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saphir1
Jan 8th, 2007, 04:35 PM
http://www.sportsmediainc.com/tennisweek/index.cfm?func=showarticle&newsid=16385&bannerregion=

goldenlox
Jan 8th, 2007, 05:11 PM
WTA's Roadap Takes Another Turn
http://www.sportsmediainc.net/tennisweek/WTASonylogo05.jpg
By Richard Pagliaro
01/08/2007

The Sony Ericsson WTA Tour's Roadmap 2010 tournament selection process has begun and now the 57 tournaments bidding for the 48 available slots on the WTA Tour's 2009 schedule will wait until March to learn if they have retained the right to remain roadside attractions or end up as road kill on the Tour's new route.


In addition to the 57 tournaments applying for 48 spots on the calendar, a total of 25 tournaments completed applications for the most prestigious 14 events envisioned under the Roadmap plan.
"We are thrilled with the global tournament interest in being a part of the enhanced calendar called for under our Roadmap 2010 plans," said Larry Scott, CEO of the Sony Ericsson WTA Tour, in a statement release today.
A search team, led by Tour President Stacey Allaster, "will meet with tournament applicants and review applications over the coming months, with the Board expected to make a final decision in March 2007 as to which tournaments will compose each level of the enhanced calendar structure to be launched in 2009," the Tour announced.
The WTA has devised its Roadmap to reduce its calendar, streamline the schedule, encourage rivalries among top players and create a shorter season that concludes in October by the year 2009, but some tournament directors and tennis associations executives, while not expressing road rage, are not exactly enthusiastic about the restructured route the Tour may take.
It has been rumored that some of the current U.S. Open Series events leading up to the U.S. Open are in jeopardy of failing to make the cut in the main draw that is the 2009 WTA Tour schedule. The Bank of the West Classic at Stanford, Acura Classic in San Diego, JPMorgan Chase Open in Carson, CA, the Rogers Cup, which alternates between Toronto and Montreal and the Pilot Pen in New Haven, Conn., comprised the 2006 U.S. Open Series women's events.
USTA President Jane Brown Grimes told Tennis Week today the USTA has expressed its concerns to the WTA and will continue talks with the Tour in an effort to work out an equitable solution.
"I would consider it a success if we can work things out with the WTA," Brown Grimes told Tennis Week. "I think women's professional tennis in the U.S. has a long and glorious history. We've been supporting it for 36 to 37 years and we're going to continue to support it and we're in discussion with the WTA because we have major concerns over some of the elements of their Roadmap, which we feel would be contrary to some of the best interests of professional tennis in the United States."
Discussions between the WTA Tour and the USTA are ongoing, but based on its public posture it is clear the USTA is committed to preserving its present U.S. Open Series events even if it means continuing any tournaments that are excluded from the WTA's 2009 calendar.
"Our feeling is that they [the WTA] haven't come along as far as we need them to for these tournaments to not only survive, but thrive and we're committed to that," Brown Grimes told Tennis Week. "We're continuing to talk to them and it is my fervent hope that we will find a way through and that we can work together. But we are also going down parallel tracks and whatever it takes we will make sure that the tournaments that we have in this country are protected and grow."
The 2007 Tour schedule is comprised of 62 tournaments in 35 countries, and includes the Sony Ericsson Championships, 10 Tier I tournaments, 15 Tier II tournaments, 17 Tier III tournaments and 15 Tier IV tournaments, in addition to the four Grand Slam events. In 2007, 13 tournaments, including the U.S. Open, will be staged on North American soil.
The challenge the WTA faces is a numbers game: how does it expand the global reach of tennis into Asia and other areas without alienating or eliminating traditional tour stops in North America and Europe?
Asked if she believes it is inevitable the WTA Tour will opt to cut one or more U.S. Open Series tournaments from its 2009 schedule, Brown Grimes replied "I don't know. We feel we have to have an assured player field. Obviously the player commitment area is where the discussions go on and hopefully we can come to an accommodation. We will make sure that these tournaments are protected and do grow. A tremendous number [of North American women's events have already left] and we're not going to let anymore go and we're going to do whatever it takes to hold on to them and support them. I do believe that we can find an accommodation with the WTA. That certainly would be my hope. Everything is on the table."

goldenlox
Jan 8th, 2007, 05:21 PM
In addition to the 57 tournaments applying for 48 spots on the calendar, a total of 25 tournaments completed applications for the most prestigious 14 events envisioned under the Roadmap plan.

So the WTA has a lot of options

Andy T
Jan 8th, 2007, 05:33 PM
In addition to the 57 tournaments applying for 48 spots on the calendar, a total of 25 tournaments completed applications for the most prestigious 14 events envisioned under the Roadmap plan.

So the WTA has a lot of options

.....and there are 62 on the 2007 schedule, so that means 5 have not applied. 1 is presumably San Diego, but I wonder which other 4 are preparing to bow out...

rrfnpump
Jan 8th, 2007, 05:34 PM
48 tournaments are really few :sad:

goldenlox
Jan 8th, 2007, 05:49 PM
It sounds like the WTA is leaving money on the table.
Any tournament that will pay the women like a men's TMS event should be on the WTA calendar.

SpankMe
Jan 8th, 2007, 07:11 PM
WTA's Roadap Takes Another Turn
USTA President Jane Brown Grimes :tape:

wally1
Jan 8th, 2007, 10:08 PM
So the WTA thinks moving from 62 to 48 tournaments is progress for women's tennis? The lunatics really have taken over the asylum.

goldenlox
Jan 8th, 2007, 10:11 PM
It seems crazy. They should have A's and B's the same week, except for the 2 week mega-events.

Frode
Jan 8th, 2007, 11:30 PM
The thing that worries me the most about the new roadmap is this: "Streamlined top level of tournaments with the top players competing against each other more often"

Does that mean the top seeds will get byes further in to the tournements?

goldenlox
Jan 8th, 2007, 11:43 PM
I think it means that like Miami, the A tournaments are mandatory

Atrixo
Jan 9th, 2007, 12:04 AM
So the WTA thinks moving from 62 to 48 tournaments is progress for women's tennis? The lunatics really have taken over the asylum.

Word! Larry Scott, and the rest of the insane morons who run the WTA, should be taken out to pasture and SHOT! :mad:

Is that something to brag about, to have LESS tournaments? Man, I'd laugh my fucking ass off if the top players STILL pull out of top tournaments in 2009, regardless of fines or penalties. All this bullshit about hacking up the calendar will have been for what? Top players will make money regardless (slams and endorsements); it's the rank and file of the WTA who'll be left with the consequences of this "roadmap" (less oportunities to earn an income). :mad:

Fuck Larry Scott, that sack of dog shit. :fiery:

goldenlox
Jan 9th, 2007, 12:13 AM
You have to see what the total prizemoney is. If it doubles from now to 2010, then it's not bad.
If these A's are like TMS, which is double a normal women's Tier I.
And if the 4, 2-week events pay more than Miami does now.
And if all the B's pay better than current Tier III's, then at least there's more money for the rank and file.
But they should have B's all year long.

DutchieGirl
Jan 9th, 2007, 12:50 AM
So the WTA thinks moving from 62 to 48 tournaments is progress for women's tennis? The lunatics really have taken over the asylum.

yep, it's totally dumb!

DutchieGirl
Jan 9th, 2007, 12:52 AM
You have to see what the total prizemoney is. If it doubles from now to 2010, then it's not bad.
If these A's are like TMS, which is double a normal women's Tier I.
And if the 4, 2-week events pay more than Miami does now.
And if all the B's pay better than current Tier III's, then at least there's more money for the rank and file.
But they should have B's all year long.

It's always bad when they cut tourneys (for the lower players it's bad) whether they up the total prizemoney or not!

TheBoiledEgg
Jan 9th, 2007, 12:53 AM
.....and there are 62 on the 2007 schedule, so that means 5 have not applied. 1 is presumably San Diego, but I wonder which other 4 are preparing to bow out...

the other 5 are
the 4 slams and the Year-End Champs :wavey:

Atrixo
Jan 9th, 2007, 01:21 AM
the other 5 are
the 4 slams and the Year-End Champs :wavey:

So if that's the case, a total of 9 tournaments will be gone by 2009 (62 - 53 (48 +5) = 9). I'm assuming that you're implying that the 48 open slots being bid for, EXCLUDE the 4 slams and the YEC.

Okay, so maybe that isn't SO bad; but still, there better be a massive increase in prize money and TV exposure to justify all of these moves. :rolleyes:

goldenlox
Jan 9th, 2007, 01:57 AM
They have to bring China, Dubai, and Doha more and more into the women's sport.
Those countries invest billions in sports.
I'm willing to wait to see the final product before I attack it.
But they don't have to shorten the schedule for those outside the top 40.
Those players need an opportunity to earn a living.

Atrixo
Jan 9th, 2007, 02:35 AM
They have to bring China, Dubai, and Doha more and more into the women's sport.
Those countries invest billions in sports.
I'm willing to wait to see the final product before I attack it.
But they don't have to shorten the schedule for those outside the top 40.
Those players need an opportunity to earn a living.

I think I would be fine with the shorter schedule (less tournaments), if it meant that the main draws/qualifying draws would be expanded. Every "A" level tournament would have to have a minimum 64 (56 + 8) maindraw; with a couple of two-week super "A"s with 128 (96 + 32) main draws. With regards to the "B" tournaments; larger events could choose to offer a 64 (56 + 8) main draw as well. That way, though there would be less tournaments overall, the chances for lower ranked players to earn a living wouldn't be as adversely affected; especially if the prize money will be noticeably increased at the same time.

goldenlox
Jan 9th, 2007, 02:46 AM
I don't know how they will set up the draws.
I know there is a lot of money out there, that's clear from the amount of countries/companies that want A tournaments.

This is a thriving sport, even though it's not a major tv sport, like the NFL.
China isn't investing millions into the NFL.
The money is there, but it's global.

The WTA has to be able to bring in the big money, and spread it around.

The problem is, the people with the money only want a few players, the rank and file are interchangeable, and don't draw crowds.
They have to be allowed to earn a living.

stevos
Jan 9th, 2007, 02:50 AM
I do think that some of these changes are good. I'm sure the players will start to play the big tournaments more often, especially since the WTA is saying "we're doing this for you guys, so you'd better appreciate our hard work!" I think they'll get behind it and play more.

However, as much as Dubai, Doha, and China are great investments money wise, I feel bad losing american tournaments. Those ones just, for some reason, seem more special?
They definitely aren't getting rid of the Rogers Cup, firstly because it always has huge numbers of fans (mainly in montreal), and also Stacey McAllaster has a special spot for that tournament, being canadian. As long as that one stays I think I'll be okay.

¤CharlDa¤
Jan 9th, 2007, 03:02 AM
From my sources *lol that looks so good :lol:* (which are most likely just local newspaper or comments by tourney organizers), Quebec City and Montreal/Toronto should be ok. Especially the Rogers Cup.

goldenlox
Jan 9th, 2007, 03:02 AM
The WTA wants the US to be a strong tennis market.
San Diego is going, but most of the US tournaments will be around.
The Rogers Cup will probably be stronger with these changes.

goldenlox
Jan 9th, 2007, 12:50 PM
Carson tennis event facing uncertainty

By Lisa Dillman, Times Staff Writer
January 9, 2007


The U.S. Tennis Assn. said Monday it essentially has taken its key summer tournaments in Carson and New Haven, Conn., off the table for now by not applying for slots on the Sony Ericsson WTA Tour for 2009, a decision that raises questions about the future of those events.

The USTA owns the New Haven tournament, and holds 25% of the event in Carson, which is held at the Home Depot Center. The Anschutz Entertainment Group owns the other 75%.

Both hard-court events are part of the U.S. Open Series, and USTA executive Chris Widmaier spoke about the possibility of using them to create a rival circuit.

Sources said that organizers of the clay-court event in Charleston, S.C., also did not complete an application for a slot on the 2009 WTA calendar.

The USTA's decision, which is not set in stone, reveals the simmering dispute over the WTA's commitment to change its schedule as it seeks to boost participation by the top female players by minimizing the wear and tear of tournament play.

The WTA's Roadmap 2010 is aiming for an "enhanced calendar" to be in place for the 2009 season, according to Chief Executive Larry Scott. The USTA sees the plan as a threat to its U.S. Open Series.

"Our belief is that the Roadmap is detrimental to tennis in the United States. We're going to keep all of our options open," Widmaier said, adding that the USTA has $10 million earmarked "in the event we begin our own circuit."

Despite not having Carson and New Haven yet, the WTA announced that 57 other tournaments have completed applications for 48 slots for the 2009 calendar. Indian Wells is one of those tournaments. There will be a top tier of 14 tournaments in the revamped schedule, and 25 tournaments have applied for those slots.

Scott, who received an endorsement from his board of directors Monday in the form of a five-year contract extension, is optimistic things will be worked out with the USTA.

"Talks between the Sony Ericsson WTA Tour and USTA regarding the Tour's Roadmap 2010 plan are advancing in a positive and constructive manner, and we continue to believe that we will reach a compromise that is great for women's tennis and fans of women's tennis in both the U.S. and globally," he said in an e-mail. "We remain determined to bring reform to the tennis calendar so the fans and tournaments can consistently see a greater number of stars on a more reliable basis."

The women's tennis tour called the application process only the first stage, and negotiations are expected to continue at a U.S. Open Series meeting today in Tampa, Fla.

All this however, serves as a backdrop in the changing landscape of local tennis.

Already, Southern California is losing a high-profile tournament: This is the final year of the Acura Classic at La Costa Resort & Spa after the event's owners sold it back to the WTA Tour in August.

SpankMe
Jan 9th, 2007, 01:34 PM
All sounds good, let's hope it makes a difference in the amount of injuries & illnesses the top players suffer. ;)
Pity about the usta's current behaviour :baby: