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View Full Version : When do tennis players peak?


venusdemilo
Jan 29th, 2007, 11:18 PM
I've wondered about this for awhile, but even right now the whole thing has me scratching my head.

At what age does a tennis player peak? Is it a different peak for different players or is there a set age?

Thanks and discuss. :)

RJWCapriati
Jan 29th, 2007, 11:22 PM
I would say between 24-27

cartmancop
Jan 29th, 2007, 11:36 PM
I think different ages for different players, dependent on game/maturity/competition, etc.

Some very early: Hingis, Seles perhaps

Some late: Mauresmo, Molik is a good example of a late bloomer,

But I would say lots of players seem to hit their stride in the 20-24 ish age range yeh...

Wednesday
Jan 29th, 2007, 11:37 PM
Probably about 23

Gowza
Jan 29th, 2007, 11:41 PM
there is no set age, look at dokic she may have already had her peak and it would have been late teens. i'd say generally with top women players they peak in their mid 20s, some peak early to mid 20s while others will peak mid to late 20s, late bloomers generally peak later. farina elia was late 20s early 30s when she peaked.

men take more time to develop generally and the game is so quick etc that really their only opportunity to peak is when they're in their physical prime which is probably mid to late 20s at that point they've developed, they're fitter than they've even been and they should be mentally mature.

iPatty
Jan 29th, 2007, 11:46 PM
After 10,000 hours of practice.

Seriously. That's what my tennis coach taught me.

Gowza
Jan 29th, 2007, 11:46 PM
I think different ages for different players, dependent on game/maturity/competition, etc.

Some very early: Hingis, Seles perhaps

Some late: Mauresmo, Molik is a good example of a late bloomer,

But I would say lots of players seem to hit their stride in the 20-24 ish age range yeh...

yeah i think for women they can peak anywhere in their 20s, some even in they're 30s but the players that peak in their 30s usually aren't top top players. in the last generation (henin, clijsters etc) they seemed to peak 20-24 but they're only just reaching mid 20s so we don't know how they'll go in the next couple of years, they may not have peaked yet. the current generation seem to be getting to the top at a later age bar a couple (vaidisova and sharapova) so they might peak more in the 23/24-26 or 27 age range.

kittyking
Jan 29th, 2007, 11:48 PM
Really varies, also some players seem to have two or three peak periods.

Wednesday
Jan 29th, 2007, 11:50 PM
Hingis and Capriati peaked at very early ages. Capriati peaked again in 2001-2002.

kittyking
Jan 29th, 2007, 11:54 PM
yeah i think for women they can peak anywhere in their 20s, some even in they're 30s but the players that peak in their 30s usually aren't top top players. in the last generation (henin, clijsters etc) they seemed to peak 20-24 but they're only just reaching mid 20s so we don't know how they'll go in the next couple of years, they may not have peaked yet. the current generation seem to be getting to the top at a later age bar a couple (vaidisova and sharapova) so they might peak more in the 23/24-26 or 27 age range.

We dont know if Sharapova and Vaidisova have peaked yet. I've seen through Archive how many people said that Sharapova peaked after Wimbledon 04 but she proved that wrong last year when she won the US Open in impressive style. Now shes even number one again.
Vaidisova is still very young but has already made a couple of Grand Slam semis, you'd place money on her to win a grand slam at sometime in her career - maybe not this year, or the next but sometimes in the future definately (this will be her peak)

aussie12
Jan 29th, 2007, 11:57 PM
depends on the players, sometimes they also need the right coach as well. look at the mens for example. gonzo is hitting his peak and hes 26 while someone like hewitt hit his peak at 19. i think the best time to reach your peak is around 22-23. i just dont know when federer is meant to reach his peak form. hes been improving every year.

Steffica Greles
Jan 30th, 2007, 12:04 AM
It all depends.

Ideally it should be the between the ages of 27 and 32.

But some peak at 16 because their games are fully developed (Hingis) or much later because it took longer for their talents to be harnessed (Novotna, Mauresmo, Navratilova).

If we're talking physical endurance here, as we should be because it is most often physical problems which end careers, as opposed to loss of coordination which comes which age, it all depends on when the most strenuous part of the career began. For most players, that time would be when they began to compete at the top level, play more matches and more tournaments.

A player's shelf life is often governed by their technique and how hard they have pushed their bodies, or have needed to push their bodies, in order to compete. The injuries faced by the Williams sisters are a perfect example, given that they have always attempted to bring the full weight of their physical advantage to bear by straining their bodies to the limit in matches. Hingis is another example, having been required to stretch herself just in order to match up to the Williamses. It is noticeable that most of the tour have experienced injuries since the Williamses raised the bar (in terms of power and athleticism) earlier in the decade.

But also a player's duration is similar to that of a car engine.

Thus, if a player breaks into the higher echelons at 15, they will often be experiencing problems by 21. If they do not achieve success until their early 20s, they have a good chance of playing until their late 20s relatively injury-free. If they do not achieve success relative to their potential until their mid-late 20s, they will be often play into their early 30s. The psychological factor of motivation also plays a significant role in that process because if a player, and particularly a woman, with her biological clock ticking, has achieved all that she wishes by 25, and has experienced a series of injuries, she will often lose the desire to continue. Yet if a player feels that they have yet to do their talents justice, they are often inclined to continue.

Gowza
Jan 30th, 2007, 12:36 AM
We dont know if Sharapova and Vaidisova have peaked yet. I've seen through Archive how many people said that Sharapova peaked after Wimbledon 04 but she proved that wrong last year when she won the US Open in impressive style. Now shes even number one again.
Vaidisova is still very young but has already made a couple of Grand Slam semis, you'd place money on her to win a grand slam at sometime in her career - maybe not this year, or the next but sometimes in the future definately (this will be her peak)

i agree we don't know if sharapova or vaidisova have peaked or when they will. what i said was that most of the younger generation are getting to the top later with the execptions of vaidisova and sharapova, what i was implying was that it's likely that the current generation coming through will peak later than the current one e.g. henin, clijsters etc. i wasn't implying or saying anything about sharapova and vaidisova's peak.