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View Full Version : Australian open 2006- A to Z


Keaka
Dec 27th, 2006, 04:55 PM
The Australian open 2007 is getting closer and this is how the tournament looked like in 2006.Probably it was already posted but here it is :D

A is for Akgul Amanmuradova from Uzbekistan. An Asian wildcard, Amanmuradova defeated Dally Randriantefy from Madagascar in the opening round 6-3 2-6 6-1, before the No.185 ranked right-hander was beaten by No.17 seed Daniela Hantuchova in the second 6-4 6-1.

And we have to mention that A also is for AO Radio Served up by American Express …making its biggest impression yet at Melbourne Park. The commentary team called every game on Rod Laver Arena - day and night. Well done girls and guys.

B is for Baghdatis, Baghdatis, Baghdatis … can we write it again … Baghdatis. He is the bearded bloke who has shaken the foundations of the game's elite and tournament with his flamboyant and swashbuckling game. Marcos Baghdatis. Bless him.

C is for Comeback … the comeback of three-time Australian Open champion Martina Hingis. She wooed her fans as well as her peers with a quarter-final finish in her first Grand Slam in three years. And she won the Mixed Doubles title with Mahesh Bhupathi.

D is for Denis Istomin. The first man to fall to world No.1 Roger Federer at the Australian Open. Istomin, from Tashkent, Uzbekistan qualified for the Open as an Asian wildcard.

E is for Extreme Heat Policy. Australian Open officials enforced the policy on five days of the tournament. It was a hot fortnight in Melbourne.

F is for Federer …..what more can you say about the debonair champion. He's fearless.

G if for Grunt …..the grunting game of Russian Maria Sharapova. Others call it a shriek, but for these purposes, we're going with grunt. G is also for the official health and beauty partner at the Australian Open, Garnier. Garnier is great.

H is for Heineken …. the beer of choice for those who visit Melbourne Park. If you consume too much, you'll start to believe that the Dutch brewer's funny green hats can be worn on Derby Day at Flemington.

H is also for honourable mention to Dominik Hrbaty and his magical 'holy' holey shirt. It provided the wind beneath his wings in his four marathon five-set matches.

I is for Ivan Ljubicic ….the sturdy baseliner reached the top-10 ranking for the first time in 2005. He polished off the season guiding Croatia to it first-ever Davis Cup final victory against Slovak Republic with a perfect win-loss record. He came here with high expectations and he didn't disappoint.

J is for Jim and JA. We have enjoyed the commentary and banter between dual Australian Open winner Jim Courier and Aussie legend John Alexander on host broadcaster Channel Seven. And in the words of the red-headed American …'Heads are gonna roll, JA …'

K is for Kia Motors, major sponsor and official car of Australian Open 2006.

L is for loser. There would be no winners without losers.

M is for Mary Pierce. We miss you Mary. After a promising return to the top-flight in 2005 with Grand Slam finals appearances at Roland Garros and at Flushing Meadows, the former Aussie Open champ bowed out in the second round.

N is for Nalbandian, David Nalbandian. He got so close again to reaching a men's final, but it wasn't to be … another seeded victim to the giant-slaying Marcos Baghdatis.

O is for ouch! Leading players Lindsay Davenport and Kim Clijsters sustained injuries after tumbles, while Michaella Krajicek prematurely departed the tournament with heat stress. And then there was the disappointing exit of Justine Henin-Hardenne in the women's singles final. It was over and out as tummy troubles forced her to retire while down 1-6 0-2 to Mauresmo.

P is for paper. You would not believe the amount of paper that is produced to cater for the hundreds of media assigned to the Grand Slam. Paper containing vital match statistics, match analysis, media releases, game schedules and interview transcripts are all available at beck and call. The ITF, ATP, WTA and Australian Open organisers do a superb job catering for the media.

P is also for the junior girls champion Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova

Q is queues at Garnier World. The two-storey health and beauty oasis adjacent to Show court Three at Melbourne Park catered for more than 1500 women, children and men daily during the tournament. Visitors were treated to facials, massages and the latest hairstyles, plus a gift pack worth $48. The queue was long but the wait was worth it.

R is for Rod. The namesake of Melbourne Park's main Arena jetted into Melbourne to for an historic first meeting with Roger Federer and to present the men's singles trophy.

S is for Souvlaki and Saganaki. The late-night Greek recovery snacks of choice for men's singles finalist Marcos Baghdatis and his entourage.

T is for teenagers. There were five teenagers in the men's singles draw and all were eliminated in the opening round - Richard Gasquet, Gael Monfils, Denis Istomin, Andy Murray and Novak Djokovic.

U is for unseeded. Marcos Baghdatis is the first unseeded man to reach the final of the Australian Open since Russian Marat Safin in 2004.

V- Viva Le France. Amelie Mauresmo became the first woman to fly the Tricolour at an Australian Open since Mary Pierce won the women's singles in 1995, beating Spaniard Arantxa Sanchez-Vicario.

W is for Williams - the Williams sisters Venus and Serena. They are wild and wacky, and we love them visiting Down Under.

X is Xavier Malisse from Belgium. He made the second round in the men's singles and doubles at the Australian Open. He went down in a five-set epic to Thomas Johansson and stumbled alongside countryman Olivier Rochus against Julian Knowle and Jurgen Melzer from Austria.

Y is for Yanks, or rather the lack of them at the pointy-end of the tournament. Lindsay Davenport reached the quarters, while Andy Roddick stumbled in the fourth round. The Bryan brothers - Mike and Bob - salvaged some US pride, capturing the men's doubles crown.

Z is for Zheng and Zi … Australian Open women's doubles champions Zi Yan and Jie Zheng from China. The duo won their nation's first ever Grand Slam title.