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goldenlox
Dec 23rd, 2006, 02:13 PM
The Tennis Week Interview: Bethanie Mattek
http://www.sportsmediainc.net/tennisweek/MattekWTAhead.jpg
Mattek Photo By WTA By Richard Pagliaro
12/22/2006

Clad in clothes that sometimes seem to co-exist with traditional tennis fashion as much as a tie-dye tunic at a black-tie ball, Bethanie Mattek stands out even when she's sitting down.


And Mattek was sitting down in front of her locker in the Wimbledon women's locker room last June when she heard the foreboding footsteps of the All England Club representatives echoing in her ears. Those authoritative approaching footsteps prompted the 21-year-old American to pick up her pace of dress faster than a fugitive fleeing from an overzealous fleet of fashion police.
Sitting and waiting for what she began to believe could be a tournament decree ranging from a rebuke to a complete revocation of the uniquely-crafted outfit she wore in a 6-1, 6-0 opening-round loss to defending-champion Venus Williams on Centre Court one thought began to bounce around Mattek's mind like a ball off backboard: "Oh crap!"
Mattek's eccentric ensemble featuring styles wrapped together as if engaged in a game of fashion Twister included a samurai-style headband, tank top, skater short-shorts and knee-high soccer socks, generated international headlines in the aftermath of her Centre Court appearance and she was anticipating a fashion critique from officials while she prepared for her mixed doubles match.
Rather than a reprimand, Mattek received a request from members of the Wimbledon museum staff who prefaced their remarks by politely stating words she recalls as, "Listen, we know you dress kind of crazy..."
"They came up to me in the locker room and I was a little worried. And they were like 'Listen, since [your outfit] is so unique, we would love it if you would donate to the museum,' " Mattek recalls. "So I was like 'Sure, what do you need?' So they asked for the socks and shorts and for me to sign everything and then they'd put it up in one of the little displays. I thought that was pretty cool. I'm thinking 'Hey, I only got one game and I'm in the museum.' So that was cool, but it's really not my goal. I'm glad it works out, but again another goal for next year is to show my tennis skills more. And if that comes along with it, it's even better."
And so Mattek gained an invitation to take up residence at the same museum that hosts clothes worn by Wimbledon winners including John McEnroe, Bjorn Borg and Roger Federer. Aspiring to be more than a museum piece, Mattek is investing time and effort into an offseason training program to smooth out the rough edges of her game and show she has substance to accompany her ever-evolving style.
"If it comes down to it tennis is entertainment," Mattek says. "Of course I want to play my best and I work my ass off every day to get better — that's not a question. I think [fashion] is one way to bring out your personality."
While the court may sometime seem to be the platform for her own personal Project Runway series, Mattek has been diligently working to design a game plan that will showcase her athletic assets. The Rochester, Minn. native, who currently lives in Boca Raton, Fla., has been spending recent weeks working with coach Jason Fransen in Indian Wells, Calif.
"I love how talented Bethanie is," Fransen said. "She's an athlete. She has good hand-eye coordination, she has a lot of ability at net and she has good quickness. She's understanding how to make the ball do different things and how to work the point. In doubles, there's less court to hit to so there's no decision-making at all and she can just let her game flow and that may be a reason she's been successful in doubles. All of a sudden, put her on a singles court where she can do anything and has more options and she has a lot more decisions to make. So we've been working on some technical things, but also on strategy."
Review Mattek's 2006 results that saw her register a 24-25 record and conclude the season ranked No. 126 and you'll see a series of several three-set losses, including a three-set setback to third-seeded Elena Dementieva in the Los Angeles quarterfinals. Mattek, who reached two doubles finals and partnered Jelena Jankovic to the U.S. Open round of 16, frequently found her shot selection come apart at the seams on pivotal points of decisive sets.
Mattek's offseason work is the tennis equivalent of assembling a workable wardrobe: she believe she has all the pieces in place and is now trying to seamlessly sew together a strategy to transform into pattern play.
"It's not really like I choke or get really tight because I actually like pressure situations. It was a matter of I wasn't focusing on the right things where I got off my game plan," Mattek says. "And if you don't have a game plan in those situations then you start forcing stuff and that's when your technique goes. I'll change my mind and try to change things up in the middle of the point and that's when you start using your hand and that's when my technique would break down and I'd get more inconsistent. It's a matter of me just mentally thinking the same thing when I won the first or second set and taking that into the third."
When her former clothing sponsor, adidas, unceremoniously cut her off during a tournament, Mattek responded by making cuts of her own: she sliced up her adidas skirt, pulled out a sheer orange shirt from her suitcase that she'd bought on a shopping trip in South Beach, and fashioned her first tennis design. Since that initial foray into fashion by necessity, Mattek has designed and sewn many of the clothes she wears on court, from fabric and clothes she finds in boutiques during her global travels.
Persistently pounding the pavement is not solely a shopping spree for Mattek. Her fashion sense is based on fun, form and fit and she's spending some of her offseason adding perhaps the most important "F" word in the tennis lexicon to her game: footwork. To that end, she's spent time watching video of another tennis fashion icon who stalks the court as if it is his runway: Roger Federer.
"I feel I am fast and athletic, but I was relying too much on that and making too much effort instead of being efficient and technically correct," Mattek says. "If I had to get away with just using my hands and reaching, I was relying on that. I'm working on just trying to work on my footwork and setting myself up for a better shot and being on balance when I get to the ball."
Tennis Week caught up with Mattek for this interview in which she discusses her playing style, fashion sense and goals for the coming season.
Tennis Week: Bethanie, can you tell us a bit about your training in Indian Wells the past week or so? Specifically, what have you been working on and what areas of your game are you trying to target improve?
Bethanie Mattek: Actually, the initial goal was just being more efficient on court. I was breaking down in a lot of my matches, especially as I did better in a tournament and make the second or third round. My body would just break down. I wasn't moving properly and a lot of times I was late for balls. I had some issues and I had been talking to Jason since Indian Wells, just on the phone every once in a while. I was playing a tournament out here, lost first round and wasn't really ready to play. So I decided to shoot over and work with him based on our conversations on the phone. He has been trying to help my with some of the footwork. I've been watching a lot of video of players I would like to try to copy, players I thought were very good movers.
Tennis Week: Who?
Bethanie Mattek: I've been watching Federer a lot. Jason actually has a bunch of Federer tapes and we'd turn TiVo on and just watch him in slow motion and Federer's just such a smooth, efficient mover. That's my goal: I just want to be efficient. I feel like I have good athletic gifts.
Tennis Week: You seem to have pretty good speed around the court.
Bethanie Mattek: Oh yeah. I was getting to balls, but it was too much effort. I feel I am fast and athletic, but I was relying too much on that and making too much effort instead of being efficient and technically correct. If I had to get away with just using my hands and reaching, I was relying on that. I'm working on just trying to work on my footwork and setting myself up for a better shot and being on balance when I get to the ball. Obviously, you have more options and can hit your targets easier when you get to the ball early and you're on balance. So that's been my biggest goal in coming out here to Indian Wells and working with Jason. He helped me with some technical things on my forehand: I'm changing my technique a bit and using my core more than just my arm. Again, I had pretty good hands so I relied too much on my arm and hands. If I want to change the direction of the ball, now I'm trying to use my core and hips to line up the ball and change direction instead of using my hands to try to aim. And you know some days you're on and some days you're off so when you're relying so much on your hands it's a more risky shot than if you set up properly and rely on your core muscles. I was starting to get some recurring shoulder issues that would pop up at some inconvenient moments. So we videotaped myself so we could break down why things would be hurting. Most of the time when you get pain it's because you're doing something wrong with your technique: you know you're either landing wrong or loading wrong, but it's something you can figure out. I watched myself hit on video and that has helped me try to make adjustments.
Tennis Week: Preparing to talk to you today, I was looking back at your results from this season and was struck by the fact several of your losses were three-setters where you lost tight third sets: you lost to Mirza, 7-5, in the third at Indian Wells, you lost to Bartoli, 6-4, in the third at Birmingha, you lost 7-6 in the third to Savchuk in the third in Eastbourne, you lost to Frazier, 7-6 in the third in San Diego. What do you take from those tight third-set losses and how do you take the next step where you start pulling out some of those tight third sets?
Bethanie Mattek: I don't how many times I lost in three sets this year. You know what: it's not really like I choke or get really tight because I actually like pressure situations. It was a matter of I wasn't focusing on the right things where I got off my game plan. And if you don't have a game plan in those situations then you start forcing stuff and that's when your technique goes. I'll change my mind and try to change things up in the middle of the point and that's when you start using your hand and that's when my technique would break down and I'd get more inconsistent. it's a matter of me just mentally thinking the same thing when I won the first or second set and taking that into the third. I really did come close in a lot of matches and one of my goals for next year is to really take what I did good out of my matches. A lot of times in the past, I would get really bummed out. For instance, against Bartoli in Birmingham, I won the first set, was up in the second and then I just started thinking and lost my game plan and started forcing my shots. And then obviously you're not quite as consistent and then you start coaching yourself on the court like "OK, I gotta start figuring this out, what happened? What can I do here?"
Tennis Week: It's funny how even that slightest indecision — that split-second of slight doubt — can create problems and rather than just seeing the ball and reacting that small indecision can re-route your shot selection or stroke, especially the pace players are hitting, it can really hurt you.
Bethanie Mattek: Exactly. It just kills you. So then I go to the next tournament, which was tough circumstances because I had made the semis in doubles [at Birmingham] so I had like 12 hours to get to the next tournament at Eastbourne to played qualies in singles. I was playing Olga Savchuk and I lost 7-6 in the third. Honestly, I lost it at that point. I just went off on my coach, I just lost it.
Tennis Week: When you lose it, what's that like? Do you throw your racquet? Do you just flip out?
Bethanie Mattek: Normally I'll be upset because I'm a very competitive person. I might not just say a lot. I need an hour or so to kind of be alone and get over it. But this match was different; this was like a breaking point. I think I broke my racquet right after match point. I threw it in my bag. My coach comes after me and says "Listen, don't worry about it. You got in at 2 a.m., you didn't really have time to prepare, don't worry about it." I was like "What? I suck! I'm going home! I'm not playing Wimbledon!" It was really unfortunate because I could have really gotten a lot out of that match. Technically, it wasn't the greatest circumstances going into it and I would have had to play two matches that day if I had won so it really wasn't the best circumstances. But one of my goals for next year is to really try to take something good and positive out of those matches because this year it seemed like I was taking two steps back and one step forward and mentally it really drains you especially throughout the year after playing weeks in a row. It will really grind away at you if you keep that up week after week.
Tennis Week: I remember Jim Courier saying once that in retrospect he probably over-worked himself at the end of his career. That his work ethic really helped him reach the top and in latter years he tried working even harder believing if hard work had helped him get to the top than working harder was the solution when he was trying to get back, but he realized later he had probably overworked and would have been better pulling back a bit. Do you think it's possible you may have over trained at some point? Because in your case, you're playing qualies a lot, plus you're playing doubles and you're doing the off-court training in the gym as well, do you think there were times you over trained?
Bethanie Mattek: For sure, for sure. A lot of times I would play through a lot of pain. I remember sometimes in the middle of a match feeling pain and thinking: "OK, either I can go for this, pull out or ignore my knee right know." And maybe I'd make it through that and the next round, I'd be dying. It would take me an hour to warm up and it just wasn't the way to go. As soon as I got to the tournament, I would feel great then after that it would be a slow decline. So I want to minimize that decline. It starts with the training I do at home. A lot of times I would over-work myself in the gym. There were days since I would feel bad a lot — you know knee or shoulder or hip — where I felt good, I'd be like "Shoot, I'm going to the gym all day today because I feel great." So I'd go to the gym trying to maximize it until I just couldn't go anymore. And then as soon as I felt better in a couple of days, I'd be like "Man, I gotta get in shape today." It wasn't what it was about. I decreased a lot of the pounding on my legs and done a lot of different kind of exercises as far as building strength and endurance. That was a wake-up call: I'd wake up some mornings and feel like I was an NFL player who was 80. I was like "There's no way I should feel this way, I'm 20 years old." And I really got smart and got a new therapy plan and a new fitness regimen. I've really been changing a lot of stuff toward the end of this year, which is really exciting because I feel I'm making a lot of break throughs.
Tennis Week: How did you fall in love with tennis and get interested in the game in the first place?
Bethanie Mattek: I grew up in Minnesota and Wisconsin. My dad got me started. He was working a lot and didn't have a lot of time to spend with me, so when we did have time together, on the weekends, he'd take me to the tennis court and we'd play. He didn't really play when he as younger. He was a semi-pro basketball player, he played pro ball over in Asia, so he was an athlete. I was involved in every single sport growing up — soccer, volleyball, basketball, track and field — I mean you name it, I played it. Pretty much when I was 12 my dad was kind of like "You might want to start making a decision about what sport [you will pursue]." One of the things that made my choose tennis was it was an individual sport. I just started doing well. I really liked basketball too, I think it was my second sport. My mom was a really good athlete as well, she played softball and track and field in high school in college. So I just kind of grew up around sports; for fun we'd all play badminton or something, we are all very active. So I think that really kind of helped me be the player I am now as far as working out and working hard and being in shape. I pretty much had to make the decision to choose tennis. When I was 12, we moved to Boca Raton and I went to the Evert Tennis Academy. In Wisconsin, I'd play in the morning for an hour, then I'd go to school and play for an hour in the evening and I was like "OK, cool." Then I came down to Evert's and it was like I played six hours a day. It was a reality check. And I think it's great that I went through it, but you can't do that forever. It definitely does get you tough. You figure out what your body can handle and how well you can play even if you think you're tired and can't go on. That was a good experience for me, plus there was a lot more international players. I had been one of the better players in Wisconsin like winning states 18s when I was 14, so I got invited to all the USTA national camps. Once I got down to Florida it was a case of playing against all the international kids and playing against kids who were older than me, so it was a good change.
Tennis Week: A lot of tennis fans have come to know you for your fashion sense and for your unique clothes. I didn't realize you actually make some of your own clothes. How did you develop your sense of style and how do you choose the clothes you'll wear? How do you get the ideas for what you want to wear? I saw your interview at Wimbledon and it almost sounded like you made the decision to wear those soccer-style socks the night before you played on Centre Court?
Bethanie Mattek: Initially I was with Nike when I was at Evert's and then I got patch deals so I had to change companies because Nike has a clean contract [no patches permitted]. I had some pretty good deals wearing patches when I was 16 so it was unfortunate because I liked Nike, but you know it just couldn't work out with the patches. So I switched to adidas and was with them for a couple of years. I was in Australia and I got a call from them saying "Listen, you're cut" basically. I was in Australia already with all my adidas stuff and I was like "No way!" I didn't even tell anyone, I was so pissed. I didn't even tell my parents. I was so pissed I was like "I'm not wearing any adidas stuff on court, no way." You know, they cut me right before the tournament, two days before I played. So I basically opened my suit case and looked at all the stuff I had packed to wear out or wear to dinner...
Tennis Week: You mean, you went to your regular clothes?
Bethanie Mattek: Yeah, my regular clothes. I was like: "You know what? I'm just gonna wear these on the court. I don't care."
Tennis Week: Some might see that as a bit of a radical idea wearing your street clothes on court?
Bethanie Mattek: I think I wore an adidas skirt, but I cut it short so you couldn't see the adidas logo. So it wasn't like I was wearing jeans, I was still wearing an athletic skirt and the shoes.
Tennis Week: Right. So it's not like you went out there wearing cut offs and flip flops?
Bethanie Mattek: (laughs) I was like "Whatever, I'll just wear regular clothes." I had some hot, sheer orange shirt and it looked pretty cool so it just kind of went on from that. I really came out of my shell when I was 16 or 17 and was in Florida. Before that, I really wasn't into fashion. Coming from Wisconsin, I wore hiking boots and flannels all the time.
Tennis Week: So you were sort of the LL Bean or female Paul Bunyan of tennis fashion in those days.
Bethanie Mattek: Yeah, really. That's really what I wore. No one believes me now when I tell that story.
Tennis Week: Well now some people think of you as sort of the bohemian tennis player because your style is so distinct.
Bethanie Mattek: I just enjoy it. I like different looks. I don't have one look that I stick with all year. I'm kind of spur of the moment when it comes to the clothes. I'll be in a city walking by a store and see something and sayd "Oh my God, that's hot." All these shop owners think I'm crazy because I'll be trying on these clothes and I'll be doing my tennis strokes in them and they'll look at me like "What's she doing?" But it really is spur of the moment. The first couple of timees I'd be down in South Beach looking at stuff you'd wear to a club or stuff that dancers wear because obviously you can move in it. I was looking at all that stuff there and it's cool. I'd be walking in Paris and find some stuff. That's where I bought half of my Wimbledon outfit — the shorts — from a store in Paris. I was kind of looking for stockings, I thought that would be cool because I don't think the [All England] Club would have liked it if I had done something really nuts. So I thought "I'll just wear knee-high stockings" and I found these socks. So it's really spur of the moment. I mean, I'll have an idea, but then detour off of that depending on what I find. I'm more into getting a reaction from people. It's not so much I'm forcing this style on people, I just think it's fun.
Tennis Week: I like the fact it's a way to express your personality and a way for you to acknowledge the fans, sort of a form of entertainment for the fans. It's a way to let people know "I'm not just here to hit a ball over the net, I'm trying to give you a good show as well."
Bethanie Mattek: Yeah, I mean really, if it comes down to it tennis is entertainment. Of course I want to play my best and I work my ass off every day to get better — that's not a question. I think it's one way to bring out your personality and I think sometimes some of the players lack a little bit of it. Talking to some of the players there's so many different personalities that aren't brought out or even noticed by some of the promotion people.
Tennis Week: A friend of mine, Hey, saw you and Jankovic playing doubles together and was struck by how both of you really made an effort to acknowlege and interact with fans.
Bethanie Mattek: For sure. The fans are important. Obviously, it's important to be focused, but again if you have no fans you really don't have a tour. That's just how it is. I really enjoy playing with Jelena. I think we're going to be playing a lot together next year. I was just talking to her. She's hilarous to play with. She's one of these people who will hear what people in the crowd say. So we'll be talking between points, deciding where we're going to serve and she'll say "Did you hear what that guy said up there?" So it's really relaxing because we'll be laughing and we actually play better and we're in the moment and relaxed. I had her wearing some of my socks at some of the tournaments so in L.A. and San Diego she was wearing some of my stuff. She's really got a cool personality. I think I'm more relaxed playing doubles so I'm trying to bring that attitude to my singles just being relaxed, in the moment and having fun. I love playing doubles. I like playing at net, I have good hands, I think. So it's really fun for me. So doubles is definitely importaant next year. It comes down to schedule and if Jelena and I are playing the same events. I think she's going to play Dubai and Doha and I'm planning to play Memphis and Acapulco so you have to kind of work with the schedule. We said something about possibly playing the Grand Slams and Miami next year. We still have to talk about it, but for the Australian Open and Tokyo I'm not quite sure who I am playing with.
Tennis Week: When you look ahead to 2007 what are your goals, not just results and ranking goals, but in terms of how you play points and your style of play, what are your goals?
Bethanie Mattek: Basically, my goal for next year is to have more strategy and set up more points. I think last year some of my issues were because I was just reacting out there and if you're just reacting and you don't have a plan then you're kind of behind the 8-ball. I really want to go a step further than saying "OK, I want to hit my serve up the T." I really want to see myself pick targets and kind of just use the court and my winners will happen and I'm not counting on it or forcing it but it will happen. That's really my biggest goal: to play with specific strategy, kind of like the way Hingis does, playing a couple of shots ahead. I think Hingis is really good at that.
Tennis Week: She's great at that. You can see her sometimes almost play the point out in her head before she plays it on on court. It's like "I'm going to slice my serve wide on the deuce side, hit the backhand crosscourt on my second shot then go back crosscourt and take command.
Bethanie Mattek: Yeah, Hingis knows what she's going to do and she almost knows what the opponent is going to do. And that's why she's a good mover too because she's always there and balanced and efficient. So I would say that's going to be my big goal for next year. I think my serve is one of my strengths so I'm going to hone in on that, work on accuracy and try to set up points using my serve.
Tennis Week: How involved is your family with your tennis now?
Bethanie Mattek: It's tough. I went through that phase every teenager and tennis dad goes through. It got to be a little much because my dad was still trying to coach me and and I was working with other coaches so it was a case of too many cooks in the kitchen. So for a while I was like "Listen dad, you just be my dad, let's not talk about tennis and don't feel you've got to come to all my tournaments." But we've come a long way since then and now I think my dad really enjoys watching me play tennis; same with my mom. They haven't been able to come to a bunch of my tournaments. My mom came with me to the French Open last year and that's about it. They'll come to the U.S. Open and to Miami, but other than that they haven't really come to a lot. Obviously, I keep in touch with them and they know how I'm doing. Hopefully, I'm going to take my younger sister and brother with me to Wimbledon next year. They are really excited and want to do that.
Tennis Week: Someone told me after you mentioned you bought the socks you wore at Wimbledon at Harrods there was actually a rush on those and Harrods sold out of the socks. Is that true?
Bethanie Mattek: I actually went back to Harrods to buy more socks. I didn't even know it would be that big and it ended up being pretty massive so I went back. I went back with a friend of mine and my friend Kim said to the woman there "Do you have any more of the socks left?" So she went to check and my friend said to her: "Do you know who this is? This is the girl who played Venus first round at Wimbledon and wore the socks." And te lady said: "Yeah, I know. We've sold out of the socks. We can't keep anymore in stock." It was crazy. She recognized me right away so she said that and I was like "Wow, that's pretty cool." It was a new company called Tabio and all they do is make socks and stockings. I am getting stuff from them next year. They're going to send me some of their new stuff. I probably won't wear the same socks you saw this year because they make everything: low socks, high socks, everything. It's like a start up company in London.
Tennis Week: Have any newer clothing companies approached you about wearing their clothes? And is that something you would consider or are you committed to kind of continuing to make your own clothes?
Bethanie Mattek: Definitely, I'm looking more into that. As much as I like Nike, a lot of players wear it and you watch a match and sometimes the players will be wearing the exact same outfit and I don't like that. It happens a lot. My goal was actually to get a high-end fashion company that made sports wear like Prada or Kenneth Cole reaction. It would be worth it, I think, for a start-up company to get their clothes out and I've already got attention for that. It was funny because even my doubles matches after that Venus match, I wore the socks as well and I had so many people like "Oh there's the girl with the high socks." It's pretty cool that it has that kind of effect. Tennis Week: I was told the Wimbledon museum staff approached you and asked you to donate the outfit to the museum. Is that true? Bethanie Mattek: Yeah, I was in the locker room getting ready for mixed doubles and these two ladies came up to me and their first words to me were "Listen, we know you dress kind of crazy" or words to that effect. And I'm thinking I am in trouble at that point and that they're going to tell me I couldn't wear them for mixed doubles. So I'm already like "Oh crap." I mean, I already have to put my outfit on before all my matches and go to the referee and get it approved. So I'm like all right I got to put it on and twirl all around and say "This is what I'm wearing is it OK?" So anyway, they came up to me in the locker room and I was a little worried. And they were like "Listen, since it's so unique, we would love it if you would donate to the museum." So I was like "Sure, what do you need." So they asked for the socks and shorts and for me to sign everything and then they'd put it up in one of the little displays. I thought that was pretty cool. I'm thinking "Hey, I only got one game and I'm in the museum." So that was cool, but it's really not my goal. I'm glad it works out, but again another goal for next year is to show my tennis skills more. And if that comes along with it, it's even better.

Craigy
Dec 23rd, 2006, 02:16 PM
Ok I seriously can't read all of that :haha: :haha:

goldenlox
Dec 23rd, 2006, 02:24 PM
Here's one interesting part -

Bethanie Mattek: Initially I was with Nike when I was at Evert's and then I got patch deals so I had to change companies because Nike has a clean contract [no patches permitted]. I had some pretty good deals wearing patches when I was 16 so it was unfortunate because I liked Nike, but you know it just couldn't work out with the patches. So I switched to adidas and was with them for a couple of years. I was in Australia and I got a call from them saying "Listen, you're cut" basically. I was in Australia already with all my adidas stuff and I was like "No way!" I didn't even tell anyone, I was so pissed. I didn't even tell my parents. I was so pissed I was like "I'm not wearing any adidas stuff on court, no way." You know, they cut me right before the tournament, two days before I played. So I basically opened my suit case and looked at all the stuff I had packed to wear out or wear to dinner...
Tennis Week: You mean, you went to your regular clothes?
Bethanie Mattek: Yeah, my regular clothes. I was like: "You know what? I'm just gonna wear these on the court. I don't care."

LudwigDvorak
Dec 23rd, 2006, 03:10 PM
I read it all. She's interesting and very honest. I like that. I can tell she has a personality. Never saw her play, but I'll keep an eye out on her.

pooh14
Dec 23rd, 2006, 04:17 PM
Ok I seriously can't read all of that :haha: :haha:

lol right me too.
it is way to much words.

Sefo
Dec 23rd, 2006, 04:35 PM
She's watching Federer tapes in slow motion. Lol, that's nice.

CrossCourt~Rally
Dec 23rd, 2006, 09:44 PM
"My goal was actually to get a high-end fashion company that made sports wear like Prada or Kenneth Cole reaction. It would be worth it"

U go GIRL! :worship:

~Kiera~
Dec 23rd, 2006, 11:02 PM
Thanks for posting that, goldenlox :)

trivfun
Dec 24th, 2006, 08:06 AM
I believe if Bethanie plays some doubles, she will become a more efficient player in singles. Here is a great player who had success in doubles before she became a success in singles.


http://i.a.cnn.net/si/2006/writers/arash_markazi/05/01/hot.read/p1_hard.jpg

drake3781
Dec 24th, 2006, 09:07 AM
Mattek has been diligently working to design a game plan that will showcase her athletic assets. The Rochester, Minn. native, who currently lives in Boca Raton, Fla., has been spending recent weeks working with coach Jason Fransen in Indian Wells, Calif.
"I love how talented Bethanie is," Fransen said. "She's an athlete. She has good hand-eye coordination, she has a lot of ability at net and she has good quickness. She's understanding how to make the ball do different things and how to work the point. In doubles, there's less court to hit to so there's no decision-making at all and she can just let her game flow and that may be a reason she's been successful in doubles. All of a sudden, put her on a singles court where she can do anything and has more options and she has a lot more decisions to make. So we've been working on some technical things, but also on strategy."

...

I had some issues and I had been talking to Jason since Indian Wells, just on the phone every once in a while. I was playing a tournament out here, lost first round and wasn't really ready to play. So I decided to shoot over and work with him based on our conversations on the phone. He has been trying to help my with some of the footwork. I've been watching a lot of video of players I would like to try to copy, players I thought were very good movers.

...

Bethanie Mattek: Normally I'll be upset because I'm a very competitive person. I might not just say a lot. I need an hour or so to kind of be alone and get over it. But this match was different; this was like a breaking point. I think I broke my racquet right after match point. I threw it in my bag. My coach comes after me and says "Listen, don't worry about it. You got in at 2 a.m., you didn't really have time to prepare, don't worry about it." I was like "What? I suck! I'm going home! I'm not playing Wimbledon!" It was really unfortunate because I could have really gotten a lot out of that match. Technically, it wasn't the greatest circumstances going into it and I would have had to play two matches that day if I had won so it really wasn't the best circumstances. But one of my goals for next year is to really try to take something good and positive out of those matches because this year it seemed like I was taking two steps back and one step forward and mentally it really drains you especially throughout the year after playing weeks in a row. It will really grind away at you if you keep that up week after week.




Anyone know anything about her coach, Jason Franzen? I sat by him at a match this past year... he seemed really familiar but I can't say why. He was quiet but his two friends were effusively cheering "B" on throughout the match... made it fun to watch. I googled him but no hits.

MyskinaManiac
Dec 24th, 2006, 10:56 AM
I really like her. I like how open she is about the major clothing sponsors... she really doesn't like adidas.

The Dawntreader
Dec 24th, 2006, 11:10 AM
I believe if Bethanie plays some doubles, she will become a more efficient player in singles. Here is a great player who had success in doubles before she became a success in singles.


http://i.a.cnn.net/si/2006/writers/arash_markazi/05/01/hot.read/p1_hard.jpg

Darlene hard:D

trivfun
Dec 24th, 2006, 04:28 PM
Darlene hard:D


Yes indeed. I also think she can be good as another or even better than another Minnesotan. Here pictured with Darlene and Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman.


http://www.wm.edu/tenniscenter/arthwightmanhard1959.jpg

Drake1980
Dec 24th, 2006, 05:46 PM
Bethanie:kiss: Best of luck in '07

selesfan1
Dec 24th, 2006, 09:56 PM
I often wonder if perhaps she turned pro too soon. Just because she won les petit a's she was deemed as a future number 1.

trivfun
Dec 25th, 2006, 12:01 AM
I often wonder if perhaps she turned pro too soon. Just because she won les petit a's she was deemed as a future number 1.

It may be one of those things that she doesn't feel part of society and tennis is a way to cope for her. I feel that she is more of a giving person than a "hustler, taker" type person. All tennis players of the past and now feel that way to a certain degree. Tennis was used as a way to occupy time till marriage came in.

I hope for Bethanie that she is able to feel that she has a purpose and whether that is tennis or not, I hope for the best.

Slumpsova
Dec 25th, 2006, 06:34 AM
"Hey, I only got one game and I'm in the museum."

:rolls: she is so funny.
Beth :hearts:

Jeff
Dec 25th, 2006, 07:00 AM
This is a long, comprehensive interview. Honestly I have only read about half, but I'll read the rest after while ;) But yeah, Bethanie is really honest and open, which makes reading her interview more interesting.

Best of luck to her in 2007 :kiss:

Jeff
Dec 25th, 2006, 07:02 AM
It may be one of those things that she doesn't feel part of society and tennis is a way to cope for her. I feel that she is more of a giving person than a "hustler, taker" type person. All tennis players of the past and now feel that way to a certain degree. Tennis was used as a way to occupy time till marriage came in.




Hmm, I've never heard or thought about it that way before. Interesting though.

~Eclipsed~
Dec 25th, 2006, 04:18 PM
To those who didn't read the whole thing, don't worry about it because a lot of the information in the beginning is then repeated throughout the interview.

Very interesting article though. I like articles like these where you find out more behind the scenes stuff about tennis.

€CharlDa€
Dec 25th, 2006, 04:29 PM
This article misses a few commas :tape: It was an interesting read, but a tough one!

trivfun
Dec 26th, 2006, 05:03 AM
Hmm, I've never heard or thought about it that way before. Interesting though.


I say that she is like Darlene because Bethanie talks the same as she did concerning her career. Though I think Bethanie wants to do something bigger than having a family unlike other players.