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View Full Version : They Are At It Again: The Ethnic Ausies


tennisbum79
Jan 15th, 2007, 06:53 PM
Every year at this time, we see play out the same ethnic striffe in
the stands at the Ausie Open.
Regardless of whether the player is Australian or not.

This is one reason I never like about the Ausie Open.
For some reasons, Ausie tennis fans seem to favor
their country of origin over their current nationality.
They are still fighting the old fight from the "Old" respective countries they came from.
Croats vs. Serbs; Greeks vs. Turks; Brazilians vs. Argentinians; etc..

Source: http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/tennis/aus07/news/story?id=2731537

MELBOURNE, Australia -- Croatian and Serbian spectators kicked each other and used flag poles as weapons during brief scuffles Monday at the Australian Open.
Police and private security guards at the year's first Grand Slam event ejected 150 people from the Melbourne Park venue after the violence, which organizers, players and community leaders condemned.
Police said no injuries were reported and no arrests were made.
Two groups of mostly male youths dressed in the colors of the former rivals in a bitter early-1990s war chanted slogans and yelled insults at each other near a lawn area where a giant television screen is set up for spectators.
News photographs and footage recorded on mobile phones of the incident showed youths kicking each other and using large hand-held flags as batons. Australian television showed police, some of them with batons drawn, marching supporters out of the venue and escorting them out of the area on trains.
"While we are happy for fans to come along and support their favorite player, decisive action will be taken if any patrons or groups cross the line of acceptable behavior at this family event," Tennis Australia chief Steve Wood said in a statement.
Serbian and Croatian community groups blamed each other for the trouble.
Tom Starcevic, secretary of the Croatian Community Association in Victoria state, said witnesses told him that Serbs provoked the dispute by chanting "Die, Croat, die."
Toma Banjanin, president of the Serbian Cultural Club, blamed Croatian supporters for provoking the incident, accusing them of "mixing politics with sport."
Serbia and Croatia were involved in a brutal war in the early 1990s as the former Yugoslavia crumbled. In Australia, the Croatian and Serbian communities both number in the hundreds of thousands.
Serbian player Jelena Jankovic, a U.S. Open semifinalist last year, said ethnic divisions had no place at the tournament, but that such incidents occurred more in Melbourne -- one of Australia's most mixed-ethnic cities -- than elsewhere on the tennis circuit.
"I think just here in Melbourne that there is this kind of problem," she said. "Anywhere else in the world it's fine.
"I don't like when they are fighting against each other and kind of booing the other player just because they are from some other country," she said. "I think that's not fair."
Croatia's Mario Ancic, seeded ninth in the men's draw, said he wasn't aware of Monday's disturbance.
Authorities tightened security at the venue, with Croatian Marin Cilic due to play against Serbia's Ilia Bozoljac in a first-round men's match Tuesday.
Copyright 2007 by The Associated Press

Diesel
Jan 15th, 2007, 06:56 PM
Sad. I was wondering if any players had commented. You have pride in sports but fights and hatred that mix in racism and hatred don't mix or belong in sport.

rada
Jan 15th, 2007, 09:48 PM
well last year when i went to the open Croatian and greeks had a fight and then about 100 croatian's went to watch jelena jankovic play and made trouble.This is tennis not some war both serbs and cros make me sick.......

DelMonte
Jan 15th, 2007, 09:59 PM
Sad. I was wondering if any players had commented. You have pride in sports but fights and hatred that mix in racism and hatred don't mix or belong in sport.

Serb's plea to unruly fans
By Paul Malone

January 16, 2007 12:00


WORLD No. 11 Jelena Jankovic yesterday pleaded with her fans not to boo opponents at the Australian Open.

In the wake of yesterday's amazing scenes, when Serbian and Croatian fans faced off at Melbourne Park, Serbian Jankovic took a stand against the troublemakers.

"I don't like when they are fighting against each other and kind of booing the other player just because they are from some other country. I think that's not fair," Jankovic said after her 6-3 6-3 first- round win over Canadian Aleksandra Woszniak.

And Jankovic put the blame firmly on Australian fans of Serbian and Croatian heritage, saying she had never witnessed scenes like yesterday's anywhere in the world.

"I think just here in Melbourne that there is this kind of problem. I don't know what it is," she said.

"Anywhere else in the world it's fine when you play a Croatian girl or there's matches (between players who are) Serbian and Croatian.

"The game should just be fair and they should clap for good points and support the player they like."

At the Sydney International last week, Jankovic fans booed the popular Kim Clijsters, her opponent in the final.

Yesterday the crowd that followed the heavy-hitting Serbian was considerably quieter as she cruised past Woszniak.

There might be an easy explanation for that though. About four hours earlier, about 150 spectators – some wearing Serbian and Croatian national colours – were ejected from the tournament by police after a brawl broke out as the rival fans traded insults just outside the Rod Laver Arena.

Police later said there were no arrests or injuries, although one fan was reported to have been hurt after being hit over the head with a flagpole.

Rivalry between the two nations has often been seen at soccer matches in Australia, but this is the first time the bad feeling has spilled into tennis.

http://www.news.com.au/dailytelegraph/story/0,22049,21063561-5001023,00.html#

tennisbum79
Jan 15th, 2007, 10:09 PM
Serb's plea to unruly fans
By Paul Malone

January 16, 2007 12:00


WORLD No. 11 Jelena Jankovic yesterday pleaded with her fans not to boo opponents at the Australian Open.

In the wake of yesterday's amazing scenes, when Serbian and Croatian fans faced off at Melbourne Park, Serbian Jankovic took a stand against the troublemakers.

"I don't like when they are fighting against each other and kind of booing the other player just because they are from some other country. I think that's not fair," Jankovic said after her 6-3 6-3 first- round win over Canadian Aleksandra Woszniak.

And Jankovic put the blame firmly on Australian fans of Serbian and Croatian heritage, saying she had never witnessed scenes like yesterday's anywhere in the world.

"I think just here in Melbourne that there is this kind of problem. I don't know what it is," she said.

"Anywhere else in the world it's fine when you play a Croatian girl or there's matches (between players who are) Serbian and Croatian.

"The game should just be fair and they should clap for good points and support the player they like."

At the Sydney International last week, Jankovic fans booed the popular Kim Clijsters, her opponent in the final.

Yesterday the crowd that followed the heavy-hitting Serbian was considerably quieter as she cruised past Woszniak.

There might be an easy explanation for that though. About four hours earlier, about 150 spectators – some wearing Serbian and Croatian national colours – were ejected from the tournament by police after a brawl broke out as the rival fans traded insults just outside the Rod Laver Arena.

Police later said there were no arrests or injuries, although one fan was reported to have been hurt after being hit over the head with a flagpole.

Rivalry between the two nations has often been seen at soccer matches in Australia, but this is the first time the bad feeling has spilled into tennis.

http://www.news.com.au/dailytelegraph/story/0,22049,21063561-5001023,00.html#

So I will ask, again , what is about Australia that excerbate these ethnic brawls?
Certainly, there are immigrants countries like USA, Britain, France , but you rarely see this kind of fight at these 3 majors.

I raised this before one of the reason I did not like Ausie,
but understanbly got a lot of flakc from Ausie fans on the board.

njnetswill
Jan 15th, 2007, 10:13 PM
I don't think it would be any different in the United States. The Italian students at my school still went crazy when Italy won the World Cup, even though most of them have never even been to Italy or speak a word of Italian. Ethnic and nationalistic identity is a big deal to many people.

DelMonte
Jan 15th, 2007, 10:16 PM
So I will ask, again , what is about Australia that excerbate these ethnic brawls?
Certainly, there are immigrants countries like USA, Britain, France , but you rarely see this kind of fight at these 3 majors.

I raised this before one of the reason I did not like Ausie,
but understanbly got a lot of flakc from Ausie fans on the board.

Just a question about your terminology: If the Croats, Serbs, Greeks, Turks; Brazilians, Argentinians etc are examples of "ethnic" Australians, who exactly are the unethnic Australians? Who are the people without an ethnicity? The Australians of Anglo-Saxon descent, perhaps?

goldenlox
Jan 15th, 2007, 10:22 PM
In England, they let a guy take his clothes off and run around on the court.
This is a matter of having security at the tournaments, or this stuff happens.

Hayato
Jan 15th, 2007, 10:27 PM
So I will ask, again , what is about Australia that excerbate these ethnic brawls?
Certainly, there are immigrants countries like USA, Britain, France , but you rarely see this kind of fight at these 3 majors.

I raised this before one of the reason I did not like Ausie,
but understanbly got a lot of flakc from Ausie fans on the board.

I think you need to understand that this kind of thing happens everywhere. Big deal if it doesn't happen at the US Open, RG or Wimbledon then it'll happen at some other sporting event in those countries. There's nothing "about Australia" that makes this happen, because these kind of things happen wherever you go, i'm afraid.

goldenlox, they have security the the AO, and that's why the situation was handled so efficiantly.

tennisbum79
Jan 15th, 2007, 10:29 PM
Just a question about your terminology: If the Croats, Serbs, Greeks, Turks; Brazilians, Argentinians etc are examples of "ethnic" Australians, who exactly are the unethnic Australians? Who are the people without an ethnicity? The Australians of Anglo-Saxon descent, perhaps?

I just named the one who have been making news at the Ausie open.

I cerainly see Sweedish, Swis, German, Israeli, South African, Indian flags,
these group have not make the same kind of regretable news.

But seriously and objectively, the Anglo-Saxons (see English in case of Australia) who are usually the majority, therfore fully established(due to distant past and/or intermarriage) do not tend to peldge strident loyalties to the "old" country as much.

Althought this may change in time of wars, like it did with some Germans
in the US during WWII.

Marcus1979
Jan 15th, 2007, 10:36 PM
its so easy to criticize a tournament when u are on the other side of the world :rolleyes:

Hachiko
Jan 15th, 2007, 10:38 PM
Are you trying to make a point or something?

switz
Jan 15th, 2007, 10:43 PM
i think to say that thse ethnic tensions are something unique to Australia is quite absurd. Compared to our population Australia has a higher ratio of Serbs/Croats/Greeks than anywhere else outside their homelands (even higher specifically in Melbourne). The vast majority came here to escape cultural conflict (not as much the Greeks maybe).

You just have to look at the way Dokic was treated in Zagreb to know it's not something just about Australia.

Yes maybe the traditional Australian culture does conflict with there's and bring out the worst in people but i also think it's undeniable that they are extremely nationalistic people in general and when you add sport and alcohol to that equation it's never going to be pretty.

tennisbum79
Jan 15th, 2007, 10:44 PM
I think you need to understand that this kind of thing happens everywhere. Big deal if it doesn't happen at the US Open, RG or Wimbledon then it'll happen at some other sporting event in those countries. There's nothing "about Australia" that makes this happen, because these kind of things happen wherever you go, i'm afraid.

I not think it happens everywhere you.
You just acknowldeged yourself it does not happen at RG, Wimbledon, or US Open.

Martian Stacey
Jan 15th, 2007, 10:44 PM
Every year at this time, we see play out the same ethnic striffe in
the stands at the Ausie Open.
Regardless of whether the player is Australian or not.

Correct me if I am wrong, but when has this ever happened at the AO before? I've never seen fans of two nations break out in a fight before, and I have been to the AO in the past. How can you say it happens every year?

Some countries do have tensions between them, its not just something that only happens in Australia. Perhaps it occurs more here because we are a very multicultural country.

switz
Jan 15th, 2007, 10:44 PM
btw wasn't Jankovic going on about how good the Serbs supporters were in Sydney before :confused:

Bolt80
Jan 15th, 2007, 10:45 PM
Every year at this time, we see play out the same ethnic striffe in
the stands at the Ausie Open.
Regardless of whether the player is Australian or not.

This is one reason I never like about the Ausie Open.
For some reasons, Ausie tennis fans seem to favor
their country of origin over their current nationality.
They are still fighting the old fight from the "Old" respective countries they came from.
Croats vs. Serbs; Greeks vs. Turks; Brazilians vs. Argentinians; etc..



More often than not its the second generation of immigrants that cause these problems in Australia. Their parents make the move over here for a quieter lifestyle. While the parents may remain quiet in terms of garnering public attention, their kids are raised with stereotypical grudges against other counties, races and religion while being exposed to propaganda and misinformation while growing up in ethnically grouped communities. While many of the second generation are born over here they take on the same conflicts their parent used as a catalyst to move to Australia to begin with.

Sort of defeats the purpose of moving over and living here. If they feel that strongly about these conflicts they should head back over to their parents homeland and tackle these issues head on.

While most of the second generation (not all, but most) were born here, they’re only Australian when it suits them.

Marcus1979
Jan 15th, 2007, 10:46 PM
the question is does Paris, London or USA have significant balkan communities like Australia does.

I think Melbourne has the highest Greek population outside of Athens or something

tennisbum79
Jan 15th, 2007, 10:54 PM
i think to say that thse ethnic tensions are something unique to Australia is quite absurd. Compared to our population Australia has a higher ratio of Serbs/Croats/Greeks than anywhere else outside their homelands (even higher specifically in Melbourne). The vast majority came here to escape cultural conflict (not as much the Greeks maybe)..

That is the paradox. If they emigrated to Australia to escape cultural conflict ,
why revive them on the very territory they came to see a new, peaceful beginning and life?
That is what I do not understand.



Yes maybe the traditional Australian culture does conflict with there's and bring out the worst in people but i also think it's undeniable that they are extremely nationalistic people in general and when you add sport and alcohol to that equation it's never going to be pretty.

How so? that what I (and some other curious posters) want to understand?

The northeast of the US, which include the geographic area of the US Open site in NYC, has Serbs and Croats, Greeks and tTurks,
Argentines and Brazilians, but we never see these incidents at the US open.

terjw
Jan 15th, 2007, 10:55 PM
Correct me if I am wrong, but when has this ever happened at the AO before? I've never seen fans of two nations break out in a fight before, and I have been to the AO in the past. How can you say it happens every year?

This is what I was thinking. Although I'm the other side of the world and only know what's reported in the news - I've never heard of this happening at the AO before with fights beaking out. Nothing like this has ever been reported before as far as I'm aware. And I'd never heard of the scenes in Sydney before with Kim getting booed.

tennisbum79
Jan 15th, 2007, 10:57 PM
More often than not its the second generation of immigrants that cause these problems in Australia. Their parents make the move over here for a quieter lifestyle. While the parents may remain quiet in terms of garnering public attention, their kids are raised with stereotypical grudges against other counties, races and religion while being exposed to propaganda and misinformation while growing up in ethnically grouped communities. While many of the second generation are born over here they take on the same conflicts their parent used as a catalyst to move to Australia to begin with.

Sort of defeats the purpose of moving over and living here. If they feel that strongly about these conflicts they should head back over to their parents homeland and tackle these issues head on.

While most of the second generation (not all, but most) were born here, they’re only Australian when it suits them.

Good post!
Some time as posters, we just want to know without hidden agenda.

Joana
Jan 15th, 2007, 10:59 PM
Croats and Serbs have emigrated to numerous countries over the last hundred years but for some reason the least educated/lowlife/Damir Dokic-types went to Australia (of course, a good part of emigrants were perfectly normal people just looking for a better life). Plus many of them came from very poor and backward parts of former Yugoslavia, and when you add the refugees from recent Balkan wars, you get the explosive mixture.

tennisbum79
Jan 15th, 2007, 11:00 PM
This is what I was thinking. Although I'm the other side of the world and only know what's reported in the news - I've never heard of this happening at the AO before with fights beaking out. Nothing like this has ever been reported before as far as I'm aware. And I'd never heard of the scenes in Sydney before with Kim getting booed.

It may not have degenerated to incident like this, but is has happen in the past between Serbs and Croats.

Joana
Jan 15th, 2007, 11:02 PM
This is what I was thinking. Although I'm the other side of the world and only know what's reported in the news - I've never heard of this happening at the AO before with fights beaking out. Nothing like this has ever been reported before as far as I'm aware.


It did happen two years ago, guess who did it. ;)


And I'd never heard of the scenes in Sydney before with Kim getting booed.

Um, yeah. US Open? Roland Garros?

switz
Jan 15th, 2007, 11:03 PM
Id not think it happens everywhere you.
You just acknowldeged yourself it does not happen at RG, Wimbledon, or US Open.

well in Paris they are too busy setting cars alight, Wimbledon just doesn't let them in, and the US Open has as many securities guards and spectators so it's pretty safe.

If you think it's just tolerated read this http://www.smh.com.au/news/tennis/zero-tolerance-on-open-warfare/2007/01/16/1168709719938.html

Hayato
Jan 15th, 2007, 11:07 PM
Id not think it happens everywhere you.
You just acknowldeged yourself it does not happen at RG, Wimbledon, or US Open.

Yeah, the US Open, Wimbledon and Roland Garros are all perfect tournaments, everything runs smoothly and there are no dramas. :rolleyes:
Who are you to talk about hidden agendas? It's obvious you just have something against Australia (i've seen your other threads) and are just looking for anything to put it in a bad light. Get over it and find a hobby.

switz
Jan 15th, 2007, 11:17 PM
That is the paradox. If they emigrated to Australia to escape cultural conflict ,
why revive them on the very territory they came to see a new, peaceful beginning and life?
That is what I do not understand.




How so? that what I (and some other curious posters) want to understand?

The northeast of the US, which include the geographic area of the US Open site in NYC, has Serbs and Croats, Greeks and tTurks,
Argentines and Brazilians, but we never see these incidents at the US open.

on point one the reality is that they leave because they fear persecution and ultimately death. It would be great for everyone if they just got here and said "It's all in the past" but the reality is that the hatred felt between Serbs and Croats is so deep seeded from hundreds of years of conflict that they are likely to never get over it and move on.

Australia is not like anywhere else in the world really. Being an extremely isolated British colony for such a long time meant that anglo Australians very much developed their own distinctive character - with some good qualities and some bad qualities. Although we have developed into an extremely multi-cultural society on the face of things often different ethnic groups have become or chosen to be segregated to a certain extant. This is true in most countries though - the key difference in my opinion is that unlike some cases in bigger countries like the US, UK and France these ethnic minorities actually maintain a relatively high standard of living giving them the ability to attend sports like tennis which they are really not that interested in except to support their own. When it comes to sports like soccer they are actually much worse but there interest in the sport actually stops them making it all about hatred.

Chet
Jan 15th, 2007, 11:25 PM
Yeah, the US Open, Wimbledon and Roland Garros are all perfect tournaments, everything runs smoothly and there are no dramas. :rolleyes:
Who are you to talk about hidden agendas? It's obvious you just have something against Australia (i've seen your other threads) and are just looking for anything to put it in a bad light. Get over it and find a hobby.
it does appear he has something against Australia. Damir in disguise, perhaps? :)

tennisbum79
Jan 15th, 2007, 11:28 PM
Yeah, the US Open, Wimbledon and Roland Garros are all perfect tournaments, everything runs smoothly and there are no dramas. :rolleyes:
Who are you to talk about hidden agendas? It's obvious you just have something against Australia (i've seen your other threads) and are just looking for anything to put it in a bad light. Get over it and find a hobby.

This has nothing to do with being against Ausie.
I think you are referring the other infanous incidents, between lebanese-Ausies and
and some Anglo-Ausie. Both incidents are different.
But the constant thread between them is ethnic strife. And yes I do not like ethnic strife.

I think you seem a little closed minded, defensive with a persecusion complex.

Other Ausies posters, who saw the topic for what it is, have actually
brought great contribution to understanding why it is happening to the degree it is.

tennisbum79
Jan 15th, 2007, 11:32 PM
it does appear he has something against Australia. Damir in disguise, perhaps? :)

You are mistaken

SelesFan70
Jan 15th, 2007, 11:38 PM
But I thought Bill Clinton fixed their problems by bombing them... :sad:

Hayato
Jan 15th, 2007, 11:39 PM
This has nothing to do with being against Ausie.
I think you are referring the other inganous incidents, between lebanese and
and some Anglo-Ausie. Both incidents are different. But the constant thread between is ehtnic strife. And yes I do not like ethinic strife.

I think you seem a little closed minded, defensive with a persecusion complex.

Other Ausies posters, who saw the topic for what it is, have actually
brought great contribution to understanding why it is happening to the degree it is.

Not at all, i'm just tired of your threads which more often than not seem to be bagging Australia. I'm actually a very open minded person.

**Jelica**
Jan 16th, 2007, 08:07 PM
Yeah, isn't it so unfortunate that NATO didn't manage to kill every ethnic Serb during 1999? The world would just be so much better off without people like us :rolleyes:

It did happen before, I remember particularly an incident 2 years ago during a match of Katerina Srebotnik, they got really out of hand and were shouting at each other Chetniks, Ustase. Kata's match (I can't remember her opponent) was halted for 20 minutes while they got rid of them.

I think it's mainly cos so many recent Aussie Serbs and Croats emigrated during and after the wars of the 90s. Probably their families had suffered alot at the hands of the other and the anger they felt was very fresh and present. But because they moved from the former Yugoslavia they didn't get any perspective... The people who stayed here, it died down after a while and most people's feelings died down too. But the one's who went away carried that grudge with them.

Привет
Jan 17th, 2007, 01:57 AM
I can't understand what this poster, tennisbum, is saying, or the point they are trying to make, or the question they want answered. Actually I'm struggling to understand any of their posts, please tell me it's not just me! :lol:

Australia is very multicultural, it has it's positives and negatives. Outbursts like this one is a negative. Bolt and many other posters have posted logical and knowledgable answers in this thread. So I will deal with the simple things. (Not that I would be able to post a knowledgable answer anyway :o) It is AuSSie. 2 S's. One would think that typing Aussie would be easier than typing Australia.

tennisbum, how can you call a poster close minded when you stated that you do not like Australia because of what a small minority chose to do at a sporting event? Maybe this is not the reason you dislike Australia, but that's the impression that I got when you deliberately posted it in the thread about ethnic relations.

And do I have no ethnicity because I am Anglo-Saxon? :confused: :lol:

OZTENNIS
Jan 17th, 2007, 01:59 AM
Can't we just focus on the tennis?

Привет
Jan 17th, 2007, 02:01 AM
Can't we just focus on the tennis?

:wavey: Hey! Haven't seen you around for a while. How's it going?

athake
Jan 17th, 2007, 02:25 AM
it must be a joke :), there's not any turkish player for turks to support in GSs, i have not seen even one flag for years, so When did u see Turks vs Greeks in tennis, its not true...

Привет
Jan 17th, 2007, 02:28 AM
Yeah I thought that strange as well.. :confused: I don't see any Turkish players in any of the draws, and the Greek's have Eleni I guess, but that is it. Granted most of Marcos Baghdatis's supporters are Greek.

tennnisfannn
Jan 17th, 2007, 02:39 AM
This may just be the beginning of the ethnic conflicts. Thay have not existed in the past because in tennis we haven't had that many serbs/croatians playing as well as they are now. JJ and Ana have created alot of buzz over the lst year and more and more serbs/ croast are coming to the tournnies. A few years ago we didn't see that many belgium flags in the stands but along cam kim and justine and the flags flooded the stands.
Unfortunalty serbia and croatia share a history and it is bound to happen. Anytime a big group of people gather any flag what so over, all it takes is a few idiots to sprk unnecessary conflict.

go hingis
Jan 17th, 2007, 02:47 AM
I think the problem in Australia is that so many people that live here think they have more claim then others. We pay no respect to our natives who would call themselves Aboriginal and not Australian. The "Aussies" don't seem to know they came from somewhere too. The country and people are very racist. I had to bite my tongue at work at stupid ignorant racist people who would say shit like "they're acting like their fathers did" Seriously how would you know how their fathers acted. Most probably came to Australia for a better life and would have worked hard, not be on the the streets fighting.

I don't think what happen is right but I really hate all the racism that's going with this. It seems in todays world since Sept 11 we're going to blame everyone for one or afew bad seeds. That's not right or fair.

I think we should also be looking at the age of these kids, they're young stupid teenagers. Two groups crossed each other, they probably started mouthing off to each other and slowly it got more heated and things went to far. To then go and kick out 5 and 8 yr old kids wearing Serb colours is DISGUSTING! and that's where the whole "oh well your all the same" shit starts, with the authorities who are probably the nerds teased and bashed in school and now ready for revenge.

I also don't see what is wrong with supporting your country of origin. You should be proud to have a history etc. I was born in Australia my parents in Greece and I support both and see nothing wrong with it.

OZTENNIS
Jan 17th, 2007, 02:49 AM
:wavey: Hey! Haven't seen you around for a while. How's it going?

Yeah good thanks! :) My internet stopped working for a time there and ive been half way round the world for holidays in recent times (kuala lumpur, penang, singapore, nsw) so im just getting back into the swing of things!

Marcus1979
Jan 17th, 2007, 02:56 AM
isn't Tennisbum the same one who said the Australian Open should be moved to China or something

so he is already biased against Australia before u even look at the argument he is making

Привет
Jan 17th, 2007, 03:44 AM
I think the problem in Australia is that so many people that live here think they have more claim then others. We pay no respect to our natives who would call themselves Aboriginal and not Australian. The "Aussies" don't seem to know they came from somewhere too. The country and people are very racist. I had to bite my tongue at work at stupid ignorant racist people who would say shit like "they're acting like their fathers did" Seriously how would you know how their fathers acted. Most probably came to Australia for a better life and would have worked hard, not be on the the streets fighting.

I don't think what happen is right but I really hate all the racism that's going with this. It seems in todays world since Sept 11 we're going to blame everyone for one or afew bad seeds. That's not right or fair.

I think we should also be looking at the age of these kids, they're young stupid teenagers. Two groups crossed each other, they probably started mouthing off to each other and slowly it got more heated and things went to far. To then go and kick out 5 and 8 yr old kids wearing Serb colours is DISGUSTING! and that's where the whole "oh well your all the same" shit starts, with the authorities who are probably the nerds teased and bashed in school and now ready for revenge.

I also don't see what is wrong with supporting your country of origin. You should be proud to have a history etc. I was born in Australia my parents in Greece and I support both and see nothing wrong with it.

Racism sucks. Until now I haven't known much about Serbs & Croats in Australia. They don't live where I live. But do you actually know for a fact that they kicked out 5 & 8 year olds? Because I haven't read that anywhere. The security had to make sure that other spectators were safe. There were members of the public causing a disturbance, no matter who they are (or what ethnicity they are) they have to be removed from the event.

There is nothing wrong with supporting your country of origin, but that's where most problems start I think. Australians supporting Australians get very boisterous. And you only have to look at the Sydney final, Serbs supporting a Serbian player got a little out of hand. I'm not pointing the finger at Serbs, this was just a recent example. But as I said there's nothing wrong with supporting your country of origin. People can support whoever the hell they want to.

kittyking
Jan 17th, 2007, 03:52 AM
More often than not its the second generation of immigrants that cause these problems in Australia. Their parents make the move over here for a quieter lifestyle. While the parents may remain quiet in terms of garnering public attention, their kids are raised with stereotypical grudges against other counties, races and religion while being exposed to propaganda and misinformation while growing up in ethnically grouped communities. While many of the second generation are born over here they take on the same conflicts their parent used as a catalyst to move to Australia to begin with.

Sort of defeats the purpose of moving over and living here. If they feel that strongly about these conflicts they should head back over to their parents homeland and tackle these issues head on.

While most of the second generation (not all, but most) were born here, they’re only Australian when it suits them.

I agree

tennisbum79
Jan 17th, 2007, 04:21 AM
I can't understand what this poster, tennisbum, is saying, or the point they are trying to make, or the question they want answered. Actually I'm struggling to understand any of their posts, please tell me it's not just me! :lol:

Australia is very multicultural, it has it's positives and negatives. Outbursts like this one is a negative. Bolt and many other posters have posted logical and knowledgable answers in this thread. So I will deal with the simple things. (Not that I would be able to post a knowledgable answer anyway :o) It is AuSSie. 2 S's. One would think that typing Aussie would be easier than typing Australia.

tennisbum, how can you call a poster close minded when you stated that you do not like Australia because of what a small minority chose to do at a sporting event? Maybe this is not the reason you dislike Australia, but that's the impression that I got when you deliberately posted it in the thread about ethnic relations.

I think you guys are in denial. Fortunately it is not everybody.
Go Hingis and other have recognized the situation and posted some insightful view and informative views about this
Every year, when something unflatering is pointed out about
the Ausie open, some of you, not all, react by always saying it never happened or it happens everywhere around the world.

I did not say I dislike Australia, I said that is why I dislike the Ausie Open because of these antics and the heat.
They are not the same.
And do I have no ethnicity because I am Anglo-Saxon? :confused: :lol:
It is interesting among some of the serious points, yhis the only you chose to raise. Well I already addressed in another post.

tennisbum79
Jan 17th, 2007, 04:25 AM
Racism sucks. Until now I haven't known much about Serbs & Croats in Australia. They don't live where I live. But do you actually know for a fact that they kicked out 5 & 8 year olds? Because I haven't read that anywhere. The security had to make sure that other spectators were safe. There were members of the public causing a disturbance, no matter who they are (or what ethnicity they are) they have to be removed from the event.

There is nothing wrong with supporting your country of origin, but that's where most problems start I think. Australians supporting Australians get very boisterous. And you only have to look at the Sydney final, Serbs supporting a Serbian player got a little out of hand. I'm not pointing the finger at Serbs, this was just a recent example. But as I said there's nothing wrong with supporting your country of origin. People can support whoever the hell they want to.

I am glad you found Go hingis post.
Maybe hearing from a fellow Ausie( I assume s/he is) will make you stop and think a little.
Instead of being part of this group think where anything remotely unflatering about the Ausie open is taken as an affront ot the entire Country.

OZTENNIS
Jan 17th, 2007, 04:30 AM
I am glad you found Go hingis post.
Maybe hearing from a fellow Ausie( I assume s/he is) will make you stop and think a little.
Instead of being part of this group think where anything remotely unflatering about the Ausie open is taken as an affront ot the entire Country.

just stick to the tennis instead of wasting ur time writing about rubbish!

Bolt80
Jan 17th, 2007, 04:34 AM
isn't Tennisbum the same one who said the Australian Open should be moved to China or something

Not that I ever want to see our grand slam event moved offshore, but I used to know a guy who became an ATP umpire who said about a year ago that it was a real possibility that the event could be moved to Asia sometime in the near future.

go hingis
Jan 17th, 2007, 05:37 AM
Racism sucks. Until now I haven't known much about Serbs & Croats in Australia. They don't live where I live. But do you actually know for a fact that they kicked out 5 & 8 year olds? Because I haven't read that anywhere. The security had to make sure that other spectators were safe. There were members of the public causing a disturbance, no matter who they are (or what ethnicity they are) they have to be removed from the event.

There is nothing wrong with supporting your country of origin, but that's where most problems start I think. Australians supporting Australians get very boisterous. And you only have to look at the Sydney final, Serbs supporting a Serbian player got a little out of hand. I'm not pointing the finger at Serbs, this was just a recent example. But as I said there's nothing wrong with supporting your country of origin. People can support whoever the hell they want to.

I wasn't there to see it with my own eyes but the mother called up and said it on radio the next morning. Her son's were wearing their Serbian soccer jerseys. I will always support Martina if they play so maybe I should go wearing a swiss t-shirt. I was at Jelena vs Martina and had a large group of Jelena supporters behind me and I didn't mind they where louder then me, I still cheered for Martina and lol can't get Je- Le - Na ! out of my head.

go hingis
Jan 17th, 2007, 05:46 AM
lol, I was just reading the title "They are at it again" whose They? It implies all Ethnic Aussies where involved. It seems the only thing the media can feed off these days is hatred so they help exculate every little thing.

Marcus1979
Jan 17th, 2007, 06:09 AM
next they will be drawing links between this and the cronulla riots :o

Goai
Jan 17th, 2007, 06:19 AM
next they will be drawing links between this and the cronulla riots :o They have :o Today Tonight :rolleyes:

Marcus1979
Jan 17th, 2007, 06:22 AM
I really don't like Today Tonite

so often its just about a story and they never let the truth get in the way of a good story

how often do they have controversy issues associated with shows on other networks ;)

its just very fishy thats all :lol:

Привет
Jan 17th, 2007, 06:37 AM
I think you guys are in denial. Fortunately it is not everybody.
Go Hingis and other have recognized the situation and posted some insightful view and informative views about this
Every year, when something unflatering is pointed out about
the Ausie open, some of you, not all, react by always saying it never happened or it happens everywhere around the world.

I did not say I dislike Australia, I said that is why I dislike the Ausie Open because of these antics and the heat.
They are not the same.

It is interesting among some of the serious points, yhis the only you chose to raise. Well I already addressed in another post.
And what exactly am I in denial of? How exactly do you know more about the racial relationships of Australian society than me, an Australian citizen who has lived in Australia their entire life?
I can't remember mentioning that this never happened. I also can't seem to remember trying to justify it by saying it happens everywhere in the world.

I wasn't asking you the question of whether I have ethnicity, it was rhetorical. But thanks for trying to enlighten me.
I wasn't there to see it with my own eyes but the mother called up and said it on radio the next morning. Her son's were wearing their Serbian soccer jerseys. I will always support Martina if they play so maybe I should go wearing a swiss t-shirt. I was at Jelena vs Martina and had a large group of Jelena supporters behind me and I didn't mind they where louder then me, I still cheered for Martina and lol can't get Je- Le - Na ! out of my head.
Oh ok! Well that is disappointing, maybe the security have certain standards that they have to live up to. I would imagine that once something happens security wouldn't be allowed to breach any of their rules, even if they were just kids. I don't agree with it by the way, but I'm just suggesting a possible reason.
I am glad you found Go hingis post.
Maybe hearing from a fellow Ausie( I assume s/he is) will make you stop and think a little.
Instead of being part of this group think where anything remotely unflatering about the Ausie open is taken as an affront ot the entire Country.
Oh I'm a part of that group am I? Thanks for letting me know buddy!
I haven't said anything to suggest that I think what you're saying is offending the whole country, or what you're saying is offending the Australian Open. You've just put me in this "group" that you've created because I went against what you said. You didn't stop to realise that I don't fit into that group at all.

I am glad I found Go Hingis's post too, because it allowed me to read something remotely substantial and make my time coming into this thread worthwhile.

And for crying out loud, add another S to your Ausie.

:wavey:

Привет
Jan 18th, 2007, 07:32 AM
They have :o Today Tonight :rolleyes:

Today Tonight :lol: The majority of their stories are about people acting as the victim so that people will feel sorry for them.

Marcus1979
Jan 18th, 2007, 07:40 AM
its either that or bagging their competitors with shows that appear on those networks :o

look at how many Big Brother stories apppear on Today Tonite for example

Martian Stacey
Jan 18th, 2007, 08:03 AM
lol, I was just reading the title "They are at it again" whose They? It implies all Ethnic Aussies where involved. It seems the only thing the media can feed off these days is hatred so they help exculate every little thing.
I don't think the thread title was thought up by the media - that's the thread starter's own creation. If you click on the link he/she originally posted, the headline only mentions Serbians and Croatians.