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spiceboy
Aug 7th, 2006, 04:27 PM
http://www.rinf.com/news/nov05/googlefacts.html

1. Google's immortal cookie:
Google was the first search engine to use a cookie that expires in 2038. This was at a time when federal websites were prohibited from using persistent cookies altogether. Now it's years later, and immortal cookies are commonplace among search engines ; Google set the standard because no one bothered to challenge them. This cookie places a unique ID number on your hard disk. Anytime you land on a Google page, you get a Google cookie if you don't already have one. If you have one, they read and record your unique ID number.

2. Google records everything they can:
For all searches they record the cookie ID, your Internet IP address, the time and date, your search terms, and your browser configuration. Increasingly, Google is customizing results based on your IP number. This is referred to in the industry as "IP delivery based on geolocation."

3. Google retains all data indefinitely:
Google has no data retention policies. There is evidence that they are able to easily access all the user information they collect and save.

4. Google won't say why they need this data:
Inquiries to Google about their privacy policies are ignored. When the New York Times (2002-11-28) asked Sergey Brin about whether Google ever gets subpoenaed for this information, he had no comment.

5. Google hires spooks:
Matt Cutts, a key Google engineer, used to work for the National Security Agency. Google wants to hire more people with security clearances, so that they can peddle their corporate assets to the spooks in Washington.

6. Google's toolbar is spyware:
With the advanced features enabled, Google's free toolbar for Explorer phones home with every page you surf, and yes, it reads your cookie too. Their privacy policy confesses this, but that's only because Alexa lost a class-action lawsuit when their toolbar did the same thing, and their privacy policy failed to explain this. Worse yet, Google's toolbar updates to new versions quietly, and without asking. This means that if you have the toolbar installed, Google essentially has complete access to your hard disk every time you connect to Google (which is many times a day). Most software vendors, and even Microsoft, ask if you'd like an updated version. But not Google. Any software that updates automatically presents a massive security risk (http://www.google-watch.org/cgi-bin/nb18/0006).

7. Google's cache copy is illegal:
Judging from Ninth Circuit precedent on the application of U.S. copyright laws to the Internet, Google's cache copy appears to be illegal. The only way a webmaster can avoid having his site cached on Google is to put a "noarchive" meta in the header of every page on his site. Surfers like the cache, but webmasters don't. Many webmasters have deleted questionable material from their sites, only to discover later that the problem pages live merrily on in Google's cache. The cache copy should be "opt-in" for webmasters, not "opt-out."

8. Google is not your friend:
By now Google enjoys a 75 percent monopoly for all external referrals to most websites. Webmasters cannot avoid seeking Google's approval these days, assuming they want to increase traffic to their site. If they try to take advantage of some of the known weaknesses in Google's semi-secret algorithms, they may find themselves penalized by Google, and their traffic disappears. There are no detailed, published standards issued by Google, and there is no appeal process for penalized sites. Google is completely unaccountable. Most of the time Google doesn't even answer email from webmasters.

9. Google is a privacy time bomb:
With 200 million searches per day, most from outside the U.S., Google amounts to a privacy disaster waiting to happen. Those newly-commissioned data-mining bureaucrats in Washington can only dream about the sort of slick efficiency that Google has already achieved.

Bette_Midler
Aug 7th, 2006, 04:50 PM
1. Google's immortal cookie:
Google was the first search engine to use a cookie that expires in 2038.

:o i hate google and their stinking and annoying engines and bastard algorithms :o :fiery:

yellowcard
Aug 7th, 2006, 05:06 PM
What the fuck! It almost makes me never use google again.

Martian KC
Aug 7th, 2006, 05:07 PM
I knew about the toolbar, but the rest :scared: if true. I could not for the life of me get rid of their toolbar for awhile.

CooCooCachoo
Aug 7th, 2006, 05:09 PM
I still love Google :angel:

-sugi-
Aug 7th, 2006, 05:11 PM
I just used google :tape: :lol:

CondiLicious
Aug 7th, 2006, 05:12 PM
I hate that you can delete something yet part of it stays on google so you're incriminated forever!!!

No Name Face
Aug 7th, 2006, 05:22 PM
oh so google is big brother. right. that's nice.
i'm fucked then. well not really, i still feel used. :sad:

Ferosh
Aug 7th, 2006, 05:23 PM
:scared:

Helen Lawson
Aug 7th, 2006, 05:46 PM
Who uses the term "spooks" anymore?

northern lad
Aug 7th, 2006, 06:16 PM
Who uses the term "spooks" anymore?
my grandmother :tape:

Pheobo
Aug 7th, 2006, 07:32 PM
Nothing's perfect.

Wintermute
Aug 7th, 2006, 07:56 PM
Apparently Google's corporate motto is "Don't be evil".

Wigglytuff
Aug 7th, 2006, 08:42 PM
you know you can empty your cache, history and cookies yourself right??

if you are using ie with google toolbar, the google toolbar should be the least of your worries.

seriously there is nothing here to be "scared" or even "disturbed" about.

controlfreak
Aug 7th, 2006, 08:50 PM
Seems mostly harmless to me, it's not like I'm using Google for searching how to make an atomic bomb or where to join Al Qaeda. Everyone knows Altavista gives much better results for that kind of thing.

hurricanejeanne
Aug 7th, 2006, 08:52 PM
Google is still the best of the search engines... :worship:

PatrickRyan
Aug 7th, 2006, 08:53 PM
good i hardly ever use google

Helen Lawson
Aug 7th, 2006, 08:59 PM
I guess the lesson is that if you're searching for Al Qaeda sites to communicate with terrororist, or some good kiddie porn sites, use someone else's computer, or like Altavista or something.

Wigglytuff
Aug 7th, 2006, 09:01 PM
I guess the lesson is that if you're searching for Al Qaeda sites to communicate with terrororist, or some good kiddie porn sites, use someone else's computer, or like Altavista or something.
:lol: :lol: wow... soo... true... but... why would a person want to search for... ok nevermind :bolt: :help:

SelesFan70
Aug 7th, 2006, 09:16 PM
oh so google is big brother. right. that's nice.
i'm fucked then. well not really, i still feel used. :sad:

People forget the Internet was used back in the 1980's by the U.S. military. If y'all think Big Brother isn't watching every where you go you're either very young, very dumb, very naive, or an undercover spy. :)

Fingon
Aug 8th, 2006, 03:20 AM
oh please, I another case of wannabe journalists finding the hidden truth

http://www.rinf.com/news/nov05/googlefacts.html

1. Google's immortal cookie:
Google was the first search engine to use a cookie that expires in 2038. This was at a time when federal websites were prohibited from using persistent cookies altogether. Now it's years later, and immortal cookies are commonplace among search engines ; Google set the standard because no one bothered to challenge them. This cookie places a unique ID number on your hard disk. Anytime you land on a Google page, you get a Google cookie if you don't already have one. If you have one, they read and record your unique ID number.

ok first, what the fuck are federal websites? goverment sites? what does google have to do with that?

most cookies[/quote] place an unique id, it's their fucking purpose. The author should learn a bit about the internet. Most websites use cookies, even if the programmer didn't intend to, that's because http is an stateless protocol and the server needs to know if the request is a postback or not.

Go to CNN, Yahoo, MSN, itunes, your bank, name it, you get a cookie.

2. Google records everything they can:
For all searches they record the cookie ID, your Internet IP address, the time and date, your search terms, and your browser configuration. Increasingly, Google is customizing results based on your IP number. This is referred to in the industry as "IP delivery based on geolocation."
[/quote]

so?, of course they do, Yahoo does as well, MSN does as well, and so do Wal Mart and most companies, it's called information and they use it for data mining.

"IP delivery based on geolocation", a flamboyant way to say nothing, there isn't such a term in the "industry", that's not a technical concept, it's just something that sounds good. Of course they are customizing results based on your IP address, which in turn gives them your location, that's why if you are in the UK you are automatically directed to google.co.uk, geez.

[b]3. Google retains all data indefinitely:
Google has no data retention policies. There is evidence that they are able to easily access all the user information they collect and save.

duh!, why would they collect it if they can't access it?

4. Google won't say why they need this data:
Inquiries to Google about their privacy policies are ignored. When the New York Times (2002-11-28) asked Sergey Brin about whether Google ever gets subpoenaed for this information, he had no comment.

of course, I wouldn't have a comment to such an idiotic question, that's a legal matter.

5. Google hires spooks:
Matt Cutts, a key Google engineer, used to work for the National Security Agency. Google wants to hire more people with security clearances, so that they can peddle their corporate assets to the spooks in Washington.


whatever, many of the best software engineers had worked for the NSA, there isn't a dark conspiracy there.

6. Google's toolbar is spyware:
With the advanced features enabled, Google's free toolbar for Explorer phones home with every page you surf, and yes, it reads your cookie too.

that shows the enormity if of the author's ignorance.

First, spyware is widely understood to be for malicious purposes, this is not the case, and you are warning about that when you freaking install it, and it doesn't read your cookie, it can't, IE or Opera or Firefox do and passes the information along to the toolbar, and the cookie is a freaking Google's cookie, and guess what, google toolbar is Google's toolbar.

Their privacy policy confesses this, but that's only because Alexa lost a class-action lawsuit when their toolbar did the same thing, and their privacy policy failed to explain this.

And the author knows Google's reason to publish a policy from ...

Worse yet, Google's toolbar updates to new versions quietly, and without asking.

so does Windows, and the antivirus programs, and Adobe Acrobat, and Real One Player and every freaking piece of software that updates over the internet idiot (not the thread starter, the article's writer).

This means that if you have the toolbar installed, Google essentially has complete access to your hard disk every time you connect to Google (which is many times a day).


give me a freaking break, this idiot obviously can barely turn his computer on.

It has the same access as any other active X (that's what the toolbar is) and it depends of the security settings, obviously it can update itself, as all other browser addons, give me a break really.

Most software vendors, and even Microsoft, ask if you'd like an updated version.

untrue, you can set it up not to update automatically, but that's not the default and if you don't set it up like that it keeps trying to change your settings every time it can.

If you are running Windows, Office, an antivirus, a couple of media players, adobe reader, do you really want to update all that software manually? the author obviously has no clue whatsoever.

But not Google. Any software that updates automatically presents a massive security risk (http://www.google-watch.org/cgi-bin/nb18/0006).

so Windows and Real One Player and adobe acrobat and norton antivirus just to name a few present a serious security risk, then why don't we just stop using the internet altogether. And I never heard of a serious security site with that address.

7. Google's cache copy is illegal:
Judging from Ninth Circuit precedent on the application of U.S. copyright laws to the Internet, Google's cache copy appears to be illegal. The only way a webmaster can avoid having his site cached on Google is to put a "noarchive" meta in the header of every page on his site. Surfers like the cache, but webmasters don't. Many webmasters have deleted questionable material from their sites, only to discover later that the problem pages live merrily on in Google's cache. The cache copy should be "opt-in" for webmasters, not "opt-out."


your freaking browser caches all the pages it visit, get a clue will you?

8. Google is not your friend:
By now Google enjoys a 75 percent monopoly for all external referrals to most websites. Webmasters cannot avoid seeking Google's approval these days, assuming they want to increase traffic to their site. If they try to take advantage of some of the known weaknesses in Google's semi-secret algorithms, they may find themselves penalized by Google, and their traffic disappears. There are no detailed, published standards issued by Google, and there is no appeal process for penalized sites. Google is completely unaccountable. Most of the time Google doesn't even answer email from webmasters.


of course not, thanks to Google scams such as "optimize your site in 500 search engines for $600" don't 'work anymore, not because you submit your site 3000 times it becomes more relevant. Of course there are not published standards, there are no fucking standards, the position depends on the relevance of the site, not its desire to be higher.

9. Google is a privacy time bomb:
With 200 million searches per day, most from outside the U.S., Google amounts to a privacy disaster waiting to happen. Those newly-commissioned data-mining bureaucrats in Washington can only dream about the sort of slick efficiency that Google has already achieved.


[/quote]

really? IP addresses mean shit unless they are matched against the ISP's logs. if the surfer is from outside the US the chances for that are nearly nil.


Few times I have read so much garbage all together.

SzavayFi
Aug 8th, 2006, 03:22 AM
im a yahoo boy :hearts:

Fingon
Aug 8th, 2006, 03:30 AM
it's not Google, it's your ISP you should be worried about.

It's your ISP who gives you access to the internet, when you type wtaworld.com, it's your ISP's router that will ask Verisign who will ask someone like GoDaddy where that site is and the ISP will cache that information for later use.

They keep logs of all users internet activities, not only searches but every freaking IP address they visit, and the US government wants to force them to keep them longer and unlike Google, they can match your IP with YOU, not just your approximate location but your exact location, credit card number, telephone, name etc.

They can analyze traffic and know what it's about, there are ISP that identify bit torrent traffic and drop it, why do you think with certain ISPs is more difficult to download stuff?

If they really want to catch you, they go to the ISP, not Google.

And btw, a terrorist is unlikely to search for "bomb" on Google. they use codes, they normaly use public computers and public sites like message boards and chatrooms, but it's extremely difficult to follow a track, even for an ISP, unless they are in the US or Canada or Europe or Japan, they use *******, they change servers.

When they ping point the location of a hacker, it's not by looking at Google's database, it's normally by using packet sniffers and try to get the route of the message.

BTW, why hasn't anyone attacked Verisign? do they know the info Verisign holds? but this wannabe technical writers are too stupid to even understand what Verisign does.