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goldenlox
Dec 18th, 2006, 12:08 PM
USTA to Launch a Women’s Circuit?
http://www.tenniscelebs.com/images/USTA_Logo_New.jpg

The USTA is getting quite concerned about the WTA’s announcement indicating their plan to reduce the number of tournaments held during the season. The goal, according to the WTA, is to make the season shorter to accommodate the players who are said to be desirous of a shorter season.

In order to make the season shorter, the WTA has mentioned eliminating a number of events including Carson and New Haven, both events owned by the USTA and both events part of the USTA-promoted series of events known as the Road to the US Open.

Daily Tennis News has learned that the USTA board of directors is so concerned about the WTA’s plans that it has authorized a $10 million initial deposit to establish a possible women’s tennis circuit.

http://www.tennisnews.com/exclusive.php?pID=15574

A'DAM
Dec 18th, 2006, 12:22 PM
WOW that would be a big turn in women tennis history!

kittyking
Dec 18th, 2006, 12:25 PM
Im not surprised at all

MrSerenaWilliams
Dec 18th, 2006, 12:27 PM
wow....that would be interesting...I hope the USTA and the WTA can work it out. That would be REALLY weird.

Mother_Marjorie
Dec 18th, 2006, 12:27 PM
USTA to Launch a Women’s Circuit?
http://www.tenniscelebs.com/images/USTA_Logo_New.jpg

The USTA is getting quite concerned about the WTA’s announcement indicating their plan to reduce the number of tournaments held during the season. The goal, according to the WTA, is to make the season shorter to accommodate the players who are said to be desirous of a shorter season.

In order to make the season shorter, the WTA has mentioned eliminating a number of events including Carson and New Haven, both events owned by the USTA and both events part of the USTA-promoted series of events known as the Road to the US Open.

Daily Tennis News has learned that the USTA board of directors is so concerned about the WTA’s plans that it has authorized a $10 million initial deposit to establish a possible women’s tennis circuit.

http://www.tennisnews.com/exclusive.php?pID=15574

Oh, goody! Ann Worcester, you are "fired!"

Good riddance, bitch. I guess its not going to matter whether early entry-lists are posted here anymore, because you will gone. And when you complained to the WTA about it, I bet 'ya didn't know they were gonna cut U too.

It couldn't have happened to a better person.

Buh, bye! :wavey:

KimC&MariaSNo1's
Dec 18th, 2006, 12:30 PM
wow that would be big i would like it actually

goldenlox
Dec 18th, 2006, 12:31 PM
If the USTA used that $10 million to help LA and New Haven, they could have 2 A tournaments before the USO.

CoryAnnAvants#1
Dec 18th, 2006, 04:59 PM
Why the hell would they get rid of New Haven? It's a Mens and Womens event and the top players LOVE it. Seven of the top 10 showed up this year and they consistently get four or five top 10 players every single year. It's not like the tournament is suffering financially either...

King of Prussia
Dec 18th, 2006, 05:05 PM
Why the hell would they get rid of New Haven? It's a Mens and Womens event and the top players LOVE it. Seven of the top 10 showed up this year and they consistently get four or five top 10 players every single year. It's not like the tournament is suffering financially either...

I think the issue with the USTA is that they aren't willing to pay more price money (upgrading to Tier A) for getting pretty much the same kind of field. They want the status quo.

So the WTA will scrap tournament that won't be upgraded.

I think the USTA is to blame. They aren't willing to upgrade their tournaments to Tier A... But at the same time, they have 10 millions to create a parallel tour. So they are full of it.

Of course that parallel tour would never happen, that's just a campaign of fear. Like if a tournament with Shaughnessy as the top seed would be viable.

selesfan1
Dec 18th, 2006, 06:18 PM
Well, lots of players are based in the U.S. I am sure if the tournaments offered the right amount of prize money a lot of them would stay in the U.S. and play rather than have to travel around such as Sharapova, Hingis, etc.Also if the USTA could maybe forge an alliance with like let's say the Mexican Tennis Federation,Colombian Tennis Federation, Argentine Tennis Federation and Tennis Canada it could help this parallell tour be more viable and allow tournaments to be held in those countries. I mention these countries because they have tournaments that would probably go down the wazoo if this new plan is approved by the WTA.

It would of course help if they got another "Slam Federation" to join in. Australia or UK seems the most viable.

King of Prussia
Dec 18th, 2006, 06:32 PM
I really doubt any top player would take the risk to boycott the WTA. They have very little to gain and a lot to lose.

KoOlMaNsEaN
Dec 18th, 2006, 07:16 PM
its the early wta days all over again!

santhuruu
Dec 18th, 2006, 07:44 PM
I don't really understand why they would want to cancel Carson, I would say New Haven and Stanford to be honest.

goldenlox
Dec 19th, 2006, 12:02 PM
Several changes volleyed around

TOM TEBBUTT

It appears the spit has hit the can, so to speak, as the factions in tennis try to cough up solutions to their problems.
After years of relative peace among the principal players -- the women's WTA Tour, the ATP men's tour and the world governing body and ally of the Grand Slam events, the International Tennis Federation -- power struggles again abound.
The most serious is between the WTA Tour, which wants to shorten its schedule and restrict the lower-level events top players can enter to try to solve its injury crisis, and the United States Tennis Association, the custodian of the U.S. Open.
As part of its Roadmap 2010 plan, the WTA Tour may drop some American events and weaken others by limiting how many elite players can play in them.
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USTA officials, happy with the way the first two years of their U.S. Open Series have succeeded -- mostly in getting better television coverage -- are not pleased by moves that could reduce the number and quality of events. They are playing hardball. It was reported last week that the USTA board approved a $10-million (U.S.) contingency fund for possibly starting its own women's circuit.
WTA Tour chief executive officer Larry Scott and president Stacey Allaster, formerly of Toronto, are caught between implementing reforms and the USTA's power play.
On another front, the WTA Tour stubbornly continues its experiment with on-court coaching.
There was an almost universal chorus from big-name player such as Amélie Mauresmo, Maria Sharapova, Kim Clijsters and Serena Williams against on-court coaching at the time it was introduced at the Rogers Cup in Montreal and used in an event in New Haven, Conn., last summer.
Among arguments against it are that it is unfair to players without coaches, contrary to the principle of player self-reliance and susceptible to abuse by unscrupulous coaches. Yet, on-court coaching will again be tested at events in 2007, after the Australian Open.
All is also not well with the ATP.
New CEO Etienne de Villiers, a former Walt Disney Co. executive, is rapidly remaking the face of the game.
He wants a major combined men's and women's tournament in Madrid in May before the French Open, but has run into serious opposition from spring Tennis Masters Series clay-court events in Monte Carlo, Rome and Hamburg, Germany.
Chinese officials are also upset because De Villiers has said he wants to move the year-end Masters Cup to Europe from its current location, Shanghai, China.
Any schedule changes won't be made until 2009, because 2007 is set and 2008 is crowded by the Summer Olympics in Beijing.
De Villiers is also tinkering with tradition. Wanting to guarantee top players more matches, the ATP will experiment with round-robin play in the early rounds of 13 lower-level events in 2007, during which there will be groups of three, with winners advancing to the round of 16 or the quarter-finals, depending on draw size.
Top men's player Roger Federer is opposed to the round-robin events, which include Queen's Club in London and Indianapolis, Ind., and is not entered in any of them.
Like the WTA Tour's on-court coaching, the ATP's round-robin plans are severely flawed.
Is it worth sacrificing the timeless drama of "lose-and-you-are-out" just so one more match is assured?
Won't it be too complicated and confusing with tiebreaker rules (if all three players finish 1-1, for example) for fans to follow? And what would draw sheets look like?
How did the players ever sign off on this? They will lose money because of smaller draws at some events and also have to play more because of the round-robin format.

goldenlox
Dec 19th, 2006, 12:12 PM
USTA earmarks $10 million for alternate women's tourATP trying to move Davis Cup to week after Slams

By Matthew Cronin, ********************

http://www.********************/usta_wta_121806.html


Outgoing USTA President Franklin Johnson confirmed a report by Daily Tennis on Monday that the board of directors of America's leading tennis body has voted to designate $10 million to establish a rival women's tennis circuit in case they can't come to an agreement with the Sony Ericsson WTA Tour over the proposed changes to player fields in the tour's Roadmap 2010, especially concerning U.S. Open Series tournaments.
The tour is currently proposing to re-designate tournaments into "A" and "B" level events, and many "B" level tournaments – including some successful ones in the United States – could find it impossible to attract Top-10 players, essentially a death warrants for tournaments that have featured star players in the past.
"We haven't spent it, but we've just earmarked it, saying if we have to do it, we will," Johnson told ********************. "The board was resolute in saying, 'You cannot let them do this.' If it takes dipping into our portfolio and financing something like this, we will. We cannot let this happen. It will be devastating to tennis. We don't know whether it will be for a competing tour or just to help strengthen US tournaments so they are viable, and have top players as a lead up to the US Open. The U.S. Open Series has been so successful. The tour has said it's one of the best things to happen to tennis and they are preceding to dismantle it."
The tour is current in the midst of taking bids for the 2009 season, where most tournaments are either expected to bid up some $4 million to get an "A" designation, or go down to a lower "B" designation, where, as of yet, there is no guarantee they will be able to attract Top-10 players.
Johnson said that the USTA and WTA are talking again and that there are signs of movement, but the USTA isn't satisfied yet. WTA CEO Larry Scott has said the tour is willing to negotiate some with its partners, but wants to make sure that in 2009, the tour can offer enough high-level tournaments where the stars are competing against each other.
"He seems to be sticking it to America," Johnson said. "I don't agree with the whole philosophy to have more tournaments where all the top players play and then abandoning successful markets. You have to have at least a few of the Top 10 at Tier II tournaments. That's what the men do. You don't need 11 other tournaments outside the Slams where all the Top 10 play.
Johnson also doubts that JP Morgan Chase Open in Carson, Calif. (Los Angeles) of which the USTA owns 25 percent, will bid up an extra $4 million to become an A-level tournament because "it's barely making money."
ATP trying to move Davis Cup to week after Slams
On another front, Johnson, who is an ITF Vice President, said that ITF President Francesco Ricci Bitti and ATP CEO Etienne De Villiers are at lager heads over Davis Cup.
Johnson said that De Villiers wants to place the Davis Cup weekends right after the Grand Slams.
Currently, the first round of Davis Cup is played the week after the Australian Open, but the second round is contested in April, the third round is played 12 days after the US Open and the final is played the first weekend in December.
"He and Etienne aren't buddy, buddy," Johnson said. "I like Etienne a lot and I've been trying to broker a better relationship, but so far I've been unsuccessful. Davis Cup is the main bone of contention. BNP Paribas' sponsorship of the Davis Cup is the main financial bone for the ITF and if dates are changed right after the Slams, and top players who have reached the semis and final of the Slams have to do fly somewhere else and change surfaces, they won't play. There been a lot of unfriendly words exchanged on that issue. There's also a bunch of officials in the US who want to change the Davis Cup format (every two years or at one location) and don't realize that the rest of the world likes it just the way it is. Chile told us that when they hosted the Slovak Republic that they sold out, made a million and paid off their debt. You can't convince them and other countries like that that they shouldn't have that opportunity."
Johnson also said that the USTA will move the Houston Clay Courts to another US city in 2008 and will not abandon it.

goldenlox
Dec 19th, 2006, 12:17 PM
Johnson also doubts that JP Morgan Chase Open in Carson, Calif. (Los Angeles) of which the USTA owns 25 percent, will bid up an extra $4 million to become an A-level tournament because "it's barely making money."


There is no interest in tennis in LA.
The USTA should have figured that out by now.
Why not throw that money in a well.

rockstar
Dec 19th, 2006, 01:49 PM
i hope it remains as 1 tour circuit.

Tenis Srbija
Dec 19th, 2006, 01:58 PM
I would like for that to happen...
It would make everything much funnier :lol: :)

goldenlox
Dec 19th, 2006, 03:37 PM
The USO series, on the women's side, was all about San Diego and Rogers Cup. The 2 Tier I's.
And San Diego is going under.
So they have to blow it up, and redo the summer.