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Infiniti2001
Nov 22nd, 2006, 03:44 PM
http://i.a.cnn.net/cnn/2006/US/11/22/woman.shot.ap/story.vert.atlshooting.ap.jpg

ATLANTA, Georgia (AP) -- The niece of a 92-year-old woman shot to death by police said her aunt likely had reason to shoot three narcotics investigators as they stormed her house.

Police insisted the officers did everything right before entering the home Tuesday evening, despite suggestions from the woman's neighbors and relatives that it was a case of mistaken identity.

The woman, Kathryn Johnston, was the only resident in the house at the time and had lived there for about 17 years, Assistant Chief Alan Dreher said.

The officers had a legal warrant, "knocked and announced" before they forced open the door and were justified in shooting once fired upon, he said.

Sarah Dozier, the niece, told WAGA-TV that there were never drugs at the house. (Watch niece's fury at police shooting Video)

"My aunt was in good health. I'm sure she panicked when they kicked that door down," Dozier said. "There was no reason they had to go in there and shoot her down like a dog."

As the plainclothes Atlanta police officers approached the house about 7 p.m., a woman inside started shooting, striking each of them, said Officer Joe Cobb, a police spokesman.

One was hit in the arm, another in a thigh and the third in a shoulder. The officers were taken to a hospital for treatment, and all three were conscious and alert, police said.

The Rev. Markel Hutchins, a civil rights leader, said Johnston's family deserves an apology.

"Of the police brutality cases we've had, this is the most egregious because of the woman's age," Hutchins said.

Hutchins said he would try to meet with Atlanta Police Chief Richard Pennington and would also meet with lawyers.

http://www.cnn.com/2006/US/11/22/woman.shot.ap/index.html

tenn_ace
Nov 22nd, 2006, 04:04 PM
what brutality???????? she shot them for god's sakes!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! what were they supposed to do???? let her kill them? :rolleyes:

apology.... ass my apology. :rolleyes:

LoveFifteen
Nov 22nd, 2006, 04:09 PM
The bitch shot 3 police officers, and we're supposed to feel bad for her? :rolleyes:

Paneru
Nov 22nd, 2006, 04:18 PM
Police insisted the officers did everything right before entering the home Tuesday evening, despite suggestions from the woman's neighbors and relatives that it was a case of mistaken identity.


Was it?

Are they saying that the 92 year old woman
was dealing drugs or something like that?

Also, at her age, did she know it was the cops
or did she just think someone was breaking into her home?

Definitely much much more to this story.

Sam L
Nov 22nd, 2006, 04:20 PM
The bitch shot 3 police officers, and we're supposed to feel bad for her? :rolleyes:
:tape:

Dawn Marie
Nov 22nd, 2006, 04:21 PM
Hell fucking yeah we should feel sorry for her!

You know why? Well three fucking cops forced their way into her home. A home that she felt was safe for her. She was defending herself from three asses who stormed into her comfort zone!! They shot her down like a dog and she was 92! Maybe she didn't hear them knocking? Maybe she had a gun next to her because she was alone in her home in the first place.

What if this was your grandma? How would you feel.

The police need to get their shit straight. If you get a warrant make sure you got the right house. This happens to many times. Common police screwing up something easy.

Dawn Marie
Nov 22nd, 2006, 04:23 PM
The bitch shot 3 police officers, and we're supposed to feel bad for her? :rolleyes:


What if it were Martina as a 92 year old. cops storming the home and shooting and all along it was mistaken identity. Come on dude a innocent women died by mistaken id. Have a heart. I hardley don't think it's right to call her a bitch.

tenn_ace
Nov 22nd, 2006, 04:24 PM
my grandma would never get suspected dealing drugs

this grandma knew as she was warned that they are the police

fufuqifuqishahah
Nov 22nd, 2006, 04:24 PM
weeeeeeeeeeeee!

Paneru
Nov 22nd, 2006, 04:26 PM
my grandma would never get suspected dealing drugs

this grandma knew as she was warned that they are the police

Sorry dear, but everyone isn't your grandma.
As well as, the article never stated what exactly
they were searching her house for as to if it were
pertaining to her, relatives, or misteaken identity.

Also, you have no idea "what" the grandma knew,
you only have what the policemen said they had said
before they entered the home. Therefore, you have no clue
as do any of us with the info. given in this article as to what
the grandmother knew.

As i said, their is much much more to this story
than this article is stating.

Selah
Nov 22nd, 2006, 04:29 PM
That is a very, very unfortunate situation. There is no telling whether or not she panicked and didn't hear if they were police officers or not but the sad fact is, she fired a gun. The police had no other choice than to also fire, they also presumably didn't know whether a 92-year old innocent woman or a drug dealer was shooting at them. Unfortunate incident.

Wigglytuff
Nov 22nd, 2006, 04:34 PM
ugh, i am sorry but there really needs to be more details on this

if they went through the trouble of getting a warrant ummm why not get some cop clothes? what is the reason behind trying to serve a warrant in plain clothes?

and the WTA Retards need not have a party, a woman died and three people were shot. its hardly anything to be happy or glad about.

finally, based on the little info out now this does not seem like this is a race issue. instead this is clearly a gun control issues. NO ONE in their right mind would say that things would have turned out the same if the woman did not have a gun. Once again having guns puts the elderly at greater danger.

LoveFifteen
Nov 22nd, 2006, 04:36 PM
What if it were Martina as a 92 year old. cops storming the home and shooting and all along it was mistaken identity. Come on dude a innocent women died by mistaken id. Have a heart. I hardley don't think it's right to call her a bitch.

She would get on her knees and have a foursome! :drool: :hearts:

LoveFifteen
Nov 22nd, 2006, 04:41 PM
I apologize for calling her a bitch. The more I think about it, the more I can understand her situation. Maybe she lived in a rough neighborhood and assumed the guys were impersonating police officers. The police officers shouldnt' have come to her house at night, and they should've come in uniform.

Dawn Marie
Nov 22nd, 2006, 04:44 PM
my grandma would never get suspected dealing drugs

this grandma knew as she was warned that they are the police


You don't know that she knew or not?

Anyway I agree with Wiggly, it's about GUN CONTROL. But not just for the people but for the police as well. They need to get it right as they mess up to many times when it comes to something simple. I want to know how in the hell did they MISTAKEN the home?? If you are ready and packing the POLICE BETTER HAVE THE RIGHT FUCKING ADDY and PERSON! This happens to many times. Yet the cops still want to know why they were shot at? Dumbasses.

Wigglytuff
Nov 22nd, 2006, 05:02 PM
You don't know that she knew or not?

Anyway I agree with Wiggly, it's about GUN CONTROL. But not just for the people but for the police as well. They need to get it right as they mess up to many times when it comes to something simple. I want to know how in the hell did they MISTAKEN the home?? If you are ready and packing the POLICE BETTER HAVE THE RIGHT FUCKING ADDY and PERSON! This happens to many times. Yet the cops still want to know why they were shot at? Dumbasses.

this really really really is so much a gun control issue. and you are right for the police as well.

in nyc sometimes an empty lot will be turned into buildings or homes and if there are not enough numbers for the block an "a" or "b" will be added to the number.

so thats what happened where a friend lives. the block used to be lots and then about 15 years ago houses were built. and not having enough numbers about one third of the home numbers are A. so there is 102, 104, 104A, 106, 108, 110, 110A and so on.

so i understand HOW it is possible to get the wrong house. but i think because its clear that this is possible why not just take steps to make an arrest of the right person smooth and problems like this rare. and it seems to me that knowing that have we could go to the wrong house it seems CRAZY that they would go in plain clothes guns a blazing. and yet thats what happened.

and the woman, i mean we see time and time and time again why having a gun at home puts you in more danger than not, why get one when you are 92 and a bad shot? why the same niece that is on there now didnt do something to stop that kind of madness.

what i am saying is this isnt as easy as blaming the cops or the woman. there are LOTS of things that went very wrong and lead to a very bad bab situation.

Wannabeknowitall
Nov 22nd, 2006, 05:05 PM
It's a sad case on both sides.

I don't agree that they shot her like a dog.
I don't think the narcs had to do what they did though.
She's 92. She wasn't going to run away.
I would usually assume that she wouldn't be armed and dangerous but that didn't work out too well either.

The old women seemed to have good aim.
She shot them in places where she thought they would have difficulty getting to her with whatever weapon they had, whoever they were.

At the same time I don't know many old women who have a gun close enough to them to aim and then enough good aim to hurt them but make sure they weren't going to die.
She has a cane so it had to be extremely close.
You just don't have a gun that close to you unless there's a reason to and it says nothing in this article about this women being robbed in her house before.

It could have been prevented from happening today.
The cops certainly take too many liberties in their hands but this time according to our legal system they did nothing wrong.

mykarma
Nov 22nd, 2006, 05:10 PM
The bitch shot 3 police officers, and we're supposed to feel bad for her? :rolleyes:
Why would you call a 92 year old woman a bitch? You have no idea how alert this woman's mind was. By the time someone reaches the age of 92 their mind in not the same as yours. Perhaps she had been broken into before. There could have been a number of things that was going on in her mind. Also, how was she suppose to know that they were police officers. They had on plain clothes.

This is just plain tragic for someone to live that long and be shot down no matter whose fault it was. Have some compassion.

mykarma
Nov 22nd, 2006, 05:12 PM
:tape:
Thank you Sam. You do have some compassion. :smooch:

mykarma
Nov 22nd, 2006, 05:15 PM
my grandma would never get suspected dealing drugs

this grandma knew as she was warned that they are the police
God damnit it could have been the wrong house. There are some cold blooded people on this board.

LoveFifteen
Nov 22nd, 2006, 05:15 PM
Why would you call a 92 year old woman a bitch? You have no idea how alert this woman's mind was. By the time someone reaches the age of 92 their mind in not the same as yours. Perhaps she had been broken into before. There could have been a number of things that was going on in her mind. Also, how was she suppose to know that they were police officers. They had on plain clothes.

This is just plain tragic for someone to live that long and be shot down no matter whose fault it was. Have some compassion.

She was alert enough to shoot three men before they could shoot her. Seems like she was a regular Annie Oakley.

Wannabeknowitall
Nov 22nd, 2006, 05:21 PM
She was alert enough to shoot three men before they could shoot her. Seems like she was a regular Annie Oakley.

Not only did she shoot them, it appears she aimed for those places to make sure they wouldn't get to her.
She didn't want to kill them.

Sally Struthers
Nov 22nd, 2006, 05:24 PM
she shot at them and they shot back as they should have. The neighbors suggested it was mistkaen identities. They don't know.

mykarma
Nov 22nd, 2006, 05:24 PM
She was alert enough to shoot three men before they could shoot her. Seems like she was a regular Annie Oakley.
I'm talking about her mind, not her physical condition. As people age, it's the short term memory that goes. You don't know where the woman thought she was and who she thought was breaking into her home. As far as the Annie Oakley statement, it really isn't funny. This is a very sad situation and be thankful it wasn't your family member.

For goodness sake, have a heart.

mykarma
Nov 22nd, 2006, 05:29 PM
she shot at them and they shot back as they should have. The neighbors suggested it was mistkaen identities. They don't know.
Even if it wasn't mistaken identity why come to a 92 year old's house in the middle of the night to arrest them. That's just plain sick.

mykarma
Nov 22nd, 2006, 05:36 PM
she shot at them and they shot back as they should have. The neighbors suggested it was mistkaen identities. They don't know.
Go to the link and listen to the niece's video.

Wannabeknowitall
Nov 22nd, 2006, 05:37 PM
I'm talking about her mind, not her physical condition. As people age, it's the short term memory that goes. You don't know where the woman thought she was and who she thought was breaking into her home. As far as the Annie Oakley statement, it really isn't funny. This is a very sad situation and be thankful it wasn't your family member.

For goodness sake, gave a heart.

So she specifically got her gun, aimed at these areas with the intention of making sure she didn't kill anyone but she doesn't know where she was? :help:

I'm pretty sure she didn't know who was breaking in her house.
With her aim, if she knew they had guns she would have made sure to give them a fatal wound.

mykarma
Nov 22nd, 2006, 05:44 PM
So she specifically got her gun, aimed at these areas with the intention of making sure she didn't kill anyone but she doesn't know where she was? :help:

I'm pretty sure she didn't know who was breaking in her house.
With her aim, if she knew they had guns she would have made sure to give them a fatal wound.
I'm not saying she didn't know where she was I'm saying at her age it is possible. As example, as my great aunt aged, there were times when she thought she was on the farm and other times she was fine. No matter what happened or why, what a tragedy this is, and the insensitivity on this board is mind boggling. :scared:

TennisSTUD
Nov 22nd, 2006, 05:47 PM
They had the right I am sure to go into her house, she shot at them and they are taught to fire only when fired at. END OF STORY!

Dawn Marie
Nov 22nd, 2006, 06:17 PM
She was alert enough to shoot three men before they could shoot her. Seems like she was a regular Annie Oakley.

Have you ever heard of the "fight or flight" response?? People who are alert or even mentally impaired when they feel that they are being attacked the first response is to fight or flight.

Also many,many and still many people including the elderly have guns in their home. This is very common.

The police botched the assignment. Someone in management didn't do their job imho. Paperwork was botched and a women got killed. They didn't have any right to go into her house because they had the wrong home. The women had the right to shoot at someone coming into her home and busting down doors. It wasn't her fault that she was shooting at 3 marked gunmen who worked for the city.

*JR*
Nov 22nd, 2006, 06:19 PM
I have to agree with Dawn Marie and Jiggly Wiggly here. :eek: (As well as mykarma about the insensitive posts ITT). Let me tell you the infamous NYC story of the death of Eleanor Bumpurs years ago.

She was a 67 y.o. diabetic woman who lived in the projects (owned by the city). While eligible for more public assistance (also from the city) but a little :cuckoo: so wasn't getting all of it and was being evicted for being behind on her rent.

So (because one NYC agency wasn't in effect getting the money from another, and the city didn't have social workers pulling these loose ends together) and she was still there (with nowhere to go) the cops showed up to put her in the fucking street.

So Mrs. Bumpurs (a widow, BTW) verbally warned them that she was boiling lye on the stove, and would throw it @ them if she had to. So they kicked in the door with guns drawn. She moved towards the stove (slowly, given her age and infirmities). And died in a hail of police gunfire.

See folks, there's a common thread between her story and the one about the kid who got Tasered in that college library: cops "running on adrenaline". (UC that when a hostage taker peacefully surrenders on TV, with hands ova head as instructed, and they still go nuts, yelling "Get on the ground, get on the ground").

In other words, the proper end result isn't enough for many of them, they want that result because they said so (even where the hostage negotiators did the real work, for example). And yes, cases of mistaken addresses aren't rare. And if it was a poor neighborhood, the woman here very well could have thought they were burglars, not cops.

LoveFifteen
Nov 22nd, 2006, 06:25 PM
^^^

That's not a good example. The woman threatened the police with physical harm. When will people learn not to fight the police? Why are we supposed to feel bad for someone who threatened the police and wouldn't cooperate with them?

:shrug:

*JR*
Nov 22nd, 2006, 06:34 PM
(Originally Posted by Dawn Marie)

What if it were Martina as a 92 year old. cops storming the home and shooting and all along it was mistaken identity. Come on dude a innocent women died by mistaken id. Have a heart. I hardley don't think it's right to call her a bitch.

She would get on her knees and have a foursome! :drool: :hearts:
After your totally tasteless response to Dawn's (serious, agree with it or not) post, you should really STFU about what's a good example or not. :rolleyes:

LoveFifteen
Nov 22nd, 2006, 06:36 PM
^^^

Your example still sucks.

Lord Nelson
Nov 22nd, 2006, 07:16 PM
She asked for it. You know an old person can kill. Haven't you heard of Marvin Gaye's Dad? One is never old enough to shoot.

harloo
Nov 22nd, 2006, 07:48 PM
Until I hear more evidence I can't be for sure of the situation. Did the police pick the wrong house to search? Afterall, the grandmother lived alone. Or could it be the fact that someone who the police suspected was selling drugs lived there before?

I worry about these type of cases because my grandmother lives alone. She is often afraid at night but lives in a quiet suburban neighborhood. I'm wondering if the grandmother lived in a gang infested war zone? I need a bit more information.:confused:

Helen Lawson
Nov 22nd, 2006, 07:50 PM
When I turned 75 years ago about 12 years ago or so, I thought my window of opportunity for being gunned down by the police had closed, but I guess not.

mykarma
Nov 22nd, 2006, 07:56 PM
Until I hear more evidence I can't be for sure of the situation. Did the police pick the wrong house to search? Afterall, the grandmother lived alone. Or could it be the fact that someone who the police suspected was selling drugs lived there before?

I worry about these type of cases because my grandmother lives alone. She is often afraid at night but lives in a quiet suburban neighborhood. I'm wondering if the grandmother lived in a gang infested war zone? I need a bit more information.:confused:
Listen to the tape by her niece. The niece said that the woman had a permit for the gun because she lived alone. The niece said that she had bought the house for her aunt. It's just so sad for a person that age to have to end her life that way.

Kart
Nov 22nd, 2006, 09:05 PM
Well if she shot at them then they had to defend themselves.

The poor woman must have been petrified though, I can understand her defending herself as well.

It's a sad story - she looks like a sweet old lady from the picture.

RVD
Nov 22nd, 2006, 09:39 PM
Apologies Infiniti2001.
I didn't notice this thread before I created mine. :lol:

I lost my first cousin this way. We were born on the same day, one year apart. We were damn good friends!! Very close.
The cops bust down his door while he was sleeping. He thought it was the neighborhood gang members, and so climbed out of the window, and they shot him. His wife was apparently part of a credit card scam gang, which he knew nothing about. It was one of those Intra-Departmental units [Oakland Police Department, FBI, and Postal Police] that responded on that day.

His family [my aunt and uncle] received a HUGE payout for his death. I was very sad and missed him for YEARS!! :sad:

Anyway, here's the thing for people saying she shouldn't have shot the officers...

* Pain Clothes officers mean that you are not wearing official Police uniforms. It also mean, in most cases, that you look like shit because you have to blend in with your environment.
* Chances are highly likely that she lived in a high-crime neighborhood.
* Police aren't the only ones who announce themselves as police. One very common ploy of robbers, thieves, and scam artists is to in fact dress as a cop to gain entry.
* She was justified in the shooting because being 90+ years old, and alone, she HAD TO PROTECT HERSELF FROM SOMEONE BREAKING DOWN HER DOOR!!!!!!!

If after seriously consider this woman's option you still believe that she wasn't justified, then really there's nothing that will convince you. :shrug:

I'm noticing a pattern on this site concerning excuses made for cops though. SMH.

RVD
Nov 22nd, 2006, 09:44 PM
Oh and one more thing...

It is my understanding that before a warrant is issued, there is supposedly an investigation done as to who lives there, who owns the property, and who may be home at the time. I could be wrong, so if someone here works for the 'department', feel free to clarify the warrant search policy straight.

Wannabeknowitall
Nov 22nd, 2006, 09:51 PM
I'm noticing a pattern on this site concerning excuses made for cops though. SMH.

I'm sorry about your cousin, I really am.

At the same time many of these good police officers and firefighters deserve respect.
It's a tough job they're doing and the good ones want to do it.
Even the good ones make mistakes.
They did make a mistake about the house but I don't think they made a mistake by defending themselves.

*JR*
Nov 22nd, 2006, 11:45 PM
I lost my first cousin this way. We were born on the same day, one year apart. We were damn good friends!! Very close.
The cops bust down his door while he was sleeping. He thought it was the neighborhood gang members, and so climbed out of the window, and they shot him. His wife was apparently part of a credit card scam gang, which he knew nothing about.
This sad case raises another issue: "shoot first, ask questions later". Meaning that if all your cousin did was attempt to flee, they acted as judge, jury, and executioner in a situation where he posed no threat to imminently use any kind of force against them. Which I don't see how they could justify even if he had been part of a credit card scam operation.
:confused:

RVD
Nov 23rd, 2006, 12:12 AM
This sad case raises another issue: "shoot first, ask questions later". Meaning that if all your cousin did was attempt to flee, they acted as judge, jury, and executioner in a situation where he posed no threat to imminently use any kind of force against them. Which I don't see how they could justify even if he had been part of a credit card scam operation.
:confused:Your point is well taken.
I see no "protection" on the suspect's side any longer. There is no innocent until proven guilty any more. It's just "...take the accuser at their word, shoot the potential suspect, and deal with the consequences later." WTH is that all about?
A hefty payout isn’t going to bring my cousin back. But what’s worse is that in the signed agreement, the legal officials stated that they would not take the blame in the wrongful death suit. It was either that or my aunt and uncle got nothing. So they were essentially got payed off with the killers walking away scott free. :fiery: :sad:

go hingis
Nov 23rd, 2006, 02:48 AM
The world is becoming a very unsafe place, CRAZY place.

mykarma
Nov 23rd, 2006, 03:55 AM
This sad case raises another issue: "shoot first, ask questions later". Meaning that if all your cousin did was attempt to flee, they acted as judge, jury, and executioner in a situation where he posed no threat to imminently use any kind of force against them. Which I don't see how they could justify even if he had been part of a credit card scam operation.
:confused:
This reminds me of when I lived in Boston many years ago. The peoople down stairs sold after hour liquor and they raised hell all night. I couldn't sleep and called the cops. When they rang my doorbell instead of buzzing them in, I looked over the bannister to see who it was. As I bended over, the cop was standing there with his gun pointed right at me. I'm telling you, that barrel looked as large as a cannon staring at me. If I had made a wrong move, been a male, or if it had been another police officer, who knows what would have happened. Needless to say, I never called the cops again.

RunDown
Nov 28th, 2006, 02:25 AM
Informant in shooting says he never bought drugs at house
Says he was asked to lie
By SAEED AHMED
The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Published on: 11/27/06

The confidential informant on whose word Atlanta police raided the house of an 88-year-old woman is now saying he never purchased drugs from her house and was told by police to lie and say he did.

Chief Richard Pennington, in a press conference Monday evening, said his department learned two days ago that the informant — who has been used reliably in the past by the narcotics unit -- denied providing information to officers about a drug deal at 933 Neal Street in northwest Atlanta.

"The informant said he had no knowledge of going into that house and purchasing drugs," Pennington said. "We don't know if he's telling the truth."

The search warrant used by Atlanta police to raid the house says that a confidential informant had bought crack cocaine at the residence, using $50 in city funds, several hours before the raid.

In the document, officers said that the informant told them the house had surveillance cameras that the suspected drug dealer, called "Sam," monitored.

Pennington on Monday evening said the informant told the Internal Affairs Unit hat he did not tell officers that the house had surveillance equipment, and that he was asked to lie.

The Chief still maintained that "Sam," the alleged drug dealer, "actually exists."

Pennington was joined at the press conference by representatives from various law enforcement agencies who are now looking into the shooting.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation has also been called in to investigate.

The Georgia Bureau of Investigation, at the request of the Fulton County District Attorney's Office, is also looking into the incident, including examining the home to determine how many gunshots were fired in the confrontation.

Kathryn Johnston was killed Tuesday night when she fired at officers seeking to serve a warrant. They had broken down the front door and exchanged gunfire with Johnston.

Police later claimed a man named "Sam" had sold drugs from inside the house to an informant, prompting the officers to seek a "no-knock" warrant. Such warrants are frequently issued so police can get inside a home before suspects can destroy or flush drugs.

Johnston --- described by neighbors and family as a frightened woman who had burglar bars on her windows and door and rarely let friends and neighbors into her home --- had lived at the one-story brick home near the Georgia Dome for 17 years.

The police chief said officers found marijuana inside the house but "not a large quantity." The officers were not wearing uniforms but had on bulletproof vests with "Police" emblazoned across the front and back. And they identified themselves as they burst through the doors, police said.

Johnston grabbed a rusty six-shot revolver and emptied it. Five shots struck the officers, hitting one of them three times. The other two were each hit once. The officers returned fire, shooting Johnston twice in the chest and elsewhere, police have said.

The three officers were released from the hospital the next day. They are on leave with pay.

Funeral plans for Johnston have not been made.


http://www.ajc.com/services/content/metro/atlanta/stories/2006/11/27/1127metshoot.html?cxtype=rss&cxsvc=7&cxcat=13

RVD
Nov 28th, 2006, 03:18 AM
Informant in shooting says he never bought drugs at house
Says he was asked to lie
By SAEED AHMED
The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Published on: 11/27/06

The confidential informant on whose word Atlanta police raided the house of an 88-year-old woman is now saying he never purchased drugs from her house and was told by police to lie and say he did.

Chief Richard Pennington, in a press conference Monday evening, said his department learned two days ago that the informant — who has been used reliably in the past by the narcotics unit -- denied providing information to officers about a drug deal at 933 Neal Street in northwest Atlanta.

"The informant said he had no knowledge of going into that house and purchasing drugs," Pennington said. "We don't know if he's telling the truth."

The search warrant used by Atlanta police to raid the house says that a confidential informant had bought crack cocaine at the residence, using $50 in city funds, several hours before the raid.

In the document, officers said that the informant told them the house had surveillance cameras that the suspected drug dealer, called "Sam," monitored.

Pennington on Monday evening said the informant told the Internal Affairs Unit hat he did not tell officers that the house had surveillance equipment, and that he was asked to lie.

The Chief still maintained that "Sam," the alleged drug dealer, "actually exists."

Pennington was joined at the press conference by representatives from various law enforcement agencies who are now looking into the shooting.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation has also been called in to investigate.

The Georgia Bureau of Investigation, at the request of the Fulton County District Attorney's Office, is also looking into the incident, including examining the home to determine how many gunshots were fired in the confrontation.

Kathryn Johnston was killed Tuesday night when she fired at officers seeking to serve a warrant. They had broken down the front door and exchanged gunfire with Johnston.

Police later claimed a man named "Sam" had sold drugs from inside the house to an informant, prompting the officers to seek a "no-knock" warrant. Such warrants are frequently issued so police can get inside a home before suspects can destroy or flush drugs.

Johnston --- described by neighbors and family as a frightened woman who had burglar bars on her windows and door and rarely let friends and neighbors into her home --- had lived at the one-story brick home near the Georgia Dome for 17 years.

The police chief said officers found marijuana inside the house but "not a large quantity." The officers were not wearing uniforms but had on bulletproof vests with "Police" emblazoned across the front and back. And they identified themselves as they burst through the doors, police said.

Johnston grabbed a rusty six-shot revolver and emptied it. Five shots struck the officers, hitting one of them three times. The other two were each hit once. The officers returned fire, shooting Johnston twice in the chest and elsewhere, police have said.

The three officers were released from the hospital the next day. They are on leave with pay.

Funeral plans for Johnston have not been made.


http://www.ajc.com/services/content/metro/atlanta/stories/2006/11/27/1127metshoot.html?cxtype=rss&cxsvc=7&cxcat=13WHAT?!?!?!!?!?!?

Is this for real?!!??!?!?!

Now see, this is what I've been saying.

However, this is all worth CRAP if nothing is done to all those involved.
INCLUDING THE JUDGE ISSUING THE WARRANT!!

Now expect one, or at the most, two lower ranked officers to take the fall for an entire corrupt system.

RunDown, could you post a link to this story. I wanna place this in my favorites to refer back to.

Stamp Paid
Nov 28th, 2006, 03:21 AM
LOL@ the lack of sympathy in the board for this 92 year old woman.
I'm sure if it had happened in Boca Raton instead of Atlanta, some people here would be a lot more sympathetic.

RunDown
Nov 28th, 2006, 03:55 AM
RunDown, could you post a link to this story. I wanna place this in my favorites to refer back to.

I posted it at the end of the article, but here ya go RVD ;) ...

http://www.ajc.com/services/content/metro/atlanta/stories/2006/11/27/1127metshoot.html?cxtype=rss&cxsvc=7&cxcat=13

It's shame this woman's life ended the way it did. She had no reason to believe that it was indeed the police bursting into her door since it would appear that she was not engaged in criminal activity.



Edited to add...Apparently the link leads to a registration page now :( But, the story is there after you register.

vejh
Nov 28th, 2006, 04:13 AM
I think the police orders int his country are "shoot to kill". How can well-trained police officers not know how to disable a armed person? A shot in the hand, in the foot..no?

This just brings back awful, awful memories of Amadou Diallo, and now this recent case of one person getting shot 13 times by cops and he wasn't even armed. It seems this happens all the time; the cops get crazy and just shoot to kill. It sickens me.

Infiniti2001
Nov 28th, 2006, 04:52 AM
LOL@ the lack of sympathy in the board for this 92 year old woman.
I'm sure if it had happened in Boca Raton instead of Atlanta, some people here would be a lot more sympathetic.


No shit :rolleyes:

Rocketta
Nov 28th, 2006, 05:04 AM
uh, uh uh I mean why is it so hard for some individuals to understand that the number of times a 92 or 88 year old shoots cops and meant to shoot cops is very very very rare.....of course there clearly was a mistake going on even before the story came out. :rolleyes:

I mean did we need to know the warrent was a no-knock warrent to know they burst in her house and she didn't know who that was. Do we know what room she was shot in? Most people who have guns for protection keep them by their bed because burglars like to break in when people are sleeping. :shrug:

It's a terrible story and it's outrageous if it's true that they burst into this house based on a tip from an informant clearly without them doing surveillance for themselves? They burst into a house and having not seen this Sam or seen Sam go into the house? :confused:

Jewelz
Nov 28th, 2006, 05:36 AM
This is such a sad story. I can't imagine being that old, alone, and afraid. I don't like to see anyone suffer, much less an old person. To the people who said bad things about this woman, like 'oh she deserved it, and so on.' One day you too are going to be old. And I pray that KARMA doesn't bite you in the ass.

Kunal
Nov 28th, 2006, 07:25 AM
thats horrible

Wigglytuff
Nov 28th, 2006, 07:27 AM
Informant in shooting says he never bought drugs at house
Says he was asked to lie
By SAEED AHMED
The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Published on: 11/27/06

The confidential informant on whose word Atlanta police raided the house of an 88-year-old woman is now saying he never purchased drugs from her house and was told by police to lie and say he did.

Chief Richard Pennington, in a press conference Monday evening, said his department learned two days ago that the informant — who has been used reliably in the past by the narcotics unit -- denied providing information to officers about a drug deal at 933 Neal Street in northwest Atlanta.

"The informant said he had no knowledge of going into that house and purchasing drugs," Pennington said. "We don't know if he's telling the truth."

The search warrant used by Atlanta police to raid the house says that a confidential informant had bought crack cocaine at the residence, using $50 in city funds, several hours before the raid.

In the document, officers said that the informant told them the house had surveillance cameras that the suspected drug dealer, called "Sam," monitored.

Pennington on Monday evening said the informant told the Internal Affairs Unit hat he did not tell officers that the house had surveillance equipment, and that he was asked to lie.

The Chief still maintained that "Sam," the alleged drug dealer, "actually exists."

Pennington was joined at the press conference by representatives from various law enforcement agencies who are now looking into the shooting.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation has also been called in to investigate.

The Georgia Bureau of Investigation, at the request of the Fulton County District Attorney's Office, is also looking into the incident, including examining the home to determine how many gunshots were fired in the confrontation.

Kathryn Johnston was killed Tuesday night when she fired at officers seeking to serve a warrant. They had broken down the front door and exchanged gunfire with Johnston.

Police later claimed a man named "Sam" had sold drugs from inside the house to an informant, prompting the officers to seek a "no-knock" warrant. Such warrants are frequently issued so police can get inside a home before suspects can destroy or flush drugs.

Johnston --- described by neighbors and family as a frightened woman who had burglar bars on her windows and door and rarely let friends and neighbors into her home --- had lived at the one-story brick home near the Georgia Dome for 17 years.

The police chief said officers found marijuana inside the house but "not a large quantity." The officers were not wearing uniforms but had on bulletproof vests with "Police" emblazoned across the front and back. And they identified themselves as they burst through the doors, police said.

Johnston grabbed a rusty six-shot revolver and emptied it. Five shots struck the officers, hitting one of them three times. The other two were each hit once. The officers returned fire, shooting Johnston twice in the chest and elsewhere, police have said.

The three officers were released from the hospital the next day. They are on leave with pay.

Funeral plans for Johnston have not been made.


http://www.ajc.com/services/content/metro/atlanta/stories/2006/11/27/1127metshoot.html?cxtype=rss&cxsvc=7&cxcat=13

WTF??? is this TRUE??? this shit is fucking nuts!!!

Wigglytuff
Nov 28th, 2006, 07:33 AM
LOL@ the lack of sympathy in the board for this 92 year old woman.
I'm sure if it had happened in Boca Raton instead of Atlanta, some people here would be a lot more sympathetic.

its pretty sick and transparent.

alfonsojose
Nov 28th, 2006, 01:23 PM
what a crazy bitch :lol:

Rocketta
Nov 28th, 2006, 07:28 PM
You would think that people would take the time to read the entire thread before making a fool of themselves. :o :help:

Stamp Paid
Nov 28th, 2006, 07:33 PM
You would think that people would take the time to read the entire thread before making a fool of themselves. :o :help:

and whats with calling a 92 year old woman a bitch, like its OK?

Rocketta
Nov 28th, 2006, 07:45 PM
and whats with calling a 92 year old woman a bitch, like its OK?

I would say piss poor home training. :( I would never in a million years refer to my elder in that way doesn't matter how crazy I thought she was. :o

On one of my first jobs, there was this older lady who was around 65. I called all the older women, Miss or Mrs and their last names. They hired a new girl and she didn't even ask if she could call them by their first name....she just called them by their first name. :o Some would correct her and say their name was Miss or Mrs but others like the lady I'm talking about was too nice to say anything. I have to say when I saw her calling Miss Allison by her first name....it just came off as sooooooo disrespectful and that's how most saw it. It wasn't as if she used her last name and then Miss Allison said, 'No call me Pecolia, please' :lol:

The women at that job were seriously old school. :eek:

LoveFifteen
Nov 28th, 2006, 07:45 PM
and whats with calling a 92 year old woman a bitch, like its OK?

I'll be sad if no one dares to call me a bitch when I'm 92. I hope my life is still fun then. :angel:

trivfun
Nov 28th, 2006, 07:50 PM
Sounds like a cover up to me.

Slumpsova
Nov 28th, 2006, 08:23 PM
i can imagine what was in her head during that time :crying2:

mykarma
Nov 29th, 2006, 12:39 AM
I think the police orders int his country are "shoot to kill". How can well-trained police officers not know how to disable a armed person? A shot in the hand, in the foot..no?

This just brings back awful, awful memories of Amadou Diallo, and now this recent case of one person getting shot 13 times by cops and he wasn't even armed. It seems this happens all the time; the cops get crazy and just shoot to kill. It sickens me.
"shoot to kill, black people"

mykarma
Nov 29th, 2006, 12:48 AM
she shot at them and they shot back as they should have. The neighbors suggested it was mistkaen identities. They don't know.
I guess the neighbors did know. :sad:

mykarma
Nov 29th, 2006, 12:53 AM
LOL@ the lack of sympathy in the board for this 92 year old woman.
I'm sure if it had happened in Boca Raton instead of Atlanta, some people here would be a lot more sympathetic.
This really pisses me off because nothing will happen to them. Just look at the shit that was talked about this dear old lady on this board. The same kind of cold hearted bit*hes will let them go.

RunDown
Feb 24th, 2009, 08:36 PM
Ex-Atlanta cops get prison for drug raid killing


A federal judge on Tuesday handed down varying prison terms to three Atlanta police officers for their roles in the notorious 2006 drug raid that left an elderly woman dead and disgraced the department’s narcotics unit.

U.S. District Judge Julie Carnes sentenced former officer Gregg Junnier to six years in prison, Jason Smith to 10 years in prison and Arthur Tesler to five years in prison.
• Documents reveal details in Johnston slaying, cover-up
• Photos: The Johnston case

Recent headlines:


Ex-Atlanta cops get prison for drug raid killing
Atlanta anti-crime activists see movement growing
Fire guts Downtown Atlanta warehouse
• Atlanta and Fulton County news Junnier, 42, and Tesler, 42, had faced recommended 10 years in prison under sentencing guidelines, while Smith, 36, faced 12 years and seven months.

Defense attorneys asked Carnes to reduce sentences for Smith and Junnier in light of their eventual cooperation with authorities.

Carnes said she cut Tesler’s sentence to half the guideline amount because of his “minor role” in the botched drug raid.

The judge noted that Tesler was the junior member of the narcotics squad and looked up to Junnier and Smith. “The truth of the matter is that he was the rookie and learned from them,” Carnes said.
Tesler’s lawyer had sought a prison term of only two years but after the sentencing called the judge’s decision “insightful.”

The officers will not be eligible for parole in the federal system.
On Monday a parade of relatives, friends and pastors spoke on the officers’ behalf at a sentencing hearing before Carnes. Friends of Johnston recalled the victim. The officers, wearing jail jumpsuits and leg irons, apologized for their actions.

The trio of officers was involved in a Nov. 21, 2006, drug raid at the Neal Street home of 92-year-old Kathryn Johnston.

She was killed by officers after they used a no-knock warrant — obtained with falsified evidence — to storm into her house in search of drugs an informant had inaccurately told them were inside. Apparently thinking the officers were robbers, Johnston fired a shot through the door. Officers responded with 39 shots, five or six of which struck her.

The officers initially sought to cover up their actions in obtaining the warrant, but their story eventually unraveled. All three pleaded guilty to conspiring to violate Johnston’s civil rights.

Carnes said she hopes that if anything good comes from Johnston’s death it will be “a renewed effort by the Atlanta Police Department to prevent something like this from ever happening again.”

She also said the “pressures brought to bear” by the department’s performance quotas, calling for officers to get a certain number of warrants and arrests, “did have an impact on these and other officers on the force.”

“It is my fervent hope the APD will take to heart what has happened here,” the judge said.

At a press conference following the sentencing, U.S. Attorney David Nahmias called the sentences reasonable.

The Johnston tragedy, he added, has led to two positive results. First, the Atlanta Police Department implemented new and extensive training procedures and completely revamped the narcotics unit, he said.

“Second, the significant prison sentences imposed by the court today should send a strong message to other law enforcement officers who may be tempted to lie under oath or otherwise violate the law,” he said.
The Rev. Markel Hutchins, who had led community critics in demanding reforms after the raid, said he was “not in any way displeased” with the sentences.

He said the practice of falsifying affidavits to obtain illegal search warrants, revealed by the investigation into the raid, “a powder keg.”

“You just want to make sure that powder keg is not swept under the rug,” Hutchins said.

Hutchins said he called Sarah Dozier, the 76-year-old niece of Johsnton, to tell her of the sentences.

“Hopefully it’s finally going to be over,” he said she replied.


http://www.ajc.com/metro/content/metro/atlanta/stories/2009/02/23/johnston_sentencing.html?cxntlid=homepage_tab_news tab

Slutiana
Feb 24th, 2009, 09:03 PM
39 FUCKING shots, compared to the one shot that she fired? Seriously, wow.

hablo
Feb 25th, 2009, 01:30 AM
Good. I'm glad they're doing time.

TennisViewer531
Feb 25th, 2009, 05:13 AM
I think the verdict is reasonable...

Dawn Marie
Feb 26th, 2009, 05:28 PM
They murdered a women. They should get life in prison.
Looking back at this thread, it makes me cringe when I see all the ignorant posters that we still have on this board. WOW. You tools, know who you are.

Anyhoo,I'm glad these men will pay for there crimes by doing some time in jail. I know the family has some sort of peace now. I would press for a civil suit.

Barrie_Dude
Feb 26th, 2009, 06:17 PM
I just wish she were a better shot.....

spartanfan
Feb 26th, 2009, 08:12 PM
They murdered a women. They should get life in prison.
Looking back at this thread, it makes me cringe when I see all the ignorant posters that we still have on this board. WOW. You tools, know who you are.

Anyhoo,I'm glad these men will pay for there crimes by doing some time in jail. I know the family has some sort of peace now. I would press for a civil suit.
If I'm not mistaken the City of Atlanta has already settled with the family. But to be honest the officers didn't get enough jail time. If the shoe had been on the other foot and anyone had shot and killed a police officer in the line of duty (especially a black person) they would have had a death penalty charge brought against them and they wouldn't have gotten such a slap on the wrist.

Dawn Marie
Feb 27th, 2009, 05:06 AM
So true, so true. This is the racism that I refer to a lot of times. The racism toward the AA community is appalling.