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View Full Version : Do you live near a WWI or WWII Battlefield??


Staticbeef
Nov 28th, 2006, 06:33 PM
I have noticed many War memorials all over Europe and just was wondering if many here have memory of or have heard stories told of battles right where you live? I know that Europe was almost destroyed in two major wars, so there must be many stories of human suffering right here.

LoveFifteen
Nov 28th, 2006, 06:48 PM
There are definitely a few people on this board that grew up near the Battle of the Bulge.

Staticbeef
Nov 28th, 2006, 06:50 PM
There are definitely a few people on this board that grew up near the Battle of the Bulge.



Should be many near Normandie, also, Not to mention the Battle of England, I am just wondering if anyone even talks about it anymore.

azdaja
Nov 28th, 2006, 06:55 PM
well, the place where my family used to live was burned down by the wehmacht in a retaliatory raid. when i was little my grandmother, who was a little girl during the ww2, told me how she had to flee to the hills in order to hide from these raids. her older brothers and cousins fought as guerillas against germans and some of them were killed. i don't know much about all this because i was too little to understand it. my mother's father was also a supporter of the guerillas, i was told, but don't know any details.

-Ph51-
Nov 28th, 2006, 07:02 PM
Of course we do and we are surrounded by them.

LoveFifteen
Nov 28th, 2006, 07:04 PM
Should be many near Normandie, also, Not to mention the Battle of England, I am just wondering if anyone even talks about it anymore.

Many people still talk about WWI and WWII battles. Not many people got my joke. :bigcry:

Big Fat Pink Elephant
Nov 28th, 2006, 07:15 PM
I know that Europe was almost destroyed in two major wars, so there must be many stories of human suffering right here.

several wars destroyed different countries and areas, but yes yes, i understand what u mean. sorry, just sounded like you were talking about Europe as it was one country.

Geoffry
Nov 28th, 2006, 07:17 PM
I live in a small village that hardly existed after World War I had passed by - but then again, most of the villages and towns in the area in which I live were destroyed by the War.

I don't think - but I'm not sure - that much was destroyed around here during WO II, seeing Belgium quickly surrendered to Germany.

I don't know anyone who has experienced World War I - quite logical, seeing they would be very old to have any recollections of it - but I know a lot of people who have lived through the second World War and some of them talk about quite often, and others never do. The personal anecdotes you hear are, to me, so much more interesting than the common information you get in history lessons.

gentenaire
Nov 28th, 2006, 07:19 PM
My grandfather grew up in Passendaele. They fled to France during the war. When they came back home, they couldn't even make out where their house once stood because everything was gone. The entire town, all the trees, everything. The town was one big mass grave.

I also discovered letters that were written during the second world war, written by grandparents and great aunts, etc. They're very moving and show how hard it must have been.

As for my grandparents on my mother's side. My grandfather was born in Holland because my great grandparents fled te neutral Holland when the Germans came too close. As a result, my last name is spelled the Dutch way instead of the Belgian way. My great grandfather had a brewery, which was confiscated by the Germans. He had to start from scratch again after the war. Then during the second world war, he lost it all again. He didn't have the heart to start it all again and gave up. So the brewery is gone.

Staticbeef
Nov 28th, 2006, 07:21 PM
well, the place where my family used to live was burned down by the wehmacht in a retaliatory raid. when i was little my grandmother, who was a little girl during the ww2, told me how she had to flee to the hills in order to hide from these raids. her older brothers and cousins fought as guerillas against germans and some of them were killed. i don't know much about all this because i was too little to understand it. my mother's father was also a supporter of the guerillas, i was told, but don't know any details.

I can well imagine how difficult living was and how worried they must have been about day to day survival.

wehmacht=Infantry

Staticbeef
Nov 28th, 2006, 07:24 PM
several wars destroyed different countries and areas, but yes yes, i understand what u mean. sorry, just sounded like you were talking about Europe as it was one country.

Ye, I can see why. Din't mean it that way, just figured it would be easier than listing all the countries that suffered.Sorry

Big Fat Pink Elephant
Nov 28th, 2006, 07:25 PM
the norwegians destroyed the battleship Blücher - which mattered a lot. by delaying the attack from the germans, our royal family had time to escape to england.

my parents live right next to the former international airport. the germans took over our area, the schools i went to were used as military bases.
not many battles happened in norway, but several of my friends' grandparents were sent different jails/camps. not many pleasant stories to tell.

Dementieva_Dude
Nov 28th, 2006, 07:30 PM
There are definitely a few people on this board that grew up near the Battle of the Bulge.

:worship: :devil:

Staticbeef
Nov 28th, 2006, 07:31 PM
the norwegians destroyed the battleship Blücher - which mattered a lot. by delaying the attack from the germans, our royal family had time to escape to england.

my parents live right next to the former international airport. the germans took over our area, the schools i went to were used as military bases.
not many battles happened in norway, but several of my friends' grandparents were sent different jails/camps. not many pleasant stories to tell.


I understand, I am a war veteran, and totaly changed my mind about war after actually being in one. A lot of people bear the pain in silence, not good.

gentenaire
Nov 28th, 2006, 07:31 PM
It's also strange how members of the resistance don't dare to talk, even today. That fear of retaliation never went away. After all these years, they're still scared the Germans will find out.
My SIL's grandfather was in the resistance and not even his wife knew about it. My SIL knows very little of what he's done.

My grandfather was a POW for a short while, then suddenly released, he never knew why they released him. He had a factory but near the end of the war, hardly had any workers left because they'd all been sent to Germany for forced labour. Also, it was a radio factory but they weren't allowed to build radios during the war, they were forbidden because the Germans didn't want people to listen to the BBC. So my grandfather built radios in his garage in secret. In the factory they made flash lights. There was a high demand for flash lights since all lights had to be switched at night to protect against air raids. The lights would make the cities a target.

I can go on and on telling stories...

azdaja
Nov 28th, 2006, 07:31 PM
I can well imagine how difficult living was and how worried they must have been about day to day survival.

wehmacht=Infantry
it's actually the wehrmacht, it was a typo :o and it means german army from the ww2 in general. yeah, i now unerstand how difficult it was. there was a policy to kill 100 local men for every german soldier killed by the guerillas and there were a lot of massacres. it was a very brutal war.

Staticbeef
Nov 28th, 2006, 07:32 PM
:worship: :devil:
Thank you D>D>, I got it but din't want to change the mood:angel:

Staticbeef
Nov 28th, 2006, 07:35 PM
it's actually the wehrmacht, it was a typo :o and it means german army from the ww2 in general. yeah, i now unerstand how difficult it was. there was a policy to kill 100 local men for every german soldier killed by the guerillas and there were a lot of massacres. it was a very brutal war.

Yes, I studied it briefly and realize that so many civilians had to have been killed, no one will ever know how many innocents. Not to mention property and foodstuff being confiscated. Dark Times indeed

Dementieva_Dude
Nov 28th, 2006, 07:43 PM
Thank you D>D>, I got it but din't want to change the mood:angel:

Yeah, sorry, don't want to get it off topic...the thread is interesting. To contribute...no, I don't live near any WWI or WWII battlefields (since I live in Canada), but when my grandpa's village in the Netherlands was invaded by the Nazis they used my grandpa's family's house as their base. For almost 5 years my grandpa's family lived with Nazi commanders, all while being part of the Dutch underground. When the Nazis left town they torched the house...so it's not really a battleground story, more of a general war story.

Staticbeef
Nov 28th, 2006, 07:45 PM
It's also strange how members of the resistance don't dare to talk, even today. That fear of retaliation never went away. After all these years, they're still scared the Germans will find out.
My SIL's grandfather was in the resistance and not even his wife knew about it. My SIL knows very little of what he's done.

My grandfather was a POW for a short while, then suddenly released, he never knew why they released him. He had a factory but near the end of the war, hardly had any workers left because they'd all been sent to Germany for forced labour. Also, it was a radio factory but they weren't allowed to build radios during the war, they were forbidden because the Germans didn't want people to listen to the BBC. So my grandfather built radios in his garage in secret. In the factory they made flash lights. There was a high demand for flash lights since all lights had to be switched at night to protect against air raids. The lights would make the cities a target.

I can go on and on telling stories...

God Bless them, heroes every one. You should be proud.

Natalicious
Nov 28th, 2006, 07:53 PM
i live near azdaja so we had the same situation here

Staticbeef
Nov 28th, 2006, 07:56 PM
Yeah, sorry, don't want to get it off topic...the thread is interesting. To contribute...no, I don't live near any WWI or WWII battlefields (since I live in Canada), but when my grandpa's village in the Netherlands was invaded by the Nazis they used my grandpa's family's house as their base. For almost 5 years my grandpa's family lived with Nazi commanders, all while being part of the Dutch underground. When the Nazis left town they torched the house...so it's not really a battleground story, more of a general war story.

No Prob, if you know me, you know I love to joke, humor is always good.

Please guys take this the right way, I mean nothing sinister by it.
My granfather flew in the only American Black fighter escort squadron in the war, they were heroes also, commended for not losing even one bomber while escorting them to bombing missions in Germany. He was a happy cool guy and I loved him very much, when he talked about the war, he always got sad and his jokes would stop. Why would we want to go through that again????

azdaja
Nov 28th, 2006, 07:58 PM
Yes, I studied it briefly and realize that so many civilians had to have been killed, no one will ever know how many innocents. Not to mention property and foodstuff being confiscated. Dark Times indeed
well, because i mentioned the place where my family used to live (i'm talking about serbia here, btw), there was quite a lot of guerilla activity there. i read about their sabotage actions on the railway that goes nearby. i also saw a picture of the execution of a german soldier who refused to shoot at the hostages. german soldiers who refused to take parts in massacres were shot at the spot.

i still don't really know where exactly my grandmother lived during the ww2 :o but there was a lot of guerilla activity there as well. i remember she told me that one of her brothers was killed in a retaliatory raid. he was a civilian.

azdaja
Nov 28th, 2006, 08:00 PM
i live near azdaja so we had the same situation here
well, my grandparents didn't live where you and me now do ;) but yeah, it was similar all over the continent.

gentenaire
Nov 28th, 2006, 08:02 PM
well, because i mentioned the place where my family used to live (i'm talking about serbia here, btw), there was quite a lot of guerilla activity there. i read about their sabotage actions on the railway that goes nearby. i also saw a picture of the execution of a german soldier who refused to shoot at the hostages. german soldiers who refused to take parts in massacres were shot at the spot.

i still don't really know where exactly my grandmother lived during the ww2 :o but there was a lot of guerilla activity there as well. i remember she told me that one of her brothers was killed in a retaliatory raid. he was a civilian.

That's pretty much what happened to the people in the resistance as well. If found out, they were executed on the market square, for all to see.

My boss's father was sent to the concentration camps for being in the resistance. He worked for the railways and was therefore one of the few who was aware of what was happening to the Jews. From the letters I read, from the stories I heard from my grandparents, it's clear people really didn't know what was going on.

azdaja
Nov 28th, 2006, 08:13 PM
That's pretty much what happened to the people in the resistance as well. If found out, they were executed on the market square, for all to see.
they used to hang people in prominent places and leave them there hanging dead for days.

Natalicious
Nov 28th, 2006, 08:18 PM
well, my grandparents didn't live where you and me now do ;) but yeah, it was similar all over the continent.

oh ok.. but my grandmother told me also some things from the 2nd world war (i think she was 5 or 6) and all these things sound terrible

Elske
Nov 28th, 2006, 09:00 PM
My family lives in Ypres. Everything in that city reminds you of World War I. It was the center of the battles between Germans and Brits

http://antares666.altervista.org/_altervista_ht/ypres-1917.jpg

Ypres 1917

http://www.toerismewesthoek.be/uploadedimages/brugseommelandbe/cultuur/beziensw/ID800085661_KLAROENERS.jpg
The Menin Gate, the names of those who died are written in this huge monument

and lots and lots of cemeteries....

http://spbbayeux.dse.nl/verslag/images/engels_kerkhof4.jpg

Selah
Nov 28th, 2006, 09:53 PM
wow, you know to be quite honest, the World Wars have always been this period of history, tragic yes, but i never think of it in a personal way at all. I never honestly think of the suffering of Europeans. I always think of Europeans (older) in a more predatory way, as causing destruction around other parts (obviously more personal for me as an African). Hearing you guys tell some personal stories ,really personalized it for me, and I now have another point pof view. I joined long ago and just read, never posting because of a lot of the fighting etc. But the board can be useful in a positive way, to learn from each other. Even when fighting, i think people get another point of view they might not have been exposed to. :)

Josh
Nov 28th, 2006, 10:18 PM
I don't live near a battlefield but my grandmother told me that her uncle lived in Antwerp during WWII and the first V-bomb that fell on the city destroyed his house. Luckily they weren't home when it happened.

Staticbeef
Nov 28th, 2006, 10:21 PM
wow, you know to be quite honest, the World Wars have always been this period of history, tragic yes, but i never think of it in a personal way at all. I never honestly think of the suffering of Europeans. I always think of Europeans (older) in a more predatory way, as causing destruction around other parts (obviously more personal for me as an African). Hearing you guys tell some personal stories ,really personalized it for me, and I now have another point pof view. I joined long ago and just read, never posting because of a lot of the fighting etc. But the board can be useful in a positive way, to learn from each other. Even when fighting, i think people get another point of view they might not have been exposed to. :)

:eek: WWII, was truly a global conflict, check out the story of the African campaign, especially Rommel and the Algerian and Tunisian conflicts. A lot of the positioning we see today are a direct result of the victory or loses of the Axis and Allied forces. The Turkish and Greek invasions also warrant some research,the Japanese expansion and attack on the USSSR. I promise you interesting and:eek: enlightening reading.

Selah
Nov 28th, 2006, 10:41 PM
:eek: WWII, was truly a global conflict, check out the story of the African campaign, especially Rommel and the Algerian and Tunisian conflicts. A lot of the positioning we see today are a direct result of the victory or loses of the Axis and Allied forces. The Turkish and Greek invasions also warrant some research,the Japanese expansion and attack on the USSSR. I promise you interesting and:eek: enlightening reading.

Well, I know the history aspect. What i meant to convey was that I never thought of it in personal ways, like personal life stories because i have never been exposed to anyone who had family that experienced it.

Staticbeef
Nov 28th, 2006, 11:02 PM
Well, I know the history aspect. What i meant to convey was that I never thought of it in personal ways, like personal life stories because i have never been exposed to anyone who had family that experienced it.

Gotcha, kinda knew you did, What I was trying to suggest would expose you to the personal stories of the major players, the majority of which came from very humble beginnings, people like you and me, who for some trick of fate ended up with the key to the destruction of the planet.

Brett.
Nov 28th, 2006, 11:51 PM
Nup = nowhere near! :lol: - But my grandfather fought in world war II in Palestine and Egypt for 182 days - He's still alive at 87!! :hug: :hug: :hug: :hug: :hug:

©@®eLess
Nov 29th, 2006, 12:16 AM
i live just across a place where my grand grand father died in 1944 during Allies bombing of Belgrade...Bombing was really not necesary...as the Americans said they bombed beacuse they wanted Germans out of Belgrade (there were no germans in that area)...and more civilians died of American bombing that year...then from German bombing 1941 :o

RatedR Superstar
Nov 29th, 2006, 01:07 AM
yup, i live near a ww2 battle field...i used to live in an old american base here, i used to play with those old broken down ww2 planes when i was young:)

p.s. im not old, there's just a lot of old ww2 planes dumped in where i used to live

Hagar
Nov 29th, 2006, 01:24 PM
I have noticed many War memorials all over Europe and just was wondering if many here have memory of or have heard stories told of battles right where you live? I know that Europe was almost destroyed in two major wars, so there must be many stories of human suffering right here.

I was born and grew up in Ieper/Ypres and I have heard many stories from my older family members about the war.
My grandmother on mother's side fled with her family to France when she was 5 (beginning of 1915). They ended up in Lisieux, in Normandy-France. They only came back in the early 20ies and had to start from scratch. When WOII started and my grandmother was a young mother, she always had a basket ready with all the necessary stuff for the two babies she had at the time. But WOII did not hit Ieper very hard as the focus was then more on urban/industrial areas. It was a completely different war. So my grandparents could stay on their farm but it were very somber, frightening years.
My grandfather on my father's side was born in 1899 and was called on duty in 1918. As he was a butcher, they let him work in the kitchen. But he caught the Spanish flu and was ill for quite some time and by then the war was over.
Etc... basically every family member from the generation of my grandparents had a story about the 2 WW but seen the region we lived in, WOI had definitely left most marks. So every family gathering, I have heard so many stories about WOI that I somehow have the impression I was there myself.

WOI is still remembered in Ieper and I think it is a wonderful tradition which should never be abolished. The British have done a great job laying out the war cemetries which are peaceful and serene places.

Staticbeef
Nov 29th, 2006, 06:35 PM
I was born and grew up in Ieper/Ypres and I have heard many stories from my older family members about the war.
My grandmother on mother's side fled with her family to France when she was 5 (beginning of 1915). They ended up in Lisieux, in Normandy-France. They only came back in the early 20ies and had to start from scratch. When WOII started and my grandmother was a young mother, she always had a basket ready with all the necessary stuff for the two babies she had at the time. But WOII did not hit Ieper very hard as the focus was then more on urban/industrial areas. It was a completely different war. So my grandparents could stay on their farm but it were very somber, frightening years.
My grandfather on my father's side was born in 1899 and was called on duty in 1918. As he was a butcher, they let him work in the kitchen. But he caught the Spanish flu and was ill for quite some time and by then the war was over.
Etc... basically every family member from the generation of my grandparents had a story about the 2 WW but seen the region we lived in, WOI had definitely left most marks. So every family gathering, I have heard so many stories about WOI that I somehow have the impression I was there myself.

WOI is still remembered in Ieper and I think it is a wonderful tradition which should never be abolished. The British have done a great job laying out the war cemetries which are peaceful and serene places.


:worship: :worship: :worship: I feel this. I remember in the begining when I first started hearing the stories (Very Young Boy) I though they were fairy tales, but I enjoyed listening to the many stories of heroism and humanity to fellow man. Thank you for this wonderful post.