orleans residents in order to combat the strong hold that drug dealing has on the city. Malveau stated "As long as you have a large population that is uneducated and has no job and no hope, what else is there to do but sell drugs? Until you fix that, it's hard to see the problems getting much better."

The city's criminal justice infrastructure has not recovered from the devastation it experienced during Katrina, and may never fully do so. According to New York Times reporters, evidence in hundreds of criminal cases was lost during the flood. This left a number of cases open that there is now little to no hope of closing. Even more devastating was the destruction of the New Orleans Police crime lab, which has yet to be rebuilt. Often, suspects in drug-related arrests have to be released because chemical evidence cannot be tested at other locations before the deadline to bring charges arrives. Last year, over 3,000 suspects, many of them arrested on drug offenses, were released without undergoing full investigation, due to the fact that deadlines expired before adequate evidence and paperwork for the cases was collected and filed by law enforcement.

Federal funds amounting to $5 million for a new crime lab are on the way, along with an additional influx of prosecutors and undercover drug agents in an attempt to curb the city's overall crime rate. However, until funding for the lab is processed, and work on the lab is completed, it is likely that the revolving door on drug arrests will continue to be a problem, continuing to fuel the high murder rate.

Mother_Marjorie
Feb 6th, 2007, 01:57 AM
From NPR:

Hundreds Protest Violence, Policies in New Orleans
by Eve Troeh

All Things Considered, January 11, 2007 Hundreds of New Orleans residents march to City Hall to protest a rising murder rate and what they say is a lack of city and police response.

People have been galvanized by the loss of two prominent, yet disparate, cultural figures in the city.

Helen Hill, 36, an experimental filmmaker, was murdered in her home. Dinerral Shavers, 25, a brass-band musician and high-school band leader, was shot and killed while driving home. Hill was a white woman, a transplant to New Orleans; Shavers was a young, black man and a native of the city.

The march is being seen as a symbol of two distinct communities coming together to oppose Mayor Ray Nagin's assertion that the recent crime wave is mostly "black on black" attacks between drug dealers and therefore not a direct threat to the city's larger community.
From New Orleans, Eve Troeh reports.